US3325920A - Ski boot - Google Patents

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US3325920A
US3325920A US362723A US36272364A US3325920A US 3325920 A US3325920 A US 3325920A US 362723 A US362723 A US 362723A US 36272364 A US36272364 A US 36272364A US 3325920 A US3325920 A US 3325920A
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Prior art keywords
boot
foot
member
portion
flap
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US362723A
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Frank D Werner
Marvin A Luger
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Emerson Process Management Ltd
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Emerson Process Management Ltd
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Priority to US362723A priority Critical patent/US3325920A/en
Priority claimed from AT898364A external-priority patent/AT265910B/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • A43B5/04Ski boots; Similar boots
    • A43B5/0405Linings, paddings, insertions; Inner boots
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • A43B5/04Ski boots; Similar boots
    • A43B5/0427Ski boots; Similar boots characterised by type or construction details

Description

June 20, 1967 F. D. WERNER ET AL 3,325,920

SKI BOOT Filed April 27, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORs' FZfl/Vk 0. Mam/5e Myer/N ,4. A0452 @1412; W wa June 20, 1967 F. D. WERNER ET AL 3,325,920

SKI BOOT Filed April 27. 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 32% 'Z w June 20, 1967 F. D. WERNER" ET AL 3,325,920

SKI BOOT 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 liiii.\

Filed April 27, 1964 June 20, 1967 F. D. WERNER ET AL 3,325,920

SKI BOOT Filed April 2'7, 1964 INVENTOR$ FEW/(4K a WEMK Amer/w ,4. A0552 BY 40 W MWK alt/MM 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 J n 1967 F. D. WERNER ET AL 3,325,920

SKI BOOT Filed April 27, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 /@5 FIG. 24

(2m FIG. 26

INVENTORS' Few/Me 0. MZeA/Ee MflZV/A/ 4. 1.0463.

United States Patent 3,325,920 SKI BQOT Frank ll). Werner, Minneapolis, and Marvin A. Luger,

North St. Paul, Minn, assignors to Rosemount Engineering Company, Minneapolis, Minn, a corporation of Minnesota Filed Apr. 27, 1964, Ser. No. 362,723 19 Claims. (Cl. fad-25) This application is a continuation-in-part of our copending application, Ser. No. 250,918, filed Jan. 11, 1963 for Ski Boot and of our co-pending application, Ser. No. 318,370, filed Oct. 23, 1963, for Ski Boot and Conformable Pad for Same, both now abandoned.

The present invention has relation to boots for skis or skates and more particularly to a boot which will hold the foot firmly and exactly so as to permit positive foot control of the wearer.

At the present time the boots used for skiing are made with heavy leather uppers and heavy leather soles which are originally relatively stifi. The boots are fixed firmly to the skis with any of a variety of bindings. The boots are designed so that they will lace up to fit the foot closely and hold the foot firmly against padding usually present between the foot and the boot either in the form of heavy socks or foam pads sewed within the inner surface of the boot.

The boots presently on the market provide a firm support when new but after they have been used and are wet they become soft and stretch. The boots are also hard to put on and require a great deal of time lacing and unlacmg.

After leather boots have been used a few seasons the boots must be replaced because of the softening and stretching of the leather uppers. In order to obtain rigidity, the present boots require very heavy sections of leather and consequently the weight of the boot is relatively high. The boots of the present invention, in the form as disclosed have uppers and soles made of rigid material, such as thin strong fiberglass reinforced plastic, other strong plastic or metal. The metal can be light in weight, for example, aluminum. The boots are provided with foot access openings. Flaps or boot portions are provided to cover the access openings after the foot has been inserted into the boot. Suitable clamps provide for holding the hinged or flap portions closed when the boot is in use.

it has been found that after a boot having a rigid outer shell, that will not stretch or soften, has been placed onto the foot, some means must be provided inside the shell to hold the foot firmly in place. It has been found that the most desirable is the use of several pads located within the boot and filled with a material that will conform exactly to the shape of the foot within the boot and will retain this shape between usages so that the boot will fit the foot each time.

Therefore, one feature of the present invention is to present a unique pad material that will provide for conformability of the pad to the particular foot configuration and which will retain the shape of the foot between usages. Thus the foot will be firmly held and clamped by a rigid outer shell so that in skiing in particular, the boots will permit excellent edge control of the skis and Will be comfortable to wear.

Also, the present invention presents a unique ankle cuff or band which is pivotally mounted through rigid struts to a boot lower portion and is designed to encircle the ankle when the foot is within the boot and the boot is closed. Further, the cuff is made in two segments which interlock so that when the ankle tends to bend sideways, with respect to the longitudinal direction of the boot, the interlocking members of the cuff segments transmit all in section and parts broken forces, including shear, from one member to the other and there is no relative movement between the members.

When laces are used to close the front of the boot as is done conventionally, the shear forces at the ankle cuff due to lateral bending of the leg will distort one side of the ankle cuff downwardly while the other side of the cuff distorts upwardly. This is because the lace joint is flexible and will permit shear movement. This flexibility results in lesser control of the boots, and therefore is less desirable.

With the rigid struts connecting the two cuffs segments of the boot as shown herein, and with the cuff segments joined to each other in an interlocking manner to prevent shear movement, greater lateral rigidity results. This particular cuff structure can be adapted for use in boots made of any type of material, and will be most suitable when the boot lower is of a rigid material.

It is an object of the present invention to present a boot for skis or skates which has an outer shell that will not stretch or change in configuration when wet.

It is a further object of the present invention to present a boot for skis or skates which is easy to put on a wearers foot.

It is still a further object of the present invention to present a boot for skis or skates which is light in weight.

It is another object of the present invention to present means to maintain a close fit between the boot and the wearers foot to obtain maximum foot control.

It is still a further object of the present invention to present a new and unique material for filling padding which must conform to some irregular shape, and also a simple method of placing the material in the pad.

Another object of the present invention is to present a boot having a hinge ankle section that will give greater lateral rigidity to the boot than heretofore available.

It is still a further object of the invention to present an improved type of clamp for holding an access flap of a boot closed.

Other and further objects are those inherent in the invention herein illustrated, described and claimed, and will become apparent as the description proceeds.

The following description sets forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, and these are indicative of but a few of the various ways which the principles of the invention may be employed.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a ski boot made of a rigid material and having a foot access door positioned according to a first form of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken as on lines 33 in FIG. 1, showing a first form of structure for holding a foot within the boot;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of a boot made according to a second form of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a rear end elevational view of the device of FIG. 4;

FIG, 6 is a bottom plan view of the device of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional view taken as on lines 7-7 in FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a side perspective View of a ski boot made according to a third form of the present invention with parts in section and parts broken away;

FIG. 10 is .a side perspective View of the ski boot of FIG. 9 as viewed from an opposite side thereof with parts away;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary enlarged side elevational view of the upper cuff portion of the boot of FIG. 10 and showing a clamp for holding the cuff portion in usable position;

taken as on line 88 in FIG, 12 is a fragmentary enlarged front elevational view showing a typical interlocking member of the cuff portion of the boot of FIG. 9;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the boot of FIG. 9 showing a side flap in an open position and showing interior foot holding pads in the boot;

FIG. 13A is a fragmentary sectional view looking forwardly at the heel portion of the boot of FIG. 13 showing straps utilized to keep the heel pads from rolling during use;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary sectional view taken as on line 14-1-4 in FIG. 13 and showing a filling spout for a pad on the cuff portion;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary sectional view taken as on line 15-15 in FIG. 13 and showing a filling spout for a pad in the lower portion of the boot and at the side of the boot;

FIG, 16 is a view taken on substantially the same line as FIG. 15, with the filling spout of the pad in closed position;

FIG. 17 is an enlarged plan view of a hasp member used in the clamp for holding the cuff of the boot in closed position;

FIG. 18 is an enlarged plan view of a latch member utilized with the device of FIG. 6;

FIG. 19 is a sectional view of the clamp assembly for the cuff structure taken as on line 19-19 in FIG. 11;

FIG. 20 is a top plan view of a spring clip member used in clamp of FIG. 11;

FIG. 21 is a sectional view taken as on line 2121 in FIG. 20;

FIG. 22 is a side elevational view of the hasp member of FIG. 17;

FIG. 23 is a sectional view taken as on line 2323 in FIG. 18;

FIG. 24 is a fragmentary top plan view of a typical clamp used to hold the access flap or door closed in the ski boot of FIG. 9;

FIG. 25 is a view of the clamp of FIG. 24 in opened position;

FIG. 26 is a sectional view taken as on line 2626 in FIG. 25 but with the clamp in a closed position;

FIG. 27 is a sectional view taken on substantially the same line as FIG. 26 showing the clamp unlatched;

FIG. 28 is a sectional view taken as on line 28-28 in FIG. 25 with the clamp in a latched position;

FIG. 29 is an exploded view of the clamp of FIG. 24 showing it in open and separated position;

FIG. 30 is a sectional view of the boot of FIG. 9 showing a modified sole structure which can be used for minor tightening adjustments;

FIG. 31 is a fragmentary sectional view of a modified ankle cuff attaching structure which can be used with the boots of the present invention;

FIG. 32 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the device of FIG. 31; and,

FIG. 33 is an exploded view showing four embodiments of the ankle attaching member of FIGS. 31 and 32.

Referring first to FIGS. 1 through 3 a simplified structure of a ski boot is illustrated.

A boot 35 has an upper portion 36 attached to a sole 37. The upper portion includes a main boot member 38 and a side flap or door 39. The side flap 39 is attached to the sole 37 with a hinge 40. The side flap 39 will swing outwardly from the main boot 38 to permit a foot to be inserted into the boot.

The sole and upper portion as well as the side flap or door are made of a very rigid material, for example, fiberglass or formed metal which will not stretch nor be affected by water, heat or other environmental factors. The boot will retain its original shape under all conditions of normal usage.

The flap meets the main boot member along a parting line 41 and will swing away from the main member as shown by arrow 42. With the flap in its open position, pivoted away from the main boot member, the foot can be inserted in the boot and the flap re-closed to hold the foot in place. The side flap 39 is held in contact with the main portion 33 through the use of a strap 43 wrapped around the upper portions of the boot and held in place with a suitable clamp or ordinary friction type strap buckle 43a. If desired an ordinary skate strap can be used for this purpose.

FIG. 3 illustrates a foot 44 inside the boot with the flap closed The interior of the boot is lined with material or padding to hold it firmly with respect to the outer shell. The padding in the fiap moves with the flap and other padding remains with the main portion of the boot when the flap is opened.

As shown, in order to obtain a very close fit between the foot and the boot, a very thin layer of material 45, which will stretch and generally conform to the foot shape is bonded with suitable adhesives all around the edges of the flap, at the top, as shown at 46, at the bottom 47 and front 48, and also along the portions of the flap adjacent the parting line 41. A separate piece of material 45A is similarly bonded to the main portion of the boot. Two separate compartments are formed, one inside the flap and one inside the main portion of the boot. This is shown fragmentarily in FIG. 2. A compartment 49 is formed between the outer wall of the flap and the ma terial 45 and this chamber is then filled with suitable material or potting compound illustrated at 50 which will flow when put into the boot in order to completely fill chamber 49, and is poured in through an opening 51 using a funnel 52. Other openings can be suitably located in the outer shell of the boot, for example, at 53, which, after use, is closed with a threaded plug. The material used is hardenable or expandable (a plastic foam for ex ample) after it has been placed within the compartment 49,. The material conforms to the shape of the portion of the foot in contact therewith and a very close snug fit is obtained. After the material has hardened it retains the shape of the foot and acts as a thermal insulator while the boot exactly fits the foot of the wearer.

Filler material will also be poured into the lower compartment on the main boot portion so that the foot is held from both sides.

The hardened compound in the flap compartment will move with the flap and separate along the parting line of the boot so that the foot can be removed and inserted with ease.

Thus, once the potting compound has hardened, the skier need merely remove strap 43, open the boot flap 39 and insert his foot; close the boot and then replace the strap to hold the flap in place. The boot is thus put on very rapidly without time consuming lacing or delay. The rigid outer shell of the boot does not stretch so the boot will remain usable for years.

A variation of the structure shown in FIG. 3 is to prefill the compartment 49 (and also the compartment on the main boot portion) with a suitable material. The material used in the compartment 49 could be an expanded polystyrene or similar foam, which can be obtained in various degrees of hardness. The material could be initially shaped in general foot configuration. The wearer then inserts his foot, determines the fit, and can peen or compress the lining material in the areas where there is interference between his foot and the material. By shaping the material, for example expanded polystyrene, in the areas of interference the wearer can get an exact fit for his foot.

Also shown in FIG. 3 are patches 53 of foam padding material that can be inserted to provide support for the foot. The patches 53 are loose and can be moved to any location in the boot. Also the patches can be placed within any type of boot, even conventional boots to obtain very close fits. If desired, the patches 53 can be filled with hardenable fluid that is injected into the boot between an inner liner and the normal lining material. This gives a very close custom fit. Other padding that may be used is more fully described later.

Once the wearer has established a cavity within the boot that fits his foot closely there would be not further adjustments necessary and the skier need only open the boot, insert his foot and then close the boot again.

In FIGS. 4 through 8 there is shown a boot 60 that has a sole 61, and an upper 62. As shown perhaps best in FIG. 5, the upper is split longitudinally along a parting line 63 and the sole is hinged with a longitudinal continuous hinge 64 at the bottom of the sole. The boot will split open into two boot sections along parting line 63 about the axis of the hinge 64. The boot sections are substantially symmetrical. The boot is normally held closed with over center clamps 64- of any usual or preferred design (for example luggage clamps) adjacent top edges of the boot. The two sections of the boot fit together snugly.

The clamps 65 can include a lug 66 fixedly attached to one boot section, with suitable fasteners and a latch member 67 attached to the other boot section. The latch member includes a pair of brackets 68 fixed to the other boot section in any usual or preferred manner. A lever 69 is pivoted to the brackets and has a loop of wire 70 pivoted thereon and which extends to engage the lug 66. The lever will go over center when in position shown in dotted lines in FIG. 7 to hold the two boot sections together. As many clamps as desired can be used.

The boot in this form of the invention is also made of a rigid material, such as fiberglass or metal. The boot is easily placed on the foot by splitting the boot open along the hinge, placing the foot inside and then reclamping it into place.

The interior of the boot is lined with suitable pads. As shown, a sheet of liner material 72 is bonded to the boot section along the parting line 63, at the sole, as shown at 73, and along the top as shown at 74.

The liner material 72 on each boot section forms separate compartments that can be filled with suitable material 75 so that the liner engages the foot and holds it snugly when the sections are clamped closed.

The material 75 can be the same as disclosed previous? ly or can be shredded foam, or can be the pad material that will be subsequently disclose-d.

The two boots shown in FIGS. 1-8 do not have movable ankle portions. The foot and leg are held very rigidly in all directions. However, the boots are easy to put on and take off and a close fit between the boot and foot is provided.

Referring to FIGS. 9 through 30 and a modified form of the invention shown therein, a boot 100 is comprised as a lower boot portion 101 and an ankle cuff assembly 106. The lower portion 101 includes a main boot member 102 and a flap member 103A. The flap member 103A is hingedly attached with a suitable longitudinally extending hinge 104 to the main member adjacent the sole 105 of the boot. The flap pivots about hinge 104 from a closed position shown in FIGS. 9 and to position as shown in FIG. 13. Also, the boot 100 has an ankle or cuff assembly portion 106. The culf assembly portion 106 is also split along a parting plane and has a first cuff section 107 that comprises a semi-cylindrical band 108 that is attached to a rigid upright strut 109 so as to move with the strut. The strut 109 is pivotally mounted to a bracket 110 with a suitable pivotal rivet or other member 111. The bracket 110 is fixedly attached to the lower main portion 102 of the boot with suitable attaching screws or rivets 112. The bracket 110 extends above the upper edge of the main portion of the boot. The lower portion of the boot is cut away, as shown, to provide clearance for pivotal movement of the strut 109 about its axis in directions as indicated by arrow 113.

The ankle or cuif portion 106 also includes a second or fiap cuff section 117. The fiap cuff section has a semicylindrical band 118 which is attached to rigid upright strut 119 so as to move with the strut. The strut 119 is pivotally mounted to a bracket 120 with a rivet 121 or other suitable pivotal mounting member. The bracket 120 is fixed to the lower flap member 103A of the boot with suitable fastening members 122. The two semi-cylindrical portions 118 and 108 pivot about the same axis and will move in a fore and aft direction.

The lower flap portion 103A and flap ankle cuff assembly 117 together form a flap assembly 103. With the flap assembly in closed position, the cuff assembly (comprising sections 107 and 117) pivots with respect to the lower boot portion 101 (comprising lower flap member 103A and lower main boot portion 102). With the flap open the main boot assembly and the flap assembly 103 become distinct portions of the boot.

The cuff member or ankle portion, as can be seen in FIG. 13 is supported by the struts 109 and 119 above the main portion of the boot. When the flap assembly 103 is in its open position, one of the cuff portions is moved away from the other portion and the boot is open, as shown, to permit a foot to be inserted into the interior of the boot.

A plurality of suitable individual pads, illustrated generally at 125, which will be more fully explained, are fixedly (and releasably) attached within the boot, through the use of suitable adhesives or other fastening devices. Individual pads are attached to each of the ankle cuff members and also to the lower flap portion and lower main boot portion in order to give adequate support to the foot and hold it with respect to the outer shell.

It should be noted that the lower portion of the boot is preferably made of a rigid material, such as a lightweight metal or molded rigid plastic, such as a fiberglass reinforced plastic. The cuifs 108 and 118 are preferably made of metal as are the strut members 109 and 119.

After a foot has been inserted in the boot, the flap assembly 103 including the cuff portion 117 and the lower portion 103A is closed.

When the flap is moved to its closed position, suitable clamp assemblies illustrated generally at 126 are utilized for holding the flap closed. The clamps are illustrated in detail in FIGS. 24 through 29 and will be more fully explained later. Also, suitable over center clamps (such as luggage clamps) can be used if desired.

The two cuff sections 107 and 117 are held in a closed position through the utilization of a web or strap that encircles the cuff members and is suitably secured. As can be seen, in the embodiment shown, a nylon web strap 127 is fastened to semi-cylindrical band 108 with a rivet 124 or other suitable fastening device. The nylon strap is substantially the same vertical height as the cuff members.

As can be seen, in FIG. 11, the opposite end of the nylon strap pass from cuff member 117 to the cuff member 10% and are fastened together with a suitable clamping device 128. The clamping device is adjustable and is shown in detail in FIGS. 17-23.

The web clamping device includes a hasp or lever member 129 which is attached to one of the ends of the nylon web.

The end portion of the nylon strap is cut away as shown at 130 to form a U-shaped opening and the end portions of the web forming the legs of the U are folded back upon themselves and stitched as along lines 131 to form loops on opposite sides of the opening 130.

The hasp member 129 has a pair of laterally outwardly extending wings or members 132 which are positioned within the opposite ones of the loops formed in the ends of nylon strap 127. The outwardly extending members 132 of the hasp are free to pivot in the loops but will be held from movement in longitudinal direction.

The hasp member has a pair of longitudinally extending stitfening legs 133, 133 depending from each end thereof and, as perhaps can best be seen in FIG. 22 an outer end portion 134 of these ribs extends beyond an end surface 135 of the main portion of the hasp member. The end portions 134 of the ribs serve as guides when the hasp is to be locked, as will be more fully explained later.

A latching assembly 137 is mounted at the opposite end of the nylon strap 127 from the hasp 129. This end of the nylon strap is also cut away with an opening 138 to leave a pair of spaced apart lengths of material that are folded back upon themselves and stitched as 139 to form loops which are transversely spaced apart, at the end of the strap. The latch member 137 has a pair of outwardly extending members 140, 140 which are positioned within the loops formed at this end of the belt 127. The latch member can pivot in these loops. In addition, a spring fulcrum member 141 is utilized with the clamping device 128 and is adapted to be mounted on the latch member 137 so that it is adjustable in longitudinal direction to obtain adjustment of the effective length of the nylon strap and thereby adjust the amount of clamping force holding the two cuff members 107 and 117 together.

Spring fulcrum member 141 has a pair of spaced apart pivot or fulcrum brackets 142 at an outer end thereof, the brackets 142 extend upwardly from the main portion of the member. (See FIG. 19.) A retainer clip 143 is formed at the opposite end of the member 141 by doubling the member back upon itself. A dog 144 is attached to the main portion of the bracket and extends in direction opposite from the fulcrum brackets. In order to use the spring retainer device and the latch member combination, the retainer clip 143 is slipped through a provided opening 145 on the latch member 137 so that the member 141 is mounted over the latch member. The dog 144 is placed into a desired one of a plurality of transverse, space apart slots 146 provided at an outer end of the latch member. The particular slot 146 in which the dog is placed depends on how tight the cuff members are to be closed. In other Words, if greater effective length of strap 127 is needed to properly close the cuff members the dog 144 of the retainer clip would be placed in an outer one of the slots 146 of the retainer clip and if a shorter effective length of strap 147 is needed the dog will be placed in an inner one of the slots 146.

When the clamp is to be closed, the hasp or lever member 129 is placed so that the outer end surface 135 thereof contacts the fulcrum brackets 142 on the spring clip. The spring clip, of course, is positioned on the latch member 137, as shown in FIG. 19. The hasp member 129 is first inserted as shown in dotted lines in FIG. 19.

It should be noted that the outer ends 134 of the legs 133, can be placed on opposite sides of the latch member 137 and used as guides for guiding the end surface 135 in place in the fulcrum brackets of the spring clip.

The hasp member 129 then pivoted in the fulcrum brackets in direction as indicated by the narrow in FIG. 19 until it goes over center and locks against the cuff member. In this latched position, as shown in FIGS. 19 and 11, the hasp will be latched securely and the web strap will be holding the cuff members tightly together.

The hasp member extends rearwardly, as seen, in its closed position, and can be curved, if desired, in order to more closely fit the cuff member. The spring clip can be adjusted in slots 146 to get the proper tightness.

When the person is skiing there are always forces on the leg tending to bend the ankle laterally (about an axis extending in longitudinal direction of the foot). Lateral bending is objectionable when good control of the skis is necessary.

The boot of the present invention prevents lateral bending. The usual cuff or ankle members in normal boots are U shaped. The open end of the U is usually toward the front of the boot and is closed with a tongue and laces. This permits the opposite sides of the cuff member (the legs of the U) to twist with respect to each other under load, because the laces will not carry loads from one side of the cuff to the other. Therefore, conventional boots are not rigid because the shear load which results is not cylindrical bands are interlocked so that shear load is transferred from one of the cuff members to the other. Shear movement is prevented.

As can be seen, the band 107 of the cuff member 117 has a pair of integral dogs or tongue members 150, 150

on opposite ends thereof and protruding toward the other cuff member. (See FIG. 13.) The band 108 of the cuff member 107 has a pair of female receptacles 151, 151 in the outer vertical edges thereof. The receptacles 151, 151 are positioned to receive the tongues 150, 151) when the fiap of the boot is in a closed position, as shown in FIG. 12. The tongues are tapered in vertical direction and the receptacles are made to snugly hold them. Suitable guide members 153, 153 can be positioned on opposite sides of each of the receptacles in order to guide and hold the tongues in place in the receptacles.

When the nylon strap 127 has been firmly latched in place, as previously described, and the cuff members 107 and 117 are closed, the tongue and female receptacles will mate as shown in FIG. 12. Any forces on the cuff member 117 as shown by arrow 152, will be transferred by the engaging surfaces of tongue 150 and receptacles 151 to the cuff member 107 and vice versa. The two part cylindrical hands now form a continuous band encircling the leg of the wearer. Therefore, as one cuff member tends to bend about a longitudinal axis of pivot, or bend laterally, the other cuff arrests the shear movement of the boot structure at the joint of the two cuff members.

In any lateral bending, there is a compressive force in one of the struts supporting the cuff members and a tension force in the other. One of these forces pushes upward on one side of the cuff assembly and the other pulls downwardly, tending to put the hands into shear distortion. When the front of the boot is closed by laces, the laces do not transmit this shear effectively but when the design of the present invention is utilized the shear is effectively transmitted and results in a far stiffer cuff structure in regard to lateral pivoting than that previously advanced.

The interlocking cuff band sections, as shown, can be utilized with boots having leather lower portions, if desired. Of course, the leather lower portions should be relatively stiff in order to obtain the rigidity necessary. Some form of mechanical connection to transmit the shear forces from one cuff section to another is necessary. As shown, it is a tongue and receptacle but other forms of interlocking devices can be used, if desired.

In order to hold the foot firmly in the boot, various structures have been advanced. However, the preferred embodiment shown comprises a number of individual pads located inside the boot and adhesively fixed in place.

The pads are divided so that as shown there is 21 separate main boot heel pad 155, a main boot foot side and top pad 156 which comes up over the instep of the foot and a main cuff section pad 157. All of these pads are adhesively fastened in place or otherwise fixed, in relation to the boot.

On the flap assembly 103, there is a flap heel pad 158; a flap main foot pad 159, and a flap cuff pad 160.

Each of the pads is filled with a material which will conform to the formation of the foot and any foot irregularities, as well. The material is placed within the pads through suitable filling spouts on each. of the pads. Typical filling spouts are shown in FIGS. 14, 15 and 16. The main cuff pad shown in FIG. 14 comprises an outer envelope 161 of suitable shape for its particular location filled with a conformable material 162. The pad has a tubular filling spout 163 that is open to the interior of the envelope 161. The spouts can be of suitable size so that a teaspoon illustrated fragmentarily at 164 can be partially placed within the spout and material 162 on the teaspoon can be forced down through the spout into the interior of the pad.

The material, once it is located within the spout can be forced down by stripping the spout from top to bottom between the thumb and forefinger and forcing the material into the pad.

In order .to fill the pad when it is positioned on the cuff (or in the boot as the case may be) it is necessary that the portion of the envelope 161 above the spout, for example, the portion indicated at 165 can be moved away from the adjacent portion of the cuff band 108 a sufiicient distance to permit the spout to be lifted above the cuff band. In order to accomplish this, the portion 165 of the envelope 161 above the spout can be attached to the cuff band with a pressure sensitive adhesive so this upper portion of the pad can be stripped away from the cuff member 108 to permit lifting the spout 163 above the pad in position to be accessible for filling with a teaspoon. After the pad has been filled to a desired amount, the spout member 163 is merely folded several times transverse to its longitudinal axis and tucked between the envelope 161 and the adjacent portion of the boot, as shown, cuff member 108. The upper portion 165 of the envelope is then pressed against the cuif member 108 and the pressure sensitive adhesive will hold the upper portion in place. The folding of the spout seals the pad so it does not leak.

The end portions of the pads and the portions not adjacent the filling spout 163 can be attached to the boot with a permanent contact cement or other suitable adhesrve.

It is to be noted that each of the pads in the boot has a filling spout 163, as shown typically in FIG. 14.

For example, the spouts for the pads on the main portion of the boot are shown in dotted lines in FIG. 13, as typical representations of the location of the filling spout.

The use of pressure sensitive adhesive permits removal of a portion of the envelope from its adjacent boot portion and filling or if desired removing materials through the spout. The pad can then again be adhesively placed in position.

In addition to using a teaspoon as shown, other suitable filling means can be used, for example, a piston and cylinder arrangement which will discharge material from the cylinder into the pad. A tube having a rubber bulb on the end (similar to a hygrometer) can also be used. The bulb will suck material into the tube and then recompressed to blow it into the pad.

FIGS. 15 and 16 show the spout for the main foot pad 156. The spout 163 is extended above the lower boot portion 102 and extended through the opening between the cuff and lower portion for filling. The pad is filled as before and the spout folded as shown in FIG. 16. The top portion of the pad is then read hered to the boot wall. Pressure sensitive adhesive is used at the top portions of the pad.

The pads are filled with a special material. The material within the pads must be able to conform to the shape of the foot and the ankle, particularly an irreguarity, such as a bunion or bone, and still retain its shape when the foot is removed so that the pads do not have to be custom fit each time the boot is put on.'The material must be firm and provide a support against sudden movement of the foot. The material must not take a set or assume a permanent shape as the foot shape changes slightly from day to day.

Many pads have been advanced which contain only liq uid or air. The pads are not satisfactory because fluids will shift and provide a rolling action for the foot. This is not desirable in skiing because control of the skis is necessary at all times and the skis must immediately respond to the movement of the foot and legs of the skier. Also, air or liquid will leak from very small pin holes in the outer covering.

A material consisting of discrete particles surrounded with a binder of a special liquid coating, such as a wax, grease or liquid, has the desired properties of firm support, conformability, retention of shape and no leakage.

10 For example, the material for filling the pads illustrated generally at 162 which consists of a mixture of small discrete hollow spheres of material each particle of which has its own structural strength, surrounded by a special liquid coating comprising lubricating grease (silicone base grease is best) has been found to be suitable.

It has been found that a mixture of hollow spheres of phenolic resin (these have individual structural strength) which are microscopic bubbles varying in size from .0002 inch to .005 inch and which have an average diameter of .0017 inch, and silicone grease in a ratio of 20 to 1 by weight (20 parts of the spheres to one part of grease) has the desired characteristics. The liquid coating coats the particles sufi'iciently so that the particles will slide past one another. The hollow spheres are commercially available and are sold by Union Carbide Plastics Company, 270 Park Ave., New York, N.Y., under the trademark Microballoons.

Further, it has been found that ordinary sand particles mixed with grease will also function properly as will particles ranging up one eighth inch in diameter. The larger the particles, the more harsh the feel on the foot and the more auxiliary padding which would be necessary between the foot and the conformable pad. The sand is very heavy and does not insulate well, in addition to having a harsh feel on the foot. The special liquid coating is defined for the purpose of this specification as a material which will coat the hollow balloons or particles and will not harden (it will yield under shear) at the temperatures encountered when skiing nor will it evaporate. The special liquid coating material should be non-evaporating, non-toxic, non-allergenic and should not have any odor.

The particular ratio of grease or special liquid coating to particles is, of course, dependent on the size of the particles and the amount of rigidity desired in the pads. The particles must be coated with a suflicient amount of the special liquid coating or grease to cause the particles to tend to stick together so that the pad retains the shape of the foot after the foot has been removed. This cannot be done with bags or pads filled only with liquid or air. The amount of binder is preferably equal to or less than the void volume (volume of the interstitial spaces in a quantity of the particles) of the particles. If the volume of binder exceeds the void volume of the particles the bag will have substantially the flow properties of the binder (the special liquid coating) and not the desired properties.

Only a very thin coating of the special liquid on the particles is necessary. There is always a chance that the foot will change in shape or size somewhat due to swelling or other influences. At that time, the conformable pads as disclosed can be reshaped to fit the foot exactly so that discomfort will not result. Also, each time a person steps the foot changes in shape. The material 162 will conform to these changes to give foot comfort at all times.

The small hollow spheres of material (Microballoons) that are utilized resemble fine flour before the special liquid coating is added to the particles. The particles have a bulk density of from 3-5 pounds per cubic foot. The particles can blow away and will shift easily from external forces without the coating. Once the special liquid coating grease binder has been added the particles will no longer be lost through the pad seams (if the pads are sewed) by dusting nor will the resultant pad filler material voluntarily lose its configuration when the feet are removed from the boot. The function of the special liquid coating is primarily to form a tacky binder that will hold the particles in place when the foot is removed and to keep the light hollow sphere particles from floating off like dust in the air during the filling process. It is desirable to minimize the weight in the pads as well as provide good heat insulation, if possible. Therefore, the hollow spheres are very desirable. The material mixture (particles having a special liquid coating) has the characteristics of transmitting axial force and moving under shear. This means that sudden forces on the pads and material while skiing will not cause any changes in the pads but the material can be worked to position to fit the foot. The special liquid coating is a material that does not harden at temperatures encountered while skiing.

In normal use, the envelopes for the filler material can be made of a suitable suede leather material or other leather sewed or adhesively sealed to form the envelope shape. Preferably, the pads will be able to breathe slightly to permit absorption of some perspiration and transfer of air. Once the pads have been shaped to fit the foot, the suede leather can be coated with a product known as leather stiffener to cause the envelope to also retain its shape and prevent shifting of the material. Leather stiffener can be purchased from Prime Leather Finishes Co., Milwaukee 4, Wis.

If desired, the insole of the the conformable material 162.

Referring now to FIGS. 24-29 the preferred embodiment of the clamps used on the heel and instep of the boot to hold the flap member in closed position, it can be seen that the clamp assembly 126 located at the heel and the instep are identically constructed. The length of the clamp assembly is different so as to fit the particular position in which they are located. For example, the clamp 170 at the instep extends from the toe cap indicated 171 up to a shoulder 172 adjacent the upper portions of the lower member of the boot.

The heel clamp 173 extends from the upper portion of the sole up to the same shoulder 172, which runs around the lower section of the boot, as will be explained later.

A typical clamp assembly is shown in FIGS. 24-29. The clamp includes a latch member 17 4 which is designed to be appealing to the eye when latched in place on the boot. The latch member 174 in turn is pivotally mounted to a leaf spring member 175 with a suitable rod 176. It can be seen that the latch member 174 has a plurality of lugs 177 raised therefrom which interlock with projections 178 on the leaf spring member so that the rod passes alternately through the lugs 177 on the latch member and the projections 178 on the leaf spring. The projections 178 are formed so that they encircle the rod 176.

The opposite side edge portion of the leaf spring 175 is also formed into spaced projections 181 the edges of which are rolled around a rod 182 so that they are pivotally mounted on the rod. Rod 182 also passes through lugs 183 projecting upwardly from a first mounting member 184 which is attached with suitable rivets or screws to the main portion of the boot 102.

As shown, the main mounting member 184 extends along the underside of the boot 102 and projects upwardly along the parting line of the boot. The edge portion of the boot may be notched to receive the member 184. Lugs 183 extend upwardly above the top surface of the main boot member 102 along the parting line of the boot.

A catch member 185 is mounted in any usual or preferred manner, for example with rivets 186 into the lower portion 103A of the flap, along the edge thereof where it mates with the main portion of the boot when in closed position.

The latch or the catch member 185 has lugs 187 at the outer edge thereof which are complemental to the lugs 183 on the main mounting member 184. The lugs .187 interlock with the lugs 183 when the flap is in its closed position and movement in direction along the longitudinal axis of the pin 182 is prevented.

Therefore, the flap will not shift in this direction with respect to the main portion of the boot.

Also, as can perhaps best be seen in FIG. 16, a main mounting member 184 has an edge surface 190 which is indented in a shallow V-shape. This edge surface 190 is facing the catch member 187. The catch member 185 has an edge surface 191 that is the complement of the surface 190 and these surfaces 190 and 191 nest together with the flap assembly 103 in its closed position. It should be noted boot can also be filled with 1 2 that the V-shape of the surface 191 is provided by trimming away the edge portions thereof between the lugs 187 on the catch member so that these V-shape surfaces on the catch member meet with the edge surface on the lugs 183 of the main member.

In FIG. 17 there is shown the configuration of the surfaces of members 184 and 185 that mate in the areas between lugs 133 of the main member. The mating portions of these surfaces seal to prevent snow from getting into the boot. The V-shaped surfaces prevent movement of the flap and main mounting member relative to each other in directions as indicated by arrow 192 in FIG. 16. This insures that the flap and boot are held solidly when the catch is closed.

If the latch is to be closed, the two members are moved as shown in FIG. 16. The flap is then in closed position. The latch member 174 is raised up as shown so that a hook portion, 193 thereof fits into a provided groove 194 formed on the catch member. An outer end portion 195 of the latch member 174 is then pushed downwardly so that it rests against the main part of the boot 102. When this happens the pivot points of rods 176 and 182 go over center and the latch member will snap into place. Then the flap is held in closed position and cannot be moved until the latch. is released.

The leaf spring member 175, as shown perhaps best in FIGS. 15 and 17, is slightly bowed in transverse direction. In order to permit the rods 176 and 182 to go over center, the spring will flatten out or yield until the rods go over center and then the spring will snap the catch into place with the lugs 177 resting on the top surface of the main portion of the boot.

It is to be noted that the hook member 193 and the groove 194 extend along the entire length of the clamps.

To release the catch member, the outer end portion 195 is raised in direction as indicated by arrow 196 until the pins again go over center in the opposite way and the hook 193 can be released from the groove 194.

When the boot is to be used, for example the first time, pads 125 are partially filled with material 162 and are placed within the boot. The flap member 103 is closed, and the clamps 170 and 173 at the instep and heel, respectively, are latched closed, as previously described. Also, the clamp assembly 128 for the nylon strap around the cuff member is latched closed.

The material 162 within each of the pads is then displaced so as to conform to the foot in the boot. If additional material is necessary, the respective spouts 163 for each of the pads can be removed, as previously described, and additional material 162 forced into these spouts and pads. By replacing the foot into the boot several times and adding material as needed, the proper fit on the pads against the foot is obtained. The pad material will not shift unless it is subjected to external forces and the boot can be then used repeatedly without changing the filling or having to rearrange the material in the pads.

Also, if a bunion or corn appears on the foot, the pad material can be rearranged to meet this new irreguarity.

The foot can be placed on a suitable insole 197. The insole can be of any desired or preferred construction.

Inasmuch as the construction of the boot as shown in this embodiment, is of a cuff member and lower boot portion only and an open area between the cuff and the lower boot, some means of preventing snow and foreign material from. getting inside the boot is necessary. As can be done in any number of ways, such as placing a strip of flexible material between the upper edge of the lower portion of the boot and the cuff member. However, as shown, a simple piece of legging 198 is placed on each of the legs before the foot is placed into the boot. After the boot has been closed the legging is pulled downwardly so that the lower edge portions 199 of the legging slip over the top portions of the lower member of the boot. The lower edge of the legging 198 has a hem and the hem has an elastic band or otherresilient member therein which will permit the legging to be stretched outwardly over the shoulder 172 (see FIG. 13) and snap into place in a provided groove 200. The groove 200 extends around the boot completely when the flap is closed and the legging thus can be snapped into the groove to permit snow from coming in around the top portions of the lower member of the boot.

In addition, the upper edge portions 201 of the legging also contain a hem which has a band of elastic material therein, and constructed in a known way so that the upper edge will resiliently grip the outer surface of the ski pants of the wearer to prevent snow from entering from the top cutf. Other suitable flexible covers can be placed between the upper cuff and the lower member of the boot in any usual manner. However, it has been found that the legging will work well and is quickly put into place.

When the boot is to be removed a lower portion 199 of the legging is removed from the ridge 172 and the entire legging is pulled upwardly on the leg until it clears the boot cuff. The catches or clamps are then released on the nylon strap on the cuff, and then the instep and heel, the flap is opened and the foot can be removed.

The material in the pads will retain its shape after the foot has been removed and will always fit the foot exactly. This will give perfect control to the skier and greatly increase thewskiers skill.

The side location of the access flap permits solid heel clamping with the heel pads 155 and 158. As shown in FIG. 13A, the human heel tapers upwardly above the sole of the foot and the pads can bulge to clamp onto the heel securely. The heel then cannot be lifted from the sole of the boot. With the side flap there is no tendency to displace the bulge of material in each pad that fits into the heel depressions at a persons heel when the foot is inserted and the flap closed.

Another tendency when the heel pads bulge as shown is for the heel to raise against the pads. The inner walls of the pad tends to move upwardly and roll under this force. With the conformable material used most of this roll is eliminated. However, in order to absolutely prevent this roll a strap 167 of substantially non-stretchable material is attached to the inner wall 166 of the main boot heel pad 155 as at 167A and extends downwardly and is attached to the sole of the boot as at 167B. The strap |167 is attached to pad 155 at its bulge point.

A substantially non-stretchable (for example leather) strap 168, is attached to the inner wall 169 of the flap heel pad 158 as at 168A and extends downwardly and is fastened to the very bottom portion portion of the flap as at 168B. The straps 167 and 168 retain the respective inner walls of the pads to which they are attached and prevent the pad bulge from rolling upwardly. This holds the heel firmly onto the sole of the boot.

The straps can be attached to the pads and the boot portion with suitable adhesives or mechanical fasteners.

It should be noted that the heel pads terminate a distance above the sole of the boot so that pad material will not work down and cause the pad to work underneath the foot.

Referring to FIG. 30, there is a modified form of a sole member that can be used inside the boot to obtain a tightening effect against the pads 125 if the foot becomes slightly loose while skiing. Instead of using the normal insole within the boot, a sole plate 205 is mounted inside the outer shell of the boot. The sole plate 205 is provided with suitable guide members to retain it within the boot and yet permit it to slide in a vertical direction, as shown by arrow 206. The sole plate 205 is not fixedly attached with respect to the inside of the boot.

The foot of the wearer rests upon the top of the sole plate. Suitable padding can be provided if desired. The sole plate has a pair of blocks 207, 207 mounted on the bottom thereof. The blocks have inclined lower ramplike surfaces 208, 208 which mate with inclined upper surfaces 209, 209 of blocks 210 which form, the upper portions of a sole jacking plate 211. The sole jacking plate is mounted within the hollow portion of a modified sole member 212. It can be seen that the sole member 212 has a very thin bottom panel 213 (as opposed to the sole and the panel 213 supports the sole jacking plate 211 thereon. The sole jacking plate is slidably mounted along the bottom panel 213 of the hollow boot sole 212. A set screw 214 is threadably mounted at the front end of the boot shell at the lower sole portion and can be threadably adjusted with a screw driver or wrench to move the boot jack in direction as indicated by arrow 215. Thus the screw will move the sole plate 205 upwardly in direction as indicated by arrow 206. The end of set screw 214 engages the forward edge of the sole jacking plate and bears against this edge to force the jacking plate in direction as indicated by arrow 215. The weight of the foot on the sole plate tends to move the jacking plate forwardly.

By turning the screw 214 the foot can be tightened against the pads 125 inside the foot and the boot will be fitted more snugly to the wearers foot. This adjustment is made mainly for minor adjustments that are necessary during skiing when it is inconvenient to refill the pads, if a tighter fit is necessary. Any amount of pressure can be exerted with the set screw and thus the desired fit between the boot and the foot can be obtained.

Also, if the boot fits too tightly, the set screw can be loosened slightly to permit the sole jack to move forwardly and thereby lower the sole plate to slightly release the pressure on the foot and insure a proper, comfortable fit.

Referring specifically to FIGS. 31, 32 and 33, a modified form of attaching the struts for the ankle member to the lower portion of the boot is shown. While only one side portion of the boot is shown, it is to be understood that both struts (on either side of the boot) will be attached in the same manner. The main boot section 102 has its pad 156 filled with material 162 attached to the interior surface thereof, as in the previous forms of the invention. A bracket is fixed to the side of the boot, as in the previous form of the invention as well. Also, the ankle cutf member 107 is mounted above the lower portion of the boot 102. The culf member 107, in this form of the invention, is connected to the lower portion through an offset strut 217. The strut 217 has its lower end portion positioned outside of the bracket 110. The strut 217 is attached to the bracket 110 (the strut on the other side will be attached to the bracket with a disc-like rubber torsional washer 218. The rubber washer can be adhesively secured to the bracket 110 and to the strut 217, if desired, or can be vulcanized to the bracket and to the strut, if desired. The rubber washer, as shown, is relatively thick and will permit a torsional pivotal movement about an axis substantially aligned with the ankle bone of the foot of the wearer. The torsional movement is as indicated by arrow 219.

The ankle assembly is therefore not freely pivotally mounted to the lower boot section in this form of the invention. The torsional washer 218 will always cause the ankle culf member to tend to return to its upright or normal position no matter what direction it is pivoted during use. This fact will limit the freedom of ankle pivoting and additional rigidity in fore and aft direction can be added to the boot by proper selection of the hardness of the washer.

FIG. 33 illustrates three types of flexible disc washers and one type of spiral spring that can be used to attach the modified strut 217 to the bracket 110 in order to obtain the effect of having a resistance to .pivotal movement of the ankle member.

A solid washer 220 which is made of rubber material throughout can be used and adhesively secured in place on the strut and bracket or vulcanized in place as desired. A slotted washer 221 made of suitable rubber material can also be adhesively secured in place to the strut and to the bracket. The slots 221A in the washer will make the torsional twisting of the ankle somewhat easier than the solid washer but Will still cause the cuff member to return to its normal upright position when not under pivotal stress or force.

A hollow washer 222 which has a pair of disc-like end members 223, 223 joined together with radially extending ribs 224 can also be used for attaching the strut 217 to the bracket 110 as shown in FIGS. 31 and 32. The end members 223, 223 will be secured to the strut and bracket, respectively.

If desired, the struts 217 can be attached to the bracket 110 with a suitable torsion or spiral spring 225. The spring will always tend to return the cult with normal position in a manner similar to the rubber torsional washers previously described. The spring 225 can be attached to its outer end 226 with a suitable bolt or rivet 227 to the strut 217. The inner end 228 of the spring can be attached with a suitable bolt or rivet 229 to the bracket 110. In this manner a resistance to pivotal movement of the ankle piece is accomplished.

Therefore, the ski boot presented i to hold the foot firmly with respect thereto and has an outer shell that will not stretch or soften when wet or old nor distort when subjected to load. Further, the cuff member gives a very rigid holding of the ankle of a wearer in resistance to lateral bending, which is the heart of controlling the edging of skis and therefore the performance on the skis. If the boot is rigid and prevents lateral bending of the ankle absolute control of the skis can always be effected. The fore and aft bending about a pivotal axis, as shown in the front embodiment herein, aids the skier in assuming a more relaxed position on the skis. It is thought by many persons that some type of fore and aft bending of the ski boot is necessary for proper ski control.

Several specific embodiments have been illustrated herein, applicant is limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

The rigid outer construction boot also is usable for skates or other athletic boots where precise control is important. The laterally rigid cuff, as presented, is also very important in hockey skate boots.

What is claimed is:

1. A ski boot comprising an outer shell made of a permanently substantially rigid material, said boot having an opening including a portion of the instep area of the boot permitting foot access to the interior thereof, a flap member of size and configuration to substantially cover said opening and hold a foot in the boot, means pivotally mounting said flap member on said boot about an axis lying in a substantially upright plane extending longitudinally of the boot so as, when closed, to provide clamping force generally transverse to the longitudinal axis of the foot in the instep area of the foot, releasable clamping means for holding said flap member in position covering said opening, and means within said outer shell for holding a foot firmly with respect thereto.

2. The combination as specified in claim 1 wherein said means for holding said foot firmly with respect to said shell is comprised as a plurality of individual separated pads positioned within said shell and on said flap and adapted to engage said foot, said pads being substantially filled with a material which will conform to the shape of the foot in contact therewith and which will retain its shape when said foot is removed from the boot.

3. The combination as specified in claim 2 wherein said material within said pad is comprised as a quantity of small discrete particles and a thin coating of nonhardening binder material on each particle which causes particles to adhere to each other.

4. The combination as specified in claim 2 wherein the separated pads include separate heel pads that terminate above the insole of the boot, and separate substantially non-stretchable strap means attached to the inner surface of each heel pad at one end thereof and attached to the boot adjacent the insole of the boot at the other end thereof.

5. The combination as specified in claim 1 wherein the boot includes a lower portion and an ankle portion pivoted to the lower portion to permit movement of the leg of the wearer, and bias means fastened between said ankle portion and the lower portion to tend to return the ankle portion to a normally centered position, said bias means having sufiicient resistance to resist forward pivoting of the ankle of a wearer of the boot.

6. An athletic boot comprising a base member including a shell portion, a flap portion, and an ankle member, a foot access opening in said shell portion, a flap adapted to cover said foot access opening, means to hold said flap in closed position covering said foot access opening, means for pivotally mounting said ankle member to said base member about an axis substantially aligned with the ankle bone of a foot within said shell portion, said ankle member being comprised as two sections, one on said'fiap portion and the other on said shell portion, said sections forming said ankle member which encircles the ankle when said flap is in closed position, and complemental interlocking means on the sections of said ankle member which prevent movement of the sections relative to each other.

7. The combination as specified in claim 6 wherein said base member and said ankle member are made of a substantially rigid material.

8. The combination as specified in claim 6 wherein said ankle member is comprised as two semi-cylindrical bands spaced above the base member of said boot and a pair of struts attached to the bands at the upper ends thereof and pivotally mounted to the base member, at the lower ends thereof.

9. A boot comprising an outer shell made of a substantially rigid material, said boot having an opening .permitting foot access to the interior thereof, a flap member of size and configuration to cover said opening, said flap member comprising a substantial portion of one longituditudinal side of the boot, and movable from open to closed position, said flap member being positioned, when closed, so as to provide force generally transverse to the longitudinal axis of the foot in the instep area of the boot, re-

r leasable clamp means for holding said flap member in position over said opening and means within said outer shell for holding a foot within the boot firmly with respect thereto.

10. The combination as specified in claim 9 wherein the hinge for said flap extends in longitudinal direction.

11. The combination as specified in claim 9 wherein said flap is made of substantially rigid material and is hinged to the shell about an axis lying in a substantially upright longitudinally extending plane.

12. The combination as specified in claim 11 wherein the rigid material is a fiberglass reinforced plastic.

13. The combination as specified in claim 11 wherein the boot shell is divided into two substantially identical portions and the hinge extends substantially along a vertigal plane passing through the longitudinal axis of the 14. A ski boot comprising an outer shell made of substantially rigid material, a foot access opening in said shell, a flap made of a rigid material positioned to enclose said foot access opening, clamp means to hold said flap in closed position, said outer shell comprising a base member and an ankle member, means for pivotally mounting said ankle member to said base member about an axis substantially aligned with the ankle bone of a foot within said shell, said ankle member having a main boot portion and a flap portion, and interlocking means at the junction of the main boot portion and the flap portion of said ankle member to transfer vertical shear forces from one portion to the other without relative movement between the portions- 15. The combination as specified in claim 14 wherein the portions of said ankle member are held together with a flexible band that is attached to one of said portions and is of length to extend around the other portion with the flap in closed position, and clamp means to hold the ends of the band secured to each other.

16. The combination as specified in claim 15 wherein said clamp means is adjustable.

17. A ski boot comprising an outer shell made of substantially rigid material and comprising a main boot por tion and a flap portion, said flap being hingedly attached to the main boot portion and movable from closed position wherein it encloses the main boot portion to an open position wherein a foot can be inserted into the main boot portion, means to hold said flap in closed position, said outer shell with said flap in closed position comprising a lower base member and an ankle member, means for pivotally mounting said ankle member to said base member about an axis substantially aligned with the ankle bone of a foot within said shell, said ankle member having a main boot portion and a flap portion, interlocking means at the junction of the main boot portion and the flap portion of said ankle member to transfer vertical shear forces from one ankle portion to the other without relative movement between the ankle portions.

18, The combination as specified in claim 17 wherein the interlocking means on the portions of the ankle member comprises a tongue on one member tapered in vertical direction from its outer to its inner end, and a receptacle having edge surfaces of configuration to engage the tongue and hold the tongue from vertical movement with the flap in closed position.

19. A boot having a lower portion and an ankle portion both being made of substantially rigid material, said ankle portion comprising at least two sections which are relatively openable to permit foot access to the boot and further being closable to substantially encircle an ankle of a wearer, fastener means to hold the sections in closed position, and complemental interlocking means separate from the fastener means on the mating portions of the relatively openable sections of the ankle portion, said interlocking means being oriented to transfer substantially vertical shear forces between the mating sections when they are closed, said interlocking means comprising at least one projection fixedly mounted on an edge of one ankle portion section and projecting towards its complementary ankle portion section, and a recess in the complementary ankle portion section adjacent the edge thereof, said recess snugly receiving said projection.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 326,728 9/1885 Georges 3671 374,106 11/1887 Winter 3671 1,209,660 12/1916 Baum 367.1 1,216,579 2/1917 Lemieux 362.5 1,258,024 3/1918 Laybourn 367.1 1,268,199 6/ 1918 Zavarkin 362.5 1,954,122 4/1934 Fiori 3671 2,292,556 8/ 1942 Whitman 3671 2,319,143 5/1943 Levy et al 3671 2,444,428 7/ 1948 Carrier 362.5 2,516,872 8/1950 Hauser et a1 12880 2,660,812 12/1953 Henke 362.5 2,891,023 6/1959 Peerman et a1 2602.5 2,979,469 4/ 1961 Shannon et al 2602.5 3,064,644 11/ 1962 Patterson 128-80 3,067,531 12/1962 Scott et a1. 36-2.5 3,169,325 2/1965 Fesl 362.5 3,239,952 3/1966 Lange et al. 362.5

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,055,295 10/1953 France.

OTHER REFERENCES Das A. BC Schuh Fabrication-June 10, 1936p. 38.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

A. R. GUEST, Assistant Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 ,325 ,920 June 20 1967 Frank'D: Werner et a1.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 13, line 50, strike out "portion", second occurrenc column 14., line 21, for foot! read boot column 16, line 49, for the claimweference numerm'elL.'.'9V"v read l1 Signed and sealed this 31st day of December 1968.

(SEAL) Attest:

Edward M. Fletcher, Jr. EDWARD J. BRENNER Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Claims (1)

1. A SKI BOOT COMPRISING AN OUTER SHELL MADE OF A PERMANENTLY SUBSTANTIALLY RIGID MATERIAL, SAID BOOT HAVING AN OPENING INCLUDING A PORTION OF THE INSTEP AREA OF THE BOOT PERMITTING FOOT ACCESS TO THE INTERSION THEREOF, A FLAP MEMBER OF SIZE AND CONFIGURATION TO SUBSTANTIALLY COVER SAID OPENING AND HOLD A FOOT IN THE BOOT, MEANS PIVOTALLY MOUNTING SAID FLAP MEMBER ON SAID BOOT ABOUT AN AXIS LYING IN A SUBSTANTIALLY UPRIGHT PLANE EXTENDING LONGITUDINALLY OF THE BOOT SO AS, WHEN CLOSED, TO PROVIDE CLAMPING FORCE GENERALLY TRANSVERSE TO THE LONGITUDINAL AXIS OF THE FOOT IN THE INSTEP AREA OF THE FOOT, RELEASABLE CLAMPING MEANS FOR HOLDING SAID FLAP MEMBER IN POSITION COVERING SAID OPENING, AND MEANS WITHIN SAID OUTER SHELL FOR HOLDING A FOOT FIRMLY WITH RESPECT THERETO.
US362723A 1964-04-27 1964-04-27 Ski boot Expired - Lifetime US3325920A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US362723A US3325920A (en) 1964-04-27 1964-04-27 Ski boot

Applications Claiming Priority (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US362723A US3325920A (en) 1964-04-27 1964-04-27 Ski boot
AT898364A AT265910B (en) 1963-10-23 1964-10-22 Cushion, especially for shoes
CH1370164A CH443056A (en) 1963-10-23 1964-10-22 padding cushion and use of this cushion
FR992342A FR1412280A (en) 1963-10-23 1964-10-22 internal trim shoes and boots
DE19651485772 DE1485772C3 (en) 1964-04-27 1965-04-24
CH573365A CH514300A (en) 1964-04-27 1965-04-26 Shoe
AT382265A AT276155B (en) 1964-04-27 1965-04-26 shoe
FR14899A FR1438624A (en) 1964-04-27 1965-04-27 Improvements in shoes

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3325920A true US3325920A (en) 1967-06-20

Family

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US362723A Expired - Lifetime US3325920A (en) 1964-04-27 1964-04-27 Ski boot

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US (1) US3325920A (en)
AT (1) AT276155B (en)
CH (1) CH514300A (en)
DE (1) DE1485772C3 (en)
FR (1) FR1438624A (en)

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3377721A (en) * 1966-05-04 1968-04-16 Raymond R. Johnson Reinforced ski boot and method of making the same
US3405463A (en) * 1965-10-08 1968-10-15 Rosemount Eng Co Ltd Ski boot having a hinged door
US3469576A (en) * 1966-10-05 1969-09-30 Henry M Smith Footwear
US3530596A (en) * 1969-03-12 1970-09-29 Raichle Boot Co Ltd Ski boot
US3581412A (en) * 1971-02-04 1971-06-01 Melvin W Dalebout Inner boot and method for forming the same
US3640003A (en) * 1970-03-02 1972-02-08 Roland M Anderson Method and construction of a ski boot
DE2106667A1 (en) * 1970-10-09 1972-04-13
US3657827A (en) * 1969-05-21 1972-04-25 Justus Rieker Pressure distribution element for boots
US3745998A (en) * 1971-01-06 1973-07-17 Bio Medical Syst Inc Vacuum formed support structures and immobilizer devices
US3747239A (en) * 1971-11-15 1973-07-24 R Green Safety shoe
US3786580A (en) * 1968-05-02 1974-01-22 Tanner Gold & Trask Inner boot and method for forming the same
DE2300602A1 (en) * 1967-10-18 1974-07-18 Raimund W Vogel Shoe linings
US3834044A (en) * 1970-03-16 1974-09-10 Anderson & Thompson Ski Co Method of foaming ski boots
US3958291A (en) * 1974-10-18 1976-05-25 Spier Martin I Outer shell construction for boot and method of forming same
US4385024A (en) * 1978-07-31 1983-05-24 Tansill Horace A Method for making a molded article from a curable material and a curing agent, the curing agent being in a container initially flexible and infrangible which is made frangible
DE3404554A1 (en) * 1984-02-09 1984-07-12 Albert Klein Method for adapting the inner space of a ski boot to the foot shape of the user
US4962762A (en) * 1989-02-21 1990-10-16 Beekil Steven L Modular self-contained orthotic device
US5362543A (en) * 1993-02-23 1994-11-08 Jay Medical, Ltd. Pressure-compensating compositions and pads made therefrom
US5869164A (en) * 1995-11-08 1999-02-09 Rik Medical Llc Pressure-compensating compositions and pads made therefrom
US6178665B1 (en) 1997-06-12 2001-01-30 Macpod Enterprises Ltd. Fit and support system for the foot
US20060010717A1 (en) * 2004-06-15 2006-01-19 Wayne Finkelstein Therapeutic shoe sole design, method for manufacturing the same, and products constructed therefrom
RU177466U1 (en) * 2017-04-04 2018-02-26 Общество с ограниченной ответственностью "Реабилитационный Центр "СОЧУВСТВИЕ" Orthopedic device to immobilize the human limb
EP3482648A1 (en) * 2017-11-10 2019-05-15 Head Technology GmbH Liner for sports shoes

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US326728A (en) * 1885-09-22 georges
US374106A (en) * 1887-11-29 Harding
US1209660A (en) * 1916-03-28 1916-12-26 Leopold A Baum Shoe.
US1216579A (en) * 1916-10-26 1917-02-20 Joseph Lemieux Boot or shoe.
US1258024A (en) * 1916-10-23 1918-03-05 Charles E Laybourn Overshoe.
US1268199A (en) * 1918-01-02 1918-06-04 Maxim Zavarkin Aluminum shoe.
US1954122A (en) * 1932-04-28 1934-04-10 John M Fiori Boot
US2292556A (en) * 1941-03-27 1942-08-11 C S Pierce Company Shoe pad
US2319143A (en) * 1941-03-13 1943-05-11 Levy David Shoe pressure pad
US2444428A (en) * 1942-06-03 1948-07-06 Carrier Marcel Shoe for sports and the like
US2516872A (en) * 1948-01-27 1950-08-01 John M Hauser Ankle brace
US2660812A (en) * 1951-04-17 1953-12-01 Henke Hermann Ski boot
FR1055295A (en) * 1952-04-30 1954-02-17 Improvements in ski shoes and the like
US2891023A (en) * 1956-03-09 1959-06-16 Gen Mills Inc Compositions containing amino polyamides and heat reactive phenolic resins
US2979469A (en) * 1957-12-30 1961-04-11 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Production of phenolic foams
US3064644A (en) * 1960-03-02 1962-11-20 Thomas W Patterson Lower leg brace
US3067531A (en) * 1961-03-15 1962-12-11 Aspen Boot Ltd Ski boot
US3169325A (en) * 1960-04-05 1965-02-16 Fesl Franz Sports boot closure construction
US3239952A (en) * 1965-02-24 1966-03-15 Robert B Lange Ski boot

Patent Citations (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US326728A (en) * 1885-09-22 georges
US374106A (en) * 1887-11-29 Harding
US1209660A (en) * 1916-03-28 1916-12-26 Leopold A Baum Shoe.
US1258024A (en) * 1916-10-23 1918-03-05 Charles E Laybourn Overshoe.
US1216579A (en) * 1916-10-26 1917-02-20 Joseph Lemieux Boot or shoe.
US1268199A (en) * 1918-01-02 1918-06-04 Maxim Zavarkin Aluminum shoe.
US1954122A (en) * 1932-04-28 1934-04-10 John M Fiori Boot
US2319143A (en) * 1941-03-13 1943-05-11 Levy David Shoe pressure pad
US2292556A (en) * 1941-03-27 1942-08-11 C S Pierce Company Shoe pad
US2444428A (en) * 1942-06-03 1948-07-06 Carrier Marcel Shoe for sports and the like
US2516872A (en) * 1948-01-27 1950-08-01 John M Hauser Ankle brace
US2660812A (en) * 1951-04-17 1953-12-01 Henke Hermann Ski boot
FR1055295A (en) * 1952-04-30 1954-02-17 Improvements in ski shoes and the like
US2891023A (en) * 1956-03-09 1959-06-16 Gen Mills Inc Compositions containing amino polyamides and heat reactive phenolic resins
US2979469A (en) * 1957-12-30 1961-04-11 Owens Corning Fiberglass Corp Production of phenolic foams
US3064644A (en) * 1960-03-02 1962-11-20 Thomas W Patterson Lower leg brace
US3169325A (en) * 1960-04-05 1965-02-16 Fesl Franz Sports boot closure construction
US3067531A (en) * 1961-03-15 1962-12-11 Aspen Boot Ltd Ski boot
US3239952A (en) * 1965-02-24 1966-03-15 Robert B Lange Ski boot

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3405463A (en) * 1965-10-08 1968-10-15 Rosemount Eng Co Ltd Ski boot having a hinged door
US3377721A (en) * 1966-05-04 1968-04-16 Raymond R. Johnson Reinforced ski boot and method of making the same
US3469576A (en) * 1966-10-05 1969-09-30 Henry M Smith Footwear
DE2300602A1 (en) * 1967-10-18 1974-07-18 Raimund W Vogel Shoe linings
US3786580A (en) * 1968-05-02 1974-01-22 Tanner Gold & Trask Inner boot and method for forming the same
US3530596A (en) * 1969-03-12 1970-09-29 Raichle Boot Co Ltd Ski boot
US3657827A (en) * 1969-05-21 1972-04-25 Justus Rieker Pressure distribution element for boots
US3640003A (en) * 1970-03-02 1972-02-08 Roland M Anderson Method and construction of a ski boot
US3834044A (en) * 1970-03-16 1974-09-10 Anderson & Thompson Ski Co Method of foaming ski boots
DE2106667A1 (en) * 1970-10-09 1972-04-13
US3745998A (en) * 1971-01-06 1973-07-17 Bio Medical Syst Inc Vacuum formed support structures and immobilizer devices
US3581412A (en) * 1971-02-04 1971-06-01 Melvin W Dalebout Inner boot and method for forming the same
US3747239A (en) * 1971-11-15 1973-07-24 R Green Safety shoe
US3958291A (en) * 1974-10-18 1976-05-25 Spier Martin I Outer shell construction for boot and method of forming same
US4385024A (en) * 1978-07-31 1983-05-24 Tansill Horace A Method for making a molded article from a curable material and a curing agent, the curing agent being in a container initially flexible and infrangible which is made frangible
DE3404554A1 (en) * 1984-02-09 1984-07-12 Albert Klein Method for adapting the inner space of a ski boot to the foot shape of the user
US4962762A (en) * 1989-02-21 1990-10-16 Beekil Steven L Modular self-contained orthotic device
US5362543A (en) * 1993-02-23 1994-11-08 Jay Medical, Ltd. Pressure-compensating compositions and pads made therefrom
US5869164A (en) * 1995-11-08 1999-02-09 Rik Medical Llc Pressure-compensating compositions and pads made therefrom
US6178665B1 (en) 1997-06-12 2001-01-30 Macpod Enterprises Ltd. Fit and support system for the foot
US20060010717A1 (en) * 2004-06-15 2006-01-19 Wayne Finkelstein Therapeutic shoe sole design, method for manufacturing the same, and products constructed therefrom
US7484318B2 (en) 2004-06-15 2009-02-03 Kenneth Cole Productions (Lic), Inc. Therapeutic shoe sole design, method for manufacturing the same, and products constructed therefrom
US7805859B2 (en) 2004-06-15 2010-10-05 Kenneth Cole Productions (Lic), Inc. Therapeutic shoe sole design
RU177466U1 (en) * 2017-04-04 2018-02-26 Общество с ограниченной ответственностью "Реабилитационный Центр "СОЧУВСТВИЕ" Orthopedic device to immobilize the human limb
EP3482648A1 (en) * 2017-11-10 2019-05-15 Head Technology GmbH Liner for sports shoes

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
DE1485772B2 (en) 1973-10-04
CH514300A (en) 1971-10-31
DE1485772A1 (en) 1972-08-10
AT276155B (en) 1969-11-10
FR1438624A (en) 1966-05-13
DE1485772C3 (en) 1974-07-18

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