US3306168A - Gas operated semi-automatic pistol - Google Patents

Gas operated semi-automatic pistol Download PDF

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Publication number
US3306168A
US3306168A US48300865A US3306168A US 3306168 A US3306168 A US 3306168A US 48300865 A US48300865 A US 48300865A US 3306168 A US3306168 A US 3306168A
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Prior art keywords
receiver
barrel
bolt
frame
slide
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Expired - Lifetime
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Howard J Blumrick
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Howard J Blumrick
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A21/00Barrels; Gun tubes; Muzzle attachments; Barrel mounting means
    • F41A21/48Barrel mounting means, e.g. releasable mountings for replaceable barrels
    • F41A21/482Barrel mounting means, e.g. releasable mountings for replaceable barrels using continuous threads on the barrel
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A19/00Firing or trigger mechanisms; Cocking mechanisms
    • F41A19/06Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms
    • F41A19/42Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having at least one hammer
    • F41A19/43Mechanical firing mechanisms, e.g. counterrecoil firing, recoil actuated firing mechanisms having at least one hammer in bolt-action guns
    • F41A19/44Sear arrangements therefor
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A3/00Breech mechanisms, e.g. locks
    • F41A3/12Bolt action, i.e. the main breech opening movement being parallel to the barrel axis
    • F41A3/36Semi-rigid bolt locks, i.e. having locking elements movably mounted on the bolt or on the barrel or breech housing
    • F41A3/38Semi-rigid bolt locks, i.e. having locking elements movably mounted on the bolt or on the barrel or breech housing having rocking locking elements, e.g. pivoting levers or vanes
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A5/00Mechanisms or systems operated by propellant charge energy for automatically opening the lock
    • F41A5/18Mechanisms or systems operated by propellant charge energy for automatically opening the lock gas-operated

Description

Feb- 28, 1967 H. J. BLUMRICK GAS OPERTED SEMI-AUTOMATIC PISTOL 6 Sheets-$heet l Filed Aug. 16, 1965 IN VEN TOR.

Y. No l l l I l I l b l H. J. BLuMRlcK 3,306,168 GAS OPERATED SEMI-AUTOMATIC PISTOL 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

Feb. 28, 1967 l Filed Aug. 16, 1965 H. J. BLUMRICK GAS OPERATED SEMI-AUTOMATIC PISTOL Feb. 28, 1967 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 16, 1965 INVENTOR.

Wiet/aff Feb 28, 1967 H. L BLUMRICK GAS OPERATED SEMI-AUTOMATIC PISTOL 6 Sheets-SheefI 4 Filed Aug. 16, 1965 NaN QMN QQN S INVENTOR.

Feb- 28, 1967 H. J. BLUMRlcK GAS OPEHATED SEMI-AUTOMATIC PISTOL 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 16, 1965 INVENTOR.

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Feb. 28, 1967 H. J. BLUMRICK 3,306,168

GAS OPERATED SEMI-AUTOMATIC PISTOL Filed Aug. 16, 1965 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 IN V EN TOR.

.moving casing for the barrel.

nitedStates Patent Orifice 3,306,168 GAS OPERATED SEMI-AUTOMATIC PISTL Howard .1. Blumrick, 749 N. 98th St., Seattle, Wash. 98103 Filed Aug. 16, 1965, Ser. No. 483,008 12 Claims. (Cl. 89-191) This application is a continuation-impart of my copending patent application, Serial Number 151,699, tiling date of November 13, 1961, now abandoned, entitled Semi-Automatic Pistol.

This invention relates to a semi-automatic pistol, and which pistol is especially adapted for target shooting.

There have been invented and manufactured many automatic and semi-automatic pistols. The various pistols have become grouped in ditferent categories. For example, these pistols may be grouped -according to the position of the rear sight and the front sight. In one type `both the rear sight and the front are mounted on a In other words, the sights are not mounted on a fixed member of the gun, but are mounted on a moving member of the gun.

In a second ltype the front sight is mounted on a 'barrel and the rear sight is mounted on a member which moves. The rear sight may be mounted on a member which slides or on a member which rotates. However, the front and rear sights are mounted on two different members and one of which moves. In a third type the Ybarrel and the case are separate members of the gun. The front sight is mounted on the barrel and the rear sight is mounted on the case. In this instance the front and rear sights are not mounted on the same member but are mounted on two separa-te members. As a result of having the front and rear sights on different members of the gun or on `moving members of the gun, there is a possibility that the sights will not always be accurately aligned for the the best shooting. This is of particular importance in target shooting. As is known, if one of the sights is olf a small distance in target shooting, then there is introduced an error.

With this in mind I have invented a semi-automatic pistol having a ixed barrel and receiver. In fact, the barrel and receiver are integral or rigidly connected. The rear sight is mounted on the receiver and the front sight is mounted on the barrel. In this manner the sights are mounted on xed mem-bers. This leads to a greater degree of accuracy in the alignment of the sights and the tiring of the pistol. A further 4advantage of my invention is a light spring load on the trigger. With a light spring load on the trigger there is required only a light trigger action. A further advantage is the low maintenance of my pistol as there `are relatively few moving parts. As a corollary to the low maintenance, there is also the fact that my pistol is less expensive to manufacture, as there are few moving parts. In addition, it is easy and quick to disassemble the integral or rigidly connected barrel and receiver from the frame. Also, there are no screws except to hold on the hand grips, as the pivot pins and other parts are so located as to be prevented from shock, wear, etc., while the gun is in the assembled state. Further, the assembly problems are minor as the gun may be taken apart and completely reassembled with no other tool than a pin punch and a screw driver (to remove the hand grips).

These and other advantages and objects of the invention will be more particularly brought forth upon reference to the appended drawings, the detailed specification and the claims.

In the drawings:

FIGURE l is a vertical longitudinal cross-sectional View of a specific embodiment of the invention, con- 3 ,36 ,168 Patented Feb. A28, l l 967 structed in accordance with the preferred teaching thereof, and illustrates a cartridge in the chamber waiting to be fired;

FIG. 2 is a vertical longitudinal cross-sectional view of a specific embodiment of the invention and illustrates the same, after the tiring pin has contacted the cartridge and the lbullet has been lired and is traveling down the Ibarrel and before the bullet casing is pulled from the chamber;

FIG. 3 is a vertical longitudinal cross-sectional View of a specic embodiment of the invention and shows the same after the :bullet has left .the barrel of the gun and after the bolt and breech slide have moved rearward and with the casing flying out of the gun;

FIG. 4 `is a plan view looking at the front of the gun and down the barrel of the same;

FIG. 5 is a side view of the receiver;

FIG. 6, taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 5, is a plan view looking up at the receiver;

FIG. 7 is an elevational view looking at the front of the receiver;

FIG. 8 is a plan view looking down on the breech slide and the bolt;

FIG. 9 is a side elevational view looking at the breech slide and the bolt;

FIG. 10 is a front elevational view of the breech slide and the bolt;

FIG. 11 is a rear elevational view of the breech slide and the bolt;

FIG. 12 is a side elevational view of the rigidly connected barrel and reeciver and also of the integral breech slide and bolt in an assembled relationship;

FIG. 13 is a side elevational v-iew of the handle and trigger arrangement;

FIG. 14, taken on line 14-14 of FIG. 13, is a plan view looking down on the relationship of the parts in the handle and the trigger mechanism;

FIG. l5 is a vertical longitudinal cross-sectional View of another specific embodiment of the invention, constructed in accordance with the preferred teaching thereof;

FIG. 16, taken on line 1616 of FIG. 17, is a plan view looking down on the breech slide and bolt;

FIG. 17 is an exploded view of the breech slide and bolt and a sleeve in the breech slide and bolt;

FIG. 18, taken on line 18-18 of FIG. 17, is a front elevational view of the breech;

FIG. 19 is a front elevational view looking at the front of the gun and down the barrel of the same;

FIG. 20, taken on line 2li-20 of FIG. 27, is a view looking at the front of the receiver `and illustrates the place in the receiver in which the slide and bolt move;

FIG. 2l, taken on line 21-21 of FIG. l5, is a lateral vertical cross-sectional view and illustrates t-he position of the receiver, the bolt and the magazine for feeding cartridges;

FIG. 22, taken on line 22-22 of FIG. 15, is a lateral vertical cross-sectional view and illustrates the arrangement of the receiver, the bolt and the hammer;

FIG. 23 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the magazine for holding the cartridges and illustrates the spring in the magazine for feeding cartridges to the chamber;

FIG. 24 is a fragmentaryzlongitudinal vertical crosssectional view illustrating the position of the Ibullet in the barrel as the bullet is emerging from the barrel and also illustrating the gases Ipassing into the recoil vent so as to slide backwardly the breaker pin which disconnects the locking bar -leaving the pressure in the chamber to act on the slide-bolt in the usual fashion peculiar to automatic weapons;

FIG. 25 is a fragmentary Vertical longitudinal cross- 4sectional view illustrating the position of the bullet after ,3 it has left the barrel and the position of the breech slide and the bolt upon ejecting the cartridge case from the cartridge chamber in the barrel;

FIG. 26 is a fragmentary vertical longitudinal crosssectional view of the end of the gun and illustrates a modification for a recoil vent;

FIG. 27 is a plan view looking up at the underneath side of the receiver;

FIG. 28 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the integral barrel and receiver and the integral or rigidly connected breech slide and bolt;

FIG. 29 is a fragmentary side elevational view illus trating the frame;

FIG. 30, taken on line 30-30 of FIG. 29, is an eX- ploded view looking down on the frame of the gun; and,

FIG. 31 is a fragmentary side elevational view looking at the safety lever and slide hold lever.

Referring to the drawings it is seen that there are illustrated two semi-automatic pistols. In FIGS. 1414 there is illustrated a pistol which may be used for smaller calibers such as .22, .25, and .32 caliber. In FIGS. -31 there is illustrated a semi-automatic pistol which may be used for higher cali-bers such as .38 and .45 calibers, to name a few.

In FIGS. 1-14 there is illustrated a semi-automatic pistol 40 having an integral or rigidly connected barrel and receiver 42 and a frame 44.

The integral or rigidly connected barrel and receiver 42 comprises the receiver 46 and the barrel 48. The receiver 46 is open on the bottom and is recessed at 50 so as to receive breech slide and bolt and barrel assembly 52. Also, the upper central portion of the receiver 46 is cut away at 54 so as to form a notch. Also, the front part of the receiver 46, and near the lower base, is drilled at 56 to receive -a shaft and a spring. In addition, just below this longitudinal passageway 56, there is a locking lug 58 having semi-cylindrical lateral surface 60. The semi-cylindrical lateral surface is for high power models and for lower power cartridges.

On the rearward part of the receiver and near the lower edge there is a lateral pin or shaft 62. This shaft is to assist in locking the integral or rigidly connected barrel and receiver 42 to the frame 44.

The forward part of the receiver is internally tapped at 64. The barrel 48 is externally threaded at 66 and screwed into the receiver thread 64. Also, the rearward lower part of the barrel is recessed at 68 so as to receive the breech slide and bolt assembly 52.

Also forming part of the integral or rigidly connected barrel and receiver assembly 42 is the breech slide and bolt assembly 52. The assembly 52 comprises a breech slide 70. The central portion orf the breech slide 70 is cut away or removed at 72. Also, the front part of the breech slide 70' tapers into a smaller forwardly projecting member 74. The central part of the member 74 is drilled or cut away at 76. It is rseen that on each side of the opening 72 there are two side walls 78. Referring back to the receiver 46, it is seen that the front part of the receiver depends into the member 55. As is recalled, in the central depending member 55 there is a longitudinal drilled passageway 56. Also, the outer walls of the receiver 46 depend into the walls 57. The inner depending member 55 and the two outer walls 57 provide a longitudinal chamber 59. The longitudinal chamber S9 fits over the wall 78 of the breech slide 70. In other words, the wall 78 of the breech slide can slide in a longitudinal rectilinear path in the chamber 79.

In assembled position the breech slide 52 co-iits with the integral or rigidly connected barrel and receiver 42 so that the sides 78 of 52 are in the chambers 59 of 42. In the back part of the opening 56 in the receiver there is a plug 80. Attached to this plug 80 and directed headwardly is a shaft or rod 82. A coil spring 84 wraps around this rod 82 and bears against the plug 80 and also against the end wall 86 on the front of the breech 4 slide 52. More particularly, looking at FIGS. 8 and 9 it is seen that the passageway 76 does not extend clear through the member 74 but extends almost to the end of 74 so as to leave an end wall 86.

Integral with the rear part -of the breach slide 52 is bolt 88. This bolt 88 comprises a barrel 90, a firing pin 92 and an extractor 94. The construction of the bolt itself is conventional and does not form part of the invention. However, it is to be remembered that the bolt is integral with the breech slide S2 so as to have an integral breech slide and bolt assembly 52.

Mounted on the upper and back part of receiver 46 is a rear sight 96. Mounted on the upper and forward part of the barrel 48 is a front sight 98.

The frame 44 of the gun 48 comprises a hand-gripping portion. This Ihand-gripping portion has a front wall 100, two side walls 102 and a rear wall 104. The rear wall 1014 is shaped to receive the palm of the users hand. The bottom of the frame is open at 106 so as to receive a magazine 108. Also, the upper part of the frame is open at 110 so as to allow cartridges to pass from the magazine to the tiring chamber of the gun.

The frame also comprises a trigger guard 112 having an opening 114. The upper part and also the back part of the trigger guard is 4cut away, or recessed, at 116. This is more particularly brought forth in the longitudinal cross-sectional views of FIGS. l, 2 and 3. The recessed portion is clearly shown in these figures. However, all. of the trigger guard and frame in this region is not cornpletely eliminated or recessed, as one portion 118 is left to define a lug. This lug 118 bears against the back part of t-he barrel `48 and also bears against the plug 8i) and the back part of the longitudinal drilled passageway 56. This is once again brought forth in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. In addition, in the frame 44 and the lug 118, there is a drilled lateral passageway 120. The drilled lateral passageway 120 co-fits with the drilled lateral passageway 60 of the barrel and receiver assembly 42.

A trigger 122 is pinned by pin 124. The trigger 122 rotates around the pin 124. It is seen that the forward surface of the trigger is in the shape of a curve 126 for receiving a finger and the like. The rear part of the trigger is recessed at 128. Attached to this part of the trigger is a pin 130. A connector 132 contacts the pin 130. More particularly, the connector 132 comprises a base 134. Projecting forwardly from the lower part of this base is an arm 136. In t-he arm 136 there is an upwardly directed slot or ygroove 138. Also, the slot or groove 138 defines a forwardly projecting finger 140 having a -forwardly curved lip 142. The slot or groove 138 ts around the pin 130. A trigger spring 144 is positioned between the upper surface of the lip 142 and a pin 146. The pin 146 is positioned in the circular passageway defined by the curved surfaces 6i) and 128. As is realized, the trigger spring 144 presses down-wardly on' the lip' 142 so as to have the arm 136 bear against the pin 130, causing the rearward extension of the arm 136 to bear upwardly. In other words, the spring 144 keeps the arm 136 in contact with the pin 130.

The rear part of the connector projects rearwardly to an arm 148. Also, the base 134 projects upwardly into an arm 150. This arm 150 is positioned in a recess 152 in the frame 11). A more complete description of the function will be presented in a later part of the specication. A lightner hole 154 is in the base 134.

Before leaving the arm 136, it `is to be realized that at 156 in this arm there is a jog or a bend so as to allow the arm to move around the magazine 102.

The arm 148 has a slot or groove 158 in it. This arm terminates in a finger 160. The groove 158 co-fits with the pin 162. The pin is attached to sear 164. The scar 164 pivots around pin 166. The pin 166 is attached to the frame 44. In the front face of the sear 164 there is a groove 168. This groove 168 co-iits with the pin 178. The pin 17'3 is attached to the safety lever 226 and acts as a stop for the forward rotation of the scar 164. When the safety is ON 170 blocks movement of the sear so as to effectuate the safety.

The back surface of the sear is curved at 172. Also, in this surface there is a notch 174. The purpose of this notch will be more fully explained in a later part of the specification.

The lower part of the sear 164 is curved. Also, the frame 44 is curved at 176 in this region so as to receive the lower part of the sear. A spring 178 is positioned between the curved part of the frame 176 and recessed in the sear so as to urge the lower part of the sear forward and thereby the upper part of the sear rearward.

Positioned so as to be yin contacting relationship with the sear 164 is a hammer 180. This hammer is pivoted around a pin 182. The pin 182 is part of the frame 44. Also, the lower forward surface of the hammer has a notch 184 which catches with the catch 174 of the sear. The upper part of the hammer has a striking face 136. The striking face 186 strikes the `bolt 92 so as to move it or jar it forwardly. The lower rear part of the hammer has a curved or a notched region 188. This curved 0r notched region 188 receives a shaft 190.

More particularly, in the frame 44 there is an upwardly directed passageway 192. The shaft 190 passes through the passageway 192. Below the passageway 192 there is a large passageway 194. Positioned in the passageway 194 is a coil spring 196. The lower part of the shaft 19t connects with the upper part of the coil spring 196 and is integral therewith. The lower part of the coil spring 196 connects with the lever 198. The upper part of the lever 198 is pivoted to a pin 200. The pin 200 comprises part of the frame 44. The lower part of the lever 198 terminates in a bearing portion 262. This bearing portion 2112 may be serrated for ease of movement. It is seen that the bearing portion 202 terminates in a forwardly directed face 204. The face 204 overlies the passageway 196 in 4the bottom of the frame and functions to maintain the magazine in the frame.

In operation the spring 196 urges the shaft 190 upwardly so as to bear against the hammer 180. More particularly, the upper part of the shaft 190 co-ts with the notch 188 4in the hammer 180. In other words, the shaft 198 urges the hammer upwardly and forwardly.

As is recalled the arm 150 is positioned in a recess 152 in the frame 110. The arm 150 terminates in a sloping face 151. 151 to engage co-Iitting slide recess 153. When the slide 38 recoils the arm 150 is moved downwardly so as to break the connection from the trigger to the sear (see FIG. 3). This permits the sear to move freely and to catch the hammer and to hold it in a cocked position. It is seen that the gun must cock while the finger pressure is on the trigger (see FIGS. 3 and 25).

In use the firing of the cartridge 2161 in a chamber 212 kicks back the bolt 88. The firing of the cartridge and the subsequent action of the bolt, trigger, sear and hammer is more particularly illustrated in FIGS. l, 2 and 3. In FIG. l there is illustrated a cartridge 210 in the chamber 212. The gun is cocked and ready for firing, i.e., the firing pin 92 is in a position to be moved forwardly. The sear 164 is positioned so as to keep the hammer 180 away yfrom the ring pin 92. However, it is to be realized that the spring 1196 s urging the shaft 191i) upwardly. The shaft 19t) is bearing against the hammer 18th so as to urge it toward the ring pin 92. However, the notch 174 and the sear 164 are in contact with the ledge 184 of the hammer 180 and prevent the forward movement of the hammer 180, as the extension 170 safety catch is ON, see FIG. l.

With reference to FIG. 2, there is illustrated the result of the backward or rearward movement of the trigger 122 and the rearward movement of the connector 132. It is seen that the lower part of the sear 164 has been moved backwardly so as to move the ledge 174 The purpose of 150 is for the -face aw-ay from the catch 184 of the hammer 180. This releases the hammer for forward rotative movement. The spring 196 and the shaf-t 190 urge the hammer 180 to move forward and the hammer so moves. It strikes the firing pin 92 which in turn hits the cartridge 210 in the chamber 212. The cartridge is fired, and the bullet 214 moves down the barrel of the gun.

In FIG. 3 there is illustrated the recoil of the bolt 88. Upon the recoil of the bolt 88 the ejector 92 directs the cartridge casing 216 out of the opening created by the sliding bolt. Actually, the firing pin ejects the shell casing as the firing pin becomes a Xed member in relation to the moving shell. Also, with the rearward moveyment of the ybolt 88, the hammer 180 is rotated backwardly around the pin 182. With the rearward rotative move- -ment of the hammer 180 the ledge 184 is elevated above the notch 174 of the sear 164. The spring 178 has a relative small spring constant and is not used to cause the sear 164 to catch the hammer 180. Because of the rearwardly speed of the recoiling slide bolt, the hammer would not positively catch on the sear unless a strong sear spring were used in conjunction with a deeper notch in the hammer. This would lead to a strong, and possibly rough, trigger pull, and therefore would be intolerable for target shooting. In FIG. 3 it is seen that this system appears standard in the hammer, sear and connector linkage, but I consider that the mechanism differs in the combination of these elements as above stated. Also, the shaft that transfers the energy of the spring 196 as it is forced downwardly by hammer 180 in recoil operation describes an arc. More particularly, the hammer 180 is pivoted on pin 182. As is appreciated, the hammer, in rotating through the arc, combines forward motion as well as downward motion to the shaft 19t). This causes shaft 190 to bear against the lower part `of the sear 164, see FIGS. 3 and 25. As is recalled, the sear rotates on pin 166. With this series of events, the upper ledge 174 engages the hammer ledge 184. With the slide bolt in its most rearward position, the hammer 18@ is rotated backward, and the ledge 184 is slightly higher than the ledge 174. With the forward movement of the slide bolt, the hammer rotates forwardly until the ledge 184 catches on the ledge 174. At this time the spring 178 prevents the sear from jarring out of position during the take-up of slack. This combination of elements allows for a tight and positive cocking of the trigger while only light trigger pressure is needed to release the hammer for firing. Further, the location of the pivot points also reduces the travel distance of the trigger, and the slight slack allows the sear to be moved to release the hammer without touching the shaft 190. The net result is there is no burdening of the trigger pull. As is seen in the drawings, the pin 170 of the lever 226 limits the travel of the sear.

In the upper rear part of the frame 44, that part of the frame above the web between the index finger and the thumb when a person is gripping the gun, there is a recess 220. This reces co-ts with the pin 62 and receives the same. Also, it is seen that the shaft 146 has a flat surface 222. On the right hand side of the gun, see FIG. 13, there is a lever arm 224. This lever arm is at right angles to the shaft 146 and is integral therewith. The recess 220 and the pin 62, and the recess 60 and the recess 120 and the pin 146 are of importance in the assembly and disassembly yof the barrel and receiver 42 from the frame 44. More particularly, it is seen in FIG. 13 that the lever 224 has been rotated so that the pin 146 is no longer in Contact with the curved portion 60 of the lug 58. Therefore, it is possible to remove the barrel and receiver assembly 42 from the frame 44. This is easily accomplished by just pulling up on the front of the barrel, as the lock shaft 146 is no longer in locking position. Then, by pulling the assembly 42 backwards and out of contact with the curved receiver portion 226, the assembly is taken away from the frame 44.

To assemble the gun with the assembly 42 and the frame 44, the reverse steps are taken. The pin 62 is positioned in the curved section 220 and the assembly 42 is rotated towards the frame 44. With the assembly 42 positioned on the frame 44, the lever 224 is rotated so that it points toward the front of the gun. This rotates the locking shaft 146 to the position illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 so that the assembly 42 is lirmly attached to the frame 44.

Attached to the shaft 182, on the left hand side of the gun, is a forwardly directed lever arm 226, see FIG. 14. Also attached to the lever arm 226 is an inwardly directed shaft 170. Referring to FIG. 1 it is seen that this shaft in the safety position is elevated so as to be out of contact with the recess 168 in the sear. Also, it is seen that this shaft 170 is bearing against the forward face of the sear, said forward face being above the recess 168, so as to prevent the forward movement of the sear. By preventing the forward movement of the sear 168, the catch 174 is maintained in contact with the catch 184. In this way the hammer 180 is maintained in the position illustrated in FIG. 1 and locked against forward movement. In other words, the gun is on safety.

With the `gun on safety the lever arm 226 is rotated upwardly. By rotating the lever arm 226 downwardly, the gun is taken off of safety, and the shaft 170 is illustrated in the position shown in FIG. 3. In other words, the shaft 170 is in the recess 168. It is seen that the shaft 170 is not bearing against the sear around the recess 168, but is spaced apart from said recess. However, by moving the trigger 122 4backwardly the connector 132 is moved rearwardly. The lower part of the sear 164 is rotated toward the rear of the gun, and the upper part of the sear is rotated towards the front of the gun. This rotation is sufficient to allow the sear ledge 174 to move out of engagement with the hammer ledge 184. As a result the hammer 'is free to move forward to hit the tiring pin 92 as previously explained.

In FIGS. through 3l there is illustrated another species 230 of this semi-automatic pistol and which species is used for the larger :calibers above 0.380 caliber. The design of the species 238 will handle the pressures of the .357 Magnum and the .44 Magnum. As is well known the larger size calibers used in revolvers are not adaptable for pistols as the handle becomes too large to grasp. To adapt species 230 for these larger calibers, it may be desirable to redesign the cartridge.

The species 230 comprises a frame 232 and a barrel and a receiver assembly 234. Frame 232 is substantially the same as frame 44. There is one difference and this will be explained in detail at an appropriate part of the specification. The like parts of frame 232 and the like parts of frame 44 will be assigned the same reference numeral so as to avoid duplication and possible confusion.

The barrel and receiver assembly 42 is somewhat different from the barrel and receiver assembly 234. More particularly, the barrel and receiver assembly 234 is provided with a recoil vent so that the gases from the cartridge activate and release the locking device which prevents the opening of the breech until the bullet has left the gun, as the ratio of the weight between the bullet and the sliding bolt in large caliber bullets with higher gas pressures is not great enough to allow direct blowback as shown and described for pistol 40, FIGS. 1-14. The breech locks on closing and unlocks only by escaping gas behind the bullet when the bullet passes the vent or by an operator in manual operation of the slide. In FIG. 24 there is illustrated the recoil vent gases activating the pin 306 to its complete function (breaking the lock), but, as is seen, the slide has not been urged rearwardly by gases in the chamber. 1f it were not for this recoil and due to a spring urging the slide and bolt forwardly, it would not be possible for the kickback of the cartridge to move the breech slide and the bolt rearwardly. Therefore, the barrel and receiver assembly 234 will be described in detail.

The barrel and breech assembly 234 comprises a receiver 236 having an upper open central slot 238. The front part of the receiver is identified by reference numeral 240. In 244i there is a center passageway 242.

The assembly 234 also comprises a barrel 244. This barrel 244 is externally threaded at its inner end 246. 246 is screwed into the passageway 242 so as to form an integral or rigidly connected barrel and receiver assembly 234. As is seen in FIG. 15 there is a chamber 248 at the inner end of the barrel.

Near the breech or opening of the barrel there is a passageway 256. The purpose of this passageway will be explained more particularly after the explanation of the breech slide.

The assembly 234 also comprises a breech slide and bolt assembly 252. This breech slide and bolt assembly comprises a solid base member 254. The inner part of this base member is removed so as to form a through passageway or opening 256. Surrounding this opening and passageway 256 are sides 258. The sides 258 project forwardly in the opening 256 and taper into a narrow forwardly directed member 260. The front part of the forwardly directed member is removed so as to form a cavity 262. In the member 268 there is a through passageway 264. Also, it is seen in FIG. 16 and FIG. 17 that the lower rearward section of Zeil is removed to have an opening or passageway 266. In FIG. 16 this passageway appears to be of a generally rectangular conguration in the plan view, and in FIG. 17 this passageway seems to be of a Igenerally rectangular configuration in the side elevational view. Actually7 this is more than a pasageway, it is an opening in the rearward lower part of 260.

In FIG. 20 there is illustrated a front elevational view of the receiver and barrel assembly 234. The receiver 236 comprises a central depending member 270. On each side of this central depending member are two depending legs or sides 272. The `sides 272 in conjunction with the depending member 278 define chambers or cavities 274. The cavities 274 co-t with the sides 258 of the breech slide. Or, the sides 258 t into the cavities 274.

In the depending central portion there is a longitudinal passageway 276. In the end of this passageway there is a block 278. On the front of the passageway is a slot 280. In the lower part of the depending portion and the front thereof, there is a curved recess 282. The curved recess 282 receives a locking bar 284. The locking bar will be more particularly described with reference to the frame 232.

It is to be remembered that the depending member 270 is fixed with respect lto the frame 232, and that the breech slide and bolt assembly 252 slides with respect to the depending member 27 8.

In assembled relation a sleeve 286 that this sleeve has a depending lug 288 on the trailing end. The depending lug 288 `co-its with the slot 266. The front end of the sleeve is externally threaded at 290. A cap 292 which is internally tapped at 294 screws onto the front end of the sleeve. The front end of the sleeve projects through the passageway 264 and also through the passageway 262. The cap 292 projects somewhat inwardly into the passageway 262. On the plug 278 there is a forwardly directed shaft 296. Coiled around this shaft 296 is a coil spring 298. The shaft 296 does not project all the way from the plug 278 to the cap 292, but projects from the plug 278 to approximately the inner end of the sleeve 286 when the spring is uncoiled to its full limit in the assembled gun. In FIG. l5 it is seen that the cap 292 does not project all the way into the opening or passageway 262, but there is room for play. Also, in FIG. 17 it is seen that the trailing edge of the lug 288 slopes downwardly and forwardly.

Returning now lto the gas vent 258, it is seen that this vent connects with the passageway 302. This passageasoaiss 9 way 302 is substantially parallel to the bore of the barrel 244. In the passageway 302 there is a lateral pin 304. Also, in the passageway 302 there is a plunger 306. The upper part of the plunger 306 is removed at 308 so as to move with respect to the pin 304.

As previously stated the frame 232 is substantially the same as the frame 44. However, there is one major diiTerence. In the forward part of the trigger guard 112 there is a passageway 308. In this passageway there is a spring 310. On the upper part of the spring 310 there is a cap 312. In the locking bar 284 there is a recess 314 and which recess -receives and co-fits with the cap 312. It is seen that the inner end of the locking bar 284 is curved at 316 to co-t with the `curved recess 282. The inner end 316 of the locking bar 284 is positioned in the curved recess 282 and rotates therein. In operation the spring 310 urges the cap 312 upwardly so as to urge the locking bar 284 upwardly and against the inner end of the slide and forms a rigid block in the open area for the slide to travel. There is a slight clearance between 284 and 300. With the sleeve 286 moving backwardly, the sloping surface of the lug 300 forces downwardly the locking bar 284, see FIGS. and 2S. The passage or open area allows the slide to move rearwardly by means of the gas pressure in the chamber.

Referring now to the operation of the gun, reference is made to FIGS. l5, 24 and 25. In FIG. 15, it is seen that the cartridge case 320 is in the chamber 248; bolt 322 is positioned and locked in position by the locking bar 284, and firing pin 324 has been pushed forward so as to Contact the cartridge -case 320. The gun has been fired, and the bullet 326 is traveling down the barrel. However, it is seen that the bullet 326 has not yet reached the recoil vent 250.

In FIG. 24 the bullet 326 has passed the recoil vent 250, and the expanding gases have forced the breaker pin 306 backwardly, and thereby have forced the cap 292 and the sleeve 286 assembly backwardly a slight distance. It is to be noted that the breech slide is not changed and that the slide has not yet moved, even though the locking bar 284 is unlocked. It may be said that the chamber is closed because of the bullet in the barrel. In addition, it is seen that the locking bar 284 has been pushed downwardly by the backward movement of the sleeve 286 and the inclined surface of the lug 288.

In FIG. 25 it is seen that the bullet 326 has left the barrel of the gun and that the gases from the burning of the powder have passed down the vent 250 so as to break the lock 284 and to initiate Vthe rearward movement of the sleeve assembly, and also have functioned to assist in removing the cartridge case 320 from the chamber 248. One must bear in mind that the shell is pushing the breech because of the gas pressure inside Ithe shell. The rearward motion of the shell then strikes the fixed member 94 (ejector) near the rim of the shell. This causes the shell to move out of its path of travel. In this instance, the shell moves out of the opening in the receiver.

The function of the bolt assembly with respect to the other components of the frame is substantially the same as previously described for the species of `gun illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 14, and therefore will not be described at the present time.

The bolt 322 is, or may be, a conventional bolt having a center tire pin and hammer arrangement, or may be a rim lire bolt.

In FIG. 26, there is illustrated another vent system. This vent system comprises a vent 330. The vent 330 is substantially at right angles to the barrel. Also, substantially at right angles to the vent 330 and parallel to the barrel is a longitudinal passageway 332. In this passageway there is a plunger 334 and which plunger connects with the rearwardly directed shaft 336. The shaft 336 passes through and is positioned in a rearwardly directed passageway 338. The passageway 338 connects with the passageway 332. The front part of the passageway is tapped at 340 to receive a screw plug 342. The function of the plunger 334 and the shaft 332 is the equivalent of the breaker pin 306 of FIG. 15. In fact, these are substantially the same. With the expansion of the gases in the barrel, some of that gas is passed through the passageway 330 and pushes against the plunger 334 so as to move shaft 336 rearwardly. With the rearward movement of 336, the cap 292 is moved rearwardly so as to force the sleeve assembly 252 rearwardly.

The magazine 108 is a conventional magazine and comprises the normally used components of a magazine. No claim is made to the structure of this magazine.

It is seen that there are hand grips 344. These hand grips are on each side of the gun and may be attache-d by a number of diiferent means. For example, there is illustrated in FIG. 4 the magazine catch pivot forms having outwardly directed studs 346. Also, there are two bolts 348. The studs 346 can position the hand grips 344, and the bolts 348 can unite the hand grips to the frame 232.

From the foregoing, it is realized that the semi-automatic pistol comprises a frame and also a barrel and receiver assembly and which assembly includes the bolt and slide. The barrel and receiver assembly may be disengaged from the frame. It is possible to build a frame suitable for all calibers. For example, it is possible to build a frame suitable for the .45 caliber. This frame is then suitable for all smaller calibers. Then, it is possible to build a barrel and receiver assembly for the .22 caliber and which assembly ts with the .45 caliber frame. Also, it is possible to build a barrel and receiver assembly suitable for the .45 caliber and which assembly fits with the .45 caliber frame. Of course, it is necessary to have different cartridge clips for different sized cartridges. Now, it is seen that a person may buy one frame and two or more barrel and receiver assemblies. If a person buys one frame and two barrel and receiver assemblies, then the person buys the equivalent of two guns at approximately one and one-half the price of a single gun. A person may buy a .22 caliber barrel and receiver assembly and a' .45 caliber barre-l and receiver assembly. The person may wish to shoot the inexpensive .22 caliber bullet for target practicing and hunting and small game. Then, when necessary or desirable the person may attach the .45 caliber barrel and receiver assembly to the frame. From this, it is seen that I have provided a versatile gun which is suitable for many calibers and which requires only one frame for all of these calibers.

Having described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a bolt, a breech slide, a barrel and a receiver, said receiver adapted to receive said bolt, said bolt adapted to move in said receiver, said barrel and said receiver rigidly connected, said bolt and breech slide being integral, a gaseous recoil vent connecting with said barrel, a plunger associated with said vent, said plunger adapted to move against said breech slide, and said gaseous vent, upon the gun being tired, becoming a trap for gas so that the gas pressure in the vent increases so as to move said plunger against said breech slide in order to move the bolt away from the barrel.

2. A pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a bolt, a breech slide, a barrel and a receiver, said barrel and receiver being rigidly connected, said bolt and breech slide being integral, said receiver adapted to receive said bolt, said bolt adapted to move in said receiver, a hammer, a sear, a trigger, said trigger connecting with said sear so as to move the same, said sear connecting with said hammer so as to restrain the movement of the hammer until the sear is moved, a recoil vent connecting with said barrel, a plunger associated with said recoil vent, said recoil vent adapted to function as a trap for gas, and said recoil vent, upon the build-up of the gaseous pressure,

allowing the plunger to move against the breech slide so as to move the bolt away from the barrel.

3. An automatic pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a barrel, a receiver, said barrel and said receiver being rigidly connected, a breech slide and a bolt, said breech slide and said bolt being integral; said frame at the upper rear having a first lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the lower rear part having a second lateral recess to receive a pin, in the assembled state a first pin in the first and second lateral recesses; in the upper and central part of the frame a third lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the forward part having a depending lug, said lug having a fourth lateral recess, said third and fourth lateral recesses facing each other, in the assembled state a second pin in the third and fourth lateral recesses', said frame having an upwardly projecting lug; said frame having a cartridge-clip cavity and an opening in the bottom leading to the cavity; an opening in the top of the receiver and adjacent the chamber portion of the barrel; the bolt of said integral breech slide and bolt being offset from the slide; said receiver having a chamber for receiving said bolt; said chamber in the receiver and the bolt co-fitting with each other to allow the bolt to slide in the receiver; said breech slide being positioned below the barrel; a coil spring positioned between the forward part of the breech slide and the upwardly projecting lug to urge the bolt against the barrel; a hammer, a sear, a trigger, said trigger connecting with said sear so as to move the same, and said sear connecting with said hammer so as to restrain the movement of the hammer until the sear is moved.

4. An automatic pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a barrel, a receiver, said barrel and said receiver being rigidly connected, a breech slide and a bolt, said breech slide and said bolt being integral; said frame at the upper rear having a first lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the lower rear part having a second lateral recess to receive a pin, in the assembled state a first pin in the first and second lateral recesses; in the upper and central part of the frame a third lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the forward part having a depending lug, said lug having a fourth lateral recess, said third and fourth lateral recesses facing each other, in the assembled state a second pin in the third and fourth lateral recesses; said frame having an upwardly projecting lug; said frame having a cartridge-clip cavity; an opening in the top of the receiver and adjacent to the chamber portion of the barrel; the bolt of said integral breech slide and bolt being offset from the slide; said receiver having a chamber for receiving said bolt; said breech slide being positioned below the barrel; a means positioned between the forward part of the breech slide and the upwardly projecting lug to urge the bolt against the barrel; a hammer, a sear, a trigger, said trigger connecting with said sear so as to move the same; and, said sear connecting with said hammer so as to restrain the movement of the hammer until the sear is moved.

5. An automatic pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a barrel, a receiver, said barrel and said receiver being rigidly connected, a breech slide and a bolt, said breech slide and said bolt being integral, said frame at the upper rear having a first means, said receiver at the lower rear part having a second means, in the assembled state said first and second means coacting to position the rigidly connected barrel and receiver on the frame; in the upper and central part of the frame a third means and said receiver at the forward part having a fourth means, in the assembled state said third and fourth means cooperating to position the rigidly connected barrel and receiver on the frame; said frame having an upwardly projecting lug; an opening in the top of the receiver and adjacent the chamber portion of the barrel; the bolt of said integral breech slide and bolt being offset from the slide; said receiver having a chamber for receiving said bolt; said breech slide being positioned below the barrel; and, a means positioned between the forward part of the breech slide and the upwardly projecting lug to urge the bolt against the barrel.

6. An automatic pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a barrel, a receiver, said barrel and said receiver being rigidly connected, a breech slide and a bolt, said breech slide and said bolt being integral; said frame at the upper rear having a first lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the lower rear part having a second lateral recess to receive a pin, in the assembled state a first pin in the first and second lateral recesses; in the upper and central part of the frame a third lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the forward part having a depending lug, said lug having a fourth lateral recess, said third and fourth lateral recesses facing each other, in the lassembled state a second pin in the third and fourth lateral recesses; said frame having an upwardly projecting lug; said frame having a cartridge-clip cavity and an opening in the bottom leading to the cavity; an opening in the top of the receiver and adjacent the chamber portion of the barrel; the bolt of said integral breech slide and bolt being offset from the slide; said receiver having a chamber for receiving said bolt; said chamber in the receiver and the bolt co-fitting with each other to allow the bolt to slide in the receiver; said breech slide being positioned below the barrel; a coil spring positioned between the forward part of the breech slide and the upwardly projecting lug to urge the bolt against the barrel; a hammer, a sear, a trigger, said trigger connecting with said sear so as to move the same, and said sear connecting with said hammer so as to restrain the movement of the hammer until the sear is moved, a recoil vent connecting with said barrel, a plunger associated with said recoil vent, said recoil vent adapted to function as a trap for gas, and said recoil vent upon build-up of gaseous pressure allowing the plunger to move against the breech slide so as to move the bolt away from the barrel.

7. An automatic pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a barrel, a receiver, said barrel and said receiver being rigidly connected, a breech slide and a bolt, said breech slide and said bolt being integral; said frame at the upper rear having a first lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the lower rear part having a second lateral recess to receive a pin, in the assembled state a first pin in the first and second lateral recesses; in the upper and central part of the frame a third lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the forward part having a depending lug, said lug having a fourth lateral recess, said third and fourth lateral recesses facing each other, in the assembled state Ia second pin in the third and fourth lateral recesses; said frame having an upwardly projecting lug; said frame having a cartridge-clip cavity and an opening in t-he bottom leading to the cavity; an opening in the top lof the receiver and adjacent the chamber portion of the barrel; the bolt of said integral breech slide and bolt being offset from the slide; said receiver having a chamber for receiving said bolt; said chamber in the receiver and the bolt co-fitting with each other to allow the bolt to slide in the receiver; said breech slide being positioned below the barrel; a coil spring positioned between the forward part of the breech slide and the upwardly projecting'lug to urge the bolt against the barrel; a hammer, a sear, a trigger, said trigger connecting with said scar so as to move the same, said sear connecting with said hammer so as to restrain the movement of the hammer until the sear is moved, a chamber integral `with the barrel, a plunger in said chamber, said plunger projecting out of the chamber and directed toward the breech slide, with said bolt bearing against the barrel said breech slide being in close proximity to the plunger, a vent connecting said chamber to the barrel, and said recoil vent being at an angle -other than approximately degrees to the barrel.

S. An automatic pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a barrel, a receiver, said barrel and said receiver being rigidly connected, a breech slide and a bolt, said breech slide and said bolt being integral; said frame at the upper rear having a first lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the lower part having a second lateral recess to reoeive a pin, in the assembled state a first pin in the first and second lateral recesses; in the upper and central part of the frame a third lateral recess to receive a pin, said receiver at the forward part having a depending lug, said lug having a fourth lateral recess, said third and fourth lateral recesses facing each other, in the assembled state a second pin in the third and fourth lateral recesses; said frame having an upwardly projecting lug; said frame having a cartridge-clip cavity and an opening in the bottom leading to the cavity; an opening in the top of the receiver and adjacent the chamber portion of the barrel; the bolt of said integral breech slide and bolt being offset from the slide; said receiver having a chamber for receiving said bolt; said chamber in the receiver and the bolt co-tting with each other to allow the bolt to slide in the receiver; said breech slide being positioned below the barrel; a coil spring positioned between the forward part of the breech slide and the upwardly projecting lugl to urge the bolt against the barrel; a hammer, a sear, a trigger, said trigger connecting with said Sear so as to move the same, said sear connecting with said hammer so as to restrain the movement of the hammer until the sear is moved, a chamber integral with the barrel, a plunger in said chamber, said plunger projecting out of the chamber and directed toward the breech slide, with said bolt bearing against the barrel said breech slide being in close proximity to the plunger, a recoil vent connecting with chamber to the barrel, and said recoil vent being at right angles to the barrel.

9. A pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a bolt, a breech slide, a barrel and a receiver, said receiver adapted to receive said bolt, said bolt adapted to move in said receiver, said barrel and said receiver rigidly connected, said bolt and breech slide being integral, said fJ-ame at the upper rear having a first means, said receiver at the lower rear part having a second means, in the assembled state said first and second means coacting to position the rigidly connected barrel and receiver on the frame, in the upper and central part -of the frame a third means and said receiver at the forward part having a fourth means, in the assembled state said third and fourth means cooperating to position the rigidly connected barrel and receiver on the frame, a gaseous recoil Vent connecting with said barrel, a plunger associated with said vent, said plunger adapted to move against said breech slide, and said gaseous vent, upon the gun being fired, becoming a trap for gas so that the gas pressure in the vent increases so as to move said plunger against said breech slide in order to move the bolt away from the barrel.

10. A pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a bolt, a breech slide, a barrel and a receiver, said barrel and receiver being rigidly connected, said bolt and breech slide being integral, said receiver adapted to receive said bolt, said bolt adapted to move in said receiver, said frame at the upper rear having a first means, said receiver at the lower rear part having a second means, in the assembled state said first and second means coacting to position the rigidly connected barrel and receiver on the frame, in the upper and central part of the frame a third means and said receiver at the forward part having a fourth means, in the assembled state said third and fourth means cooperating to position the rigidly connected barrel and receiver on the frame, a hammer, a scar, a trigger, said trigger connecting with said sear so as to move the same, said sear connecting with said hammer so as to restrain the movement of the hammer until the sear is moved, a recoil vent connecting with said barrel, a plunger associated with said recoil vent, said recoil vent adapted to function as a trap for gas, and said recoil vent, upon the build-up of the gaseous pressure, allowing the plunger to move against the breech slide so as to move the bolt away from the barrel.

11. A pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a bolt, a breech slide, a barrel and a receiver, said receiver adapted to receive said bolt, said bolt adapted to move in said receiver, said barrel and said receiver rigidly connected, said bolt and breech slide being integral, a rst means on the frame, a second means on the receiver, said first means and said second means coacting in the assembled state to position the rigidly connected barrel and receiver on the frame, a gaseous recoil vent connecting with said barrel, a plunger associated with said vent, said plunger adapted to move against said breech slide, and said gaseous vent, upon the gun being fired, becoming a trap for gas so that the gas pressure in the vent increases so as to move said plunger against said breech slide in order to move the bolt away from the barrel.

12. A pistol, said pistol comprising a frame, a bolt, a breech slide, a barrel and a receiver, said barrel and receiver being rigidly connected, said bolt and breech slide being integral, said receiver adapted to receive said bolt, said bolt adapted to move in said receiver, a first means on the frame, a second means on the receiver, said first means and said second means coacting in the assembled state to position the rigidly connected barrel and receiver on the frame, a hammer, a sear, a trigger, said trigger connecting with said sear so as to move the same, said sear connecting with said hammer so as to restrain the movement of the hammer until the scar is moved, a recoil vent connecting with said barrel, a plunger associated with said recoil vent, said recoil vent adapted to function as a trap for gas, and said recoil vent, upon the build-up of the gaseous pressure, allowing the plunger to move against the breech slide so as to move the bolt away from the barrel.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 968,989 8/1910 Schrader 89-196 X 1,200,872 10/1916 Rosebush 89-196 X 2,468,784 5/1949 Seagraves 89-191 X FOREIGN PATENTS l 21,836 6/1947 Finland.

BENJAMIN A. BORCHELT, Primary Examiner. S. C. BENTLEY, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A PISTOL, SAID PISTOL COMPRISING A FRAME, A BOLT, A BREECH SLIDE, A BARREL AND A RECEIVER, SAID RECEIVER ADAPTED TO RECEIVE SAID BOLT, SAID BOLT ADAPTED TO MOVE IN SAID RECEIVER, SAID BARREL AND SAID RECEIVER RIGIDLY CONNECTED, SAID BOLT AND BREECH SLIDE BEING INTEGRAL, A GASEOUS RECOIL VENT CONNECTING WITH SAID BARREL, A PLUNGER ASSOCIATED WITH SAID VENT, SAID PLUNGER ADAPTED TO MOVE AGAINST SAID BREECH SLIDE, AND SAID GASEOUS VENT, UPON THE GUN BEING FIRED, BECOMING A TRAP FOR GAS SO THAT THE GAS PRESSURE IN THE VENT INCREASES SO AS TO MOVE SAID PLUNGER AGAINST SAID BREECH SLIDE IN ORDER TO MOVE THE BOLT AWAY FROM THE BARREL.
US3306168A 1965-08-16 1965-08-16 Gas operated semi-automatic pistol Expired - Lifetime US3306168A (en)

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US4619184A (en) * 1983-11-28 1986-10-28 The State Of Israel Ministry Of Defense, Military Industries Gas actuated pistol
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