US3315583A - Photographic processing apparatus - Google Patents

Photographic processing apparatus Download PDF

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US3315583A
US3315583A US404045A US40404564A US3315583A US 3315583 A US3315583 A US 3315583A US 404045 A US404045 A US 404045A US 40404564 A US40404564 A US 40404564A US 3315583 A US3315583 A US 3315583A
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rollers
sheets
container
roller
solution
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US404045A
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Charles J Hunt
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Beattie Coleman Inc
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Beattie Coleman Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ANALOGOUS TECHNIQUES USING WAVES OTHER THAN OPTICAL WAVES; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03DAPPARATUS FOR PROCESSING EXPOSED PHOTOGRAPHIC MATERIALS; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • G03D5/00Liquid processing apparatus in which no immersion is effected; Washing apparatus in which no immersion is effected
    • G03D5/06Applicator pads, rollers or strips
    • G03D5/067Rollers

Description

April 25, 1967 Q J H PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSING APPARATUS 2 Sheets- Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 15, 1964 C. J. HUNT PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSING APPARATUS April 25, 1967 2 Sheets-$heet 2 Filed Oct. 15, 1964 IVI/EA/TOE. 67 4/9455 cl 115w;
irroelves make it posssible to process a backed sheets and the elimination United States Patent 3,315 583 PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSING APPARATUS Charles J. Hunt, .Orange, Califi, assignor to Beattic- Coleman, Inc., Anaheim, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Oct. 15, 1964, Ser. No. 404,045 2 Claims. (CI. 95-94) This invention relates to a processing apparatus for developing a latent image on exposed photosensitive material to produce a finished print. The invention is broadly applicable for its purpose and may be embodied not only in a two-solution stabilization processor but also in a monobath processor.
A stabilization processor produces a finished print from an exposed photosensitive sheet in which the emulsion incorporates a developing agent and in which the processor employs an activator solution to bring out the image and a second stabilizer solution to fix the image. The single solution in a monobath processor combines one or more developing agents with one or more fixing agents. Both types of processes are capable of producing a print within a short time period. For the purpose of disclosure, the invention is described herein as embodied in a stabilization processor which if desired may also be employed as a monobath processor.
In a typical stabilization processor as heretofore constructed, rollers immersed in an activator solution treat the photosensitive sheet and then the sheet follows arcuate guide wires into complete immersion in the stabilizer solution. The guide wires curve upward from the stabilizer solution to a final pair of squeegee rollers which draw the sheet from the stabilizer solution for exit from the Stabilization processors are widely used because they eliminate the tedious steps of conventional wet processing of prints and are capable of quickly producing quality prints on a variety of photosensitive materials. With the wide acceptance of stabilization processors, however, certain pressing needs for improvement have become apparent and the broad object of the present invention is to meet these needs.
One need is to reduce the time required for a print to dry sufiiciently for use on a mock up. Another need is to provide an apparatus that will process the emulsion face of a photosensitive sheet without drenching the opposite back face of the sheet. Such an apparatus would photosensitive sheet havback surface without ad- The use of adhesively of the usual drying time application of the deing an adhesive coating on its versely affecting the adhesive.
would make possible immediate veloped prints to a mock up.
Another need is to eliminate the necessity for any preliminary manual bending of a sheet of photosensitive material to facilitate gripping of the sheet by the squeegee rolls and to prevent blocking of the advance of the sheet by the squeegee rolls. If a sheet is slightly stiff it is often necessary to bend up the leading end of the sheet slightly for this purpose before the sheet is inserted into the apparatus because otherwise the sheet catches and buckles in the activator solution.
A further and pressing need is for a processor that is more flexible in the sense of being capable of processing photosensitive sheets of widely different physical proper ties and widely different sizes. A conventional stabilization processor cannot be used to process relatively stiff photosensitive sheets, for example, metal name plates and metal labels because the changes in direction of the path of travel of the sheet through the processor would permanently bend the sheet material. At the opposite extreme a photosensitive sheet of limp fabric simply wads em further makes it possible to 3,315,583 Patented Apr- 25, 1967 up in the stabilizer solution without reaching the squeegee output rolls.
The limitation with respect to the dimensions of photosensitive sheets is inherent in the structure of a conventional stabilization processor. Since the developer rolls must push the photosensitive sheet through the stabilizer solution to the final squeegee rolls, a sheet to be processed must be at least as long as the path between the developer rollers and the final squeegee rollers including the curved detour through the stabilizer solution. A sheet that is too short simply comes to rest in the stabilizer solution.
Broadly described, the present invention meets all of these needs by employing a plurality or set of closely spaced pairs of cooperating pressure rollers to move the photosensitive sheet material through the apparatus with the path of travel wholly above the level of the two solutions. Lower pressure rollers of the set are partially immersed in both of the solutions for the purpose of treating the lower emulsion face of the photosensitive sheets, but the final rolls of the set are above the level of the activator solution to squeegee the finished sheets to thoroughly dry state.
In the presently preferred practice of the invention the pairs of pressure rollers are divided into two groups, comprising two pairs of rollers in the region of the activator solution and three pairs of rollers in the region of the stabilizer solution. In this regard, a feature of the invention is the employment of separate gear trains at opposite sides of the processor to actuate the two groups of pressure rollers. Thus there is no possibility of liquid migrating along the gearing from one solution to the other.
Since all of the successive pairs of pressure rollers are closely spaced, the sheet material is under close control throughout the process. For this reason a limp sheet of fabric is processed as efficiently and expeditiously as a relatively stiff paper sheet. The close spacing of the rollproces-s efiiciently pieces of sheet material as short as two inches in length or shorter.
Since the final output rollers are not immersed in the activator solution, an upward change in direction of the traveling sheet must occur. A feature of the invention, however, is that the change in direction is relatively slight, for example on the order of 15, and the resulting bending of the sheet material is well within the elastic limits of most sheet metal stock up to 18 gauge thickness. Thus the invention makes it possible to process sheet metal stock with no permanent bending deformation.
The features and advantages of the invention may be understood from the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings.
In the drawings, which are to be regarded as illustrative:
FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the initial embodiment of the invention;
FIG. 2 is a plan view of the apparatus on a larger scale with a major portion of the cover broken away to reveal normally concealed structure;
FIG. 3 is a side elevational view with the cover shown in section;
FIG. 4 is an elevational view of the roller assembly as seen from one side of the assembly;
FIG. 5 is a similar view as seen from the opposite side of the assembly;
FIG. 6A is a diagrammatic view on a smaller scale showing how a relatively short piece of paper is transported through the apparatus;
FIG. 6B is a similar view showing how the device handles limp pieces of fabric;
FIG. 6C is a similar view showing how a metal plate travels through the apparatus; and
FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic view of a pair of rollers showing the relation of the liquid thereto.
The principal parts of the initial embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings include: a receptacle or container means, generally designated 10, which as indicated in FIG. 6A is divided into a first compartment 12 containing a body of activator liquid 14 and a second compartment 15 containing a body of liquid stabilizer 16; a motor housing 18 integral with one end of the receptacle 10; a roller assembly illustrated by FIGS. 4 and which is removably mounted on the receptacle and a removable cover 20 which normally closes the open top of the receptacle 10.
The receptacle 10, which is of relatively wide configuration in plan, is preferably of thin-walled construction molded from a suitable plastic. The two compartments 12 and 13 are separated by a rounded partition 22 (FIG. 6A) and the rim 24 of the receptacle is integral with an outer wall 25 that terminates in a continuous lower flange 26 which is best shown in FIG. 1. The flange 26 rests on support pads 28 at the four corners of the receptacle and at intermediate points at the front and back of the receptacle.
As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, each of the two compartments 12 and 15 is formed with an extension or bay 30 at the right side of the compartment which bay has an upwardly sloping bottom wall 32. The sloping bottom wall 32 has an index mark 34 to indicate the correct liquid level and has a drainage port 35 at a higher level which may be employed when desired to drain the receptacle with the receptacle in tilted position.
As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the motor housing 18 encloses a suitable motor 36 which incorporates reduction gearing (not shown) to actuate a short drive shaft 38. The drive shaft 38 terminates in a square socket to receive the square end 40 of a second drive shaft 42 which is, in effect, a continuation of the first drive shaft. A suitable electric cord 44 is provided to plug the motor int-o a source of current and an external switch '45 is provided to control energization of the motor.
The cover 20, which may be of thin-wa1led construction of the same plastic material as the receptacle 10, rests on the rim 24 of the receptacle and preferably is suitably releasably latched in place. For this purpose the heads of a pair of screws 46 (FIGS. 2 and 3) on the front and back of the receptacle adjacent the motor housing 18 may serve as detent lugs to engage corresponding detent apertures 48 (FIG. 1) in the cover, the cover being sufficiently resilient for disengagement when desired. The front of the cover is provided with a transverse feed slot 50 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 and is further provided with a transverse discharge slot 52 indicated in FIG. 2.
As may be seen in FIGS. 1 and 3, the cover 20 is stepped down on its right hand side to provide a shelf 54 in which two circular seats or recesses 55 are formed to receive the shoulders of two upside down bottles 56 which contain supply quantities of the activator liquid and the stabilizer liquid respectively. Each of the seats 55 is of circular configuration and is provided with a circular concentric opening 58 to receive the neck of a bottle. As indicated in FIG. 3, each of the bottles 56 is provided with a stopper 60 in which is mounted a short downwardly extending feed tube 62 and a longer vent tube 64. The two tubes 62 and 64 extend down to the desired liquid level in the bay 30 of the corresponding compartment 12 or 15 and cooperate to supply replenishing liquid automatically as necessary to maintain the liquid level, the liquid level being indicated by the line 65.
As shown in FIG. 6A, the rollers of the roller assembly comprise a first group of two pairs of rollers associated with the first compartment 12 that contains the activator liquid and a second group of three pairs of rollers associated with the second compartment 15 that contains the stabilizing liquid. The first pair of rollers comprises a lower roller 66 partially immersed in the activator solution 14 and a cooperating upper roller 68. The second pair of rollers comprises a lower roller 70 also partially immersed in the activator solution 14 and a cooperating upper roller 72. The third pair of rollers comprises a lower roller 74 partially immersed in the stabilizer solution 16 and a cooperating upper roller 75. The fourth pair of rollers comprises a lower roller 76 which is only lightly immersed in the stabilizer solution 16 and a cooperating upper roller 78. The last pair of rollers comprises a lower roller 80 which is spaced above the liquid level of the stabilizer solution 16 and a cooperating upper roller 82. All of the lower rollers are driven rollers and are of the same diameter for propelling sheet material through the apparatus at a uniform rate. In this embodiment of the invention all of the upper rollers are of the same diameter as the lower rollers except the last upper roller 82 which is of reduced diameter for vertical compactness of the apparatus.
Each of the ten rollers is mounted on a corresponding rigid shaft 84 (FIGS. 2 and 3) and comprises a cylindrical body of yieldable elastomeric material such as a resilient grade of polyvinyl chloride or suitable resilient neoprene. The rollers of each of the pairs are compressed together to provide a mutual pressure Zone where the unit pressure is sufficiently high to serve the purpose of the invention. For this purpose each roller of a pair may be reduced in cross dimension by as much as 10 percent or more by the pressure of the other roller of the pair depending upon the yieldability of the elastomeric material and the unit pressure that is necessary to serve the purpose of the invention.
The roller assembly comprises the ten rollers divided into the two groups and the previously mentioned second drive shaft 42 together with a left side plate 85 shown in FIG. 4 and a right side plate 86 shown in FIG. 5. For
the purpose of supporting the roller assembly at each of its four corners on the rim 24 of the receptacle 10, four lateral support tongues are provided by the two side plates, namely, a forward tongue 88 and a rearward tongue 90 on the left side plate 85 and a forward tongue 92 and a rearward tongue 94 on the right side plate 86.
For the purpose of centering or positioning the roller assembly on the receptacle 10, the two tongues 92 and 94 on the right side plate 86 are provided with apertures 95 (FIG. 5) which releasably engage corresponding pins 96 on the receptacle 10 as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. Since the fixed pins 96 are on the side of the roller assembly that is furthest removed from the motor housing 18, the far side of the roller assembly may be lifted clear of the pins to permit sidewise movement of the roller assembly for disengaging the square end 40 of the second drive shaft 42 from the socket in the first drive shaft 38. The roller assembly is held together by the various roller shafts 84 and the second drive shaft 42, the various shafts being provided with snap rings 98 (FIGS. 4 and 5) for this purpose.
The second drive shaft 42 carries a drive gear 100 on the outer side of the right side plate 86 for driving the first group of rollers associated with the compartment 12 containing the activator solution and carries a second drive gear 102 on the outer side of the left side plate 85 for driving the second group of rollers associated with the compartment 15 containing the stabilizer solution. As shown in FIG. 5 the gear train associated with the drive gear 100 for actuating the first group of rollers comprises an idler pinion 104, a gear 105 that is unitary with the lower roller 70, an idler pinion 106, and a gear 108 that is unitary with the lower roller 66. In like manner as shown in FIG. 5, the gear train that is associated with the drive gear 102 for actuating the second group of rollers comprises an idler pinion 110, a gear 112 that is unitary with the lower roller 74, an idler pinion 114, a gear 115 that is unitary with the lower roller 76, an idler pinion 116, and a gear 118 that is unitary with the lower roller 80. The arrangement of the two gear trains on the opposite sides respectively of the roller assembly makes it impossible for one of the solutions to migrate to the other solution by way of the gearing.
The manner in which the apparatus functions for its purpose may be readily understood from the foregoing description. The operator simply inserts the successive sheets of exposed photosensitive material into the roller assembly through the feed slot 50 of the cover with the emulsion sides of the sheets facing downward and the fully processed sheets are discharged through the discharge slot 2 in the cover on the back side of the apparatus. Once a sheet is engaged by the first pair of rollers 66 and 68 it is under close control as it passes through the successive pairs of rollers.
FIG. 6A shows diagrammatically how a relatively short piece of photosensitive paper 120 passes from the first group of rollers to the second group of rollers. It is apparent that the sheet of paper may be as short as the distance between the two pressure zones of the two pairs of rollers.
FIG. 6B shows how a relatively limp sheet 122 such as a fabric sheet passes through the apparatus. The leading end of the limp sheet 122 droops as it emerges from each pair of rollers but the successive pairs of rollers are so close togetherthat the drooping leading end is picked up by the next pair of rollers in the series. When the leading end reaches the partition 22 between the two compartments the drooping leading end of the fabric slides over the rounded upper edge of the partition and is thereby led into engagement with the next pair of rollers 74 and 75.
FIG. 6C shows diagrammatically how a relatively heavy metal plate 124 is transported through the apparatus. Since the three bottom rollers 74, 76 and 118 of the second group of rollers are progressively elevated to position the last pair of rollers above the level of the stabilizing solution, there is a change in direction that results in bending of the metal plate 124. It is to be noted that the change in direction is relatively slight and it is to be further noted that the spacing between the two groups of rollers above the partition 22 permits the bending to be distributed lengthwise of the metal plate.' Because of the low angle and the liberal space for the bending to occur, the metal plate 124 is not flexed beyond its elastic limits and therefore emerges from the apparatus as fiat as when it entered the apparatus.
The important features of the operation of the apparatus are: first, that the two solutions are applied only to the emulsion-coated under faces of the successive sheets; second, that the applied solutions are driven into the undersidcs of the sheets by the pressure created by the successive pairs of rollers; and, third, that since the successive sheets are not immersed in a solution in the course of the process, the high pressure exerted by the last pair of rollers 80 and 82 dries the successive sheets so effectively that the sheets may be used for mock ups without waiting through an additional drying period.
With the emulsion-coated faces of the successive sheets facing downward, the backs of the sheets are not wetted by either of the two solutions. For this reason the invention makes it possible to process sheets having adhesive coatings on their back faces with no possibility of applying the processing solutions to the back faces. This fact is of special importance in making mock ups because it makes it practical to provide the photosensitive sheets with adhesive coatings in advance of the processing of the sheets. For further convenience, the adhesive coatings may be pressure-sensitive adhesives covered by the usual protective sheets and the protective sheets may be peeled away as soon as the photosensitive sheets emerge from the apparatus.
The fact that the upper rollers are not appreciably wetted by the solutions and the fact that the solutions are applied solely to the under faces of the successive sheets, may be understood by referring to FIG. 7. In FIG. 7 the lower feed roller 66 is liberally immersed in the activator solution 14 and consequently a liberal layer of the activator solution accumulates on the forward side of the roller 66 between the body of solution and the flat pressure zone 126 that is formed by the two rollers. If a sheet of photosensitive material is not present between the two rollers 66 and 68, the pressure zone 126 functions as an effective barrier against further travel of the clinging solution. Consequently the rear surface 128 of the lower roller 66 is substantially dry and the whole peripheral surface of the upper roller 68 is dry except at the entrance to the pressure zone 126.
When a photosensitive sheet is fed to the two rollers 66 and 68, solution from the coating 125 on the lower roller is transferred to the underside of the traveling sheet but no solution is applied to the upper face of the traveling sheet by the upper roller 68. As the traveling sheet passes through the pressure zone 126 the relatively high pressure created by the lower roller 66 drives the solution into the underside of the photosensitive sheet with the consequence that the emulsion coating on the underside of the traveling sheet is penetrated more effectively than would be possible by merely immersing the whole sheet into the solution.
My description in specific detail of the selected embodiment of the invention will suggest various changes, sub stitutions and other departures from my disclosure within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.
I claim:
1. In a photographic processing apparatus for applying processing liquid to sheets of print stock to develop latent images thereon, the combination of:
container means having an input end and an output end with the container means forming a receptacle adjacent its input end for an activating solution and forming a receptacle near its output end for a stabilizer solution;
a series of upper rollers above the liquid level of the processing liquid and a series of lower rollers cooperative therewith to engage the sheets and transport the sheets from the input end of the container means to the output end across the processing liquid above the level thereof;
the rollers of both series being relatively close together and forming a substantially continuous bank of rollers from the input end of the container means to the output end to keep the sheets under close control including relatively short sheets and sheets of limp fabric,
some of the lower rollers being partially immersed in the processing liquid to apply the processing liquid to the under surfaces of the sheets,
a final lower roller on the output end being above the liquid level of the processing liquid and cooperating with a corresponding upper roller to squeegee the sheets,
said rollers being divided into a first group above the activating solution and a second group above the stabilizer solution;
power means;
a drive shaft connected to the power means and extending between the two groups of rollers parallel thereto,
and means including gearing for actuation of the rollers by the drive shaft, said gearing including two gear trains on opposite sides, respectively, of the container means for driving the two groups of rollers respectively,
said drive shaft having two gears on its opposite ends which are members of the two gear trains respectively,
alternate gears of each of the two gear trains being unitary with the rollers respectively of the series of lower rollers,
said gear trains being separate from each other to prevent migration of the activating solution along the gearing to the stabilizer solution.
2. In a photographic processing apparatus for applying processing liquid to sheets of print stock to develop latent images thereon, the combination of:
container means to contain a supply of the processing liquid; and
a series of upper rollers above the liquid level of the processing liquid and a series of lower rollers paired therewith to engage the sheets and transport the sheets from the input end of the container means to the output end across the liquid above the level thereof,
the pairs of rollers being relatively close together to keep the sheets under close control from the input end of the container means to the output end,
the pairs of rollers being divided into a first group near the input end of the container means and a second group leading to the output end of the container means, the pairs of rollers of the second group defining a path of travel of the sheets that is inclined upward from the path of travel defined by the first group of rollers,
the space between the two groups of rollers being greater than the space between the successive pairs of rollers in either group to provide room for bending of the sheets as they pass from the first group of rollers to the second group of rollers to avoid bending the sheets beyond the elastic limits of sheet metal stock.
References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,107,596 10/1963 Arnold et al 9594 X 3,270,654 9/1966 Russell et a1 95--89 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,206,285 2/1960 France.
943,653 12/1963 Great Britain.
NORTON ANSHER, Primary Examiner.
20 F. L. BRAUN, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSING APPARATUS FOR APPLYING PROCESSING LIQUID TO SHEETS OF PRINT STOCK TO DEVELOP LATENT IMAGES THEREON, THE COMBINATION OF: CONTAINER MEANS HAVING AN INPUT END AND AN OUTPUT END WITH THE CONTAINER MEANS FORMING A RECEPTACLE ADJACENT ITS INPUT END FOR AN ACTIVATING SOLUTION AND FORMING A RECEPTACLE NEAR ITS OUTPUT END FOR A STABILIZER SOLUTION; A SERIES OF UPPER ROLLERS ABOVE THE LIQUID LEVEL OF THE PROCESSING LIQUID AND A SERIES OF LOWER ROLLERS COOPERATIVE THEREWITH TO ENGAGE THE SHEETS AND TRANSPORT THE SHEETS FROM THE INPUT END OF THE CONTAINER MEANS TO THE OUTPUT END ACROSS THE PROCESSING LIQUID ABOVE THE LEVEL THEREOF; THE ROLLERS OF BOTH SERIES BEING RELATIVEL CLOSE TOGETHER AND FORMING A SUBSTANTIALLY CONTINUOUS BANK OF ROLLERS FROM THE INPUT END OF THE CONTAINER MEANS TO THE OUTPUT END TO KEEP THE SHEETS UNDER CLOSE CONTROL INCLUDING RELATIVELY SHORT SHEETS AND SHEETS OF LIMP FABRIC, SOME OF THE LOWER ROLLERS BEING PARTIALLY IMMERSED IN THE PROCESSING LIQUID TO APPLY THE PROCESSING LIQUID TO THE UNDER SURFACES OF THE SHEETS, A FINAL LOWER ROLLER ON THE OUTPUT END BEING ABOVE THE LIQUID LEVEL OF THE PROCESSING LIQUID AND COOPERATING WITH A CORRESPONDING UPPER ROLLER TO SQUEEGEE THE SHEETS, SAID ROLLERS BEING DIVIDED INTO A FIRST GROUP ABOVE THE ACTIVATING SOLUTION AND A SECOND GROUP ABOVE THE STABILIZER SOLUTION; POWER MEANS; A DRIVE SHAFT CONNECTED TO THE POWER MEANS AND EXTENDING BETWEEN THE TWO GROUPS OF ROLLERS PARALLEL THERETO, AND MEANS INCLUDING GEARING FOR ACTUATION OF THE ROLLERS BY THE DRIVE SHAFT, SAID GEARING INCLUDING TWO GEAR TRAINS ON OPPOSITE SIDES, RESPECTIVELY, OF THE CONTAINER MEANS FOR DRIVING THE TWO GROUPS OF ROLLERS RESPECTIVELY, SAID DRIVE SHAFT HAVING TWO GEARS ON ITS OPPOSITE ENDS WHICH ARE MEMBERS OF THE TWO GEAR TRAINS RESPECTIVELY, ALTERNATE GEARS OF EACH OF THE TWO GEAR TRAINS BEING UNITARY WITH THE ROLLERS RESPECTIVELY OF THE SERIES OF LOWER ROLLERS, SAID GEAR TRAINS BEING SEPARATE FROM EACH OTHER TO PREVENT MIGRATION OF THE ACTIVATING SOLUTION ALONG THE GEARING TO THE STABILIZER SOLUTION.
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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3375770A (en) * 1965-07-20 1968-04-02 J T Hellyer Inc Photographic processing machine
US3500734A (en) * 1967-10-04 1970-03-17 California Computer Products Photographic recorder and processor
US3591286A (en) * 1967-02-07 1971-07-06 Ricoh Kk Photographic copying machine
US3688677A (en) * 1969-12-12 1972-09-05 Agfa Gevaert Ag Apparatus for processing photographic material or the like
US3702581A (en) * 1971-03-17 1972-11-14 Horizons Research Inc Method and apparatus for forming images in anodized sheet metal
US3833918A (en) * 1972-02-21 1974-09-03 Agfa Gevaert Photographic processing apparatus
US4737811A (en) * 1985-09-25 1988-04-12 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Developing station of a processing system for printing plates
US5734946A (en) * 1995-11-08 1998-03-31 Agfa Ag Processing device for photographic materials
US6022152A (en) * 1998-12-07 2000-02-08 Eastman Kodak Company Non-abrasive processing of printing plates

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR1206285A (en) * 1958-07-03 1960-02-09 Photocopy developing device
US3107596A (en) * 1960-04-07 1963-10-22 Peerless Photo Products Inc Photocopy machine
GB943653A (en) * 1959-12-17 1963-12-04 Kodak Ltd Improvements in or relating to a photographic processing apparatus
US3270654A (en) * 1964-02-06 1966-09-06 Eastman Kodak Co Roller transfer processing mechanism

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR1206285A (en) * 1958-07-03 1960-02-09 Photocopy developing device
GB943653A (en) * 1959-12-17 1963-12-04 Kodak Ltd Improvements in or relating to a photographic processing apparatus
US3107596A (en) * 1960-04-07 1963-10-22 Peerless Photo Products Inc Photocopy machine
US3270654A (en) * 1964-02-06 1966-09-06 Eastman Kodak Co Roller transfer processing mechanism

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3375770A (en) * 1965-07-20 1968-04-02 J T Hellyer Inc Photographic processing machine
US3591286A (en) * 1967-02-07 1971-07-06 Ricoh Kk Photographic copying machine
US3500734A (en) * 1967-10-04 1970-03-17 California Computer Products Photographic recorder and processor
US3688677A (en) * 1969-12-12 1972-09-05 Agfa Gevaert Ag Apparatus for processing photographic material or the like
US3702581A (en) * 1971-03-17 1972-11-14 Horizons Research Inc Method and apparatus for forming images in anodized sheet metal
US3833918A (en) * 1972-02-21 1974-09-03 Agfa Gevaert Photographic processing apparatus
US4737811A (en) * 1985-09-25 1988-04-12 Hoechst Aktiengesellschaft Developing station of a processing system for printing plates
US5734946A (en) * 1995-11-08 1998-03-31 Agfa Ag Processing device for photographic materials
US6022152A (en) * 1998-12-07 2000-02-08 Eastman Kodak Company Non-abrasive processing of printing plates

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