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Convection heat booster

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Publication number
US3324938A
US3324938A US49262565A US3324938A US 3324938 A US3324938 A US 3324938A US 49262565 A US49262565 A US 49262565A US 3324938 A US3324938 A US 3324938A
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Prior art keywords
casing
air
wall
heater
extension
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Expired - Lifetime
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Martin G Berkoff
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Martin G Berkoff
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D19/00Details
    • F24D19/06Casings, cover lids or ornamental panels, for radiators
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24DDOMESTIC- OR SPACE-HEATING SYSTEMS, e.g. CENTRAL HEATING SYSTEMS; DOMESTIC HOT-WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS; ELEMENTS OR COMPONENTS THEREFOR
    • F24D19/00Details
    • F24D19/008Details related to central heating radiators
    • F24D19/0087Fan arrangements for forced convection
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D1/00Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators
    • F28D1/02Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid
    • F28D1/0233Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with air flow channels
    • F28D1/024Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with air flow channels with an air driving element

Description

June 13, 1967 M. G. BERKQFF CONVECTION HEAT BOOSTER Filed Oct. 4, 1965 Sheets-Shem 1 June 3, 1967 M. G. BERKOF'F- 3,324,938

CONVECTION HEAT BOOSTER Filed Oct. 4, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR 26 Martin G'Berkaff .5; r I r United States Patent Office 3,324,938 Patented June 13, 1967 3,324,938 CONVECTION HEAT BOOSTER Martin G. Beriroff, 941 Midway, Woodmere, N.Y. 11598 Filed Oct. 4, 1965, Ser. No. 492,625 Claims. (Cl. 165-39) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE An air circulating apparatus having a motor operated rotor fan and air inlet and outlet means constructed so as to be attached by permanent magnet means to a conventional heater and connected to conventional sources of electric energy whereby the heated air from the heaters is vigorously circulated in the room enclosure.

This invention relates to the art of air circulation devices and more particularly concerns an appliance for magnifying air convection currents passing through a room air heater.

One object of the invention is to provide a device which can be juxtaposed to a room air heater to blow heated air through the heater for magnifying air convection currents emitted thereby.

Another object is to improve the efficiency and speed of heating of an air space in a room by means of a device having ducts so arranged to pass streams of air through a space heater, with a motor driven fan in the device to magnify the air streams, a thermostat in circuit with the motor attachable to the heater for automatically turning' on and shutting off the fan.

Still another object is to provide a device as described, with magnetic means for holding the device in contact with parts of the heater to prevent accidental displacement of the device.

. For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a device embodying the invention.

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken on line 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view in an inverted position of perforated wall plate employed in the device.

FIG. 5 is a diagram of an electric circuit employed in the device.

FIG. 6 is a reduced rear view of the device shown in operating position with an associated heat radiator.

FIG. 7 is an end elevational view taken on line 77 of FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a reduced perspective view of the device shown in operating position with another heat radiator.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged perspective view of the device with parts of the radiator of FIG. 8 broken away.

Referring first to FIGS. l4, there is shown a device 10 including a generally rectangular hollow casing 12. The casing has a removable upper closure plate 14. Plate 14 is generally L-shaped in construction as best shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4, with a rectangular top wall 15 and narrow depending front wall 16 having holes 18 therein to admit air into the top of the casing. Plate 14 is held on the casing by screws 19 at the top and at the front. At the underside of top wall 15 abutted to front wall 16 is a pair of spaced bar or block magnets 20 secured to plate 14 by rivets 22. A curved baflle plate 24 is secured at the interior corner defined by walls 15, 16 of plate 14 to direct air into the casing.

Plate 14 is secured to upper horizontal lateral flanges 25 and rear flange 26 and to rectangular imperforate front wall 27. The casing has imperforate vertical side walls 28, 29, rear wall 30, and bottom Wall 32.

A rectangular extension is at the bottom front of the casing. This extension is defined by forwardly extending portions of the side walls 28 and 29, a narrow irnperforate front wall 34 and bottom wall 32. In the open top of the casing extension 35 is fitted a rectangular top plate 36 having holes .37 through which air passes in an upward direction out of the casing. Plate 36 is mounted by rivets 31 securing vertical front, side and rear flanges 38 of plate 36 to adjacent walls of the casing.

Inside the casing is a motor 40 supported by a spider 43 having arms 42 secured by screws 44 on side walls 28, 29. The motor has an axially vertical downwardly extending shaft 45 carrying a fan rotor 46. The inclined vanes 48 of the rotor draw air downwardly through duct D1 and blow it out of the casing via duct D2; see FIG. 2. Duct D1 is defined by the closed side Walls 28, 29, rear wall 30 and front wall 16. Duct D2 is defined by the closed extensions of side walls 28, 29, front wall 34 and bottom wall 32. A curved baffle 49 can be inserted at the bottom of duct D2 to guide and deflect the air stream forwardly and then upwardly out of the casing extension through holes 37 in narrow top wall or plate 36. Plate 14 and adjacent walls of the casing should be made of nonmagnetic material such as aluminum, copper or the like.

Connected to motor 46 is a cable 50 which passes out of side wall 28 through an opening near its bottom end. Motor 40 is connected in circuit with a thermostat switch 42. Cable 50 terminates in a plug 52 which can be inserted in a suitable electric power outlet. The thermostat is attached to a spring clamp or clip 54 which can be engaged upon a heat radiating portion of a space heater.

FIG. 5 shows the electric circuit C of the device. Motor 40 is connected in series with bimetallic element 55 and contact 56 which constitute thermostat 42. Plug 52 is connected to the free end of cable 54).

'In FIGS. 6 and 7 is shown the device 10 disposed in association with a heat radiator 60 whose loops 62 contain steam or hot water. The extension 35 of the device is inserted underneath the radiator loops 62. The rear portion of the device is located at the front of the radiator with the front wall 16 abutting the front edges 61 of the radiator loops. Magnets 20 are magnetically engaged with the edges 61 of the loops 62 so that the device is held in abutment against the radiator. The clip 54 is engaged on edge 61 of one of the radiator loops. Plug 52 is inserted into an adjacent electric outlet 64.

In operation of the device, motor 40 is normally deenergized. When the radiator 60 heats up in conventional fashion, the thermostat 42 responds to close the circuit C and motor 40 is energized. The rotating fan rotor 46 draws an air stream S down into the device through top and front walls 15, 16 and the air is forced upwardly out of the casing extension 35 as vertical streams S; see FIG. 7. The air entering in stream S is warmed by the adjacent loops of the radiator though some of the air in this stream may be cool fresh air approaching horizontally in stream S". In any event, warmed air is discharged in stream S so that accelerated, magnified air convection currents pass through and upwardly out of the spaced loops of the radiator. This will have the desirable effect of heating more quickly the room in which the radiator 60 is located. Furthermore, more efiicient heating is obtained because air which would normally rise slowly and pass along cool walls will now rise quickly and will be circulated before it can be cooled by adjacent walls of the room. Thus the room is heated more efiiciently, effectively and quickly. Two or more devices may be used for a single large radiator to good effect.

It will be noted that magnets are spaced from the edges 61 of the radiator loops by the thin nonmagnetic Wall 16. This spaced arrangement decreases the magnetic reluctance of the magnetic circuit between the magnets and the magnetically engaged radiator loops and maximizes the magnetic engagement force. A further advantage of this arrangement is that the magnets are disposed in a concealed and protected position behind the plate 14.

In FIGS. 8 and 9 is shown a device 10 employed in association with a hot air or hot water type of radiator 70. This radiator has vertical baffle plates 72 in front of which may be a metal radiator enclosure or guard 74 having a vertical front wall 75. The front wall 16 of the device 10 is abutted to wall 75 and is held thereto by magnets 20 in the same manner as described in connection with radiator 60. Extension 35 is located underneath the baffie plates 72 which are elevated above floor F. The enclosure 74 has louvers 76 through which warm air issues in rapidly moving streams SS accelerated by the rapidly rotating fan rotor 46 in the device 10. Warm and fresh air streams S, S" enter the device 10 at thetop of the device.

The casing 12 should be made of thin lightweight nonmagnetic metal preferably aluminum, but it can be made of other magnetic metal or even of plastic material. This non-magnetic construction is necessary to obtain most effective use of the magnets 20.

The device 10 as described will be found to fulfill a long felt need. It may be made up in small or large sizes as may be required. It is a readily portable appliance which can be attached to and used with any conventional type of room heater to magnify the air convection currents obtained therefrom and thus to improve the efficiency of the heater.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An appliance for magnifying air convection currents of an elevated space heater, comprising a generally rectangular hollow casing having a forwardly directed rectangular extension, said casing having imperforate vertical side, rear, front and bottom walls, said casing having an apertured first top wall for admitting air into the casing, said extension having an apertured second top wall for passing air out of the casing, an air blower comprising a motor and a fan driven by the motor disposed in the casing, baffle means for guiding air through the casing and extension, said casing extension being short enough in height to fit underneath said heater to drive air streams therethrough, an electric cable connected to said motor in a normally open power supply circuit with a thermostat switch, clamp means supporting said switch and including means for attaching said thermostat to said heater outside the casing so that the thermostat is heated by the heater for closing said circuit to energize said motor, and permanent magnets disposed in the casing adjacent said front wall for magnetically engaging said casing to said heater to prevent accidental displacement of the appliance with respect to the heater while said extension extends under the heater.

2. An appliance according to claim 1 wherein said baffle means includes a first bafile member in the casing to guide air entering the apertured first top wall to the fan,

4- and second bafile member in the casing to guide air passing from the fan out through the apertured second top wall.

3. An appliance for magnifying air convection currents of an elevated space heater, comprising a generally rectangular hollow casing having a forwardly directed rectangular extension, said casing having imperforate vertical side, rear, front and bottom walls, said casing having an apertured first top wall for admitting air into the casing, said extension having an apertured second top Wall for passing air out of the casing, an air blower comprising a motor and a fan driven by the motor disposedin the casing, baflle means for guiding air through the casing and extension, said casing extension being short enough in height to fit underneath said heater to drive air streams therethrough, an electric cable connected to said motor in a normally open power supply circuit with a thermostat switch, clamp means supporting said switch and including means for attaching said thermostat to said a heater outside the casing so that the thermostat is heated by the heater for closing said circuit to energize said motor, said baffle means including a first baffie member in the casing to guide air entering the apertured first top wall to the fan, and a second baffie member in the easing to guide air passing from the fan out through the apertured second top wall.

4. An appliance for magnifying air convection currents of an elevated space heater, comprising a generally rectangular hollow casing having a forwardly directed rectangular extension, said casing having imperforate vertical side, rear, front and bottom walls, said casing having an apertured first top wall for admitting air into the casing, said extension having an apertured second top wall for passing air out of the casing, an air blower comprising a motor and a fan driven by the motor disposed in the casing, baffie means for guiding air through the easing and extension, said casing extension being short enough in height to fit underneath said heater to drive air streams therethrough, an electric cable connected to said motor in a normally open power supply circuit with a thermostat switch, clamp means supporting said switch and including means for attaching said thermostat to said heater outside the casing, so that the thermostat is heated by the heater for closing said circuit to energize said motor, permanent magnets disposed in the casing adjacent said front wall for magnetically engaging said casing to said heater to prevent accidental displacement of the appliance with respect to the heater while said extension extends under the heater, said bafile means including a first baflle member in the casing to guide air entering the apertured first top wall to the fan, and second baffie member in the casing to guide air passing from the fan out through the apertured second top wall.

5. An appliance for magnifying air convection currents of an elevated space heater, comprising a generally rectangular hollow casing having a forwardly directed rectangular extension, said casing having imperforate vertical side, rear, front and bottom walls, said casing having an apertured first top wall for admitting air into the casing, said extension having an apertured second top wall for passing air out of the casing, an air blower comprising a motor and a fan driven by the motor disposed in the casing, bafile means for guiding air through the casing and extension, said casing extension being short enough in height to fit underneath said heater to drive air streams therethrough, an electric cable connected to said motor in a normally open power supply circuit with a thermostat switch, clamp means supporting said switch and including means for attaching said thermostat to said heater outside the casing, so that the thermostat is heated by the heater for closing said circuit to energize said motor, permanent magnets disposed in the casing adjacent said front wall for magnetically engaging said casing to said heater to prevent accidental displacement of the appliance with respect to the heater while said extension extends under the heater, said apertured first top Wall being part of an L- shaped plate removably mounted on the open top of the casing, said L-shaped plate having a narrow, depending vertical wall section disposed at and detachably secured to said imperforate front wall, said magnets being secured to said depending section of the L-shaped plate, said plate being made of thin nonmagnetic sheet material to serve as thin spacer means between said magnets and said heater to maximize the magnetic attraction between the magnets and the heater.

6 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,624,565 4/1927 Stoddard 165-121 2,022,333 11/1935 Woolley 126-l10 5 2,069,190 1/1937 Woolley 165121 2,151,725 3/1939 Woolley 165-121 2,738,957 3/1956 Wales 165-121 ROBERT A. OLEARY, Primary Examiner. 10 M. A. ANTONAKAS, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. AN APPLIANCE FOR MAGNIFYING AIR CONVECTION CURRENTS OF AN ELEVATED SPACE HEATER, COMPRISING A GENERALLY RECTANGULAR HOLLOW CASING HAVING A FORWARDLY DIRECTED RECTANGULAR EXTENSION, SAID CASING HAVING IMPERFORATE VERTICAL SIDE, REAR, FRONT AND BOTTOM WALLS, SAID CASING HAVING AN APERTURED FIRST TOP WALL FOR ADMITTING AIR INTO THE CASING, SAID EXTENSION HAVING AN APERTURED SECOND TOP WALL FOR PASSING AIR OUT OF THE CASING, AN AIR BLOWER COMPRISING A MOTOR AND A FAN DRIVEN BY THE MOTOR DISPOSED IN THE CASING, BAFFLE MEANS FOR GUIDING AIR THROUGH THE CASING AND EXTENSION, SAID CASING EXTENSION BEING SHORT ENOUGH IN HEIGHT TO FIT UNDERNEATH SAID HEATER TO DRIVE AIR STREAMS THERETHROUGH, AN ELECTRIC CABLE CONNECTED TO SAID MOTOR IN A NORMALLY OPEN POWER SUPPLY CIRCUIT WITH A THERMOSTAT SWITCH, CLAMP MEANS SUPPORTING SAID SWITCH AND INCLUDING MEANS FOR ATTACHING SAID THERMOSTAT TO SAID HEATER OUTSIDE THE CASING SO THAT THE THERMOSTAT IS HEATED BY THE HEATER FOR CLOSING SAID CIRCUIT TO ENERGIZE SAID MOTOR, AND PERMANENT MAGNETS DISPOSED IN THE CASING ADJACENT SAID FRONT WALL FOR MAGNETICALLY ENGAGING SAID CASING TO SAID HEATER TO PREVENT ACCIDENTAL DISPLACEMENT OF THE APPLIANCE WITH RESPECT TO THE HEATER WHILE SAID EXTENSION EXTENDS UNDER THE HEATER.
US3324938A 1965-10-04 1965-10-04 Convection heat booster Expired - Lifetime US3324938A (en)

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4390005A (en) * 1982-04-05 1983-06-28 Porter Donald G Fan accessory for heater
US4392478A (en) * 1981-07-13 1983-07-12 Black Hugh J Portable heat circulation means
US4458666A (en) * 1982-07-31 1984-07-10 Kabushiki Kaisha Takanawa Seisakusho Warm air blow-out device for box-shaped stove
US4502463A (en) * 1984-04-26 1985-03-05 Gregory Willis H Method and apparatus for efficiently capturing and distributing heat produced by gas logs
EP0724124A1 (en) * 1995-01-30 1996-07-31 Valeo Thermique Moteur Device for the electric connection of an engine fan mounted on the finned body of a heat exchanger
FR2730047A1 (en) * 1995-01-30 1996-08-02 Valeo Thermique Moteur Sa Cabling of fan motor directly fixes to automobile radiator
FR2735854A1 (en) * 1995-06-22 1996-12-27 Valeo Thermique Moteur Sa Electrical connection device of a motor-driven fan for a motor vehicle exchanger heat
US6808018B1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2004-10-26 Michael Toner Heat circulation apparatus
US20060174864A1 (en) * 2005-02-09 2006-08-10 Steve Pordzik Forced radiant heat
US20070114003A1 (en) * 2003-12-03 2007-05-24 Uwe Verken Ab Modular heating system for large vehicles
US7789129B1 (en) * 2008-06-11 2010-09-07 Barden John A User-operated air-flow enhancing device for improving heat distribution from an existing baseboard radiator and associated method
US7841389B1 (en) * 2006-06-05 2010-11-30 Ralph Barba Apparatus for efficiently distributing warm air generated by a steam radiator
EP3124879A1 (en) * 2015-07-28 2017-02-01 Gary Stanton Webster Radiator fan unit

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1624565A (en) * 1923-11-26 1927-04-12 Elliott J Stoddard Radiator
US2022333A (en) * 1934-07-07 1935-11-26 American Radiator Co Heating cabinet
US2069190A (en) * 1935-11-08 1937-01-26 American Radiator Co Circulation enhancing attachment for radiators
US2151725A (en) * 1935-09-26 1939-03-28 American Radiator Co Air circulating attachment for heating radiators
US2738957A (en) * 1955-05-02 1956-03-20 Nathaniel B Wales Radiator heat-transfer accelerator

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1624565A (en) * 1923-11-26 1927-04-12 Elliott J Stoddard Radiator
US2022333A (en) * 1934-07-07 1935-11-26 American Radiator Co Heating cabinet
US2151725A (en) * 1935-09-26 1939-03-28 American Radiator Co Air circulating attachment for heating radiators
US2069190A (en) * 1935-11-08 1937-01-26 American Radiator Co Circulation enhancing attachment for radiators
US2738957A (en) * 1955-05-02 1956-03-20 Nathaniel B Wales Radiator heat-transfer accelerator

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4392478A (en) * 1981-07-13 1983-07-12 Black Hugh J Portable heat circulation means
US4390005A (en) * 1982-04-05 1983-06-28 Porter Donald G Fan accessory for heater
US4458666A (en) * 1982-07-31 1984-07-10 Kabushiki Kaisha Takanawa Seisakusho Warm air blow-out device for box-shaped stove
US4502463A (en) * 1984-04-26 1985-03-05 Gregory Willis H Method and apparatus for efficiently capturing and distributing heat produced by gas logs
FR2730047A1 (en) * 1995-01-30 1996-08-02 Valeo Thermique Moteur Sa Cabling of fan motor directly fixes to automobile radiator
EP0724124A1 (en) * 1995-01-30 1996-07-31 Valeo Thermique Moteur Device for the electric connection of an engine fan mounted on the finned body of a heat exchanger
FR2730046A1 (en) * 1995-01-30 1996-08-02 Valeo Thermique Moteur Sa Electrical connection device for a motor fan mounted on a finned body of a heat exchanger
US5813489A (en) * 1995-01-30 1998-09-29 Valeo Thermique Moteur Electrical connecting device for a motorized fan unit mounted on a finned body of a heat exchanger
US5868197A (en) * 1995-06-22 1999-02-09 Valeo Thermique Moteur Device for electrically connecting up a motor/fan unit for a motor vehicle heat exchanger
FR2735854A1 (en) * 1995-06-22 1996-12-27 Valeo Thermique Moteur Sa Electrical connection device of a motor-driven fan for a motor vehicle exchanger heat
WO1997001070A1 (en) * 1995-06-22 1997-01-09 Valeo Thermique Moteur Device for electrically connecting a motor-fan unit in a motor vehicle heat exchanger
US6808018B1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2004-10-26 Michael Toner Heat circulation apparatus
US20070114003A1 (en) * 2003-12-03 2007-05-24 Uwe Verken Ab Modular heating system for large vehicles
US20060174864A1 (en) * 2005-02-09 2006-08-10 Steve Pordzik Forced radiant heat
US7841389B1 (en) * 2006-06-05 2010-11-30 Ralph Barba Apparatus for efficiently distributing warm air generated by a steam radiator
US7789129B1 (en) * 2008-06-11 2010-09-07 Barden John A User-operated air-flow enhancing device for improving heat distribution from an existing baseboard radiator and associated method
EP3124879A1 (en) * 2015-07-28 2017-02-01 Gary Stanton Webster Radiator fan unit

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