US3321187A - Continuous muller with adjustable mulling wheels and plow means - Google Patents

Continuous muller with adjustable mulling wheels and plow means Download PDF

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US3321187A
US3321187A US333937A US33393763A US3321187A US 3321187 A US3321187 A US 3321187A US 333937 A US333937 A US 333937A US 33393763 A US33393763 A US 33393763A US 3321187 A US3321187 A US 3321187A
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mulling
sand
shaft
receptacle
plows
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US333937A
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Cecil E Simmons
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Jeffrey Galion Manufacturing Co
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Jeffrey Galion Manufacturing Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B22CASTING; POWDER METALLURGY
    • B22CFOUNDRY MOULDING
    • B22C5/00Machines or devices specially designed for dressing or handling the mould material so far as specially adapted for that purpose
    • B22C5/04Machines or devices specially designed for dressing or handling the mould material so far as specially adapted for that purpose by grinding, blending, mixing, kneading, or stirring
    • B22C5/0409Blending, mixing, kneading or stirring; Methods therefor
    • B22C5/0422Devices having a fixed receptable with rotating tools, some or all of these tools being rolls or balls loosely mounted on their axis or loose balls in contact with the side wall or the bottom of the receptacle, e.g. with aerating means; "Devices of the Muller type"
    • B22C5/0436Devices having a fixed receptable with rotating tools, some or all of these tools being rolls or balls loosely mounted on their axis or loose balls in contact with the side wall or the bottom of the receptacle, e.g. with aerating means; "Devices of the Muller type" having a horizontal tool-driving shaft
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B02CRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING; PREPARATORY TREATMENT OF GRAIN FOR MILLING
    • B02CCRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING IN GENERAL; MILLING GRAIN
    • B02C15/00Disintegrating by milling members in the form of rollers or balls co-operating with rings or discs
    • B02C15/02Centrifugal pendulum-type mills
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B02CRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING; PREPARATORY TREATMENT OF GRAIN FOR MILLING
    • B02CCRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING IN GENERAL; MILLING GRAIN
    • B02C21/00Disintegrating plant with or without drying of the material

Description

May 23, 1967 c. E. SIMMQNS CONTINUOUS MULLER WITH ADJUSTABLE MULLING WHEELS AND PLOW MEANS Filed Dec.
4 Sheets-Sheet 1 n TTY CONTINUOUS MULLER WITH ADJUSTABLE NULLINO WHEELS ANU PLOW MEANS May 23, 1967 c. E. SIMMONS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 27, 1963 INVENTOR; CECIL. ESIMMQNS,
May 23, 1967 c. E. SIMMONS CONTINUOUS MULLER WITH ADJUSTABLE MULLING WHEELS AND PLOW MEANS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Deo. 27, 1965 INVENTOR, SIM Mo N S,
sasl Q CECIL E. I
May 23, 1967 c. E. slMMoNs 3,321,137
CONTINUOUS MULLER WITH ADJUSTABLE MULLINU WHEELS AND PLow MEANS Filed Dec. 27, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet Bcl ` Xl o 09 24 24g 3 INVENTOR;
CECH. ESMMQNS, BY
United States atent 3,321,187 CONTINUOUS MULLER WITH ADJUSTABLE MULLING WHEELS AND PLOW MEANS Cecil E. Simmons, Durham County, Ontario, Canada, as-
signor, by mesne assignments, to Jeffrey Galion Manufacturing Company, a corporation of Ohio Filed Dec. 27, 1963, Ser. No. 333,937 2 Claims. (Cl. 259-112) The instant invention relates to the mulling of sand and like materials, and more particularly, to an improved mulling apparatus for continuously mulling such material, and an improved method of mulling the same.
This invention has application to the preparation of materials, such as sand, to place the same in suitable condition for use in making molds in lmetal casting operations. Such preparation of sand may involve new sand which has not previously been used in molds, recirculated sand which has been used in molds and is circulated in the foundry system for re-use, or a combination of the two. In any of these cases it is required in the preparation of the sand for use in making molds that the sand be mulled, which involves adding to the sand and combining therewith certain ingredients, particularly-wate-r and bonding agents. In the mulling operation these ingredients are uniformly combined with the mass of sand, and in an ideal operation each grain of sand is completely and uniformly coated with the added ingredients, whereby the mass of sand discharged from the mulling operation has the necessary bonding characteristics, such that it may be formed into molds into which hot molten metal may be poured.
The mulling of the sand is essentially a pressing, kneading and mixing operation in which the sand and the added ingredients are constantly being mixed and pressed together, until the added ingredients are uniformly dispersed in the mass of sand and the grains of sand are each coated with the bonding materials.
Heretoflore, most mullers in operation have been those referred to as the batch-type muller. These 'are normally fed a specific charge of sand which is worked and operated upon and then discharged. A new charge is then fed into the muller and the operation is repeated. The use of such batch-type mullers requires auxiliary equipment such as storage hoppers to derive the desirable level of use. Moreover, other auxiliary equipment such as aerators and extensive conveying equipment is necessary. All of this auxiliary equipment adds considerably to the cost of sand preparation in most foundries. Further, operations in many foundries have tended toward a continuous molding operation which requires large quantities of sand to be continuously fed into this oper-ation. To derive an adequate capacity from batchtype mullers, more than one muller is often required or a muller of extremely large capacityis often used. In either case, the investment in such mulle'is in both money and space is considerable.
In recent years there have been lattempts to make a continuous muller by joining two batch-type mullers, but the size and expense of such a device with its auxiliary equipment is greater than is contemplated by the present invention, with any auxiliary equipment which might be necessary.
In mulling operations in which for practical economic reasons recirculated sand is being operated upon, such sand is usually very hot as the result -of being in contact with hot molten metal. It is recognized in the foundry industry that sand at very hot temperatures is extremely dificult to mull. In such case, it is necessary that the sand be cooled and this may be accomplished during the mulling operation by circulating air through the sand.
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Also, in connection with the preparation of the sand for the making of molds, it is desired that the sand be aerated, which consists essentially of breaking up any lumps in the sand and placing the mass of sand in a tiutfy, uniform condition of a proper porosity, in which it may be readily and uniformly packed around a pattern in the process of making a mold with such sand. Aeration of the sand is accomplished during the mulling operation by the apparatus and 'method of' this invention.
It is a prime object of the instant invention to provide an improved apparatus and method for the preparation of sand for the making of molds as above stated.
It is another object of the instant invention to provide an improved apparatus for the preparation of sand for making molds, which is continuous in its operation, whereby raw sand may be continuously delivered to and processed sand continuously discharged from the apparatus.
It is a further lobject of the instant invention to provide an improved continuous mulling apparatus comprising a receptacle in which sand is continuously mulled as it moves through the receptacle from the delivery end thereof to the discharge end thereof.
Still another object is to provide -a mulling apparatus of the continuous type vwherein the mulling or kneading -pressures vare easily adjustable and easily controlled.
A further object is to provide a mulling machine of the continuous type wherein the degree of mulling and the total time required to achieve this degree may be easily varied selectively.
A still further object is to provide a mulling machine of the continuous type wherein the mulling force imposed on the sand may be varied by changing the speed of the rotating members.
It is also an object of the instant invention to provide an improved continuous mulling apparatus and method, in which the mulling operation also has the effect 0f yaerating the sand as it is being mulled.
Still a further object of the instant invention is to provide an improved continuous mulling apparatus and method, in which the sand may be cooled as it is being mulled.
It is still another object of the instant invention to provide an improved method of continuously mulling sand in which the sand is progressively mulled as it is fed along a path from a feed position to a discharge position.
Other objects of the invention will appear hereinafter, the novel features and combinations being set forth in the appended claims.
In the accompanying drawings:
FIG. l is a longitudinal elevational view of a continuous 4mulling apparatus constructed in accordance with this invention;
FIG. 2 is an end elevational view of the mulling apparatus, viewed from the discharge end thereof;
FIG. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view of the mulling apparatus;
FIG. 4 is a lateral sectional view of the mulling apparatus, taken on the line 4 4 in FIG. 3;
FIG. 5 is an illustration of the mulling wheels and supporting structure therefor, partially in section, taken On the line 5-5 in FIG. 4;
FIG. 6 shows the rotating seal for a mulling Wheel;
FIG. 7 shows the adjusting means for the plows;
FIG. 8 is another illustration of the ladjusting means for the plows, taken on the line 8-8 in FIG. 7;
FIG. 9 is a transverse sectional View of the mulling ap` paratus, similar to FIG. 4, but illustrating a modification thereof;
FIG. 10 is 4an enlarged illustration of the ladjusting means for the mulling Wheels shown in FIG. 9; and
FIG. 11 is a sectional View of the adjusting means for the mul-ling wheels, taken on the line 11-11 `in FIG. 10.
Referring to the drawings, particularly FIGS. 1 and 2, ythere is illustrated therein mulling apparatus constructed in accordance with the instant invention, and forming an exemplary embodiment thereof. Such mulling apparatus comprises a cylindrical drum 20, which is horizontally disposed and forms a receptacle with in which the sand is mulled. The cylindrical drum 20 is provided with a supporting base structure 21 which comprises a plurality of transverse I-beams 22 disposed at equidistantly spaced points along the length of the drum 20, with the bottom of the drum 20 being seated on and bearing on the tops of the I-beams 22. A pair of channels 23 are disposed, one at each side of the drum 20, with the I-beams 22 extending laterally between such channels 23. Each channel 23 stands in contact with the drum 20 along a longitudinal line. A plurality of gussets 24 are disposed between the top of each channel 23 and the drum 20, with the gussets 24 being shaped to be in contact with the outer surface of the drum 20. The several elements of the supporting base structure 21, including the I-bea-ms 22, the channels 23 and the gussets 24, are secured to each other and to the drum 20, as by welding, to form the same into a unitary assembly.
The cylindrical drum 20 is formed in two drum portions divided on a horizontal diametral plane defining a parting line 31. The lower drum portion 25 is secured to the supporting base .structure 21, as above described, and is fixed. The upper drum portion 26 forms a cover for the mulling apparatus and is secured to the lower drum portion 25 by a longitudinally disposed hinge 27, whereby the upper drum portion 26 may be conveniently swung upwardly and raised about the longitudinal axis of the hinge 27. This permits. the cylindrical drum 20 of lthe mulling apparatus to be opened, providing access to the interior of t-he same, for the purpose of repairing or replacing elements thereof, as may be required from time to time, and for the further purpose of cleaning the mulling apparatus.
At the side of the cylindrical drum 20, opposite the hinge A27, the lower drum portion 25 has secured thereto a longitudinally extending fiange 28, and the upper drum portion .26 has secured thereto a longitudinally extending flange 29. The fianges 28, 29 may be secured to the respective lower and upper drum portions 25, 26 by welding. The anges 28, `29 are alike and are disposed in alignment with each other. The flanges 28, 29 are bored at a plurality of equidistantly spaced points, and a plurality of bolts 30 are passed through the flanges 28, 29, and are drawn up securely against the flanges 28, 29, to -frmly and fixedly secure the upper drum portion 26 to the lower drum portion 25. It is essential that the cylindrical drum 20 be ysealed along the parting line 31 between the lower and upper drum portions 25, 26, to prevent sand being thrown out of the drum 20. Suitable sealing means may be provided at the parting line 31 between the lower and upper drum portions 25, 26, `and the several bolts 30 maintain the respective drum portions closed and in sealed engagement with each other along the parting line 31.
In the mulling apparatus the cylindrical drum 20 forms a closed receptacle within which the sand is mulled. The cylindrical drum 20- is disposed in a longitudinally extending position on a horizontal axis. The sand to be mulled is delivered to the cylindrical drum 20 at the feed end 32 thereof, this being the left end of the mulling apparatus, as viewed in FIG. 1, and the -sand isdischarged from the mulling apparatus at the discharge end 33, this being the right end thereof, as viewed in FIG. 1. The sand moves continuously within the drum 20 from the feed end 32 to the discharge end 33. During such movement of the sand it is progressively mulled, so that upon discharge the sand isin proper condition for use in the making of sand molds.
The disposition of the cylindrical drum 20 in a longitudinally extending position on a horizontal axis is a preferred disposition of the cylindrical drum 20. IHowever, the cylindrical drum 20 may also be disposed on an axis that is inclined downwardly towards the discharge end 33, in kwhich case the rate of feed of sand will be somewhat decreased. A determining factor will be the difference in Ihead between the inlet chute 34 and the discharge chute 35. Whether the cylindrical drum 20 is to be disposed on a horizontal axis or an inclined axis is determined by the operating conditions of a particular installation.
At the feed end 32 there is provided a downwardly directed chute 34, through which the sand flows into the cylindrical drum 20. The sand to be mulled 'may be continuously delivered to the chute 34 by means of a belt conveyor, or other continuously operating conveying device, whereby the sand will iiow in a continuous stream to the chute 34- and into the cylindrical drum 20 in a longitudinal or axial direction, being progressively mulled during such movement, and finally discharging at the discharge end 33 of the mulling apparatus. At the discharge end 33 a downwardly directed discharge chute 35 guides the discharging flow of sand from the cylindrical drum 20. The discharge chute 35 may have associated therewith a belt conveyor, or other continuously operating conveying device, onto which the sand discharges from the chute 35 to continuously remove the sand after it has been mulled.
Referring now, additionally, to FIGS. 3 and 4, Wherein the mulling apparatus is illustrated in greater detail, it is seen therein that the cylindrical drum 20 has a cylindrical shell that is in two half portions, there vbeing a lower shell portion 38 for the lower drum vportion 2S, and an upper shell portion 39 for the upper drum portion 26. At the feed end 32 the cylindrical drum 20 has an end plate of a substantially disc configuration, that includes a lower plate portion 40` and an upper plate portion 41, for the lower and upper drum portions 25, 26, respectively. Similarly, at the discharge end 33 of the cylindrical drum 20 there is provided an end plate of a substantially disc configuration comprising a lower end plate portion 42 and an upper end plate portion 43 for the lower and upper drum portions 25, 26, respectively. The lower end plate portions 40, 42 are secured to the lower shell portion 38, as by welding, to form the lower drum portion 25, which is fixedly secured to the supporting base structure 21. The upper end plate'portions 41, 43 are secured to the upper shell portion-39, as by welding, to thereby form the upper drum portion 26, which is hingedly connected to the lower drum portion 25,'to permit the former to be raised.
The feed chute 34 is secured to the upper end plate portion 41, as by welding, and connects to a feed opening 44 therein, through which the sand flows into the cylindrical drum 20. The discharge chute 35 is secured to the lower end plate portion 42 and leads from a discharge opening 45 therein, through whichthe sand discharges from the drum 20 to the discharge chute 35.
A support stand 46 is secured to the 'cylindrical drum 20 at the feed end 32 thereof. Such support stand 46 may comprise a pair of side plates 47, which are laterally spaced with respect to each other, and a top plate 48 which extends across the tops of the side plates 47 to form a platform. The side plates 47 and the top plate 48 may be secured to each other and to the lower end plateportion 40, as by welding, to thereby form the fixed support stand 46. A bearing 49 is mounted on the support stand 46 and is fixedly supported thereby, the bearing 49 being secured to the top plate 48 of the support stand 46, as by a plurality of bolts 50. v
At the discharge end 33 of the cylindrical drum 20, the opposite side channels 23 extend in a longitudinal direction beyond the lower end plate portion 42 and beyond the discharge chute 35. A transversely disposed I-beam 51 is supported on the tops of the side channels 23, and is secured thereto, as by welding. The transverse I-beam 51 f-orms a support stand for a bearing 52 that is similar to the bearing 49. The bearing 52 is lixedly secured to the top of the I-beam 51 by a plurality of bolts 53.
A shaft 54 extends through the cylindrical drum 20, the axis of the shaft 54 being coincident with the axis of the drum 2l). The lower and upper end plate portions 40, 41 include a circular opening 55 of substantially the same diameter as the diameter of the shaft 54, and similarly, the lower and upper end plate portions 42, 43 include a circular opening 56 of substantially the same diameter as the shaft 54, through which the shaft 54 ex tends in opposite directions. The opposite ends of the shaft 54 project beyond the feed end 32 and the discharge end 33 of the cylindrical drum 20, and are rotatably received and supported in the bearings 49, 52, respectively.
At the feed end 32 of the drum 20 the shaft 54 1ncludes a conduit 57 extending through the center of the shaft 54 and along its axis. Said conduit 57 connects to radially disposed discharge ports 58 in said shaft 54, which are disposed inwardly of the lower and upper end plate portions 40, 41. Water and bonding materials, the latter comprising, for example, sea coal and bentonite, may be fed into the cylindrical drum 20 through the conduit 57 and discharge ports 58. To facilitate the feed of these ingredients, the bonding materials may be premixed with the water -to form a slurry. Also, the quantity of each of the ingredients added to the raw sand may be controlled by small screw conveyors, or like feeding devices, the speed of which may be determined in proportion to the ampere draw of the motor which is used to drive the mulling apparatus. Thus, the rate of feed of the ingredients is determined by the load on the drive motor, which in turn is determined by the amount of sand going through the mulling apparatus. As the shaft 54 rotates, the transverse or radial discharge ports 58 will likewise rotate about the drum axis, so that the water `and bonding materials will be dispersed in a full circle.
At the discharge end 33 of the cylindrical drum 20 the shaft 54 projects beyond the bearing 52 and is formed with a keyway 59 for connecting the drive to the projecting end of the shaft 54. Such drive means may comprise the customary couplings, reducer and motor, which are normally utilized for driving rotary apparatus. Such driving means is not specifically illustratedhereimfor the reason that it may take any of a numbers of forms, as determined by the drive requirements of a-specilic unit of the mulling apparatus, and by the choice of the operator of the same. l i
Each of the lower drum portion 25 and the upper drum portion 26 has a yieldable liner 60, which is formed of rubber or like yieldable material. The liners 60 are bonded to the lower and upper shell portions 38, 39, or otherwise secured thereto, in such manner as to be united with the lower and upper shell portions 38, 39. The yieldable liners 60 are of substantial thickness, as particularly seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, and the surface thereof is the inwardly facing surface of the cylindrical drum 20. As will appear hereinafter, during the mulling operation the sand is dispersed within the cylindrical drum 20 and is distributed therein on the inwardly facing surface of `the cylindrical drum 20, with the mulling of the sand taking place on such surface and against the yieldable liners 60.
Within the cylindrical drum 20, there are provided a pair of mulling wheels 61 and an associated pair of plows 62, at the feed end 32 of the cylindrical drum 20. A second pair ofniulling wheels 63 and a second pair of plows 64 associated therewith, are provided at a position somewhat further removed in an axial direction from the feed end 32 relative to the rst pair of mulling wheels 61 and the first pair of plows 62. The pair of mulling wheels 61 is disposed at one side of the shaft 54, and the pair of mulling wheels 63 is disposed at the opposite side of the shaft 54, at opposite diametral positions. The respective pairs of plows 62, 64 are likewise disposed at opposite diametral positions. Further, the respective wheels of the pairs of mulling wheels 61., 63 are alternated with respect to each other in an axial direction, as seen in FIG. 3. Likewise, the respective plows of the pairs of plows 62, 64 are alternated with respect to each other in an axial direction, with each plow of the pairs of plows 62, 64 being disposed in circumferential alignment with a mulling wheel of the pairs of mulling wheels 61, 63, and behind such mulling wheel in the direction of movement thereof about the axis of the shaft 54.
Referring particularly to FIG. 3, there are further provided two pairs of mulling Wheels 61a, 61h, which are similar in all `respects to the pairs of mulling wheels 61.. Associated therewith are pairs of plows 62a, 62b, which are similar in all respects to the pair of plows 62. The six plows are numbered consecutively 117, 118, 11711, 118a, 1175, and 118b. The pairs of mulling wheels 61a, 61b and the pairs of plows 62a, and 62b are disposed a-t axially spaced positions along the shaft .54, with the spacing between the individual mulling wheels and the individual plows along the shaft 54 being equal. The pairs of mulling wheels 61a, 61h and the pairs of plows 62a, 62h have the same circumferential disposition relative to the shaft 54, as do the pair of mulling wheels 61 and pair of plows 62, respectively.
There are further provided pairs of mulling wheels 63a, 63b and pairs of plows 64a, 64b, disposed at axially spaced positions along the shaft 54. The individu-al wheels of the pairs shown as 63, 63a, and 63b are individually numbered progressively as 160, 161, 162, 163, 164 and 165. The individual plows of the pairs 64, 64a and 64b are individually numbered progressively as 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, and 175. The spacing between the individual wheels of the pairs of mulling wheels |63, 63a, 63b and between individual plows of the pairs of plows 64, 64a, 64b 4is the same, and the pairs of mulling wheels 63a, 63b and the pairs of plows 64a, 64b are disposed in the same circumferential position relatively .to the shaft 54 as the pairs of mulling wheels 63 and pairs of plows 64. Thus, the several mulling wheels and several plows are disposed within the cylindrical drum 20 along the shaft 54, and are alternated with each other on opposite sides of the shaft 54, to continuously operate on the sand -as it moves through the cylindrical drum 2l) in an axial or longitudinal direction from the feed end 32 to the discharge end 33, as will be explained in greater detail hereinafter. With the arrangement of the plows as described and illustrated in the drawings, there are no dead `spots, thereby providing for maximum effectiveness of the plows.
Each of the mullingv wheels -155 inclusive and -165 inclusive are of the same construction and each pair of mulling wheels such as -61 and its associated pair of plows such as 62 is mounted on the shaft S4 by the same supporting structure. The plows,`however, are of two different configurations. The plows 117, 118, 117a, 118a, 117b and 118b have a somewhat concave configuration on the sand engaging face while the plows 17tl-175 inclusive have a somewhat convex configuration on the sand engaging face. The purpose of these dilfering plow shapes will be explained in connection with the explanation of the operation of the machine hereafter.
As best seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, a pair of axially spaced hubs 65, 66 are mounted on the shaft 54. The hubs 65, 66 are alike, and each has a substantially triangular configuration and is formed with a bore 67 of substantially the same diameter as the shaft 54, and within which the latter is received. The hubs 65, 66 are aligned with each other and are fxedly secured to the shaft 54 in axially spaced positions, as by welding. Referring also to FIG. 5, it is seen that the hubs 65, 66 are formed with like bores 68, 69, respectively, within which there are press-fitted respective lbearing bushings 7o, 71.
'extending flanges 81. structure 75 may be formed as a cast element.
.flanges .80.
`projecting end of the shaft 85.
A pivot shaft 72 extends llaterally between the hubs 65, 66 in the bearing bushings Z0, 7,1, Iand is ipivotally supported therein. The opposite endsofthe pivot shaft 72 extend beyond the hubs 65, 66 to .receive opposite washers 73, 74, which are secured to the ropposite vends of the pivot shaft 72, as by welding, to
secure ,the latter in axially fixed position on the hubs `65, 66.
A supporting arm structure 7 5 is secured to the pivot Ashaft `72, and mounts the pair of mulling wheels 61 on `said pivot shaft 72 for swinging movement of the mulling vwheels towards and away from the inwardly facing sur- -face of theV cylindrical drum l20.
The supporting armstructure 75 comprises spaced arms 7,6, 77. At one end of the arms 76, 77 there is yintegrally formed one-half ofa sleeve 78, and at the opposite ends .thereof there is integrally formed asimilar sleeve 79. The sleeve lhalf 78 has integral, Oppositely extending flanges I80, and the sleeve half 79 has similar integral, Oppositely This part of the supporting arm The sleeve fhalf78 is placed on the pivot shaft72 between the `hubs `65, 66. Alike sleeve half 82 is placed on the pivot shaft 72 at the opposite side thereof, and forms a cap for the sleeve half 78. The sleeve half 82 is formed with integral, oppositely extending flanges 83, which abut the opposite Theflanges S0, 83 are bored in alignment to receiv'e'bolts 84, by which the sleeve halves 78, 82 are secured to each other and to the pivot s-haft 72. Thus, the supporting arm structure 75 is swingably mounted on the hubs 65,66 by the pivot shaft 7.2i.
Attheiother end of the supporting arm structure `75 a shaft-851s received in the sleeve half 79. A similar sleeve half 86 overlies the shaft 85 and forms a cap for the sleeve half 79. The sleeve half 86 is formed with integral, oppositely disposed flangesv87 which abut the flanges 81 of .the sleeve half 79. The flanges 81,87 are bored in align- .151 is rotatably mountedon the projecting end ofthe shaft85. It will be understoodthat the mulling wheel 150 isrotatably mounted in the same manner on the opposite The mulling wheel 151 hasa solid hub.91, whichispreferably formed of metal. The hub 91 is provided with a centrally disposed ibore 92, into which the projecting end of the shaft k85 extends. A
`pair of tapered roller bearings 93 are disposed in axially spaced positions between the shaft 85 and the bore 92,
4and arepress fitted on the shaft 85 and in the bore 92 in the .customary manner, whereby the mulling wheel is rotatably mounted on the shaft 85. The assembly of the mulling wheel 151 on the shaft 85 is secured by a suitable vlocking nut 94, that is engaged with the threaded end of .the shaft 85. The bore 92 is closed and sealed by a cover 95, which may be of a simple disc form. The cover 95 is secured to the hub 91 by a plurality of bolts 96, which may be four in number. To assure a positive seal-between Vthe cover95 and the hub k91,.an O-ring 97 is interposed betweenthe cover 95 and the hub 91. Such sealing of the bore 92 prevents theentrance of sand and dust, and proytectsthebearings 93.
At the opposite end of the bore 92, it is required that there be provided a rotating seal between the bore 92 and the shaft 85, .also for the purpose of preventing the en- ,in the bore Y92 and Vextend inwardly into engagement with the bushing 98, to provide the required rotating seal between the mulling wheel and the shaft 85.
-The mulling wheel 151 has a tire 100 formed of rubber, or likeV yieldable material. The tire is bonded to an annular band 101, ywhich may be formed of metal. The tire 100 is then mounted on the hub V91' by press fitting the annular band 101 on the periphery of the hub 91. In the mulling operation, the ysand is mulled between the yieldable tire 100 and the yieldable liner 60, which forms the inwardly facing mulling surfacev of the cylindrical drum 20. vBy having the mulling take placev between two yieldable members, theone being the liner 60 and the .terially reduced, which is animportant consideration in that the maintenance requirements of the mulling apparatus is thereby reduced.
' The pair'of plows 62 are also mounted on the hubs 65, `66, at Athe other corner thereof, as best seen in |FIG. 4. Such mounting ofthe pair of plows 62 is illustrated in greatervdetail in FIG. 7. The hubs 65, 66 are formed with like bores 102, 103, within which there are secured bearing `bushings y104, 105, respectively. A pivot shaft 106extends laterally between the hubs 65, 66 and is piv- Votally received within the bearing bushings 104, 105. The opposite ends of the pivot shaft 106 project beyond the hubs 65, 66. Washers 107, 108 are placed one on each projecting end of the pivot shaft 106, and are secured thereto, as by welding, to fix the position of the pivot shaft 106 relatively to the hubs `65, 66 in an axial direction. pivot shaft 106. `Such supporting arm structure 109 includes a sleeve half 110, within which there is received the pivot shaft 106. Oppositely directed flanges 111 are integrally Vformed with the sleeve half 110. Another sleeveihalf 112 overlies the pivot shaft 106 and forms a :cap for the sleevefhalf 110. The sleeve half `112 is also formed with Oppositely directed integral anges 113, which overlie and abut the flanges 111. `The flanges 11,1, 113 are bored to receive a plurality kof bolts 114, by which the sleeve halves 110, '112 are secured to each other and to the pivot shaft 106, whereby the suppotring arm4 structure 109 for the pair'of plows l62 is swingably mounted on `the 'hubs 65, 66. The supporting arm ,structure 109 4includes a pairof'laterally spaced arms 115, v116 which are integrally formed with the sleeve half 1,10. Each of the arms 115, 116 has a somewhat twisted configuration to place Ythe ends ofthe arms in proper positions to mount the respective individual plows 117, 118, as best seen in FIG. 3. lTheindividual plows 117, 118 are secured to the armsllS, y116 by a plurality of bolts 119, whereby the plows may be easily removed, if necessary, to replace vornout plows, or to install plows of a different configuralon.
The individual plows 117, 118 are carried around the axis of the shaft 54, vand movel over the liner 60.v The plows 117, 118',ar e preferably made of metal, to develop the highest degree of wear resistance to the abrasion of the sand, and accordingly, are non-yieldable. Thus, the posit1on of the plows 117,118 relative to the liners 60 must ybe carefully controlled, both for the purpose -of obtaining the optimum action of the plows, and further, to prevent damage to the liners `60. Forthis purpose, the sleeve vhalf 112 is formed withan integral holder 120, that has a threaded bore 121 extending therethrough. The axisl of the bore 121 is coincident with a diametral line of the shaft 54 and intersects the axis of the latter. A bolt 122 is threaded into the threaded bore 121, with the end of the bolt projecting lbeyond the holder and abutting the `periphery of the shaft 54. -By adjustment of the vposition of the bolt V122 in the threaded bore 121, the position of the plows 117, 118 relative to the liners 60, may be adjusted. Adlocking nut 1.23 secures the bolt 122 in adjusted A supporting arm structure L109 is secured to the `theaxis of mulling surface of' the cylindrical `drum 20.` Such rotation ofzthe mulling wheels 150-155 and 160-165` is .instrumental in working the sandand and tl'iecenterof the The plows 170 and 171 though shaped differently from plows 117 and 118 are joined to shaft 54 in am'anner similar to the fastenings described above with relation to plows 117 and` 118. Therefore, a repetitions detailed description is considered unnecessary.
In the operation of the mulling apparatus as heretofore described, the sand is delivered to the feed chute 34 in a continuous stream, and ows through the feed openingr44 into the cylindrical drum 20. At the same time, the mixture of water and bonding materials is delivered through the conduit 57 and the transverse discharge ports 58 into the cylindrical drum 20, to be mixed with the sand. The shaft 54 is rotated, thereby causing the several mulling wheels 89, 96, etc., and the several plows 1117, `118, etc. and 170475, to be moved about the axis of the shaft A54an`d over` the inwardly facing-surface of the liners 60,
this being the mulling surface. The shaft 54` is rotated at a relatively high speed whereby centrifugal force causes the mulling wheels 89, 90, etc., and the plows 117, 118, etc., and 17o-475, to swing outwardly towards the inwardly 'facing mulling surface. Such outward swinging movement' of themulling wheels 89, 90, etc., is limited only by engagement of the wheels with the liners 60. The outwardly swinging movement of the plows 117, 113, etc., and 170-175, is limited by the setting of the adjusting bolt 122. To assure proper outward movement of all of the plows it maybe necessary toadd weightrto` the .plows to increase thecentrifugal force imposed by the rotation of the shaft. Naturally, other suitable means may .be used to assune the outward positionof the plows during rotation even to the extent of fixing them in position.
jHoweve'r, it is contemplated to be more desirable to utilize pivotable plows as shown so that should large foreign matter such as scrap metal pieces be inadvertently introduced into the muller the plows will swing out of the way should they strike the foreign matter and thereby prevent extensive damage to either-the plows or liner as might be the case with fixed plows.
. For the purposes of describing the operation of the apparatus, it is assumed that the muller is in the middle of its run although no sand is shown in any of the drawings. As the sand feeds into the cylindrical drum 20` and through the cylindrical drum 20, it is progressively engaged be- Ktween the mulling wheels and the liners 60. Such engage- `ment produces a progressive pressing, kneading and mixing action on the mass of sand to be engaged, whereby the sand mixed andfcorn'bined with the water and bonding materials. Since the mulling wheels 150, 151, etc. and 1,60, 161, etc., are-free wheelingon the respective shafts V85, they rotate about their own axes as they move around the shaft 54 and over the inwardly facing properly mulling thesame as aforesaid. The plows 117, 118 are arranged to follow behind the mulling wheels 150, 151, respectively, in the about the axisl of shaft 54.
the mulling wheels 160=161L This arrangement is carried `through the entire mulling machine for the remaining plowsand wheels. Preferably, the center ofthe plows wheels which each plow follows are in the 'same plane; however, some variation from this arrangement will still giveacceptable results as `long as the principle of a plow following a wheel is preserved. The
mulling action of the mulling wheels results in some compacting of the sand on them-ulling surface offthe liners 60. The plows engage the sand that is so compacted, and scrape it from the mulling surface of the liners 60. Due to the relatively high speed rotation of the shaft 54, the plows`117, 118, 117a, 11811, 117b and 118b effectively throw the sand, dispersing and distributing the same around the inwardly facing surface of the cylindrical drum 20. Thus, there is mulling of the sand on all portions of i called a `mechanics studies where it l0 p l the inwardly facing mulling surface `i`n the cylindrical drum 20.
` Each of the plows 17, its, im, lisa, 1171;, and its@ is disposed at an angle, with a concave face in contact with `the sand such that when the plows meet the sand, the action of the plows in addition to moving the sand about the entire interior circumference tends to move the sand in an axial or longitudinal direction towards the discharge end 33 of the mulling apparatus. The plows 17d-175, however, because of the convex surface presented to the sand will in addition to moving the sand about the interior circumference direct a signicant portion of the sand toward the feed end of the muller as well as toward the discharge end, thus controlling or limiting the movernent of the entire charge through the muller. With plows 17o-175 directing sand each way, the sand is passed back and forth by the plows,` but on the whole moving more to the discharge end 33 all the time, so that there is a resultant movement of the sand through the cylindrical `drum 20 towards the discharge end 33.
As a result of this construction various factors can be said to affect the rate of movement of the sand through the muller. As shown in the drawings, the angle of the plows will ybe one factor. Assuming that at the angle shown, a desirable rate of rotation of the muller wheels and plows is approximately 116` rpm., .it is apparent that by altering the angle of the plows the rate of movement of the sand through the drum 20 will be changed. Accordingly, the rate of feed of the sand into the drum will require changing to correspond to the discharge rate of the sand to maintain continuity in the operation at the same thickness -of sand in the muller. Further, it will become apparent that if the angles of the plows are maintained as shown, an increase or decrease in the rotative speed of the wheels and plows will also change the rate of movement of the sand through the cylindrical drum. One additional factor which will change the rate of sand through the drum which is novel with regard to the type of action of this muller is that by holding the angle of the plows constant as shown and the rotative speed of the plows and wheels constant, the rate of movement of sand through the cylindricaldr-um 20 may be changed by increasing or decreasing the rate of feed of the sand into the cylindrical drum. The rate of discharge at the discharge end will change accordingly, as will the thickness of the sand within the muller.
The action of the present novel muller apparently is unique in its action on the sand. For one thing, a part of the sand during the working of the machine is apparently accelerated by the plows to a velocity sufficient to carry a large portion of the total sand in a circular movement about the entire circumference Iof the cylindrical shell in a layer which decreases in thickness from the intake end toward the discharge end. It .appears that the sand will flow towa-rd the discharge endy at what may be dynamic angle -of repose. It further appears that the substantial condition of agitation of t-he sand in `the drum breaks down the tendency of the sand to retain its natural stationary angle of repose and to act as a liquid which makes the foregoing flow of the material through the muller possible. This phenomenon is supported by analogous findings from foundation and soils has been determined that shearing strength of sand may be said to consist of two parts,` the internal, frictional resistance between grains,
`which is a combination of rolling and sliding friction, and
a second factor which is called interlocking and where it has been noted by at least one soils mechanics expert that in sands which naturally have very loose packing any lsudden occurrence of strain may lead to almost complete liquifac-tion, occasionally in slopes as flat as ve or -ten degrees, and may cause slides of large extent. In addition, the energy expended in overcoming the shear strength of sand has been found to cause an increase in volume. This perhaps explains why the flufling action of the present device is so outstanding.
The above analogy to liquid explains why a change in the feed rate of the sand without any change in the plows or wheels or rate of rotation will be a sole factor in determining the rate of movement through t-he mulling machine. It appears that the difference in -head between the entering sand and the ldischarge opening plus the agitation of the sand is sulcient to move the sand along. Since increasing the feed rate of the incoming sand obviously increases the difference in head, the sand Will therefore move more quickly through the muller. Another thing that will become apparent is that at the rotative speeds contemplated for this muller more sand will tend to be retained at the lower portion of the horizontal muller cylinder than at the upper portions due to the elfects of gravity. Thus, the sand can be visualized as a moving substantially horizontal hollow cylinder of sand with a greater wall thickness at the bottom portion than at the top portion. Moreover, due to the aforementioned dynamic angle of repose the cylinder walls will be thicker at the feed end of the muller than at the discharge end.
Another factor which appears to give improved action to the present muller is the variable action of each mulling wheel on the sand as it makes a complete circuit about the circumference of the cylindrical shell. For example, as the wheel rotates it is thrown outwardly by the centrifugal for-ce built up as a result of the rotation. As each wheel moves upwardly toward the top of the horizontal shell 20, the wheel meets less sand for the reasons previously brought out. Since there is less firm contact with the sand due to the force of gravity on the wheel, the wheel will rotate at a much slower speed than its synchronous speed and thereby impose a greater skidding or smearing action at this point. As the wheel moves `down toward the bottom of the shell it encounters a thicker layer of sand which offers greater resistance to the wheel and thereby causes the wheel to rotate at a speed much closer to its synchronous speed. In addition, gravity which had some influence on the force imposed on the wheel throughout its circuit, will cause the wheel pressure to be greatest toward the bottom of the shell. Thus, the action of the wheel at the bottom of the shell is predominantly a pressing and mixing action.
These numerous factors in this device contribute Vto a mixing, smearing, pressing action which is constantly changing, and because ofthis variable action apparently accounts for the superior quality of lthe results attained therefrom.
The plows 117, 118, 117a, 118e, 117b and 118b and 1'70-175, as illustrated in the drawings, are merely exemplary, and it is to be understood that other shapes may be determined for the lplows, which will be found to be kmost satisfactory for the particular operating conditions of a given installation. AIt is further contemplated that flat, straight across, scoop type plows may be found t-o be satisfactory. Such plows would still operate to permit the ow of sand as set out above.
During the operation of the mulling apparatus, as above described, the several mulling wheels and the several plows are swung outwardly on their respective supporting a-r-m structures by centifugal force to adjacent the mulling surface of the liners 460. However, when t-he apparatus is idle, the positions of the'mulling wheels, plows, and their respective supporting arms is determined by the force of gravity. Thus, referring to FIG. 4, in an idle condition of the apparatus the mulling wheels 61 would drop downwardly, and in order to limit Vsuch downward movement there is provided an labutment type'stop vL25 extending between the hubs '65,' 66. The arms 76, 77 will contact the abutment type stop 125 and thereby limit the degree to which the mulling wheels 61 will drop in the idle condition. Similarly, there is provided an abutment type stop 126 for the plow arms, such as 115, -116 `maintained in spaced relation to the same.
`to limit the lextent to which -thecorresponding plows 117,
.118 drop aw-ay from the mulling surface underthe force of gravity. Y
In order to improve the discha-rgevof the sand through the discharge opening 45, there is provided a discharge flinger 1 28, comprising a plurality of arms 129, each of which is secured to the shaft 54, as by welding, and extends therefrom in a radial direction. The end of each arm 129 is formed with a mounting block 130, to which there is secu-red ablade 131 by means of a plurality of bolts V132. Thus, the blades 131 may be readily removed when it is-necessary to --replace the same. The discharge flinger 128 rotates .with t-he shaft 54. 'This discharge inger operates to prevent any build up of sand at the discharge end.
It is customary to maintain .a const-ant circulation of sand in a foundry system, whereby the sand is re-used. Such sand is at. a, considerably higher temperature when it reaches the mulli-ng apparatus, than the temperature which is desired for the san-d when it is used in the making of molds. Inthe mulling apparatus of this invention the hot sand may be cooled as it is being mulled. Such cooling may be accomplished by a current of cooling air being passed through the sand in the cylindrical drum 20 as the sand is mulled therein. In FIGS. 1 and 3 there is the representation of a blower outlet 133, which may be directed into the feed chute 34 for blowing `a current of air through the sand to cool the same. As illustrated herein, the air flow is concurrent with the direction of movement of the sand. However, a countercurrent ow of air may also be used.
Referring now to FIGS. 9, l0 and 1l, there is illustrated therein a modification of the invention heretofore described. justable stop means for the mulling wheels, whereby the mulling wheels may bear against the liners 60, or may be lIn the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 4, the mulling wheels are moved outwardly against the mulling sur- `face without limitation by the action of centrifugal force on said mulling wheels. -In the modified embodiment of the invention there is provided means for limiting the maximum position Aof the Ymulling wheels relative to the mulling surface under the action of centrifugal force. Thus, as seen in FIG. `9, in the maximum outer position of the mulling wheels there is `a gap between the periphery of the mulllingwheels and the mulling surface. In vsome mullingloperations it is found desirable to maintain such a gap, whereby the force of the mulling wheels `on the sand is restricted. However, the action of these Wheels is essentially the same as that described herebeifore.
Referring to FIGS. 10 and -11 in which the modilication `is illustrated in greater detail, the sleeve Vhalf 82 has an adjusting boltholder 135 that is integrally formed therewith. The holder 135 is disposed above the sleeve half `82 and has a threaded bore 136, ythe axis olf which is disposed on a diametral line of the shaft 54, and intersecting the axis of the latter. The holder 135 is offset so vthat the elementsof ythe mulling apparatus will clear each other. A bolt 137 is threaded through the holder 135 and projects beyond the end thereof into engagement with the periphery of the vshaft 54. Thus, by adjusting the position of the bolt 137, the maximum outer position of the mulling wheels is 'likewise adjusted and determined. A locking nut 138 secures the adjusting bolt 137 in its adjusted position.
The most outstanding feature of the mulling apparatus described herein yis that it is continuously operative to mull sand. Thus, such mulling apparatus is compatible with a continuous foundry system, in which the molding sand is constantly circulated in the foundry system. The mull-ing apparatus rnay be set up to mull sand at a rate equal to the rate off flow or movement of the sand in the foundry system. Further, the sand which is discharged from the mulling apparatus is ready for use in making Insuchmodication, there is provided an ad- 13 molds, in that the mulling operation by means of the mulling apparatus of this invention includes aeration of the sand, and if required, the sand may also be cooled as it is being mulled.
Obviously those skilled in the art may make various changes in the details and `arrangement of parts Without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the `claims hereto appended, and applicant therefore wishes not to be `restricted to the precise construction herein disclosed.
Having thus described and shown an embodiment of the invention, what it is desired to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. Mulling apparatus for continuously mulling sand comprising, a receptacle disposed along a laterally extending axis for sand to be delivered to the receptacle at one end thereof to be mulled within the receptacle and to be discharged from the receptacle at the other end thereof after such mulling, said receptacle having a wall disposed around the laterally extending axis providing a mulling surface facing inwardly of the receptacle, a rotating main shaft disposed on the laterally extending axis, a pair of hubs secured to the main shaft at axially spaced positions, a first pivot extending between said hubs, an arm mounted on said first pivot to be pivotrally secured to the hubs and extending therefrom in a transverse direction with respect to the main shaft, a stub shaft extending from each side of the arm at the outer end thereof spaced from the hub and the main shaft, a rotatable mulling wheel mounted `on each stub shaft at opposite sides of the afnm for mulling the sand between the mulling wheels and said mulling surface, the rotating main shaft moving the mulling wheels around said -laterally extending axis and the mulling wheels ybeing urged to the mulling surface by `centrifugal force to engage the sand between the mulling wheels and the mulling surface for mulling the sand, a second pivot extending between said hubs, a pair of arms pivotally mounted on said second pivot and extending therefrom in a transverse direction with respect to the main shaft, a plow secured to the outer end of each of said pair of arms at the ends thereof removed from the main shaft, said plows being moved around said laterally extending axis yby the rotating main shaft and `being urged to the mulling surfa-ce by centrifugal force for distributing the sand around said laterally extending axis on the mulling surface and for advancing the s-and from one end of the receptacle to the other end thereof, said plows being aligned each with a mulling wheel and being disposed behind a mulling wheel in the direction of movement of the mulling wheels around said laterally extending axis, a lsecond pair of mulling wheels and ya second pair of plows mounted on the rotating main shaft by means the same as that aforesaid with respect to the first said mulling wheels and the first said plows, the second pair of mulling wheels and the second pair of plows being alternated in an axial direction with the first said mulling wheels and the first said plows, respectively, for mulling the sand at successive axial positions on the mulling surface, and the first said mulling wheels and the second pair of mulling wheels being circumferentially spaced for successive mulling of the sand by mulling wheels that are circumferentially spaced with respect to each other.
2. Mulling apparatus for continuously mulling sand comprising: a substantially horizontal normally closed cylindrical receptacle having two ends including, at least one intake opening located at one end of said receptacle, at least one discharge opening located at the other end of said receptacle below the level of the intake opening, movable closure means intermediate t-he ends for permitting access to the interior of said receptacle; a rotatable shaft extending longitudinally within said receptacle from end to end substantially coincident with the axis of said cylindrical receptacle, a plurality of fixed members joined to said shaft at predetermined intervals and extending outwardly from said shaft at substantially right angles thereto, each of said members havingva pivotable connection at a distance from sai-d axis, a `Wheel arm pivotaliy joined to at least one of said connections and extending rearwardly from the direction of rotation of said shaft in a plane substantially at right angles to said shaft, at least one free-wheeling mulling wheel carried Eby each wheel arm at its outer end for progressively mulling a sand mixture as it passes through the receptacle, said wheel arms and said wheels being swinga'ble toward and away from the wall of said receptacle, means associated with each said wheel arm and adjustably abutting said shaft for limiting outward movement of said wheels toward the wall of said receptacle, plow means carried by said fixed members for mixing, agitating and moving the sand mixture `about the inner Wall of the receptacle, additional means associated with said xed members for limiting axial movement of the sand mixture from said intake opening to said discharge opening, and said plow means carried by said fixed members are pivotally fastened to said xed members and are swingable toward and away from the Wall of said receptacle yand said plow means have abut-ment means associated therewith for adjustably abutting said shaft to limit outward movement of said plow means.
References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,144,636 1/1939 Piper 22-217 2,264,610 12/ 1941 Beardsley 22-217 2,826,794 3/1958 Knipp et al. 22-89 2,831,231 4/1958 Toensing 249-219 3,050,795 8/ 1962 Dietert 224-89 FOREIGN PATENTS 726,401 3/ 1955 Great Britain.
References Cited by the Applicant UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,670,750 5/ 1928 Simpson. 1,706,417 3/ 1929 Simpson. 2,306,422 12/ 1942 Beardsley et al.
FOREIGN PATENTS 525,221 5/ 1956 Canada. 804,225 4/ 1951 Germany. 916,785 8/1954 Germany. 1,138,515 10/1962 Germany.
713,822 8/1954 Great Britain.
J. SPENCER OVERHOLSER, Primary Examiner. R. D. BALDWIN, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

  1. 2. MULLING APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUSLY MULLING SAND COMPRISING: A SUBSTANTIALLY HORIZONTAL NORMALLY CLOSED CYLINDRICAL RECEPTACLE HAVING TWO ENDS INCLUDING, AT LEAST ONE INTAKE OPENING LOCATED AT ONE END OF SAID RECEPTACLE, AT LEAST ONE DISCHARGE OPENING LOCATED AT THE OTHER END OF SAID RECEPTACLE BELOW THE LEVEL OF THE INTAKE OPENING, MOVABLE CLOSURE MEANS INTERMEDIATE THE ENDS FOR PERMITTING ACCESS TO THE INTERIOR OF SAID RECEPTACLE; A ROTATABLE SHAFT EXTENDING LONGITUDINALLY WITHIN SAID RECEPTACLE FROM END TO END SUBSTANTIALLY COINCIDENT WITH THE AXIS OF SAID CYLINDRICAL RECEPTACLE, A PLURALITY OF FIXED MEMBERS JOINED TO SAID SHAFT AT PREDETERMINED INTERVALS, AND EXTENDING OUTWARDLY FROM SAID SHAFT AT SUBSTANTIALLY RIGHT ANGLES THERETO, EACH OF SAID MEMBERS HAVING A PIVOTABLE CONNECTION AT A DISTANCE FROM SAID AXIS, A WHEEL ARM PIVOTALLY JOINED TO AT LEAST ONE OF SAID CONNECTIONS AND EXTENDING REARWARDLY FROM THE DIRECTION OF ROTATION OF SAID SHAFT IN A PLANE SUBSTANTIALLY AT RIGHT ANGLES TO SAID SHAFT, AT LEAST ONE FREE-WHEELING MULLING WHEEL CARRIED BY EACH WHEEL ARM AT ITS OUTER END FOR PROGRESSIVELY MULLING A SAND MIXTURE AS IT PASSES THROUGH THE RECEPTACLE, SAID WHEEL ARMS AND SAID WHEELS BEING SWINGABLE TOWARD AND AWAY FROM THE WALL OF SAID RECEPTACLE, MEANS ASSOCIATED WITH EACH SAID WHEEL ARM AND ADJUSTABLY ABUTTING SAID SHAFT FOR LIMITING OUTWARD MOVEMENT OF SAID WHEELS TOWARD THE WALL OF SAID RECEPTACLE, PLOW MEANS CARRIED BY SAID FIXED MEMBERS FOR MIXING, AGITATING AND MOVING THE SAND MIXTURE ABOUT THE INNER WALL OF THE RECEPTACLE, ADDITIONAL MEANS ASSOCIATED WITH SAID FIXED MEMBERS FOR LIMITING AXIAL MOVEMENT OF THE SAND MIXTURE FROM SAID INTAKE OPENING TO SAID DISCHARGE OPENING, AND SAID PLOW MEANS CARRIED BY SAID FIXED MEMBERS ARE PIVOTALLY FASTENED TO SAID FIXED MEMBERS AND ARE SWINGABLE TOWARD AND AWAY FROM THE WALL OF SAID RECEPTACLE AND SAID PLOW MEANS HAVING ABUTMENT MEANS ASSOCIATED THEREWITH FOR ADJUSTABLY ABUTTING SAID SHAFT TO LIMIT OUTWARD MOVEMENT OF SAID PLOW MEANS.
US333937A 1963-12-27 1963-12-27 Continuous muller with adjustable mulling wheels and plow means Expired - Lifetime US3321187A (en)

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US3481547A (en) * 1967-06-26 1969-12-02 Jeffrey Galion Inc Continuous mulling apparatus

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US2144636A (en) * 1937-04-05 1939-01-24 Beardsley & Piper Co Method of treating mulling sand
US2264610A (en) * 1940-09-12 1941-12-02 Beardsley & Piper Co Method of conditioning or treating molding sand
US2306422A (en) * 1940-08-30 1942-12-29 Beardsley & Piper Co Mulling apparatus
DE804225C (en) * 1949-06-10 1951-04-19 Stotz A G Eisengiesserei Und M Device for the uninterrupted processing of foundry sand
GB713822A (en) * 1951-07-19 1954-08-18 Junkerather Gewerkschaft Apparatus for the preparation and mixing of foundry moulding materials
DE916785C (en) * 1951-07-20 1954-08-19 Juenkerather Gewerkschaft Device for the preparation of foundry molding materials
GB726401A (en) * 1952-09-11 1955-03-16 Karl Goran Westin Machine for the treatment of sand
CA525221A (en) * 1956-05-22 G. Westin Karl Machine for treatment of sand
US2826794A (en) * 1951-07-19 1958-03-18 Junkerather Gewerkshaft Apparatus for the preparation and mixing of foundry moulding materials
US2831231A (en) * 1955-05-17 1958-04-22 Erwin C Toensing Adjustable and collapsible pier mold
US3050795A (en) * 1960-05-16 1962-08-28 Dietert Co Harry W Continuous type sand mixer
DE1138515B (en) * 1959-04-28 1962-10-25 Mels Matthijs Broekhuizen Device for processing molding sand

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CA525221A (en) * 1956-05-22 G. Westin Karl Machine for treatment of sand
US1670750A (en) * 1926-06-28 1928-05-22 Joseph T Simpson Mixing machine
US1706417A (en) * 1926-08-30 1929-03-26 Joseph T Simpson Mixing machine
US2144636A (en) * 1937-04-05 1939-01-24 Beardsley & Piper Co Method of treating mulling sand
US2306422A (en) * 1940-08-30 1942-12-29 Beardsley & Piper Co Mulling apparatus
US2264610A (en) * 1940-09-12 1941-12-02 Beardsley & Piper Co Method of conditioning or treating molding sand
DE804225C (en) * 1949-06-10 1951-04-19 Stotz A G Eisengiesserei Und M Device for the uninterrupted processing of foundry sand
GB713822A (en) * 1951-07-19 1954-08-18 Junkerather Gewerkschaft Apparatus for the preparation and mixing of foundry moulding materials
US2826794A (en) * 1951-07-19 1958-03-18 Junkerather Gewerkshaft Apparatus for the preparation and mixing of foundry moulding materials
DE916785C (en) * 1951-07-20 1954-08-19 Juenkerather Gewerkschaft Device for the preparation of foundry molding materials
GB726401A (en) * 1952-09-11 1955-03-16 Karl Goran Westin Machine for the treatment of sand
US2831231A (en) * 1955-05-17 1958-04-22 Erwin C Toensing Adjustable and collapsible pier mold
DE1138515B (en) * 1959-04-28 1962-10-25 Mels Matthijs Broekhuizen Device for processing molding sand
US3050795A (en) * 1960-05-16 1962-08-28 Dietert Co Harry W Continuous type sand mixer

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3481547A (en) * 1967-06-26 1969-12-02 Jeffrey Galion Inc Continuous mulling apparatus

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