US3283999A - Transfer mechanism for a calculating machine - Google Patents

Transfer mechanism for a calculating machine Download PDF

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US3283999A
US3283999A US3283999DA US3283999A US 3283999 A US3283999 A US 3283999A US 3283999D A US3283999D A US 3283999DA US 3283999 A US3283999 A US 3283999A
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transfer
tens
accumulator
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gear
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06CDIGITAL COMPUTERS IN WHICH ALL THE COMPUTATION IS EFFECTED MECHANICALLY
    • G06C15/00Computing mechanisms; Actuating devices therefor
    • G06C15/26Devices for transfer between orders, e.g. tens transfer device

Description

TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR A CALCULATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 24, 1964 H. J. CHALL Nov. 8, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR A CALCULATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 24, 1964 H. J. CHALL Nov. 8, 1966 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 b: m9 @Q R 3 mt m9 h? mt N\\ H m-HI! W- m-HMH NOV. 8, 1966 J, CHALL 3,283,999
TRANSFER MECHANISM FOR A CALCULATING MACHINE Filed Aug. 24, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIE EI United States Patent 3,283,999 'fRANdFER MECHANISM FUR A CALCULATING MACHINE Harold ll. Chall, Castro Valley, Califi, assignor to Friden, Inc, a corporation of California Filed Aug. 24, 1964, Ser. No. 391,448 Claims. (Cl. 235-137) This invention relates to simultaneous tens-transfer, or carry, mechanism for calculating machine accumulators.
Tens-transfer mechanisms are provided in calculating machines for transferring, or carrying, one unit into a register wheel of a higher order either additively when the wheel of the next lower order moves from 9 to 0, or subtractively when the wheel of the next lower order moves from O to 9. A carry resulting from digitation, that is, from the addition or subtraction of the corresponding digits of two numbers, is called a primary tens-transfer. A carry resulting from another carry is called a secondary tens-transfer.
According to the present invention, each time a register wheel of the accumulator passes through its 9 /2 position, during the digitation operation of the calculating machine, an interponent is moved to an active position where it will remain until near the end of a machine cycle. Two opposing primary tens-transfer levers coact with the interponent, and one or the other, depending on the sign character of operation, is rocked to enter a unit in the next higher order register wheel. It may happen that rotation of the latter register wheel by the primary tens-transfer levers carries it through its 9 /2 position. In such a situation a transfer tooth on that register wheel drives a secondary tens-transfer gear which is yieldably urged into firm engagement with the register wheel for providing lost-motion-free connection to the next higher order register wheel for entering a unit therein. The secondary tens-transfer gear is brought into engagement with the register gear only during a tenstransfer phase that follows the digitation phase of the machine cycle.
In order to provide a true credit balance print-out from the accumulator, a fugitive-one tens-transfer is similarly carried from the highest order register wheel to the lowest. It is, therefore, an object of my invention to provide an improved tens-transfer mechanism for the accumulator of a calculating machine.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a tens-transfer mechanism wherein all primary and secondary tens-transfers are effected simultaneously.
Another object of the present invention is to provide separate primary tens-transfer actuators for all register wheels operable simultaneously to effect a primary tenstransfer.
A further object of the present invention is to provide a separate secondary tens-transfer gear rockably engageable with each accumulator wheel.
Still another object of the invention is to provide yieldable means for firmly engaging the secondary tenstransfer gears with the accumulator wheels in lost-motionfree engagement to provide reliable simultaneous operation.
Further objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment of the present invention, taken together with the accompanying drawings, in which:
FIG. 1 is a right elevational sectional view of a portion of the right-hand side of a machine embodying the present invention, showing particular parts associated with the addition and subtraction control keys;
FIG. 2 is a fragmentary right elevational sectional view of certain mechanisms used for conditioning the machine for addition and subtraction into the accumulator;
FIG. 3 is a right elevational sectional view showing the keyboard, actuating and accumulating mechanisms;
FIGS. 4 and 5 are right elevational sectional views showing the primary and secondary tens-transfer mechanisms of the present invention;
FIG. 6 is a left elevational sectional view of a portion of the left-hand side of the machine showing the mechanism for controlling the operation of the primary tenstransfer levers;
FIG. 7 is a front elevational section taken along the plane indicated by the line 77 of FIG. 3 showing the arrangement of the simultaneous tens-transfer mechanism;
FIG. 8 is a perspective view taken from the upper left rear, showing the tens-transfer mechanism of the machine; and
FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of the simultaneous tens-transfer mechanism, taken from the upper left rear, and showing a primary end-around-carry means.
Only those parts of the complete calculating machine which are immediately concerned with the simultaneouslyoperable, primary and secondary, tens-transfer mechanisms constituting the subject matter of the present invention are shown in the accompanying drawings. The invention is embodied in a machine of the general construction shown and described in United States Patent No. 3,108,745, issued October 29, 1963.
Referring to FIG. 3, the present calculator includes a ten-key keyboard 21 on which numbers are entered one digit at a time, highest order digit first. As each digit is entered, a pin 22 is set and a selector sector 23, including a check dial 24, is released. The pins 22 and check dials 24 are part of a traveling selector which moves one order toward the left as each digit is entered. With a number in the selector, an addition key 26 (FIG. 1) or a subtraction key 27 may be depressed for causing the machine to cycle, and to transfer the number from the selector to an accumulator. In FIG. 3, an actuator includes a series of actuator sectors 28, one for each order. Print wheels 29, geared to the actuator, print the number on a paper strip carried by a roller 31.
During an addition or a subtraction cycle, the actuator is connected to the selector by means of a gear pendant 32. "A cam 33 (FIG. 1) drives a bellcrank 34 for driving a link 36 rearward. A shoulder on this link overlies an car 37 (FIG. 3) of the frame member of the pendant 32.
Also, during an addition or a subtraction cycle, the actuator is connected to drive gear 38 of an accumulator by means of a rear gear pendant 39. These drive gears 38 are in constant mesh with register wheels, or gears, 41 of the accumulator. During an additive entry, the drive gear 38 occupy their normal, upper position for engagement with central gears 42 of the rear pendant 39, and during a subtractive entry, they occupy an alternative, lower position for engagement with the lowermost gears 43 of the pendant 39.
The rear pendant 39 and the drive gears 38 are controlled by mechanism shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The pendant 39 is moved by box cams 44 (FIG. 2) fixed to a shaft 46 controlled by a bellcrank 47 (FIG. 1). This bellcrank 47 is normaly blocked in its home position by a hook lever 48 (FIG. 1) but during addition and subtraction operations, it is unblocked, and is moved by a 3 bellcrank 49 controlled by cam 51 on the main drive shaft 52.
The addition key 26, when depressed, moves a link 53 (FIG. 1) forward a short distance for swinging the hook lever 48 (clockwise in FIG. 1) through an angle sufiicient for freeing the bellcrank 47. Similarly, the subtraction key 27, when depressed, moves the link 53 forward approximately twice as far as for an additive operation, and swings the hook lever 48 (clockwise) through a correspondingly greater angle. This motion of hook lever 48 also acts through a pin 54 (FIG. 1), a lever 56, shaft 57, a lever 58 (FIG. 2), pin 59 and a blocking lever 61. During an additive operation the blocking lever 61 has no effect. During a substractive operation, the blocking lever 61 (FIG. 2) is swung rearward (to the right in this figure) far enough to overlie an ear 62 of a dog 63 carried by a lever 64. As the machine cycle begins, the dog 63 is raised by the lever 64. As the ear 62 intercepts the blocking lever 61, the dog 63 swings (counter-clockwise in FIG. 2) about its journal 66 and in so doing, drives against a roller 67 of the frame 40 of the drive gears 38, swinging it (counter-clockwise in FIG. 2) and the drive gears 38 to their lower, subtractive, position.
The foregoing structure and operation are shown and described in more detail in US. Patent No. 3,108,745, previously referred to.
The accumulator in which the simultaneously-operated primary and secondary tens-transfer mechanisms of the present invention is employed is best shown in FIGS. 3, 7 and 8 and includes, in each numerical order, a twentytooth gear 41 rotatably and nonslidably mounted on a shaft 45. The accumulator gear 41 represents twenty units. Thus, an entry, for example, of 2, causes the gear to rotate two tooth spaces. Integral with each gear 41 are two diametrically opposite, enlarged teeth 101 and 102 (FIGS. 4 and 8) which constitute tens-transfer cams. Rotation of the register gears during the digitation phase, through the 9 /2 position, causes one of these teeth 101 or 102 to cam a T-shaped interponent, or blocking member 103, upward (FIG. 4). Each blocking member 103 is slidably mounted in a suitable aperture provided in a crossbar 104. A spring ball detent 106 is provided in the crossbar 104 for holding the interponent 103 in either its lower, in active position (FIG. 4) or upper, active position (FIG. Digitation can occur in all orders of the accumulator, and, therefore, there is an interponent 103 for each register gear 41. In its upper position each interponent 103 is aligned with abutments 107 and 108 on pawls, or two-arm levers, 109 and 110 associated with the next higher order register gear (FIG. 8).
Pawls 109 function during additive operations. They are rockably mounted on an addition control rod 111 carried by bail arms 112 and 113 (FIG. 8) controlled by a cam 114. During the tens-transfer phase of an addition operation, control rod 111 is moved forward (to the left in FIGS. 4 and 5) for actuating all pawls 109 simultaneously. In an order in which the interponent 103 has been raised, that interponent will stop the upper end of the pawls 109 (i.e., abutment 107) so that the lower end is driven against the register wheel, as best shown in FIG. 5, of the next higher order (FIG. 8) for driving the wheel (counter-clockwise in FIG. 5) one tooth space for entering the primary tens-transfer unit therein.
Pawls 110 similarly function during subtractive entries. They are mounted on a subtractive control rod 117 (FIGS. 4 and 5) which is carried by bail arms 118 and 119 (FIG. 8) controlled by a cam 121. Rod 117 carries the pawls 110 rearward (right in FIGS. 4 and 5) during tens-transfer, and the entry of that second transfer may necessitate the entry of still another, also called a secondary tens-transfer. A secondary tens-transfer will be required whenever an order stands at 9 for an additive entry (at 0 for subtractive entry) and a tens-transfer, either primary or secondary, is to be made into that order. For example, if the register stands at 299995 and a 5 is added, the digitation entry of the 5 will carry the lowest order to 0 and necessitate a primary tens-transfer into the second order, which will necessitate secondary tens-transfers into the third, fourth, fifth and sixth orders.
At each interval between adjacent register gears 41 (FIGS. 7 and 8) a broad-face secondary tens-transfer pinion 126 is rotatably mounted at 127 on a rockable arm 128 and aligned with both, one register gear 41 and the tens-transfer teeth 101, 102 of the gear of the next lower order. Each of the rockable arms 128 is journalled on a shaft 129 and is urged upwardly by a spring 131. During digitation, a control bail 132 depresses all of the arms 128 for holding the gears 126 clear of the register gears 41. During the tens-transfer phase of each entry cycle, the bail 132 is held elevated so that the gears 126 rise into engagement with the register gears, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5.
FIG. 8 shows a secondary tens-transfer gear 126 engaging the tens-transfer cam 102 of a register gear in the 0 position. It also engages the register gear of the next higher order. With the parts in this position, a tenstnansfer, either primary or secondary, in the subtractive direction into the lower of these two register gears, will drive the cam 102 (counter-clockwise in FIG. 8), turning the secondary tens-transfer gear 126 which turns the second (higher) register gears. Each spring 131 maintains firm engagement between its secondary tens-transfer gear 126 and register gear 41, and ensures that there is no lost mostion between the two gears. Uniformity of the register gears 41 then ensures little or no lost motion between each tens-transfer gear and the projecting tooth 101 or 102 of the next lower register gear. All of this provides a train of gears that are substantially free of lost motion from the register gear that originates the primary tens-transfer through all those that are required to receive secondary tens-transfers because of it (in the case of an additive entry, all immeditely successive register wheels standing at 9).
the tens-transfer phase for entering tens-transfer units During rotation of the accumulator wheel in the additive direction (counter-clockwise in FIG. 4) for a secondary tens-transfer operation the interponent 103 may drive against the tip 107, and if so, will simply rotate pawl 109 (clockwise in FIG. 4). Although rod 111 is moved forward, pawl 109 will be free to rotate because the next higher register wheel 41, with which the lower tip of pawl 109 is aligned, will be rotating for effecting the secondary tens-transfer operation. Thus, in the previous example, the register wheels stand at 299990 after digitation, and as the tens-transfer phase begins, the pawl 109 responding to the first (lowest) order drives the register wheel of the second (next highest) order. The register Wheel of the second order is standing at 9, as shown in FIG. 4. Therefore, its upper tens-transfer cam 102 passes under interponent 103 and drives it up against tip 107 of pawl 109 and thereby forces the lower end of pawl 109 toward the third order register wheel. But, at this time, the lower tens-transfer cam 101, through pinion 126, is driving the third order register wheel for entering the secondary tens-transfer therein. Therefore, the lower end of pawl 109 is free to idly follow the rotation of .the wheel and not interfere with the rotation thereof by pinion 126. The same operation is continued throughout the remaining orders, except the sixth order, which is not rotated through its tens-transfer position.
The rocked tens-transfer pawl, as seen in FIG. 5, also provides an effective anti-overthrow device for each register wheel of the accumulator. Rocking of the pawls is stopped when the edge of a pawl abuts the crossbar 104. At that time the lower tip of the pawl remains in the interdent al tooth space of the register gear 41. Because the trailing tooth of the rotated register gear cannot rotate past the lower tip of a pawl, any further rotation of the gear is prevented by the pawl. Thus, any inertia in the gear that would cause the gear to overthrow is stopped by the tip of the pawl.
Engagement with, and disengagement from, the secondary tens-transfer gear 126 by the accumulator gear 41 is controlled by the control bail 132 (FIGS. 3 and 8). For this purpose the right arm 133 of the bail 132 (FIGS. 3 and 8) extends downward from the shaft 129 and carries at its lower end a pin 134. The pin 134 extends into a slot 136 provided in the rear end of a link 137, which link 137 is connected at its forward end to the shaft 138 of the rear pendant 39 just inside of the right frame of the machine. Extending to the left from the link 137 is a stud 139 (FIG. 8) to which is connected one end of a spring 141, having its other end connected to the pin 134, whereby the spring ensures that the bail 132 will follow movement of the link 137. The spring 141 urges the pin 134 into contact with the rear edge of the slot 136. When the gear pendant 39 is in its normal position, shown in FIG. 3, link 137 holds the bail 132, 133 in its clockwise position so that the springs 131 hold the tens-transfer gears 126 in firm engagement with the register gears 41. This is the position required during the tens-transfer phase of the machine cycle. When the gear pendant 39 is swung rearward into engagement with the accumulator drive gears 38, link 137 moves rearward and swings bail 132, 133 counterclockwise for lowering the tens-transfer gears 126 clear of the register gears. This position is required during the digitation phase of positive and negative entries. The parts are also in this position during readout and re-entry in total and subtotal operations, so that gears 126 do not add to the mechanical load in those operations. This action is desirable because during readout, accuracy depends on the proper action of the spring-loaded sickle bars 30 in the actuator drive. In order to limit counterclockwise movement of the bail 132, as viewed in FIG. 3, and thereby counter-clockwise movement of the arms 128 for the secondary tens-transfer gears 126, there is provided a stop 142 extending leftward from the right-hand frame of the machine, against which stop the downward extending leg 133 of bail 132 abuts upon counter-clockwise movement of the bail. Because of the pin-and-slot connection 134 and 136, the spring 141 permits the link 137 to continue rearward movement upon rearward movement of the pendant 39, but the pin 142 limits rearward movement of the bail leg 133 and thereby overthrow of the secondary tens-transfer gears 126. Conversely, return of the rear pendant 39 to its normal position (FIG. 3) draws the link 137 forward to raise the bail 132 whereby each spring 131 will stretch and cause firm engagement of each tens-transfer gear 126 and accumulator gear 41. It can be seen that stretching of springs 131 individually takes up lost motion between the secondary gears 126 and the accumulator gears 41.
Referring now to FIGS. 6 and 8, there is seen a pair of tens-transfer drive cams 114 and 121 fixed to the main drive shaft 52 on the outside of the left side frame. One arm of a positive control bellcrank 112 carries a roller 116 riding on the cam 114. The other arm of the bellcrank 112 extends downwardly from a quill shaft 146, which shaft is suitably journalled in the machine frame and carries at its lower end, one end of the positive control rod 111 on which, as already mentioned, the positive tens-transfer levers 189 are journalled. The quill shaft 146 is rotatably journalled in a left side control frame (not shown) and in the right side frame of the machine. Near the right end of the quill shaft 146 is fastened an arm 113 (FIGS. 3 and 8) in transverse alignment with the downwardly extending arm of bellcrank 112 and has fastened at its lower end the right-hand end of the positive control rod 111. A spring 147 urges the bellcrank 112 counter-clockwise in FIG. 8. It can be seen that the above construction of the rod 111, bellcrank 112, arm 113 and quill shaft 146 forms a bail which is rockable by the positive tens-transfer drive cam 114. At about the mid-point of an additive entry cycle, cam 114 permits spring 147 to lift arm 112 for driving the addition control rod 111 forward for effecting the tens-transfers, as previously described.
A second, or negative, control bellcrank 118, is fastened to the left end of a sleeve shaft 148, as seen in FIGS. 6, 7, and 8. At the end of the forward extending arm of the negative control bellcrank 118 is fixed a roller 122 which is urged to ride the negative tens-transfer drive cam 121 by the spring 147. The other arm of this bellcrank 118 extends downward from the sleeve 148 and has fastened at its lower end the negative controlrod 117 on which rod are rockably mounted the negative primary tens-transfer drive levers 110. The sleeve 148, as mentioned above, extends transversely of the accumulator and has mounted at its right end a downward extending arm 119 (FIGS. 3 and 8), similar to the downward extending arm of bellcrank 118, to which arm 119 is fastened the right end of the negative control rod 117. During the first half of a subtraction operation the high portion of the cam 121 holds the negative tens-transfer levers 118 forward, or disengaged from the interponents 103. At about the mid-point of the subtraction cycle, the cam 121 lets the spring 147 rock bail arm 118 (clockwise in FIG. 8) for driving the negative drive rod 117 rearward for effecting negative tens-transfers, as previously described.
In order to prevent the additive tens-transfer levers 109 from driving into contact with the blocking members 103 during a subtraction cycle, and the subtraction tens-transfer levers from driving into contact with the blocking members, there is provided a means for selectively blocking the operation of the bellcranks 112 and 118. As seen in FIG. 6, a pair of blocking arms 150 and 151 are fixed to the add-subtract shaft 57 adjacent the left side of the left side frame of the machine. As was mentioned hereinbefore in connection with FIG. 1, the shaft 57 rotates about 7 (clockwise in FIG. 8) for an additive entry and about twice that angle for a subtractive entry. When shaft 57 is set for a subtraction, the arm 150 blocks an car 152 on the bellcrank 112 for preventing that bellcrank from following the cam 114 and so prevents additive control rod 111 from operating. The bellcrank 112 is unblocked during an additive entry, when its operation is required, and also during nonentry operations, when it is permitted to operate idly. When shaft 57 is either at home, or set for an addition, arm 151 similarly blocks an ear 153 on bellcrank 118 for preventing operation of the subtraction control rod 117. When shaft 57 is set for subtraction, lever 151 is clear of the ear 153, so that the bellcrank 118 is free to operate.
The present machine is provided with a second, or rear, drive shaft 155. (See shaft 110, FIG. 2 in Patent No. 3,108,745, previously referred to.) Rotation of this rear drive shaft 155 is utilized in the present invention for restoring any actively positioned T-shaped interponent members 103 before digitation in a succeeding machine operation. For this purpose there is provided an interponent restore bail 156 journalled on shaft 46 (FIGS. 3, 7 and 8). Each arm of the bail extends forward from the shaft 46 and has secured therebetween a rod 157 overlying all of the blocking members 103. The left arm of the restore bail 156 extends upward and rearward from the shaft 155 and carries at the end thereof a roller 158 riding a restore cam 159. The restore bail 156 is biased by a spring 161 for maintaining the roller 158 in engagement with the restore cam 159.
An end-around or fugitive-one transfer from the highest to the lowest orders of the accumulator is provided for enabling the present machine to read out true credit balances. In FIG. 9 there is illustrated the primary fugitive-one, carry mechanism. A pair of endaround-carry bails 162 and 163 are rockably mounted on the additive and subtractive control rods 111 and 117, respectively. The two carry bails have at their high order end (right ends in FIG. 9) upstanding arms 164 and 165, similar to the upper parts of the tens-transfer pawls 109 and 110, previously mentioned, which arms are provided with abutments 166 and 167, respectively, extending toward, and cooperating with, the horizontal bar of a T- shaped interponent 103 associated with the highest order accumulator gear 41. The other end of each bail 162 and 163 (left ends in FIG. 9) is provided with downwardly extending offset legs 168 and 169, similar to the lower part of pawls 109 and 110, in alignment with the teeth of the lowest order accumulator gear. The operation of the pawls 164 and 165 of FIG. 9 is similar to the operation of the previously described pawls 109 and 110 of FIG. 9. For example, during additive operations, the movement of control rod 111 toward the accumulator gears causes the abutment 166 to contact the actively positioned interponent and rock the end-around-carry bail. Upon rocking of the bail, the tip of leg 168 is moved into engagement with a tooth of the lowest order accumulator gear and rotates the gear one tooth space.
In those machines in which digitation does not occur in the highest order of the accumulator, it is unnecessary to provide the machine with a primary end-around-carry mechanism, as described above. In this situation the highest order accumulator wheel acts as an overflow register gear and a true credit balance is obtained by means of a secondary end-around-carry device.
The secondary fugitive-one, or end-around-carry, mechanism is shown in FIG. 8, Supported on a rockable arm (not shown), similar to arm 128, is a transfer pinion 171 arranged to cooperate with the tens-transfer teeth 101, 102 of the gear 41 in the highest order of the accumulator. This pinion 171 is similar to, but need be only about half as thick as the secondary tens-transfer pinion 126, since it needs only to co-operate with the tenstransfer teeth 101, 102 of the highest order accumulator gear 41. In constant engagement with the pinion 171 is an idler gear 172 fixed to an end-aroundcarry shaft 173 extending transverse the accumulator. Shaft 173 is journalled at its ends in a pair of arms 174 fixed on shaft 129. Pinned to the right end (left in FIG. 8) of shaft 173 is another idler gear 176, also constantly meshing with a tens-transfer pinion 177 for completing the secondary end-around-carry mechanism. Pinion 177 is similarly journalled on a rockable arm similar to arm 128 (which arm is not shown in the drawing), and is engageable with the teeth of the lowest order accumulator gear. The pinion gear 177 is about half as thick as the adjacent gear 126. It should be noted that rearward movement of link 137 will rotate shaft 129 (clockwise in FIG. 8) and disengage the two end-around-carry pinions 172 and 177 from their associated accumulator gears 41.
If, during the tens-transfer phase of the machine operation the highest order accumulator gear is caused to rotate through its tens-transfer position because of either a primary or secondary tens-transfer into it from the next lower gear, the secondary tens-transfer therefrom will be carried to the lowest order accumulator gear.
Whether or not digitation takes place in the highest order accumulator gear, it is necessary to provide the present machine with a secondary end-around-carry mechanism.
Near the end of each machine cycle the high portion of the restore cam 159 drives the roller 158 forwardly to rock the restore bail 156 (counter-clockwise as viewed in FIG. 3). Consequently, the rod 157 moves down and forces any actively positioned T-shaped blocking memher 103 back to its inactive position Where the blocking member is retained by the detent 106.
To illustrate the operation of the present simultaneously operable primary and secondary tens-transfer mech- 4 3 2 2 9 Augend (already in the accumulator) 5 6 8 3 9 Addend 9#9#0*5 Register after digitation 1 0 0 0 6 8 Register after simultaneous and secondary tens-transfer operation (SUM) Tens-transfer out of this order moves interponent 103 to active posi" tion.
'llransfer into this order, standing at 9 causes rotation of secondary gear 2 During the digitation operation the register gear 41 of each of the first and third orders rotates through its 9 /2 position and the cam tooth 102 thereof forces the associated interponent 103 upward to its active position where the detent 106 will retain it until near the end of the cycle, at which time the restore rod 157 is operated to return all interponents to their inactive position. Subsequent to digitation, the additive drive rod 111 moves forward while the subtractive rod 117 remains unmoved because the addition-subtraction shaft 57 was rocked its smaller distance by the slight forward movement of the link 53 and the subtractive blocking arm 151 prevented the subtractive control bellcrank 118 from following cam 121. Forward movement of rod 111 causes the tenstransfer levers 109 associated with the first and third ordinal interponents 103 to contact these actively set interponents and rock, as shown in FIG. 5. Rocking of these two tens-transfer levers causes the adjacent higher register gears, with which the tips of the levers are meshed (i.e., the second and fourth orders), to advance one step for effecting a primary tens-transfer therein simultaneously. Moreover, because the register gear of the fourth and fifth orders, which stood at 9 after digitation, rotates through its 9 /2 position, its transfer cam tooth 101 engages a tooth of the coordinal secondary tens-transfer gear 126 (see FIG. 4) and causes the register gear of the fifth and sixth orders, with which the secondary tens-transfer gear also meshes, to advance one step, thus performing the secondary tens-transfer operation into the fifth and sixth orders simultaneously with the primary tens-transfer into the second and fourth order register wheels.
From the foregoing description it will be evident to those skilled in the art that the novel tens-transfer mechanism of my invention may be embodied in other specific forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The present embodiment is, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, the scope of the invention being indicated by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are, therefore, intended to be embraced therein.
What is claimed is:
1. In a calculating machine comprising in combination:
ordinally arranged accomulator wheels;
means for entering values into said accumulator wheels;
an interponent for each of certain ones of said accumulator wheels, each interponent movable to an active position by the rotation of an accumulator wheel through its tens-transfer position;
an addition set of primary tens-transfer actuators, a
subtraction set of primary tens-transfer actuators, at least one of said interponents in its active position enabling two of said primary tens-transfer actuators, one from each set;
control mechanism automatically operated by an additive condition of said value-entering means for effecting an operation of said addition primary tenstransfer actuators and by a subtractive condition of said value-entering means for effecting an operation of said subtraction primary tens-transfer actuators; and
a plurality of secondary tens-transfer actuators for said accumulator wheels, each said secondary actuator driven by the adjacent lower order accumulator wheel as that lower order wheel is rotated through its tens-transfer position in either direction by said primary tens-transfer actuator for entering the secondary tens-transfer simultaneously with the primary tens-transfer operation.
2. The combination of claim 1 wherein the interponent comprises a T-shaped member, the bar of the T providing centrifugally positioned abutments for the addition and subtraction primary tens-transfer actuators.
3. The combination of claim 2 including a primary end-around-carry device conditioned by the said T-shaped interponent associated with the highest order accumulator wheel for introducing a primary tens-transfer into the lowest order accumulator wheel.
4. In a calculating machine comprisingin combination:
ordinally arranged accumulator wheels;
means for entering values into said accumulator wheels;
a plurality of interponents for said accumulator wheels, each interponent movable to an active position by the rotation of an accumulator wheel through its tens-transfer position; and
a plurality of simultaneously operable primary tenstransfer actuators for said accumulator wheels, each said primary actuator being conditioned by an actively positioned interponent to eifect a primary tenstransfer into the adjacent higher order accumulator wheel;
the improvement comprising in combination a plurality of secondary tens-transfer actuators each having gear teeth engageable with one of said accumulator wheels, and each driven by the adjacent lower order order accumulator wheel through its tens-transfer position as a result of a primary tens-transfer operation therein, for entering the secondary tens-transfer simultaneously with the primary tens-transfer operation; and
means including resilient members urging said gear teeth of said secondary actuators radially into firm, lost-motion-free engagement with the gear teeth of said accumulator wheels, whereby to prevent lost motion between each said secondary tens-transfer actuators and its accumulator wheel.
5. In a calculating means having:
ordinally arranged accumulator gears;
means for entering values into said accumulator gears;
a plurality of simultaneously operable primary tenstransfer actuators for said accumulator gears; and
a plurality of secondary tens-transfer gears, each driven by the rotation of the adjacent lower order accumulator gear as that lower order gear is rotated through its tens-transfer position as a result of a primary tens-transfer therein to enter a secondary tens-transfer simultaneously with the primary tens-transfer operation;
the improvement comprising in combination separate rockable mounting means for each of said secondary tens-transfer gears, each of said rockable mounting means being biased to urge its gear radially into firm lost-motion-free engagement with the corresponding accumulator gear; and
control means operable in timed relationship to said value-entering means for engaging and disengaging said secondary tens-transfer gears with said accumulator gears, said control means being movable to a first position to block said rockable mounting means in inactive position with said secondary tens-transfer gears disengaged from said accumulator gears during digitation operations, and movable to a second position in which it leaves said rockable mounting means free for movement by their bias for moving said secondary tens-transfer gears into firm engagement with said accumulator gears during tens-transfer operations.
References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,917,235 12/1959 Hecht 235137 3,065,908 11/1962 Gang 235-137 3,069,084 12/1962 Barkas et al. 235-137 3,076,602 2/1963 Dombrowski 235-137 3,102,688 9/1963 Gang 235137 RICHARD B. WILKINSON, Primary Examiner.
S. J. TOMSKY, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A CALCULATING MACHINE COMPRISING IN COMBINATION: ORDINALLY ARRANGED ACCOMULATOR WHEELS; MEANS TO ENTERING VALUES INTO SAID ACCUMULATOR WHEELS; AN INTERPOINT FOR EACH OF CERTAIN ONES OF SAID ACCUMULATOR WHEELS, EACH INTERPONENT MOVABLE TO AN ACTIVE POSITION BY THE ROTATION OF AN ACCUMULATOR WHEEL THROUGH ITS TENS-TRANSFER POSITION; AN ADDITION SET OF PRIMARY TENS-TRANSFER ACTUATORS, A SUBTRACTION SET OF PRIMARY TENS-TRANSFER ACTUATORS, AT LEAST ONE OF SAID INTERPONENTS IN ITS ACTIVE POSITION ENABLING TWO OF SAID PRIMARY TENS-TRANSFER ACTUATORS ONE FROM EACH SET; CONTROL MECHANISM AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED BY AN ADDITIVE CONDITION OF SAID VALUE-ENTERING MEANS FOR EFFECTING AN OPERATION OF SAID ADDITION PRIMARY TENSTRANSFER ACTUATORS AND BY A SUBTRACTIVE CONDITION OF SAID VALUE-ENTERING MEANS FOR EFFECTING AN OPERATION OF SAID SUBTRACTION PRIMARY TENS-TRANSFER ACTUATORS; AND A PLURALITY OF SECONDARY TENS-TRANSFER ACTUATORS FOR SAID ACCUMULATOR WHEELS, EACH SAID SECONDARY ACTUATOR DRIVEN BY THE ADJACENT LOWER ORDER ACCUMULATOR WHEEL AS THAT LOWER OREDER WHEEL IS ROTATED THROUGH ITS TENS-TRANSFER POSITION IN EITHER DIRECTION BY SAID PRIMARY TENS-TRANSFER ACTUATOR FOR ENTERING THE SECONDARY TENS-TRANSFER SIMULTANEOUSLY WITH THE PRIMARY TENS-TRANSFER OPERATION.
US3283999D Transfer mechanism for a calculating machine Expired - Lifetime US3283999A (en)

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3472450A (en) * 1967-04-25 1969-10-14 Litton Business Systems Inc Registering mechanism

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2917235A (en) * 1959-12-15 Hecht
US3065908A (en) * 1962-11-27 Transfer mechanism for calculating machines
US3069084A (en) * 1962-12-18 Registering mechanism
US3076602A (en) * 1963-02-05 dombrowski
US3102688A (en) * 1963-09-03 Simultaneous tens transfer and fugitive one mechanisms

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2917235A (en) * 1959-12-15 Hecht
US3065908A (en) * 1962-11-27 Transfer mechanism for calculating machines
US3069084A (en) * 1962-12-18 Registering mechanism
US3076602A (en) * 1963-02-05 dombrowski
US3102688A (en) * 1963-09-03 Simultaneous tens transfer and fugitive one mechanisms

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3472450A (en) * 1967-04-25 1969-10-14 Litton Business Systems Inc Registering mechanism

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