US3318192A - Locked action rifle for automatic and semi-automatic selective firing - Google Patents

Locked action rifle for automatic and semi-automatic selective firing Download PDF

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US3318192A
US3318192A US432198A US43219865A US3318192A US 3318192 A US3318192 A US 3318192A US 432198 A US432198 A US 432198A US 43219865 A US43219865 A US 43219865A US 3318192 A US3318192 A US 3318192A
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Prior art keywords
receiver
automatic
trigger
bolt
hammer
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US432198A
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Miller Arthur
Charles H Dorchester
George C Sullivan
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Armalite Inc
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Armalite Inc
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Priority to US432198A priority Critical patent/US3318192A/en
Priority claimed from US62234067 external-priority patent/US3380183A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A17/00Safety arrangements, e.g. safeties
    • F41A17/34Magazine safeties
    • F41A17/38Magazine mountings, e.g. for locking the magazine in the gun
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A11/00Assembly or disassembly features; Modular concepts; Articulated or collapsible guns
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A19/00Firing or trigger mechanisms; Cocking mechanisms
    • F41A19/01Counting means indicating the number of shots fired
    • F41A19/02Burst limiters
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A19/00Firing or trigger mechanisms; Cocking mechanisms
    • F41A19/06Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms
    • F41A19/42Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having at least one hammer
    • F41A19/43Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having at least one hammer in bolt-action guns
    • F41A19/46Arrangements for the selection of automatic or semi-automatic fire
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A3/00Breech mechanisms, e.g. locks
    • F41A3/12Bolt action, i.e. the main breech opening movement being parallel to the barrel axis
    • F41A3/14Rigid bolt locks, i.e. having locking elements rigidly mounted on the bolt or bolt handle and on the barrel or breech-housing respectively
    • F41A3/16Rigid bolt locks, i.e. having locking elements rigidly mounted on the bolt or bolt handle and on the barrel or breech-housing respectively the locking elements effecting a rotary movement about the barrel axis, e.g. rotating cylinder bolt locks
    • F41A3/26Rigid bolt locks, i.e. having locking elements rigidly mounted on the bolt or bolt handle and on the barrel or breech-housing respectively the locking elements effecting a rotary movement about the barrel axis, e.g. rotating cylinder bolt locks semi-automatically or automatically operated, e.g. having a slidable bolt-carrier and a rotatable bolt
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A3/00Breech mechanisms, e.g. locks
    • F41A3/64Mounting of breech-blocks; Accessories for breech-blocks or breech-block mountings
    • F41A3/66Breech housings or frames; Receivers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A3/00Breech mechanisms, e.g. locks
    • F41A3/64Mounting of breech-blocks; Accessories for breech-blocks or breech-block mountings
    • F41A3/78Bolt buffer or recuperator means
    • F41A3/82Coil spring buffers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41CSMALLARMS, e.g. PISTOLS, RIFLES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • F41C7/00Shoulder-fired smallarms, e.g. rifles, carbines, shotguns

Description

May 1%? A. MILLER ETAL 3731891192 LOCKED ACTION RIFLE FOR AUTOMATIC AND SEMI-AUTOMATIC SELECTIVE FIRING 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 12, 1965 May 9., 1196? A. MILLER ETAL 2 t e e h Qw S t e e h S D N 8 A G CN IT. R AT. MP 0 TE UV AT. T RC OE FL E E5 L W1C IT RT A M 00 T TU A A. I M B KS C O L Filed Feb. l2, 1965 uunono coo May 9., 119%? A. MILLER ETAL LOCKED ACTIO EMI N RIFLE FOR AUTOMATIC AN!) -AUTOMATC SELECTIVE FIRING Filed Feb. 12, 1965 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 May 11967 A. MiLLER ETAL EEMJQZ LOCKED ACTION RHLE FOR AUTOMATIC AND SEMI-AUTOMATIC SELECTIVE FIRING 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 12, 1965 5 t e e h S S t e 8 mm W 8 G CN HI m F O TE U V MI T E C E R m EM 5 LF lm RM M M A M U i I D M E E S O L May 9, 119%? Filed Feb. 12, 1965 May 9, @967 A. MILLER ETAL 3,3]1&i92 LOCKED ACTION RIFLE FOR AUTOMATIC AND SEMI -AUTOMATIC SELECTIVE FIRING 8 Sheets-Sheet Filed Feb. 1.2, 1965 BBMJQZ May mm A. MILLER ETAL LOCKED ACTION RIFLE FOR AUTOMATIC AND SEMI-AUTOMATTC SELECTIVE FIRING Filed Feb. 12, 1965 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 May 9, 19%? A. MILLER ETAL 3,318,392

LOCKED ACTION RIFLE FOR AUTOMATIC AND SEMI-AUTOMATIC SELECTIVE FIRING 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed Feb. 12, 1965 3,318,192 IJUCKED ACTIUN RIFLE FUR AUTUMATIL' AND SEMI-AUTUMATIE SELEETIVE FIRING Arthur Miller and Charles El. Dorehester, Costa Mesa,

and George 11. Suilivan, North I-Ioilywooi'tlalii, as-

signors to Armalite, line, Costa Mesa, Califi, a corporation of Caiifornia Fiied Feb. 12, 1965, Ser. No. 432,198

8 Claims. (1T1. Ss -1 12) This invention relates to a combat rifle, more particularly a combat rifle that can be fired in automatic or semiautomatic sequence and which will maintain the maximum of performance under adverse combat conditions.

It is well known that firing performance can be achieved in many structural arrangements of receiver, bolt, bolt carrier and action but in all instances, the parts are machined for close tolerance to achieve an excellence of performance but the same features defeat the purpose for performance under adverse combat conditions. By this is meant, the precision machining that goes into the forming of the parts and the interfitting of parts in relation to other parts for high performance requires such close tolerances that the precision achieved by the rifle formed with such parts is defeated if the rifle is subjected to combat conditions of water, sand, grime, dirt etc.

The machining operations which produce the superior performance of the parts in other rifles also increases the cost of parts and the cost of the machines to produce the parts and thereby renders such a rifle uneconomical in mass production.

It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide a rifle that can be used in an automatic or semi-automatic firing sequence at will that will be economical to produce by reason of the fact that many important parts are made from sheet metal stampings and assembled into sheet metal weldments.

It is another object of this invention to produce a combat rifle that will perform under adverse conditions by reason of the nature of the construction of the parts and employing principally sheet metal parts and eliminating close tolerances.

It is another object of this invention to provide an automatic and/or semi-automatic combat rifle of simplified construction employing a maximum number of sheet metal parts and sheet metal weldments and a minimum number of machined parts to reduce the maintenance and training to a minimum.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a construction and design of an automatic rifle having sheet metal parts which lack close tolerances and therefore will sustain rough handling, dust, dirt, mud, sand and extremes of heat and cold and yet will maintain accuracy under sustained fire.

Further and other objects of this invention will be understood from the description of the accompanying drawings in which like numerals refer to like parts.

In the drawings:

FIGURES 1a and 1b together constitute a longitudinal side view partially in section, of the rifle from the butt stock to the muzzle.

FIGURE 2 is a side view partially in section of the action, receiver, and rear portion of the barrel.

FIGURE 3 is a top plan view of the lower portion of the receiver, showing the sheet metal construction of the parts.

FIGURE 4 is a side elevation partly in section of the bolt carrier taken on the line t4l of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 5 is an end view of the bolt carrier.

FIGURE 6 is a sectional assembly view of the bolt carrier, bolt, and guide rod assembly taken on line 6-6 of FIGURE 7.

States Patent 0 FIGURE 7 is an end view of the bolt and bolt carrier assembly.

FIGURE 8 is a sectional view of the guide rods for the bolt carrier.

FIGURE 9 is a section of an alternate form of guide rods for the bolt carrier.

FIGURE 10 is an end view receiver.

FIGURE 11 is a side elevational view partly in section showing the upper portion of the receiver secured to the barrel.

FIGURE 12 is an end view of the receiver taken on the line 1212 of FIGURE 13.

FIGURE 13 is a bottom view of the sheet metal receiver attached to the barrel as shown in FIGURE 11.

FIGURE 14 is an assembly view of the hammer, trigger, and disconnect.

FIGURE 15 is a fragmentary end view of the hammer, trigger, and disconnect assembly shown in FIGURE 14, viewed as shown by arrow A.

FIGURE 16 is a rear end view of the auto sear assembly.

FIGURE 17 is a side elevational view of the auto sear assembly.

FIGURE 17a is a fragmentary plan view of the connecting link of FIGURE 17.

FIGURE 18 is a rear end elevational view of the barrel extension.

FIGURE 19 is a side sectional view of the barrel extension, taken on the line 19-19 of FIGURE 18.

FIGURE 20 is a front elevational view of the barrel extension.

FIGURE 21 is a side elevational view partly in section showing the last round stop bolt catch assembly.

FIGURE 22 is an end elevational view of the bolt catch assembly.

FIGURE 23 is an end elevational view of the selective firing lever.

FIGURE 24 is a side elevational view of the selective firing lever and cam shaft connected thereto.

FIGURE 25 is a top view of the selective firing lever and cam shaft shown in FIGURE 24.

FIGURES 26 through 29 are sectional views of the selective firing lever cam taken on the lines respectively 2626, 27-27, 2828, and 2929 of FIGURE 24.

The automatic rifle shown in FIGURES la-lb has the usual components of a barrel 1 and a receiver generally indicated as 2. The barrel is threaded into a barrel extension 3. Gas is taken from cylinder assembly 4 upon firing to actuate a push rod or actuating rod 5 to actuate the bolt carrier generally indicated as 6. A locking bolt 7 engages lugs in the rearward portion of barrel extension 3 to secure the firing chamber as will be later described.

The function and operation of the operating rod and gas cylinder are described in copending application Ser. No. 375,256, filed June 15, 1964 'by Arthur Miller, which matured into U.S. Letters Patent No. 3,246,567 on Apr. 19, 1966. The function and operation of the barrel extension and the bolt are the subject matter of Patent No. 3,027,672, filed Apr. 26, 1961 and issued to George C. Sullivan, Apr. 3, 1962.

In FIGURE 1a, are shown upper receiver 8 and lower receiver 9, hinged at 10 so that the portions of the receiver can be separated as shown in FIGURE 2, for disassembly and maintenance. A butt stock 11 is secured to lower receiver 9 and catch 12 permits unlatching the folding of butt stock 11 for positioning against the side of receiver 2. Pistol grip 13 is secured to lower receiver 9. Trigger guard 14, magazine guide 15 and rear bracket 16 comprise integral components of the lower receiver 9. Trigger assembly 17, fire selection cam 168,

of the upper portion of the hammer 120 and last round stop mechanism 150 are carried by lower receiver portion 9. Housed and carried by upper receiver portion 8 are automatic sear mechanism 19 and bolt carrier 6 which moves on a pair of guide rods 21. Channel 22 is welded to the side of upper receiver portion 8.

The parts described above in connection with the general description of the rifle can be more clearly noted in their respective relationship in FIGURE 2 which shows the upper receiver portion 8 pivoted away from the lower receiver portion 9.

One of the principal features of upper receiver portion 8 is that it is made of sheet metal, bent and formed into a receiver portion. As will be seen from FIGURES 10 to 13 and FIGURES 18 to 20, receiver portion 8 is sheet metal stamping bent to form a generally rectangular, elongated tube having suitable apertures and extensions to accommodate the parts mounted thereon. The sheet metal forming receiver 8 is joined and welded as shown at 23 and 24 on the under side of the receiver. The sighting bracket 25 is also formed of a sheet metal stamping and is shown welded to the rear upper portion of receiver portion 8.

Sight 25a is a two position sight formed of sheet metal and pivoted at 25b, biased in one of two positions by spring 250.

The left hand end of the tubular member forming receiver portion 8 is shown open in FIGURES 10 and 11. The right hand end of the tubular member forming receiver portion 8 is closed by barrel extension 3 illustrated in FIGURES 18 to 20. FIGURE 20 shows an end view of barrel sleeve extension 3 which fits within the formed sheet metal tubular member 8 and is welded thereto to close the right hand end. An extension 26 of member 3 has an aperture 27 formed therein to accommodate a locating lug 28 on the rear portion of the lower part of the hand guard 29 shown in FIGURES la-lb. The forward and rearward flanges on sleeve extension 3 have other apertures formed therein. Apertures 30 and 31 perform a similar function, that of a guide for operating rod 5. Apertures 33, 33' and 34, 34' position guide rods 21 within upper receiver portion 8. Sleeve 3 is threaded as shown at 35 to receive the correspondingly threaded portion of the rear end of barrel 1. Locking lugs 36 are formed on the end opposite the threaded portion of barrel extension sleeve 3 to engage corresponding locking lugs on the forward end of the bolt in a manner described in Patent No. 3,027,672 referred to above. Depending portions 37 have apertures 38 formed therein to accommodate a hinge pin 10 to permit hinging of the upper and lower sections of the receiver.

Referring to FIGURES 10 to 13, it will be seen that sleeve extension 3 forms support for, and completes the right hand end of upper receiver portion 8. The left hand end of the upper receiver portion shown in FIG- URE 11, is open. Formed with or attached to the sheet metal construction of receiver portion 8 are members 39 depending therefrom having holes 40 to afford a pivot point for support for the automatic sear mechanism 19.

It will be noted that the top, forward end, and left hand side of upper receiver portion 8 are closed. The lower portion has apertures 41 and 42 to accommodate the operating mechanism but are closed when in the assembled relationship with the lower portion of the receiver 9. The right hand side of the receiver portion 8 has an elongated aperture 43 to accommodate the ejection of cartridge shells and the rearward motion of a cocking lever.

The rectangular shape of upper receiver portion 8 is maintained by being welded to sleeve member 3 on the forward end, bridge member 44 intermediate the sides in which is weld 24 and intermediate member 45 at the right hand end in which is weld 23.

FIGURE 2 shows the left hand end of upper receiver portion 8 partially closed by guide rod plate 46 having a guide plate rod handle 47 welded at the middle of the top portion thereof. Guide rods 21 extend through openings in plate 46 and are welded therein to form a welded assembly of a pair of guide rods 21, plate 46, and handle 47. The guide rods have portions 21 extenting through the plate for a purpose that will be later described.

The lower portion of the receiver 9 is also a metal stamping, bent and welded to form a sheet metal construction. As will be seen from FIGURES 1a, 2 and 3 the sheet metal weldment 9 is formed with a portion 15 adapted to receive a magazine 15'. The right hand end of receiving portion 9 is formed with members 50 adapted to receive portions 37 of sleeve extensions 3 and form support for pin 10. Partition 51 is secured between the side walls of lower receiver portion 9 to form a back wall for the magazine chamber 15. Portions 52 formed inwardly on the side walls of chamber 15 form an upper limit stop for the magazine chamber. Rearward portion of the lower receiver portion 9 is completed by bracket 16 which is in the form of a bent and welded sheet metal assembly to which the sides of the lower receiver assembly 9, 9, and 9 are welded. The forward wall of bracket 16 shown in FIGURE 2 as 16', has a pair of apertures 18 through which extend the ends of guide rods 21' and a cut out portion 52 to accommodate handle 47. The upper receiver assembly is pivoted into position with the lower receiver assembly. Guide rod handle 47 is pressed forwardly with the thumb to move member 46 against springs 53 surrounding guide rods 21 so that guide rod portions 21 may register with holes 18 and forward wall 16 of bracket 16 and when released portions of guide rods 21' will extent through holes 18 and lock the two portions of the receiver in operative position. Brackets 54 extend rearwardly of member 16 to afford a hinge and catch for folding butt stock 11.

Magazine 15' is shown having a plate 55 biased upwardly by spring 56 to urge the cartridges into position to be carried into the chamber of the rifle. A ledge on the rearward portion of plate 55, numbered 57, engages the last round stop lever 58 as will be described in more detail in connection with FIGURES 21 and 22. The hammer and trigger assembly are shown mounted in the lower receiver portion and will be described in more detail in connection with FIGURES 14 and 15.

A safety holder detent 60 for selectively firing safety mechanism is shown in FIGURE 3 extending through forward wall 16' of bracket 16 and is guided therein and further is biased by a spring 61 in the forward position.

In FIGURES 4 to 7 is shown in more detail, the bolt carrier and the bolt. Bolt carrier 6 is an elongated block of a cross section to fit within the generally rectangular tubular receiver portion 8 but with suificient clearance on all sides. It is designed to have ample clearance or space all around the bolt carrier. It is supported entirely within upper receiver portion 8 on rods 21 extending through openings 78 formed therein throughout the length thereof which engages rods 21 with a sliding fit. Ribs 71 extend along the top of bolt carrier 6 and afford runners 71. Runners 71 are adapted to ensure clearance and the spacing of the block from the inside upper wall of receiver portion 8. Member 72 is a shock absorber mounted in cavity 74 formed in bolt carrier 6. The shock of the impact of the bolt carrier on plate 46 at the ends of guide rods 21 is absorbed by spring 73. Tubular pin 75 extends through the block of bolt carrier 6 for disassembly purposes. A pin 76 extends from the right hand side of the bolt carrier 6 shown in FIGURE 5 and rides in track 22 which track is welded or otherwise secured to the inner left side Wall of receiver portion 8. Pin 76 will be hereinafter referred to as a track pin. As shown in FIGURE 4 a cam slot 80 is formed in the side wall of bolt carrier 6. Chamber 81 is formed in the bolt carrier to accommodate the bolt. The rear portion of chamber 81, shown at 82, accommodates a spring 86 to bias firing pin 83 as shown in FIGURE 6. Pin 84 extends through the bolt carrier and engages a flange 85 on the firing pin to retain the firing pin and the entire assembly in place but permitting ready removal of the firing pin, spring, bolt, and cam pin for disassembly purposes.

FIGURES 6 and 7 show the bolt carrier 6 having assembled in cavity 81, a bolt 90. The bolt is of the type described in Patent No. 3,027,672 and has locking lugs 91 to engage corresponding locking lugs 36 of the sleeve extension 3 on the barrel of the rifle. An extractor mechanism is shown at 92 and an aperture for the firing pin at 93.

In FIGURE 6, bolt 90 is shown positioned in cavity 81 formed in bolt carrier 6. Bolt 90 is free to move axially of the cavity 81. As it moves in cavity 81, it slides on firing pin 83. A cam pin generally cylindrical in shape is shown at 94. It extends through bolt 90 and outwardly through cam opening 80 beyond the outside wall of the bolt carrier 6 as shown in FIGURE 7. Cam pin 94 has an aperture formed therin through which firing pin 83 extends to hold the bolt and cam pin in assembled relationship but permits easy disassembly. When cam pin 94 is in the right hand end of the cam slot 80 as shown in FIGURE 4, the bolt is in the unlocked position and cam pin 94 slides with pin 76 in track 22, during the rearward motion of bolt carrier 6. Upon forward motion of bolt carrier 6 the bolt closes the cartridge chamber fomed in the barrel and locking lugs 91 mesh with locking lugs 36 and sleeve extension 3. Cam pin 94 is then beyond the forward extent of track 22. Further forward motion of bolt carrier 6 causes cam pin 94 to rotate counter clockwise as viewed in FIGURE 7 which in turn causes a counter clockwise rotation of the bolt so that locking lugs 91 engage and lock with locking lugs 36. Clockwise rotation of locking lugs 91 with respect to lugs 36 takes place when the bolt carrier moves rearwardly impelled by operating rod 5. Cam pin 94 is then rotated to the position to be aligned with track 22 and remain in track 22 during the complete rearward motion of the bolt carrier 6.

In FIGURES 4- and 5, bolt carrier 6 is milled to provide an extension 95 to engage the hook 1113 of the auto matic sear as will be described in connection with FIG- URE 17.

FIGURE 8 shows guide rod 21 of round cross-section whereas FIGURE 9 shows guide rod 21a in an alternate form with flat portions spaced 120 apart to give adequate bearing surface but will atford greater clearance for self cleaning action.

FIGURES 16, 17 and 17a show the automatic sear connecting link for the automatic release of the hammer for automatic firing. The assembly shown in FIGURES 16, 17 and 17a is secured by a pin extending through the hole in bushing 1619 and holes 441 in member 39 forming a part of the upper receiver portion 8. The assembly is therefor secured to and functions with the upper receiver portion 8. Member 19 is a sheet metal stamping bent in a generally U-shaped form so that side members 19 and 19a alford end bearings for bushing 11111, and portion 1115 extends between side members 19, 19a. Member 19 is formed with a surface 1414 that cooperates with the safety or selective firing cam 168 as will be described later. Portion 105 forms the automatic sear for a trigger release for automatic firing. Automatic firing connecting link 1111 is pivoted to 19 at 1132. Link 101 extends inside of upper receiver portion 8. In FIGURE 11 a headed member 110 is shown which is engaged by slot 1116 formed in the forward end of link 101. Link 101 is twisted 90 degrees from a vertical position at the end near pivot 102 to a horizontal position at the end in which is formed slot 1116. The forward end of link 101 is formed with a vertical portion 111 adjacent slot 106. Portion 111 has a ramp portion 107 and a scar portion 1113. Portion 111 slides in a slot in bolt carrier 6 shown at 112 in FIGURE 4. As bolt carrier 6 moves rearwardly, portion 111 moves along slot 112 formed in bolt carrier 6. When the rifle is set for full automatic operation the forward motion of the bolt carrier 6 under the energy stored in springs 53 shown in FIGURE 2 causes projection as shown in FIGURE 4 to engage surface 163 and move the connecting link 1111 forwardly. Sear surface disengages the hammer, as will be described in more detail, which will fire the cartridge in the chamber through firing pin 83.

The structure illustrated in FIGURE 14 consists of the hammer 120, the trigger 17 and a trigger disconnect 121. Trigger 17 is made from a folded metal stamping having side portions 17a and 17b. The side portions are held in space relationship by the bent portion of the metal forming the actual trigger portion engaged by the finger of the person firing the gun. Member 122 on the left hand end of trigger 17 is welded in place and spaces trigger portions 17a and 17b. Trigger 17 is in effect a bell crank pivoted about pin 124. Spring biases trigger 17 in a forward position. The end of spring 125, shown in FIGURES l4 and 15, is shown in FIGURE 2 resting on the bottom of lower receiver assembly 9 to tension the spring. Surfaces 123 on members 17a and 17b are engaged by the safety or selective firing cams to hold portions 17a, 17b in a downward position to prevent actuation of any of the mechanism or the trigger being moved when in the safe position.

Trigger disconnect 121 is mounted on pivot 124 and is a single metal stamping as shown in FIGURE 15 and mounted in the space between sides 17a and 17b of the trigger. A compression spring 126 is supported on the lower side by two turned-in portions 127 of sides 17a and 17b and presses against trigger disconnect 121 on the top to bias trigger disconnect in a clockwise direction with respect to the trigger assembly. A hook portion 129 on the trigger disconnect 121 extends through an opening between the two sides of hammer 1211 to engage portion 136 of the hammer to lock the hammer in the down position.

The function of the trigger disconnect 121 is to engage and hold hammer 120 when trigger assembly 17 is in the clockwise position. When trigger 17 is pulled rearwardly, spring 126 is compressed and disconnect 121 is rotated and held in a clockwise position. Normally hook 129 of disconnect 121 moves freely through the opening in the forward side of hammer 1211 when the trigger is in the normal or counterclockwise position. However, when the trigger is moved rearwardly, hook 129 will latch over portion 1311 of hammer 1211 and hold it until trigger 17 moves forwardly taking the sear along by means of pin 122 against surface X and hook 129 will release the hammer and engage surfaces 131 and 132. After firing, while the trigger is held in a back position, bolt carrier 6 will depress hammer 121) and spring 126 will permit hook 129 to engage and hold 136, thus holding the hammer until the trigger is released.

Hammer 12! is formed with a sear surface 132 which engages the sear surface, on the trigger, 131 for semiautomatic firing. Hammer 1211 is mounted in the lower receiver portion 9 by pin 133 and biased in a clockwise direction by spring 134 as shown in FIGURE 2. As shown in FIGURES 3, 14, and 15 hammer 126 is also of sheet metal construction folded to provide flat parallel sides 120a and 1201). A notch is formed in the upper portion of the hammer affording a sear surface 135 which cooperates with portion shown on FIGURE 17 for the automatic firing of the rifle.

The last round stop mechanism is illustrated in FIG- URES 21 and 22 taken in conjunction with FIGURES la and 2. The last round stop consists of a lever 15d mounted at a pivot 151 on the side of the lower receiver assembly 9. It has a hook portion 152 which extends upwardly into upper receiver portion 3. It has a portion 58 formed on the forward end thereof which extends into and engages or is engaged by portion 57 of the follower 55 in magazine A button 154 is urged upwardly by a relatively weak spring 153 which is mounted on lever arm 150 to hold hook portion 152 out of the path of bolt carrier 6. Lever 150 has a relatively long lever arm from pivot point 151 to the end of member 58. Therefore if the magazine spring is weak, due to the length of the lever arm, a good mechanical advantage will be had after the last round to push hook portion 152 up into the path of travel of bolt carrier 6. It will be seen therefor from FIGURE 1a that when hook portion 152 is not held downwardly out of the path of travel of bolt carrier 6 by spring 153, it will engage bolt carrier 6 and hold the bolt carrier in the open position. It should be pointed out that button 154 rests against cross member 44 on the lower side of upper receiver portion 8.

FIGURES 23-29 illustrate the safety or firing selection lever which is mounted on the left hand side of the lower receiver portion 9 as illustrated in dashed lines in FIGURE 2. The lever 165 has a handle 166 and a pointer 167. In the vertical position of the handle as shown in FIGURE 23'with pointer 167 pointing upwardly, the rifle is in the semi-automatic firing condition. When pointer 167 is moved counterclockwise, the rifle mechanism is in the safe condition. When the pointer 167 is moved clockwise the rifle mechanism is in the automatic condition. The selective firing or the safe condition of the firing mechanism is accomplished by the shaft being milled or formed into a cam 168 throughout its length with cross sections illustrated at spaced positions along a shaft as shown by FIGURES 2629. The portions of the cam shaft or the cutouts in the cam shaft either lock portions of the firing mechanism from operating or permit motion of other parts of the firing mechanism by moving int-o and out of the recesses formed in the cam shaft.

The detent 60 has the forward end biased by spring 61 to engage one of the three notches shown in FIGURE 26 for the safe, semi, or the auto position of lever 165.

It will be noted in connection with FIGURE 1a and FIGURES 16 and 17 that member 19 is biased so that sear surface 104 moves counterclockwise. Automatic sear connecting link 101 will be biased toward the left as shown in FIGURE 17. If the fire selection lever is moved to the automatic position (auto), there will be a cutout portion in cam shaft 168 which will permit surface 104 to move freely in a counterclockwise direction. This will permit automatic sear connection link 101 to move surface 103 to the left in FIGURE 17. It will be engaged by the bolt carrier 6 in the last portion of the travel of the bolt carrier after the bolt has closed and locked the chamber. This last fractional movement of surface 103 will cause surface 105 of FIGURE 17 to move in a clockwise direction and disengage surface 135 of hammer 120 and release the hammer. If the fire selection lever is moved to a semi-automatic or safe position, the cam surface on 168 will move surface 104 in a clockwise direction so that surface 103 of FIGURE 17 will not be engaged by the bolt carrier and therefore automatic firing will not take place. It will either be safe against any firing or will operate with a separate mechanism for semi-automatic firing.

It will be noted in FIGURE 10 that as bolt carrier 6 moves rearwardly under the impact from the gas operated push rod 5, that the rear portion of bolt carrier 6 presses the upper portion of hammer 120 into the lower receiver portion 9. If the fire selection switch is set for automatic firing, portion 105 of member 19 will move in a counterclockwise direction and will engage and stop portion 135 of the hammer 120 until released by the forward motion of the bolt carrier as described above. If, as described above, the automatic firing is locked out by the position of the fire selection lever, then members 105 and 135 will not engage and the hammer then will be held by sear surfaces 131 and 132 being engaged. If

surface 123 of trigger 17 is held downwardly by portions of the cam shaft 168 and fire selection lever 166 then it will be impossible to move the trigger rearwardly about its pivot to fire the gun and the gun will be in a safe condition.

The operation of the rifle is as follows: there are two separate firing systems, one for automatic and one for semi-automatic firing. If the full automatic sear system is removed or damaged the rifle can be fired in a semiautomatic condition.

Assumed condition of weapon, i.e., bolt closed on an empty chamber, hammer cocked as in FIGURE 14, selective fire lever either on safe, semi, or auto, then (1) On Safe condition By rotating selective fire lever (FIGURES 24-2 9) to safe position: (a) the automatic sear is cammed out of engagement position, i.e., surface 104 (FIGURE 17) is cammed clockwise by the selective fire lever, and (b) trigger 17 and disconnect 121 are blocked, i.e., trigger surface 123 and disconnect surface 128 rest against outside diameter of selective fire lever, thus preventing clockwise rotation. Counter clockwise rotation of trigger is prevented by hammer.

(2) Semi-automatic or Semi condition Having fed a live round in the chamber while the weapon is on safe, the selective fire lever is rotated to semi position, as shown in FIGURE 24.

(a) The automatic sear remains cammed out of engagement position.

(b) The trigger and disconnect are now allowed to rotate clockwise. By pulling on the trigger (clockwise), the hammer is released. Having released the hammer, by disengaging surfaces 131 and 132, FIGURE 14, further clockwise rotation of the trigger-disconnect assembly, in exactly the same relationship as shown in FIGURE 14, is limited by the cutout, FIGURE 28, and contact surfaces 128 and 123, FIGURE 14.

The hammer, after impinging upon the firing pin and discharging the cartridge, is rotated counterclockwise by the bolt carrier. Since the time span for the above cycle, i.e., firing and recocking, is only a small fraction of a second, the trigger finger of the shooter does not have enough time to release the trigger, i.e., to allow the trigger spring to rotate the trigger counter-lockwise and thus engage surface 132 with trigger surface 131. Therefore, the disconnect claw 129 is first cammed counter-clockwise by hammer surface 130, then snaps over and catches the hammer at 130.

The trigger, still held by the trigger finger against the cutout in the selective fire lever, gradually relaxes, thus permitting the trigger spring to rotate the trigger with disconnect counter-clockwise, whereby the trigger forces the disconnect counter-clockwise by means of pin 122 and surface X.

This counter-clockwise rotation is continued until surfaces 129 and 130 disengage at which time the trigger catches the hammer at 131 and 132 surfaces.

The weapon has now completed its cycle and is again ready to fire.

(3) Full automatic or Auto condition By rotating the selective fire lever to auto position:

(a) The cam shaft portion (FIGURE 24, section 2828) on the selective fire lever blocks the disconnect 121 as in safe position, i.e., the cam shaft portion (FIGURE 24, section 2828) cams surface 128 of the disconnect counter-clockwise. The disconnect is now prevented from functioning during the automatic cycle.

(b) The automatic sear is now biased counterclockwise by the spring, i.e., assuming the hammer being held by the trigger (as in FIGURE 14, 131 and 132) the sear will rotate counter-clockwise until surface Y contacts radius Z on hammer. If the hammer is now released by pulling the trigger and the trigger remains pulled (all the way clockwise), i.e., surfaces 131 and 132 can no longer engage as the hammer is being cocked by the return stroke of the bolt carrier. The hammer (radius Z), in its counterclockwise rotation strikes surface Y on the sear, camming it clockwise (momentarily).

Then, as the hammer continues its counter-clockwise rotation, cutout 135 in the hammer allows the sear spring to snap the sear counter-clockwise into the cutout and eventually engage surfaces 105 and 135. In the meantime, the bolt carrier has reached the end of its rearward stroke and glides forward (feeding a new cartridge). The bolt carrier then locks the bolt and strikes surface 103 of the sear extension (FIGURE 17) and releases the hammer by causing the sear to rotate clockwise.

The above cycle is repeated until the magazine is empty or until the trigger is released (and surfaces 131 and 132 engage) in which case the auto-cycle is interrupted.

It should be clear from the foregoing description that certain changes, alterations, modifications and substitutions can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the depending claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a locked action rifle for automatic and semiautomatic selective firing, an upper receiver portion comprising sheet metal formed into a generally rectangular tube, a lower receiver portion comprising a sheet metal box of a length and width generally coextensive with said upper receiver portion, and an action housed within said upper receiver portion and said lower receiver portion, said action including a trigger mechanism made up of elements substantially all of which are made from sheet metal stampings; hinge portions formed on the forward ends of said upper and lower receiver to afford a hinge about a transverse axis, means to mount a barrel provided on the forward end of said upper receiver portion, a pair of guide rods mounted in said upper receiver portion, springs surrounding said guide rods, a bolt carrier member mounted on and guided by said guide rods to move within said upper receiver portion substantially free of the walls of said upper receiver portion, a bolt in said bolt carrier, means to rotate said bolt to lock and unlock said bolt from engagement with means on the rearward end of said barrel, a channel member stamped from sheet metal and secured inside said upper receiver portion and extending longitudinally thereof, said means to rotate said bolt including a pin member secured to said bolt carrier and engaged and guided by said channel member during movement of said bolt carrier, and latch means to secure said upper and lower portions together in the firing position.

2. A locked action rifle as defined in claim 1 wherein said latch means includes, a bracket of sheet metal, said bracket having a lower portion connected to the sides of the lower receiver assembly and an upper forward portion with apertures therein for the reception of the ends of said guide rods which extend through a member welded at the end of the upper receiver portion, means connected to said member to move said member against said springs surrounding said guide rods'when the upper receiver assembly is pivoted into position with the lower receiver assembly whereby said guide rods may register with said apertures and extend through said apertures to lock the two portions of the receiver in operative position.

3. A locked action rifle as defined in claim 2 including a folding butt stock and a pair of rearwardly extending members connected to said bracket providing a hinge and catch for said folding butt stock.

4. A locked action rifle as defined in claim 1 including a plurality of ribs extending along the top of said bolt carrier providing runners to insure the clearance and the spacing of the bolt carrier from the inside upper wall of the upper receiver portion.

5. A locked action rifle as defined in claim 1, including a rear sighting means, said sighting means comprising a sighting bracket formed by sheet metal stamping and welded to the rear upper portion of said upper receiver portion, a two position sight formed of sheet metal and pivotally mounted on said sighting bracket so that either of said positions may be manually selected, and spring biasing means mounted between the top of said upper receiver portion and said two position sight for biasing said two position sight in the position selected.

6. A locked action rifle for automatic and semiautomatic selective firing as defined in claim 5 wherein said lower receiver portion includes a strip of sheet metal formed to provide a trigger guard and a transverse partition of sheet metal spaced from the forward end of said lower receiver portion to form a magazine receiver.

7. In a rifle for automatic and semi-automatic selective firing, an upper receiver portion comprising sheet metal formed into a generally rectangular tube, a lower receiver portion comprising a sheet metal box of a length and width generally coextensive with said upper receiver portion, an action made up of elements housed within said upper receiver portion and said lower receiver portion, hinge portions formed on the forward ends of said upper and lower receiver portions to afford a hinge about a transverse axis, means to mount a barrel provided on the forward end of said upper receiver portion, a pair of guide rods mounted in said upper receiver portion, a bolt carrier mounted on and guided by said guide rods to move within said upper receiver portion substantially free of the walls of said upper receiver portion, a bolt in said bolt carrier, means to rotate said bolt to lock and unlock said bolt from engagement with means on the rearward end of said barrel, said action including a trigger formed from a metal stamping folded to form two side portions and pivotally mounted in said lower receiver portion, a spacing member welded to and between said side portions, said trigger having a sear thereupon, a hammer of sheet metal construction folded to provide parallel sides, said hammer having a sear abutment thereupon engageable by said sear on said trigger, an automatic sear abutment at the opposite extremity from said trigger sear abutment and a slot in its leading face intermediate its extremities, a trigger disconnect formed from a single metal stamping and pivotally mounted between the side portions and said trigger and extending through the slot in said hammer so as to be engageable with the leading face of said hammer, an automatic sear mechanism pivotally mounted in the upper portion of said receiver adjacent said hammer and engageable with said automatic sear abutment on said hammer, said automatic sear mechanism including a sear extension to permit the utilization of a short bolt carrier, and a selective firing control means mounted for rotation in said receiver and located between adjacent extremities of said automatic sear mechanism, said trigger and said trigger disconnect to determine the operating conditions of said automatic sear mechanism, said trigger and said trigger disconnect.

3. A rifle for automatic and semi-automatic selective firing as defined in claim 7, wherein said control means includes a rotatable member having a plurality of cam surfaces thereupon engageable, respectively, with said trigger, said trigger disconnect mechanism and said automatic sear mechanism to determine the relative positions and operation of said elements, said rotatable member also including a notched surface having three notches, a handle connected to said rotating member for rotating said member to any one of three positions, safety, semiautomatic or automatic, a detent mounted in the lower receiver portion and a spring connected to said detent biasing said detent into one of said notches, the particular notch into which said detent is biased being determined by the position of said handle.

(References on following page) References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Haubroe 4275 Petter 42-75 5 Sampson et a1. 42--16 Kolinko 42-75 Harvey 89185 Wooderson 89142 12 3,045,555 7/1962 Stoner 89-142 3,153,295 10/1964 Allyn 42 75 FOREIGN PATENTS 613,281 11/1948 Great Britain.

BENJAMIN A. BORCHELT, Primary Examiner.

S. C. BENTLEY, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

  1. 7. IN A RIFLE FOR AUTOMATIC AND SEMI-AUTOMATIC SELECTIVE FIRING, AN UPPER RECEIVER PORTION COMPRISING SHEET METAL FORMED INTO A GENERALLY RECTANGULAR TUBE, A LOWER RECEIVER PORTION COMPRISING A SHEET METAL BOX OF A LENGTH AND WIDTH GENERALLY COEXTENSIVE WITH SAID UPPER RECEIVER PORTION, AN ACTION MADE UP OF ELEMENTS HOUSED WITHIN SAID UPPER RECEIVER PORTION AND SAID LOWER RECEIVER PORTION, HINGE PORTIONS FORMED ON THE FORWARD ENDS OF SAID UPPER AND LOWER RECEIVER PORTIONS TO AFFORD A HINGE ABOUT A TRANSVERSE AXIS, MEANS TO MOUNT A BARREL PROVIDED ON THE FORWARD END OF SAID UPPER RECEIVER PORTION, A PAIR OF GUIDE RODS MOUNTED IN SAID UPPER RECEIVER PORTION, A BOLT CARRIER MOUNTED ON AND GUIDED BY SAID GUIDE RODS TO MOVE WITHIN SAID UPPER RECEIVER PORTION SUBSTANTIALLY FREE OF THE WALLS OF SAID UPPER RECEIVER PORTION, A BOLT IN SAID BOLT CARRIER, MEANS TO ROTATE SAID BOLT TO LOCK AND UNLOCK SAID BOLT FROM ENGAGEMENT WITH MEANS ON THE REARWARD END OF SAID BARREL, SAID ACTION INCLUDING A TRIGGER FORMED FROM A METAL STAMPING FOLDED TO FORM TWO SIDE PORTIONS AND PIVOTALLY MOUNTED IN SAID LOWER RECEIVER PORTION, A SPACING MEMBER WELDED TO AND BETWEEN SAID SIDE PORTIONS, SAID TRIGGER HAVING A SEAR THEREUPON, A HAMMER OF SHEET METAL CONSTRUCTION FOLDED TO PROVIDE PARALLEL SIDES, SAID HAMMER HAVING A SEAR ABUTMENT THEREUPON ENGAGEABLE BY SAID SEAR ON SAID TRIGGER,
US432198A 1965-02-12 1965-02-12 Locked action rifle for automatic and semi-automatic selective firing Expired - Lifetime US3318192A (en)

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US432198A US3318192A (en) 1965-02-12 1965-02-12 Locked action rifle for automatic and semi-automatic selective firing
GB1957265A GB1056056A (en) 1965-02-12 1965-05-10 An improved rifle
DE1965A0050745 DE1453908C3 (en) 1965-02-12 1965-11-10
NL6601138A NL6601138A (en) 1965-02-12 1966-01-28
US62234067 US3380183A (en) 1965-02-12 1967-03-10 Upper handguard fixedly mounted on barrel assembly by breechblock guide rods

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US3380183A (en) * 1965-02-12 1968-04-30 Armalite Inc Upper handguard fixedly mounted on barrel assembly by breechblock guide rods
US3386336A (en) * 1966-03-30 1968-06-04 Colt S Inc Convertible machine gun for rightand left-hand cartridge feed and operation
US3651736A (en) * 1969-06-11 1972-03-28 Michael H Adair Bolt handle and pistol grip magazine for an automatic firearm
US3675534A (en) * 1969-04-29 1972-07-11 Beretta Armi Spa Automatic rifle
US3791256A (en) * 1969-09-12 1974-02-12 Colt Ind Operating Corp Machine gun
US3850076A (en) * 1972-05-03 1974-11-26 M Atchisson Firearm apparatus
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US4044487A (en) * 1976-05-27 1977-08-30 Remington Arms Company, Inc. Rotary port cover
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US4440065A (en) * 1980-12-09 1984-04-03 Mauser-Werke Oberndorf Gmbh Breech mechanism for automatic firearms
US4485723A (en) * 1981-01-14 1984-12-04 Sarony Peter P Fire arm accessory with recoil absorbing secondary buffer arrangement
US4553469A (en) * 1981-12-31 1985-11-19 Atchisson Maxwell G Low-recoil firearm with noncircular guide rod for angularly locating bolt carrier assembly
US5279202A (en) * 1991-07-29 1994-01-18 Benelli Armi S.P.A. Bolt repositioning device for firearms
US5320023A (en) * 1993-01-25 1994-06-14 Erdem S Alper Semiautomatic pistol
US5448940A (en) * 1993-11-19 1995-09-12 Olympic Arms, Inc. Gas-operated M16 pistol
US6634274B1 (en) 2000-12-11 2003-10-21 Geoffrey Andrew Herring Firearm upper receiver assembly with ammunition belt feeding capability
US6766795B1 (en) * 2002-01-28 2004-07-27 Pursuit Marketing, Inc. Paintball gun having a hinged receiver and method for making same
US20100236395A1 (en) * 2006-06-23 2010-09-23 Brian Akhavan Firearm operating mechanisms and methods
US20100269682A1 (en) * 2009-03-24 2010-10-28 Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. Bolt carrier for gas operated rifle
US20110179945A1 (en) * 2010-01-26 2011-07-28 Robert Bernard Iredale Clark Gas Operating Systems, Subsystems, Components and Processes
US8161864B1 (en) 2009-03-24 2012-04-24 Sturm, Ruger & Company, Inc. Firearm gas piston operating system
US20120180354A1 (en) * 2011-01-14 2012-07-19 ArmWest, LLC Quick Barrel Change Firearm
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US20120311908A1 (en) * 2011-06-07 2012-12-13 Ra Brands, L.L.C. Barrel mounting and retention mechanism
US20130068089A1 (en) * 2008-07-01 2013-03-21 Michael J. Brown Firearm having an indirect gas impingement system
US20130118343A1 (en) * 2011-11-16 2013-05-16 Robert Hirt Firearm actuation system
US8661963B2 (en) * 2011-02-11 2014-03-04 Swetal K. Patel Recoil system and method for upper receiver
US20140224114A1 (en) * 2012-12-17 2014-08-14 Faxon Firearms, Llc Gas piston operated upper receiver system
US8813406B1 (en) 2010-03-25 2014-08-26 ArmWest, LLC High capacity magazine with multiple springs
US20140338523A1 (en) * 2013-05-17 2014-11-20 Sig Sauer, Inc. Automatic sear assembly for a rifle
US20150000173A1 (en) * 2013-01-14 2015-01-01 RM Equipment, Inc. Universal launcher system
US8950387B2 (en) 2013-01-25 2015-02-10 Kee Action Sports I Llc Paintball marker with split body
US8973483B2 (en) 2010-03-25 2015-03-10 Arm West, Llc Gas regulator system
US9038525B2 (en) 2011-01-14 2015-05-26 ArmWest, LLC Firearm
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US9151558B1 (en) 2011-11-16 2015-10-06 Sig Sauer, Inc. Sear trip bar for a firearm
US9488423B2 (en) 2011-01-14 2016-11-08 Arm West, Llc Firearm systems and methods
US20170045320A1 (en) * 2015-08-10 2017-02-16 Nicholas Salvatore Cozzo Apparatus for field maintenance of jammed firearms
US9658020B2 (en) 2014-06-24 2017-05-23 Daniel Defense, Inc. Systems and methods for mounting barrels to firearms
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US3380183A (en) * 1965-02-12 1968-04-30 Armalite Inc Upper handguard fixedly mounted on barrel assembly by breechblock guide rods
US3386336A (en) * 1966-03-30 1968-06-04 Colt S Inc Convertible machine gun for rightand left-hand cartridge feed and operation
US3363351A (en) * 1967-03-30 1968-01-16 Melvin A. Smith Bolt assembly for firearm
US3675534A (en) * 1969-04-29 1972-07-11 Beretta Armi Spa Automatic rifle
US3651736A (en) * 1969-06-11 1972-03-28 Michael H Adair Bolt handle and pistol grip magazine for an automatic firearm
US3791256A (en) * 1969-09-12 1974-02-12 Colt Ind Operating Corp Machine gun
US3850076A (en) * 1972-05-03 1974-11-26 M Atchisson Firearm apparatus
US4066000A (en) * 1974-04-25 1978-01-03 Brunswick Corporation Machine gun
US3996685A (en) * 1975-11-14 1976-12-14 Remington Arms Company, Inc. Shell cut-off latch
US3996684A (en) * 1975-12-18 1976-12-14 Remington Arms Company, Inc. Bolt latch
US4057003A (en) * 1975-12-30 1977-11-08 Atchisson Maxwell G Open bolt conversion apparatus
US4044487A (en) * 1976-05-27 1977-08-30 Remington Arms Company, Inc. Rotary port cover
US4358986A (en) * 1979-09-11 1982-11-16 Charles Giorgio Rifle bolt assemblies
US4440065A (en) * 1980-12-09 1984-04-03 Mauser-Werke Oberndorf Gmbh Breech mechanism for automatic firearms
US4485723A (en) * 1981-01-14 1984-12-04 Sarony Peter P Fire arm accessory with recoil absorbing secondary buffer arrangement
US4553469A (en) * 1981-12-31 1985-11-19 Atchisson Maxwell G Low-recoil firearm with noncircular guide rod for angularly locating bolt carrier assembly
US5279202A (en) * 1991-07-29 1994-01-18 Benelli Armi S.P.A. Bolt repositioning device for firearms
US5320023A (en) * 1993-01-25 1994-06-14 Erdem S Alper Semiautomatic pistol
US5448940A (en) * 1993-11-19 1995-09-12 Olympic Arms, Inc. Gas-operated M16 pistol
US6634274B1 (en) 2000-12-11 2003-10-21 Geoffrey Andrew Herring Firearm upper receiver assembly with ammunition belt feeding capability
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US6722255B2 (en) 2000-12-11 2004-04-20 Geoffrey A. Herring Apparatus and method for actuating a bolt carrier group of a receiver assembly
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US20110179945A1 (en) * 2010-01-26 2011-07-28 Robert Bernard Iredale Clark Gas Operating Systems, Subsystems, Components and Processes
US8443711B2 (en) 2010-01-26 2013-05-21 Leitner-Wise Defense, Inc. Gas operating systems, subsystems, components and processes
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US9228786B2 (en) * 2011-01-14 2016-01-05 ArmWest, LLC Quick barrel change firearm
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US20120260553A1 (en) * 2011-04-14 2012-10-18 Gnesda William G Device to improve accuracy of a small arm
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US20140224114A1 (en) * 2012-12-17 2014-08-14 Faxon Firearms, Llc Gas piston operated upper receiver system
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Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB1056056A (en) 1967-01-25
DE1453908A1 (en) 1970-07-02
NL6601138A (en) 1966-08-15
DE1453908C3 (en) 1978-03-09
DE1453908B2 (en) 1977-07-21

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