US3298232A - Golf practice game - Google Patents

Golf practice game Download PDF

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US3298232A
US3298232A US32336463A US3298232A US 3298232 A US3298232 A US 3298232A US 32336463 A US32336463 A US 32336463A US 3298232 A US3298232 A US 3298232A
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block
cord
ball
anchor
base board
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Expired - Lifetime
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Ralph J Carboni
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Ralph J Carboni
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0073Means for releasably holding a ball in position; Balls constrained to move around a fixed point, e.g. by tethering
    • A63B69/0079Balls tethered to a line or cord

Description

GOLF PRACTICE GAME Filed Nov. 15. 1963 FIG.2

INVENTOR RALPH J. CARBON I BY W a4 ATTORNEY 3,29%,232 Patented Jan. 17, 1967 nice 3.2%,232 GOLF PRAQTHCE GAME Ralph .l. Carhoni, 327 Sharon Drive, New Orleans, La. W124 Filed Nov. 13, 1963, Ser. No. 323,364 7 Claims. ((31. 73--379) This application is a continuation-in-part of application Serial No. 220,652, filed August 31, 1962, in the name of Ralph I. Carboni, now abandonet The present invention relates to a golf practice game and more particularly to a golf practice game wherein a tethered ball can be driven with conventional golf clubs within the confines of a limited area.

Tethered ball games for the practicing of golf have been previously known. These devices, however, generally utilize an elastic tether cord of one type or another. For example, British Patent 203,227 issued to William Baker on September 6, 1923, shows a golf practice device wherein a tether cord is used having a spring. Elastic tether cords, whether formed of a spring or any relatively highly elastic material such as rubber or nylon, are not suitable since a well-hit ball will be returned to the player with virtually the same speed and force with wh ch it was driven. For obvious reasons of safety, such elast c devices are not suitable. The devices of the prior art have also suffered from a poor anchorage of the tether cord to the indicating device, the cord often separating from the indicating device due to the force of the drive. Devices using non-elastic tether cords have also been utilized, but these have proved unsuccessful due to the great shock transmitted to the indicating device by the force of the ball coming to the end of the tether and the tether being unable to absorb any of the considerable kinetic energy of the ball.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a golf practice game which overcomes the difficulties inherent in the prior art devices.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a golf practice game which is completely safe within the confines of the average yard.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a golf practice game characterized by integral indicators which allow the player to estimate accurately not only the distance of the simulated shot but also the directional deviation, if any.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a golf practice game which permits the serious golfer to perfect his off the green It is another object of the present invention to provide a golf practice game which is portable, simple, completely safe, and yet is relatively inexpensive.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a golf practice game utilizing a tether cord and a tether cord anchorage which are strong and capable of safely absorbing shock.

Other objects and the nature and advantages of the instant invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a device in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one detail of the device of FIG. 1 showing the anchorage of the tether cord to the indicating device.

FIG. 3 is a perspective bottom view of a detail of the device of FIG. 1 showing a channel guide.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view partly broken away of a detail of the indicating device in accordance with golf practice game of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a plan view showing one part of the device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a weight used in the present device.

The golf practice game of the present invention is shown generally at 12 in FIG. 1 and comprises a base board 12 having desirable indicia thereon, e.g., numbers indicating the yardage a ball would have been hit with a particular stroke. The base board is shown in FIG. 1 as a fiat rectangular board, but its peripheral configuration is unimportant. A rectangular base board 12 is preferred because of the ease of packaging and shipping. The base board 12 has on its upper surface two stop blocks 14 and 14A which are securely anchored or adhered in any conventional manner to define a stopping plane normal to the longitudinal dimension of base board 12. In addition, the stop blocks 14 and 14A must be sufficiently spaced aoart to provide an opening down the center of the base board 12 between such stop blocks 14 and 14A. Behind the stop blocks 14 and 14A and also aifixed to the up er surface of the base board 12 is a channel guide 1 6. The channel guide 16 is a U-shaped trough extending in the longitudinal direction of the base board 12. A seen in FIG. 3 the channel guide 1 6 is provided with a pivot pin hole 18 in its bottom surface and the channel gu de 16 is attached to the base board 12 by a pivot pin 21 (note FIG. 5) which extends through the pivot hole 18 and into the base board 12. The pivot pin 211 permits channel guide 16 to rotate with pin 20 being the axis of rotation.

The golf practice package is also provided with a game tee 22 which consists of a flat support board 24 to which is attached a tee 26 upon which a captive ball 28 may be placed. However, the gametee 22 is not essential since a conventional golf tee may be used. Attached to the ball 28 in any conventional manner, e.g., fused to the ball cover, integral with the cover, swivel eye attachment, passed through the ball and anchored on the opposite side, passed partway through the ball and anchored to or made integral with the live center of the ball, etc, is a tether cord 30 which in turn is attached at its opposite end to an anchor block 32, shown in detail in FIG. 2. The nature of the tether cord 30 and the manner in which it is attached to the anchor block 32 is critical to the proper functioning, safety, and permanence of the present device.

Noting FIG. 2 it is seen that the anchor block 32 has a generally rectangular crosssection and has passing therethrough two countersunk anchoring holes 34 and 34A from top to bottom through which screws or preferably bolts may be passed in order to anchor the anchor block 32. In addition, passing through its center, the anchor block 32 has a third hole 36 from the front of the block to the back thereof and in a direction perpendicular to the holes 3 1 and 34A and passing between such holes. The hole 36 must be countersunk as shown at 38 at the front of the anchor block 32. The holes 24 and 3 1A are countersunk or counterbored merely to receive the bolt or screw heads, but it is essential that the hole 36 be provided at its front end with countersink 38 in order to provide proper wear for the tether cord 31?.

The tether cord Ed is passed through the hole 36 in the anchor block 32 and is knotted 40 at the back and 62 at the front of the anchor block. The distance between the knot 49 and the knot 42 must be greater than the distance from the front of the anchor block to the back of the anchor block and preferably should be about 1 /2 times the length of the anchor block.

Immediately below the anchor block 32 and integrally attached thereto by the bolts passing through holes 3 and 34A is an indicator block 44. The indicator block 44 is considerably larger than the anchor block 32 and in the preferred example weighs about 2 pounds and 8 ounces. Attached to the bottom on the indicator block 44 is a long trailing bar 16 which passes through the trough of the channel guide 16. The indicator block 44, the trailing bar 46, and the anchor block 32 thus form a unitary structure which is free to move on the upper surface of the base board 12 and which is limited only by the channel guide 16.

FIG. 4 shows one method of securing the trailing bar 4-6 to the indicator block 44. Here the trailing bar 46 is set in a groove cut in the underside of the indicator block 44- and there secured by screws 50 and 52. Bolt 54, used for attaching the anchor block 32 to the indicator block 44, is shown countersunk in the bottom of the indicator block 44.

If desired and for better control and accuracy, the indicator block 44- may be provided on its upper surface along a center line running longitudinally through the indicator block with a screw and wing nut 58 upon which additional weights such as 2-ounce weights 60, having holes 62 passing therethrough, may be placed. These weights may be kept in any desired location; however, in order to maintain a unitary structure, such weights 60 may be kept on the base board 12 out of line with the operation of the device by screw and wing nut 64.

During operation the game functions as follows:

The captive ball 28 is placed on a conventional golf tee or on the auxiliary game tee 22 as shown in FIG. 1, adjacent the base board 12, the intended line of flight being parallel to the longitudinal dimension of the base board 12 and in the direction of increasing values of yardage as indicated on the upper face of the base board. The player, with any golf club he chooses to practice with, then strikes the ball in precisely the same manner in which he would strike an untethered ball on the golf course or driving range.

The tethered ball 28 flies to the extended length of the tether cord 30, at which point the kinetic energy of the moving ball is transmitted into the cord 30, thereby causing the cord to stretch a slight degree. At this point the energy of the moving ball is transmitted to the anchor block 32 and immediately to the heavy indicating block 44, the anchor block being at the opposite end of the tether cord 30 from the ball 28. The anchor block 32, the indicator block 44, and the trailing bar 4-6, being all securely fastened together, then move forward in a unit on the base board a distance related and relative to the force with which the captive ball was struck. The harder the ball 28 is struck the farther the anchor block 44 will be dragged forward and the indicator block 44 will line up along the indicated yardage indicia corresponding to the distance an untethered ball would have been hit by an equal blow from a golf club.

The trailing bar 46 moves freely in the lengthwise direction in the channel guide 16. Since the channel guide 16 is mounted on the pivot 20, in the event the player hooks or slices his shot, the anchor block 32, the indicator block 44, and the trailing bar 46 will be pulled in a slightly sideward direction and will apply a rotational force through the trailing bar 46 to the channel guide 16 about the pivot 20, thus permitting the indicating block 44 to move towards the left or right of the base board as it is pulled forward on the base board 12 by the ball 28 and the tether cord 30. The greater the hook or slice, the greater will be the motion of the indicator block 44 to theside of the base board 12.

The nature of the tether cord 30 in the present invention is a critical feature. The tether cord 30 must be neither greatly elastic nor must it be inelastic, Materials such as rubber or nylon are entirely unsuited for the tether cord since such materials are highly elastic and, furthermore, have fast return elasticity. A steel spring would be unsuitable for the same reason. The type of elasticity necessary for the tether cord 30 is known as slow return elasticity. Slow return elasticity is defined as the ability to stretch elastically (within the elastic limit as defined by Hookes law) without going back to its unstretched state immediately after the stretching force has been withdrawn,

4t i.e., without snapping back or without kickback. Thus, the tether cord used in the present device must be capable of stretching, but upon termination of the stretching force must go back to its former length only slowly.

One example of a tether cord Which meets the above requirements is size #6 of round hollow braided Floterope manufactured by the American Manufacturing Company, Inc, of Brooklyn, New York. This particular example of tether cord is formed of 8 strands of conventional monofilament polyethylene, each strand being composed of 1S monofilaments. The rope is formed in a conventional round braided construction of the 8 strands and 178 feet of such a cord weighs one pound. In addition, the breakstrength of the cord is approximately 500 pounds. Preferably the tether cord is approximately 7 inch in diameter and at least 25 feet long.

Polyethylene is the preferred material from which the tether cord is made and it is particularly useful because of its low elasticity. The slow-return elasticity of the tether cord is due in part to the fact that polyethylene itself has a low-return elasticity and partly due to the straightening of the strands within the braided cord under the force of the driven ball. During use the tether cord, under a maximum force of about 200 pounds, will stretch about 15 to 20%, based on the length of the unstressed cord. After the ball has been hit at its maximum force, e.g., about 200 pounds, which is far less than the elastic limit of the polyethylene itself, the weight of the ball and cord causes the ball to descend and hit the ground. After the ball has hit the ground it is slowly dragged back as the tether cord slowly returns to its original length. Although the tether cord is preferably formed from polyethylene, either of the high or low density varieties, other artificial filamentary materials may be used, such as low-stretch polyethers, polyesters, and polyacrylates. A braided polyethylene filament cord having as many as 352 filaments, each filament having a diameter of 0.005 inch, wherein the cord has a diameter of has also been found to be a useful tether cord in the present device.

The absence of kickback with the tether cord of the present device is important not only from the point of view of safety to the player but is essential for the accurate transmission of distance and directional impetus to the indicator components of the device.

Another critical feature of the present device and a feature that distinguishes from prior art devices and represents a marked improvement over such prior art devices, is the manner in which the tether cord 30 is attached to the indicator components of the device. It is thus necessary that the tether cord 30 be attached to the indicating portions in a free manner with respect to both rotational motion of the cord and longitudinal motion at the point of attachment, such freedom of longitudinal motion being in the direction away from the flight of the ball. This critical attachment is made by passing the tether cord 30 through the longitudinal hole 36 in the anchor block 32, the diameter of the cord being less than the diameter of the hole. The anchor block 32 must be formed of a smooth material having good wearing quality and capable of withstanding considerable shock. The preferred material is a carefully machined block of plexiglass (methylmethacrylate polymer). It is essential that the inner bore of longitudinal hole 36 be completely smooth and that the hole 36 be countersunk at the front end of the block. In addition, the knots 40 and 42 in the tether cord 30 at either end of the anchor block 32 must be spaced apart a distance greater than the length of the anchor block and preferably about 1 to 1%. times such length.

When the cord 30 is stretched under impact of the driven ball 23 it has a slight tendency to bounce back within the anchor block to knot 42; in addition, it sometimes will rotate. When the ball 28 returns, it hits the ground and sometimes rolls back slightly to the left or the right which causes the cord to twist which effects rotation of the cord Within the hole 36 of the anchor block 32. The countersink 38 and the smooth interior bore of the hole 36 reduces friction and inhibits wear of the tether cord 30 at its point of attachment to the indicating section of the device.

As explained earlier, the trailing bar is free to move in the channel guide in a lengthwise direction; the lateral motion relative to the base board 12 is restricted to rotational displacement of the trailing bar 46, indicator block 44 and anchor block 32 about the pivot pin 2%) of the channel guide 16 as the center. Stop blocks 14 and 14A are used to restrict within limits the rotation of the trailing bar, indicator block and anchor block about the channel guide pivot and also serve as a starting rest point for the indicator block 44.

The indicia on the base board 12 are obtained empirically as indicated hereafter. Three relatively consistent golfers are obtained. Golfer #1 averages drives of from 160 to 125 yards. Golfer #2 averages about 175 to 200 yards. Golfer #3 averages about 250 to 300 yards. The marks are made a uniform distance apart as shown in FIG. 1. The weight of the indicator block 44 is varied until golfer #1 hits drives indicating drives of 100 to 125 yards as shown by the device. Under this weight of indicator block 44, it is found that golfers #2 and #3 also hit their average distance of drives as indicated by the device. Rather than change the weight of the indicator block 44, it is also possible to use added weights to vary the total weight. For example, weights 6t) weighing 2 ounces each may :be used in conjunction with the indicator block 44. Any golfer can adjust the game to his average distances of drives by adding or reducing the weights on the indicator block 44. Tests have indicated that the addition of a single two-ounce weight on the indicator block 44 reduces the indication of drives by a distance of 25 yards.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention and therefore the invention is not limited to what is shown in the drawings and described in the specification, but only as indicated in the appended claims:

What is claimed is:

1. A golf practice game comprising a tethered ball, a tether cord having a slow return elasticity connected to said ball at one end, means both to anchor and to permit rotational and longitudinal movement of said cord at the other end thereof, said anchor means comprising an anchor block, an indicator block having substantial inertia integral with said anchor block, a base board underlying said integral anchor and indicator blocks so that said integral blocks frictionally rest thereon, said base board having indicia thereon for indicating the travel of said indicator block on said base board due to the force exerted by the flight of said tethered ball, a trailing bar integral with said integral indicator and anchor blocks and projecting from the rear of said integral blocks in a direction away from the intended flight of said tethered ball, and a channel guide mounted on said base board behind said indicator block, said channel guide supporting said trailing bar to permit longitudinal travel of said trailing bar in said channel guide.

2. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said channel guide is pivotally mounted for horizontal rotation about an axis perpendicular to said base board so that the travel of said indicator block is indicative of distance and direction of the driven tethered ball.

3. A device in accordance with claim 2 wherein said tether cord is formed of woven strands of polyethylene and exhibits a maximum stretch under maximum stress of no more than about 20% of the total unstressed length.

4. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said anchor block is formed of impact resistant material having a longitudinal bore therethrough through which said tether cord is passed to obtain said connection of said cord to said anchor block and to permit said rotation of said cord.

5. A device in accordance with claim 4 wherein said tether cord is knotted behind and in front of said anchor block, the distance between said knots being greater than the length of said anchor block, :said longitudinal bore being countersunk at the front end of said anchor block and being sufiiciently smooth to inhibit wear of said cord during movement in said bore.

6. A device in accordance with claim 3 wherein said anchor block has a longitudinal bore therethrough through which said tether cord is passed, and knots in said tether cord behind and in front of said anchor block, the distance between said knots being greater than the length of said anchor block, said longitudinal bore being countersunk at the front end of said anchor block and being sufficiently smooth to inhibit wear of said cord during movement in said bore.

7. A device in accordance with claim 2 further comprising stop block means on said base board for limiting the angular displacement of said integral indicator block and trailing bar.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 914,873 3/1909 Peter 73-380 1,999,518 4/1935 Stafford 273-35 2,201,697 5/1940 Martin et al. 73-38O 2,888,266 5/1959 Melin 273-197 X JAMES J. GILL, Acting Primary Examiner. RICHARD C. QUEISSER, Examiner.

J. J. SMITH, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A GOLF PRACTICE GAME COMPRISING A TETHERED BALL, A TETHER CORD HAVING A SLOW RETURN ELASTICITY CONNECTED TO SAID BALL AT ONE END, MEANS BOTH TO ANCHOR AND TO PERMIT ROTATIONAL AND LONGITUDINAL MOVEMENT OF SAID CORD AT THE OTHER END THEREOF, SAID ANCHOR MEANS COMPRISING AN ANCHOR BLOCK, AN INDICATOR BLOCK HAVING SUBSTANTIAL INERTIA INTEGRAL WITH SAID ANCHOR BLOCK, A BASE BOARD UNDERLYING SAID INTEGRAL ANCHOR AND INDICATOR BLOCKS SO THAT SAID INTEGRAL BLOCKS FRICTIONALLY REST THEREON, SAID BASE BOARD HAVING INDICIA THEREON FOR INDICATING THE TRAVEL OF SAID INDICATOR BLOCK ON SAID BASE BOARD DUE TO THE FORCE EXERTED BY THE FLIGHT OF SAID TETHERED BALL, A
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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4071250A (en) * 1976-03-24 1978-01-31 Vroome Ray L Golf practice drive analyzer
DE2639781A1 (en) * 1976-09-03 1978-03-09 Paar Kurt Golf swing practice appts. - includes golf ball connected to guide line passing over rollers
FR2619018A1 (en) * 1987-08-03 1989-02-10 Vincent Paul Device for golf training
US5544886A (en) * 1995-07-07 1996-08-13 Vanskiver; David Golf practice device
US5885164A (en) * 1998-06-24 1999-03-23 Wheatley; W. George Golf practice aid
US9737748B1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2017-08-22 P.T. ROM And Associates LLC Low friction rehabilitation board with an integral band retaining feature
US9821184B1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2017-11-21 P.T. ROM And Associates LLC Low friction rehabilitation board with an integral band retaining feature and methods of rehabilitation
US20170368400A1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2017-12-28 P.T. ROM And Associates LLC Low friction rehabilitation board with an integral band retaining feature and methods of rehabilitation

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US914873A (en) * 1908-06-01 1909-03-09 Robert B Peter Captive golf apparatus.
US1999518A (en) * 1933-10-30 1935-04-30 John K Stafford Game apparatus
US2201697A (en) * 1939-06-12 1940-05-21 Martin Leslie Thomas Golf practicing device
US2888266A (en) * 1955-12-27 1959-05-26 Arthur K Melin Swing practicing device

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US914873A (en) * 1908-06-01 1909-03-09 Robert B Peter Captive golf apparatus.
US1999518A (en) * 1933-10-30 1935-04-30 John K Stafford Game apparatus
US2201697A (en) * 1939-06-12 1940-05-21 Martin Leslie Thomas Golf practicing device
US2888266A (en) * 1955-12-27 1959-05-26 Arthur K Melin Swing practicing device

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4071250A (en) * 1976-03-24 1978-01-31 Vroome Ray L Golf practice drive analyzer
DE2639781A1 (en) * 1976-09-03 1978-03-09 Paar Kurt Golf swing practice appts. - includes golf ball connected to guide line passing over rollers
FR2619018A1 (en) * 1987-08-03 1989-02-10 Vincent Paul Device for golf training
US5544886A (en) * 1995-07-07 1996-08-13 Vanskiver; David Golf practice device
US5885164A (en) * 1998-06-24 1999-03-23 Wheatley; W. George Golf practice aid
US9737748B1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2017-08-22 P.T. ROM And Associates LLC Low friction rehabilitation board with an integral band retaining feature
US9821184B1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2017-11-21 P.T. ROM And Associates LLC Low friction rehabilitation board with an integral band retaining feature and methods of rehabilitation
US20170333744A1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2017-11-23 P.T. ROM And Associates LLC Low friction rehabilitation board with an integral band retaining feature and methods of rehabilitation
US20170368400A1 (en) * 2011-09-02 2017-12-28 P.T. ROM And Associates LLC Low friction rehabilitation board with an integral band retaining feature and methods of rehabilitation
US10010739B2 (en) * 2011-09-02 2018-07-03 P.T. ROM And Associates LLC Low friction rehabilitation board with an integral band retaining feature and methods of rehabilitation

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