US3315364A - Universal gauge - Google Patents

Universal gauge Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3315364A
US3315364A US408548A US40854864A US3315364A US 3315364 A US3315364 A US 3315364A US 408548 A US408548 A US 408548A US 40854864 A US40854864 A US 40854864A US 3315364 A US3315364 A US 3315364A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
gauge
case
jaw
slide
movement
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US408548A
Inventor
Joseph S Olasz
Rodney E Moseman
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Hamilton Watch Co
Original Assignee
Hamilton Watch Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Hamilton Watch Co filed Critical Hamilton Watch Co
Priority to US408548A priority Critical patent/US3315364A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3315364A publication Critical patent/US3315364A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01BMEASURING LENGTH, THICKNESS OR SIMILAR LINEAR DIMENSIONS; MEASURING ANGLES; MEASURING AREAS; MEASURING IRREGULARITIES OF SURFACES OR CONTOURS
    • G01B5/00Measuring arrangements characterised by the use of mechanical means
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01BMEASURING LENGTH, THICKNESS OR SIMILAR LINEAR DIMENSIONS; MEASURING ANGLES; MEASURING AREAS; MEASURING IRREGULARITIES OF SURFACES OR CONTOURS
    • G01B3/00Instruments as specified in the subgroups and characterised by the use of mechanical measuring means

Description

April 25, 1967 J. s. OLASZ ETAL UNIVERSAL GAUGE s Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 5, 1964 ATTORNEY April 25, 1967 4. s. OLASZ ETAL UNIVERSAL GAUGE 6 Sheets$heet 2 Filed Nov. 3, 1964 I F I "I1" JOSEPH S. OLASZ RODNEY EfMOSEMAN ATTORNEY April 25, 1967 J. s. OLASZ ETAL UNIVERSAL GAUGE 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. 3, 1964 JOSEPH S. OLASZ RODNEY E. MOSEMAN ATTORNEY J. S. OLASZ ETAL April 25, 1967 UNIVERSAL GAUGE 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Nov; 3, 1964 HQ ii INVENTORS JOSEPH S. OLASZ RODNEY E. MOSEMAN ATTORNEY5 Apn'il 25, 1967v J. 5. oLA sz ETAL 3,315,364
UNIVERSAL GAUGE Filed NOV. 3, 1964 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 lllllllllllllllfl' JOSEPH S. OLASZ 280 RODNEY E. MOSEMAN W f wt.
ATTORNEYS April 25, 1961 J. 5. OLASZ ml.
UNIVERSAL GAUGE 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Nov 5, 1964 JOSEPH S. OLASZ RODNEY E. MOSEMAN m a ATTORNEY United States Patent UNIVERSAL GAUGE Joseph S. Olasz, Lancaster, and Rodney E. Moseman, Lititz, Pa., assignors to Hamilton Watch Company, Lancaster, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Nov. 3, 1964, Ser. No. 408,548 12 Claims; (Cl. 33-147) This invention relates to gauging devices and more particularly to a fine gauge suitable for use as both a hand instrument and a bench gauge capable of making a wide variety of measurements over an increased range of dimensions.
Earlier types of fine gauges or calipers often consisted of a rectangular bar having a fixed jaw mounted or formed thereon. A groove or slot was cut along the back of the bar and a second movable jaw was slidably mounted in this groove so that it was free to move back and forth along the bar. A pointer arrangement was mounted on the movable aw and a scale was engraved on could be obtained which indicated the distance by which the two jaws were separated.
This earlier type of caliper suffered from several notable disadvantages. The slidable jaw arrangement was highly undesirable for calipers where a high degree of accuracy was necessary such as for example in watch manufacturing since this arrangement exhibited a great amount of friction and was subject to momentary jamming due to the sliding surfaces. If during this momentary jamming the operator applied enough force to move the jammed elements, the extremely small and delicate parts being measured were subjected to excessive forces when the jaws became unjammed and the movable jaw was forced against the part. These excessive forces very often resulted in the part being permanently damaged and therefore unusable.
In assignees copending application, Ser. No. 155,104, filed Nov. 27, 1961, now abandoned, there is disclosed a fine gauge construction overcoming many of the difiiculties In the arranged to support the various elements and thereby substantially eliminating any friction between the movable jaw and housing assembly. In addition, the indicator movement floats, that is, is spring mounted, and is provided with a zero set adjustment to permit a more accurate zero adjustment in which the entire indicator movement is re-positioned.
The present invention provides an improved gauge construction of the type disclosed in the afore-mentioned copending application, particularly suited for use with a wide variety of indicator movements to provide a greatly increased range of measurement. By using conventional commercially available movements measurements can be made to a smallest increment of .00005 inch with a range of .004 inch. Other ranges are available using different ones of the five commercial indicator movements currently available, each having a different ranges. The range of the instrument depends upon the setting of the jaws and by moving the jaws it is possible to make measurements of as much as one inch.
The gauge may be used with a number of different accessories to not only extend the measurement range even further but also to make a wide variety of measurements including not only Width, but also depth, inside diameter, and outside diameter measurements. The gauge of this invention has overall dimensions of approximately 3 /2" by 2 /2" by 1 inch and may be readily used as a hand gauge. However, in conjunction with various stands and other attachments herein disclosed,
3,315,364 Patented Apr. 25, 1967 the gauge has almost universal application as a bench gauge for use not only as a caliper but also as an indicating micrometer, a recess depth gauge, and a long range internal-external gauge capable of measuring distances from 3 inches to 6 feet and larger.
Important features of the gauge of the present invention include the frictionless mounting of the gauging element, floating interchangeable indicator movements, adjustable gauging pressure, internal fine adjustment, interchangeable gauge feelers, a wide choice of bench accessories, and use with either a standard indicator release button or a cable release, all provided in a relatively simplified small and inexpensive construction permitting relatively simple adjustment and easy maintenance.
It is therefore one object of. the present invention to provide a novel fine gauge.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a gauge suitable for use in a wide variety of measurements.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a gauge capable of accommodating interchangeable movements having ditferent ranges.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a gauge having a substantially frictionless slidable jaw mounting.
Another object of the a small gauging device gauge and a bench gauge.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a gauge capable of button or cable actuation and adapted for use with a wide variety of support accessories.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a multi-jaw gauge usable with a number of interchange able gauge feelers.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a gauge having both the movable jaw and the indicator movement supported by a plurality of leaf springs. Provision is made for adjusting the position of both the stationary and movable gauge jaws. Accessories are provided including a cable release, a plurality of interchangeable feelers, base attachments, and range extension devices for increasing the versatility of the gauge. Internal fine adjustment is provided by a separate screw assembly bearing upon a floating mounting plate carrying the indicator movement. Also provided is a relatively simple adjustment for changing the spring bias of the movable jaw to adjust the gauging pressure of the unit. Both the stationary and movable jaws are provide-d with clamps for receiving a plurality of interchangeable gauge feelers providing a choice of the feeler most suited to the particular gauging problem. Movable tolerance hands positioned over the gauge dial make it possible to quickly and easily ascertain whether or not the gauged part is Within the desired limits.
These and further objects and advantages of the invention will be more apparent upon reference to the following specification, claims, and appended drawings, wherein:
FIGURE 1 is a front elevation of the basic gauge of the present invention;
FIGURE 2 is a view similar to that of FIGURE 1 with the dial plate removed showing the internal mechanism of the gauge;
FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 With the top plate of the indicator movement removed to further show the internal mechanism of the device;
FIGURE 4 is a cross-section taken along line 44 of FIGURE 2;
FIGURE 5 shows the gauge of FIGURE 1 used with a micrometer attachment;
FIGURE 6 shows the gauge of FIGURE 1 used in conjunction with a nonrotating feeler carrier;
present invention is to provide capable of use as both a hand FIGURE 7 is an enlarged view showing a backstop attachment connected to the gauge;
FIGURE 8 is a side elevation of stop attachment of FIGURE 7;
FIGURE 9 is a view showing a base attachment for the gauge of FIGURE 1;
FIGURE 10 is a front elevation of the gauge of FIG- URE "9;
FIGURE 11 is a view showing the gauge used in conjunction with a horizontal jaw gauge base;
FIGURE 12 is a view of the gauge taken at right angles to that of FIGURE 11;
FIGURE 13 is a front elevation of the gauge and base shown in FIGURES 11 and 12;
FIGURE 14 shows a gauge used with a recess depth gauge attachment;
FIGURE 15 is a view showing a typical component placement for outside diameter measurement with the gauge of FIGURE 1;
FIGURE 16 is an end view of the assembly of FIG- URE 15;
FIGURE 17 is a front view showing a typical component placement for inside diameter measurement with the gauge of FIGURE 1;
FIGURE 18 is a plan view of a gauge support component of FIGURES 15 and 17; and
FIGURE 19 is a plan view of a second gauge support component of FIGURES 15 and 17.
Referring to the drawings, the novel fine gauge of the present invention generally indicated at 10 in FIGURE 1 comprises a casing 12 on which is mounted a fixed jaw 14 and a movable gauge jaw 16. The jaws carry removable gauge feelers 18 and 20.
Mounted in the casing 12 is a dial plate 22 provided with suitable markings and number indicia to indicate the dimensions of the device being gauged. The gauge is provided with a rotatable indicator or hand 24 which moves in accordance with the spacing between the gauge feelers 18 and 20, Also positioned over the dial plate and manually movable from outside the casing are a pair of limit hands 26 and 23 which can be set to the permissible limits for a part being measured. In this way when the indicator 24 is located between the limit hands 26 and 28 the acceptability of the gauged part may be readily determined. Casing 12 is provided with an elongated aperture 30 through which projects the periphery of the wheel of a fine adjustment screw 32. The fine adjustment is provided to accurately adjust the Zero setting of the gauge. A release button assembly 34 is threaded into the side wall of the casing 12 and provides an operating button 36 for spreading the gauge jaws 14 and 16.
Referring to FIGURE 4 the casing 12 is provided with a back plate 33 secured to the casing by screws such as 40 and with a front or cover plate 42 secured to the front of the casing by screws such as indicated at 44. Cover plate 42 is preferably made of suitable plastic and is provided with annular opaque portion 46 in which is mounted a glass or other transparent circular disc 48 through which the dial plate 22 is visible. Secured to the center of the annular glass disc is an opaque central hub upon which are rotatably mounted by a sliding fit a pair of thin flat metal indicators 52 and 54 having formed integral therewith the limit hands 26 and 28 of FIGURE 1. The limit hand carrying indicators are preferably rotatably received over a reduced diameter portion of the central hub 50 and are located externally of the glass viewing plate 48 so that they may be manually adjusted to the desired position by simply grasping the limit hands 26 and 28 and rotating them into position. The hands remain in place once adjusted by the frictional engagement of the indicators 52 and 54 with the hub 50.
FIGURE 2 is a front elevation of the gauge 10 with the cover plate removed and the dial plate 22 omitted to make visible the internal indicator movement generally indithe gauge and back- 4f cated at 56; It is this movement which drives the hand 24 by way of the central shaft 56 upon which the indicator hand is mounted. Movement 56 may be any one of several commercially available indicator movements so that various measurement ranges may be obtained with the gauge 10 depending upon which of the interchangeable movements is utilized. The movement 56 generally comprises a top plate 60 and a bottom plate 62 joined together by three screws 64. Suitably mounted between these plates is a gear and hair spring assembly for driving the indicating hand 22.
FIGURE 3 is a view similar to that of FIGURE 2 with the top plate 60 of the movement 56 removed to illustrate the co-action of the indicator movement with the movable jaw 16 of the gauge. The indicator movement 56 is mounted on a floating support plate 66 by means of three screws 68 which pass through the bottom plate 62 of the movement and are secured to the mounting plate 66.
A mounting bar 70 is provided within the casing adjacent its upper end in FIGURE 2 and is attached to the casing by a pair of Allen head bolts 72 and 74. Shaft 76 of fine adjustment screw 32 is threadedly received through the mounting bar and bears at its end 78 against a pad 80 received in an integral upturned flange 82 provided on the mounting plate 66. Secured to the other side of this flange by a screw 84 is a generally Z-shaped flat rectangular beryllium-copper reed or leaf spring 86. The other end of this leaf spring 86 is attached to the mounting bar 70 by a pair of screws 88 and 90. A second upturned flange 92 is provided on the mounting plate 66 adjacent the end of pointer 24 in FIGURE 2 and to this latter flange is secured the end of a second leaf or reed spring 94 by means of block 96 receiving screws 98 and 100. The other end of leaf spring 94 is secured to the mounting bar 70 by a spacer block 102 and a pair of screws 104 and 106 threaded into the end of the mounting bar. In this way the support or mounting plate 66 is provided with a resilient or floating mount by means of the leaf springs 86 and 594 so that movement of the adjustment screw 32 acts through the shaft 76 and pad 80 to cause the movement 56 to pivot in an adjustable manner so as to vary the zero setting of the meter. The end of shaft 76 adjacent pad 80 carries a transverse pin 108 received with a friction fit through the shaft. Rotation of shaft 76 brings the outer end of pin 108 into engagement with a stationary pin 110 frictionally received in mounting bar 70 such that the two pins 108 and 110 act as a stop for the adjustment screw 32. Shaft 76 is permitted slightly less than 360 of rotation so that further rotation of the shaft is prevented by the pin 108 bearing either on the upper side or underside of pin 110 depending upon the direction of rotation of the shaft.
An elongated outer leaf spring 112 has one end secured to spacer block 102 by the screws 104 and 106 and an end block 114. A similar outer leaf spring 116 on the other side of the meter is secured to the opposite end of mounting bar 70 by end block 118 and screws 120, 121, and 122. Screws 124 and 126 pass through end blocks 128 and 130 and the opposite ends of the outer leaf springs 112 and 11-6 securing these springs to a slide member 132. As best seen in FIGURE 3 slide member 132 is provided with an enlarged block portion 134 which threadedly receives an elongated bolt 136 which secures the movable jaw 16 to the slide 132. A pair of dowel pins 138 and 140 are frictionally received both through the movable jaw 16 and the slide block 134further aligning and joining these elements. Movable jaw 16 includes a tongue extension 142 which reciprocates in an elongated aperture 144 in the casing in the direction of the arrows 146 in FIGURE 3. Tongue 142 is slightly spaced from the side walls of the aperture 144 so that the reciprocating movement of the jaw 16 is free of any frictional engagement with the side walls of the aperture 144 in the casing.
Slide 132 includes a flat loop portion 148 located beneath the bottom plate 62 of the movement 56, that is pad 56 rotating lever 158 in a extending between the bottom plate of the movement and the mounting plate 66. Bottom plate 62 of the movement is cutaway to define a notch permitting passage of an upstanding flange 152 on the loop portion 148 of the slide. This flange 152 carries a pad 154 engaging a similar pad 156 mounted on the end of a sector lever 158. Lever 158 is pivoted to rotate with the shaft 160 journalled in the top and bottom plates of the movement and the end of the lever is provided with a sector gear 162 engaging the first gear 164 of the movement. Movement 56 is provided with the customary gear train coupling from gear 164 to output shaft 58 and the conventional hairspring 165 is provided to resist rotation of this output shaft. By way of example only, movement 56 may be of the type manufactured by the Citizen Watch Company identified as movement number MM 250H. Several different movements having different ranges are available and may be readily substituted in the gauge.
Operating button 36 is slidably mounted in a knurled bushing 166 which is in turn threaded into a suitable aperture 168 in the side wall of the casing 12. Button 36 is mounted on the shaft 170 whose inner end passes through a suitable aperture in the leaf spring 112 and bears against a pad 172 carried a flange portion 174 of the slide 132. Also passing through the flange portion 174 of the slide is a rotatable pin 176 having a retaining head 178 and a transverse aperture 180 in its shaft. Aperture 180 receives one end of a tension spring generally indicated at 182. The other end of this spring is received through a similar aperture 184 in an adjustable screw 186 threaded into the side wall of the casing. By in serting a screwdriver into the head of screw 186 and rotating it the tension of the spring 182 can be varied so as to vary the gauging pressure applied to the slide 132 and hence to the movable jaw 16.
As best seen in FIGURE 4 each of the jaws 14 and 16 is bifurcated by a narrow central slot 188 to define a pair of slightly resilient spaced arms 190 and 192. Each of these arms is threaded to receive clamping screws 194 and 196 by means of which the feelers 18 and 20 may be clamped in the jaws between the arms 190 and 192 of each jaw. The jaws are suitably contoured to receive the cylindrical shanks 198 and 200 of the respective feelers 18 and 20. The gauging distance is the distance separating the feeler tips 202 and 204 which are illustrated in FIGURES 1 through 3 as in contact, that is at the zero setting of the gauge.
Fixed jaw 14 is attached to the casing 12 by a pair of bolts 206 and 208. The casing is preferably provided with an additional threaded hole 210 so that the position of the fixed jaw 14 may be shifted by removing the bolts 206 and 208 from the apertures 207 and 209 and inserting them into the apertures 207 and 210. This substantially increases the range of the gauge when the fixed jaw 14 is moved from the inner position illustrated to the outer position with screws 206 and 208 in threaded holes 207 and 210. Casing 12 is also provided with a threaded aperture on its side as indicated at 212 which receives an attachment screw 214 for securing different attachments to the gauge in a manner more fully described below.
In operation as a hand gauge, manual depression of the operator button 36 causes shaft 170 to bear against pad 172 and drive the slide 132 to the right thus moving jaw 16 away from jaw 14. The object to be measured is inserted between the now spaced feeler tips 202 and 204 and the operator button 36 released. Springs 112 and 114 supporting the slide and movable jaw suitably bias the jaw closed and the biasing action of these springs causes the movable jaw to retract upon the object to be measured between the feeler tips 202 and 204. This retracting movement brings pad 154 into contact with counterclockwise direction about pivot 160 and driving the indicator 24 through the sector 162, gear 164, the gear train and finally output shaft 58. The object is released by again depressing the operator button 36 to open the gauge so that the object may be removed from between the feelers.
FIGURE 5 illustrates the gauge 10 used in conjunction With a micrometer attachment generally indicated at 216. This attachment by way of example only may be a Starrett Company micrometer head, Catalogue 236 XL. When so used, screws 206 and 208 are loosened and the fixed jaw 14 removed. The micrometer head 216 is then attached by these same screws and is provided with an upwardly projecting arm 218 which receives the attachment screw 214 so that the micrometer attachment is secured not only to the bottom edge but also to the side wall of the gauge. Screw 196 is loosened and the cylindrical shaft of the feeler 20 slid out and removed from the movable jaw 16 and is replaced by the feeler 220 of FIGURE 5, particularly suited for use with the micrometer attachment 216. The gauging space is now defined by the abutting surfaces 222 and 224 in FIGURE 5.
FIGURE 6 shows a further modification wherein the gauge 10 is provided with a non-rotatable feeler or anvil carrier 226. An operator button 228 is provided to advance and retract the anvil 230 toward and away from fixed feeler 232 removably held in the movable jaw 16. Once the anvil 230 is in the correct position it is locked in that position by locking screw 234 threadedly received in the support 226 and engaging the anvil 230. Nonrotating anvil support 226 is attached to the gauge 10 in the identical manner as the micrometer attachment of FIGURE 5. The non-rotating anvil carrier with interchangeable feelers offers the same features as the indicating micrometer but the non-rotating anvils are a definite advantage for maintaining anvil parallelism which might be otherwise slightly modified by anvil rotation.
FIGURES 7 and 8 show the gauge 10 used in conjunction with a backstop attachment generally indicated at 236. This backstop attachment comprises a flat plate 238 attached to the gauge 10 by screws 240 and 242 threaded into the lower edge of the casing 12 through elongated slots 241 and 243. The plate is provided with an integral offset lug 244. This lug is attached to one end of a lever 246 by a screw 248. The other end of the lever 246 receives a second screw 250 also threaded through the backstop 252. As is apparent from the drawings the position of the backstop may be adjusted by loosening screws 248 and 250 and once the desired position is obtained these screws are tightened with the backstop in the appropriate position between the gauge feelers 18 and 20 to function as a backstop in a normal wellknown manner. Additional adjustment is gained by positioning the elongated slots 241 and 243 under screws 240 and 242.
The hand gauge 10 can be converted to a bench gauge by attaching suitable stands to the back of the gauge. Two basic stands are available to convert these hand held units to bench gauges. FIGURES 9 and 10 show a plain stand which is available and which may be attached to the basic unit 10 so that the gauge may be set at any angle for easy reading of the dial. The back plate 38 of FIGURE 4 is replaced in FIGURE 9 by a lug indicator back 254 having an integral lug 256 by means of which the gauge 10 may be adjustably mounted on the stand 258. FIGURE 10 also illustrates that the gauge 10 may be operated by a release cable 260. In this case, the release button assembly 34 of FIGURE 1 is replaced by a conventional cable attachment 262 which is threaded into the side wall of the casing 12 and the release cable 260 is coupled to this attachment. Operation is by means of the cable operator 264.
FIGURES ll, 12 and 13 illustrate the gauge used in conjunction with a horizontal support stand 264. In this case, the standard back plate 38 of FIGURE 4 is replaced by a slide back plate 266 attached to the stand 264 by the slide coupling indicated at 268 in conjunction with the bolt 270 passing through the stand. This arrangement permits the gauge to be centered over the Stand 264 is provided with a boss 272 slidably receiving the support pin 274 of an adjustable stage 276. The stage 276 is locked in the desired position by a locking screw 278. This stand permits the gauge 10 to be used in the horizontal position illustrated in FIGURES 11, 12 and 13. The standard gauge feelers 18 and 20 are rotated through 90 as best seen in FIG- URE 12 from the position illustrated in FIGURE 1 to provide the desired gauging action.
FIGURE 14 shows the gauge used in conjunction with a recess depth gauge attachment. In this construction the back plate 254 of FIGURE 9 is used on the gauge in conjunction with a depth gauge stand 280. The lug 256 on the back plate 254 of the gauge is secured to the stand 280 by a bolt indicated at dash lines at 282 in FIGURE 14. An anvil is attached to the lower edge of the gauge by means of the screws 206 and 208 of FIGURE 5 and supports a work stage 283. The conventional feeler 20 of movable jaw 16 is replaced by a special feeler 284. The unique feature of the depth gauge of FIGURE 14 is that it will measure the depth of a recess, counterbore, or in some cases the depth of a shoulder as a direct reading.
FIGURES 15 and 16 are front elevation and end views, respectively, of the gauge 10 used in conjunction with a long range external diameter measurement attachment. In this embodiment the gauge is mounted on the end of a piece 286 to be measured. The workpiece 286 is shown as having a reduced diameter at its upper end illustrated at 288 and an internal bore 290. The gauge is supported on the fiat end surfaces 292 and 294 by the feet 296 and 298 of a pair of support brackets 300 and 302 having integral tubular portions 304 and 306 wrapping around and engaging the two lower pipes 308 and 310 of a tubular framework which includes an upper pipe 312. FIGURE 18 is a plan view of support 300 showing its mounting on the lower pipes 308 and 310 and showing the depending foot 296.
Coupling the pipes together are a plurality of spacer webs 314, 316 and 318 of generally triangular configuration as best seen in FIGURE 16, which webs likewise are slidable along the tubes but are held by friction in the position to which they are adjusted. Each of the webs carries a socket such as 320 and received in this socket in the two end webs 314 and 318 is a threaded pin supporting a ball handle 322 and 324. The large mass of the balls 322 and 324 acts as a heat sink so as to absorb body heat and prevent expansion of the gauge as a result of such body heat.
Also adjustably movable along the framework pipes is an extension bracket 326 having a groove 328 receiving a vertically movable slide 330. Threaded into the base of the groove 328 are a pair of screws 332 and 334 and these screws pass through an elongated slot 336 in the slide 330. By loosening screws 332 and 334 the vertical position of the slide in groove 328 may be adjusted as desired. Threaded into the lower end of the slide at 338 is a stationary gauge feeler 340.
Gauge 10 is slidably mounted on the support pipes by a suitable bracket 342. The movable jaw 16 is replaced by a modified movable feeler holder 344 which receives :a vertical rod 346. The position of the rod in holder 344 may be vertically adjusted and is held by a suitable set screw (not shown). Passing around the lower end of vertical rod 346 is a clamp 348 provided with a clamping :screw 350. Formed integral with the clamp is a socket 352 which receives the movable gauge feeler 354 also held in place by a set screw (not shown).
FIGURE 17 shows a similar long range assembly for measuring the inside diameter of the bore 290 of the workpiece 288. In FIGURE 17 like parts bear like reference numerals. In FIGURE 17 the slide bracket 326 is moved to the right along the tubes or pipes so that the feeler 340 engages the inner righthand wall of the .bore 290. At lb? 53m? time gauge 10 is moved to the supporting bolt 270.
jaw secured to one end of said case,
left and either rod 346 is rotated in holder 348 or the clamp loosened and rotated 180 about the lower end of rod 346 so that the feeler 354 engages the left hand wall of the bore 290. In this embodiment, the support brackets 300 and 302 are turned around so that the feet 298 and 299, as best seen in FIGURE 19, are directed inwardly. These supports give a three point support for both measurements and provide clearance for the feelers 340 and 354 along with their cooperating support structure.
It is apparent from the foregoing that the present invention provides a novel hand gauge having universal application not only for readily checking parts by hand but also adapted to be used in conjunction with attachments as a bench gauge. Because of the interchangeable movements which may be readily provided in the gauge a wide variety of ranges are available and provision is also made for substantially extending the range through the use of a tubular support structure and sliding bracket mountings. A fine adjustment for zero setting is provided which gives increased accuracy because of the floating reed spring support of the dial movement. At the same time, friction is substantially reduced by also mounting the sliding jaw on a pair of leaf or reed springs in a manner such that the jaw and its supporting slide are completely clear or free of the gauge casing and therefore are subject to no sliding friction. Adjustable gauging pressure is available by the simple manipulation of a screw in the side of the gauge to vary the spring pressure on the movable jaw slide. A release button or cable release attachment is provided in the sidewall of the casing so that the device may be actuated either by hand or remotely by means of a cable. Pressure is applied directly to the spring mounted slide such that no intermediate linkage is required.
Important features of the present invention include among others, interchangeable movements, a frictionless mounting, adjustable gauging pressure, internal fine adjustment, a choice of gauge feelers, and a wide choice of accessories for extended ranges and different types of measurements, all in conjunction with a relatively simple inexpensive gauge providing ready repair and easy maintenance.
The invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodiments are therefore to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.
What is claimed and desired to be secured by United States Letters Patent is:
1. A precision linear gauge comprising a generally fiat, rectangular case, a fixed jaw secured to said case, a movable jaw, leaf spring means within said case and supporting said movatble jaw for reciprocating movement into and out of engagement with said fixed jaw, a dial indicator movement coupled to said movable jaw, support means including a spring resiliently supporting said indicator movement within said case, and means passing through said case and bearing against said support means for adjusting the zero position of said indicator movement.
2. A gauge according to claim 1 wherein said support means includes a pair of leaf springs supporting said indicator movement in a floating position in said case, and said adjusting means comprises a screw for adjusting the position of said movement.
3. A gauge according to claim 2 including stop means for limiting the rotation of said adjusting screw.
4. A precision linear gauge comprising a case, a fixed said one end of said case having an elongated aperture formed therein, a movable jaw, a slide member within said case having 9 a portion extending through said aperture and secured to said movable jaw, said portion being reciprocatable in said aperture free of the aperture walls, a mounting bar in said case, a pair of spaced leaf springs supporting said slide member from said mounting bar, a dial indicator movement having an actuator pad mounted in said case, said slide member including an actuator for engaging said pad, a release button external of said case, a shaft secured to said release button and passing through said case, the inner end of said shaft bearing against said slide member whereby depression of said button pushes said slide member to drive said movable jaw away from said fixed jaw against the bias action of said leaf springs,
5. A gauge according to claim 4 including a tension spring coupled to said slide element, and adjusting means accessible from outside said case for adjusting the tension of said tension spring.
6. A gauge according to claim 5 wherein said dial indicator movement includes top and bottom plates, a lever carrying said actuator pad at one end pivoted between said plates, a gear train mounted between said plates, and a sector on the other end of said lever meshing with the first gear of said gear train.
7. A precision linear gauge comprising a case, a fixed jaw secured to one end of said case, said one end of said case having an elongated aperture formed therein, a movable jaw, a slide member within said case having a portion extending through said aperture and secured to said movable jaw, said portion being reciprocatable in said aperture free of the aperture walls, -a mounting bar in said case, a pair of spaced leaf springs supporting said slide member from said mounting bar, a floating support plate in said case, spring means supporting said support plate from said mounting bar, an adjusting screw having a portion passing through said case, the inner end of said adjusting screw bearing against said support plate whereby rotation of said screw acts to adjust the position of said support plate, a dial and indicator movement including top and bottom plates mounted on said support plates, a lever carrying an actuator pad at one end pivoted between said top and bottom plates, said slide member including an actuator for engaging said pad, a gear train mounted between said plates, a sector on the other end of said lever meshing with the first gear of said gear train, an indicator hand driven by said gear train and movable over said dial within said case, and release means passing through said case and bearing on said slide member whereby actuation of said release means pushes said slide member to drive said movable jaw away from said fixed jaw against the bias action of said leaf springs.
8. A gauge according to claim 7 wherein said jaws are bifurcated to define a pair of spaced arms, and means for clamping the arms of each jaw around the shank of a removable gauge feeler.
9. A gauge according to claim 8 wherein said release means comprises a cable fitting threaded into the side of said case, and an actuator cable coupled to said fitting.
10. A precision linear gauge comprising a case, a fixed jaw secured to one end of said case, said one end of said case having an elongated aperture formed therein,
a movable jaw, a slide member within said case having a portion extending through said aperture and secured to said movable jaw, said portion being reciprocatable in said aperture free of the aperture walls, a mounting bar in said case, a pair of spaced leaf springs supporting said slide member from said mounting bar, a floating support plate in said case, spring means supporting said support plate from said mounting bar, an adjusting screw having a portion passing through said case, the inner end of said adjusting screw bearing against said support plate whereby rotation of said screw acts to adjust the position of said support plate, a dial and indicator movement including top and bottom plates mounted on said support plate, a lever carrying an actuator pad at one end pivoted between said top and bottom plates, said slide member including an actuator for engaging said pad, a gear train mounted between said plates, a sector on the other end of said lever meshing with the first gear of said gear train, an indicator hand driven by said gear train and movable over said dial within said case, release means passing through said case and bearing on said slide member whereby actuation of said release means pushes said slide member to drive said movable jaw away from said fixed jaw against the bias action of said leaf springs, a transparent cover over the front of said case, said cover including a central hub, and pair of indicators rotatably received over said hub, said indicators each carrying a radially exending limit hand manually settable in position over said dial.
11. A gaugeaccording to claim 10 including a tension spring having one end coupled to said slide element, a screw threaded into said case, and means coupilng the other end of said tension spring to said screw, whereby rotation of said screw varies the tension on said slide element and said movable jaw.
12. A gauge according to claim 11 wherein said gear train is coupled to an output shaft passing through said dial and carrying said indicator hand, and hairspring means acting on said output shaft to bias said indicator hand to its zero position.
References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 855,865 6/1907 Roost 33174 1,648,138 1'1/1927 Lauer 33172 1,981,153 11/1934 Schoof 33147 2,200,479 5/ 1940 Sisson et al 33-147 2,507,727 5/1950 Loxham 33l72 2,663,945 12/1953 Emery 33-172 2,772,481 12/1956 Grobey 33147 2,792,802 5/1957 Sagona 33-172 2,906,029 9/1959 Croshier et al. 33167 3,061,934 11/1962 Dow 33-172 FOREIGN PATENTS 730,333 5/1955 Great Britain.
779,246 7/ 1957 Great Britain.
LEONARD F ORMAN, Primary Examiner.
W. D. MARTIN, JR., Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A PRECISION LINEAR GAUGE COMPRISING A GENERALLY FLAT, RECTANGULAR CASE, A FIXED JAW SECURED TO SAID CASE, A MOVABLE JAW, LEAF SPRING MEANS WITHIN SAID CASE AND SUPPORTING SAID MOVABLE JAW FOR RECIPROCATING MOVEMENT INTO AND OUT OF ENGAGEMENT WITH SAID FIXED JAW, A DIAL INDICATOR MOVEMENT COUPLED TO SAID MOVABLE JAW, SUPPORT MEANS INCLUDING A SPRING RESILIENTLY SUPPORTING SAID INDICATOR MOVEMENT WITHIN SAID CASE, AND MEANS PASSING THROUGH SAID CASE AND BEARING AGAINST SAID SUPPORT MEANS FOR ADJUSTING THE ZERO POSITION OF SAID INDICATOR MOVEMENT.
US408548A 1964-11-03 1964-11-03 Universal gauge Expired - Lifetime US3315364A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US408548A US3315364A (en) 1964-11-03 1964-11-03 Universal gauge

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US408548A US3315364A (en) 1964-11-03 1964-11-03 Universal gauge

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3315364A true US3315364A (en) 1967-04-25

Family

ID=23616721

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US408548A Expired - Lifetime US3315364A (en) 1964-11-03 1964-11-03 Universal gauge

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3315364A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2463911A1 (en) * 1979-08-23 1981-02-27 Mouille Francois Single instrument for checking various dimensions - comprises fixed and movable probes providing reading on comparator gauge

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US855865A (en) * 1904-08-10 1907-06-04 Hermann Roost Measuring instrument.
US1648138A (en) * 1924-03-27 1927-11-08 Krupp Ag Precision indicator
US1981153A (en) * 1930-09-09 1934-11-20 Western Electric Co Measuring apparatus
US2200479A (en) * 1939-05-18 1940-05-14 Starrett L S Co Dial thickness gauge
US2507727A (en) * 1946-11-26 1950-05-16 Sigma Instr Co Ltd Linear-dimension gauge or comparator
US2663945A (en) * 1950-09-01 1953-12-29 Standard Gage Co Inc Shockproof dial indicator gauge
GB730333A (en) * 1951-12-22 1955-05-18 Sigma Instr Co Ltd Improvements in or relating to linear-dimension gauging instruments
US2772481A (en) * 1953-09-17 1956-12-04 Bryant Grinder Corp Gage having damped gaging movement
US2792802A (en) * 1955-06-23 1957-05-21 Sagona Charles Indicating means useable per se and as part of length-measuring instruments and gages
GB779246A (en) * 1953-09-08 1957-07-17 Goulder & Sons Ltd J Improvements in or relating to ring checking devices
US2906029A (en) * 1958-05-26 1959-09-29 Standard Gage Co Inc Wire holder for three wire method of measuring threads
US3061934A (en) * 1959-05-22 1962-11-06 Walter K Dow Flush pin gage and adapter therefor

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US855865A (en) * 1904-08-10 1907-06-04 Hermann Roost Measuring instrument.
US1648138A (en) * 1924-03-27 1927-11-08 Krupp Ag Precision indicator
US1981153A (en) * 1930-09-09 1934-11-20 Western Electric Co Measuring apparatus
US2200479A (en) * 1939-05-18 1940-05-14 Starrett L S Co Dial thickness gauge
US2507727A (en) * 1946-11-26 1950-05-16 Sigma Instr Co Ltd Linear-dimension gauge or comparator
US2663945A (en) * 1950-09-01 1953-12-29 Standard Gage Co Inc Shockproof dial indicator gauge
GB730333A (en) * 1951-12-22 1955-05-18 Sigma Instr Co Ltd Improvements in or relating to linear-dimension gauging instruments
GB779246A (en) * 1953-09-08 1957-07-17 Goulder & Sons Ltd J Improvements in or relating to ring checking devices
US2772481A (en) * 1953-09-17 1956-12-04 Bryant Grinder Corp Gage having damped gaging movement
US2792802A (en) * 1955-06-23 1957-05-21 Sagona Charles Indicating means useable per se and as part of length-measuring instruments and gages
US2906029A (en) * 1958-05-26 1959-09-29 Standard Gage Co Inc Wire holder for three wire method of measuring threads
US3061934A (en) * 1959-05-22 1962-11-06 Walter K Dow Flush pin gage and adapter therefor

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2463911A1 (en) * 1979-08-23 1981-02-27 Mouille Francois Single instrument for checking various dimensions - comprises fixed and movable probes providing reading on comparator gauge

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6553685B2 (en) Measuring instruments
US2627119A (en) Electromagnetic pickup for gauging devices
US2177399A (en) Measuring instrument
US4064633A (en) Gauging instrument
US3996670A (en) Protractor with digital readout
US4035922A (en) Digital electro-optical micrometer and gages
US4103427A (en) Electronic digital micrometer
KR20030055082A (en) Squreness Inspection System
US4982505A (en) Gauge for measuring both the depth and the diameter of a bore hole
US3781999A (en) Cutting tool setting device
CN207963779U (en) A kind of laser displacement sensor calibrating installation
CN103822565B (en) A kind of pitch-row comparing measuring apparatus
US2625585A (en) Magnetic measuring gauge
CN106705823A (en) Field calibration method for linear displacement sensor
US3116560A (en) Gage for determining size and angle of countersink
US2741848A (en) Combination micrometer caliper
US6868618B2 (en) Gauge and method
US5287631A (en) Precision extended-length micrometer with displacement meter probe adapter
CH672838A5 (en)
US5224274A (en) Contact gage
US4208796A (en) Gage for direct internal measurement
US4062120A (en) Digital electronic micrometer
US5253431A (en) Linear measurement device
US3911586A (en) Precision control apparatus
CN201145553Y (en) Adjustable hole center distance measuring rule