US3273296A - Detachable baseboard and flooring trim assembly - Google Patents

Detachable baseboard and flooring trim assembly Download PDF

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US3273296A
US3273296A US288410A US28841063A US3273296A US 3273296 A US3273296 A US 3273296A US 288410 A US288410 A US 288410A US 28841063 A US28841063 A US 28841063A US 3273296 A US3273296 A US 3273296A
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flooring
wall
floor
baseboard
member
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Glenn E Soulon
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Glenn E Soulon
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F19/00Other details of constructional parts for finishing work on buildings
    • E04F19/02Borders; Finishing strips, e.g. beadings; Light coves
    • E04F19/04Borders; Finishing strips, e.g. beadings; Light coves for use between floor or ceiling and wall, e.g. skirtings
    • E04F19/045Hygienic or watertight plinths
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S52/00Static structures, e.g. buildings
    • Y10S52/01Hand tools for assembling building components

Description

DETACHABLE BASEBOARD AND FLOORING TRIM ASSEMBLY Filed June 1'7, 1963 Sept. 20, 1966 E. SOULON 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 mammal INVENTOR.

GLENN E. SOULON A TTORNEYS Sept. 20, 1966 G. E. SOULON DETACHABLE BASEBOARD AND FLOORING TRIM ASSEMBLY Filed June 17, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet. 2

FIG]

INVENTOR.

GLENN E. SOULON ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,273,296 DETACHABLE BASEBOARD AND FLOORING TRIM ASSEMBLY Glenn E. Soulon, New York, N.Y. (43 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich, Conn.) Filed June 17, 1963, Ser. No. 288,410 3 Claims. (Cl. 52-288) This invention relates to flooring trim construction and particularly to such construction for use in gymnasiums, school and theater stages, school shops, dance floors and the like. Due to the expanse of floor involved in the latter type of structures, compensation must be made for the expansion and contraction of the flooring caused by humidity and other climatic changes, as well as accidental spillage of water and other liquids. It is thus customary to provide a void or space between the marginal edge of the flooring and the adjacent wall, which is then covered by a baseboard or trim molding.

A problem frequently encountered in flooring construction is that which is referred to as cupping. Cupping may be the result of an unbalanced moisture content in the wood which occurs when the underneath side of the flooring absorbs moisture at a greater rate than the surface. Consequently, a greater swelling of the lower surface of the floor occurs with the result that a distortion develops in each individual strip causing the upper surface to become concave. Cupping also may take place when the individual flooring strips absorb too much moisture from the surrounding atmosphere so that a dimensional change occurs throughout. Since the finished flooring, after it is laid in place, is confined or restricted by nails and the adjacent strips, compression ridges from at the junction of the lateral edges of the individual strips. Of late, the extensive use of concrete on grade floor slab construction has very substantially increased this problem because of condensation which forms on the top of the concrete during the prolonged periods of high humidity in the spring, summer and early fall. Adequate ventilation of the flooring is thus a necessity in order to avoid the problem of cupping.

If a baseboard is fitted tightly over the expansion void and snugly to the adjacent wall, it will interfere with the expansion and contraction of the floor as well as trap moist, dead air in the expansion void and under the entire floor structure, tending to cause the floor to heave and buckle as well as the decay of the flooring material due to moisture.

Furthermore, in gymn-asiums, theaters, shops, dance floors, and like structures, it is desirable to frequently change the decor of the building for different theatrical performances and other events.

It is therefore one of the objects of this invention to provide a detachable baseboard assembly which can be quickly and easily installed and removed to obtain varying color combinations or ornamentation to change the decor as desired.

A further object is to provide a detachable baseboard which can be removed and replaced without damage to same with a minimum of effort in the event the floor is buckled and needs repair due to execessive moisture or other liquids as a result of pipe breakage or storm damage.

A further object is to provide a baseboard having an uninterrupted, smooth, clean surface with no visible bolts, screws, nails or other anchoring devices to mar the appearance of the finished product.

A further object is to provide a baseboard of elastomer or plastic material in which the color may be homogeneously mixed with the plastic to eliminate the necessity of repainting the baseboard.

A further object is to provide a baseboard which will provide a constant circulation of air underneath the floor structure to equalize the room temperature thereby resulting in a warm floor on which gymnastics and dance activities are held.

Still another object is to provide a baseboard ventilating system in which the baseboard is suspended above the floor and away from the wall to adequately provide a cold air return for hot air heating systems.

Still another object is to provide a detachable baseboard assembly that can be quickly and easily installed and removed, and that when installed will not interfere with expansion or contraction of the floor due to climatic changes, or the evaporation of moisture at the expansion void and underneath the floor.

Another object lies in the provision of a flooring trim assembly in which a baseboard or trim molding can be quickly and easily removed and replaced at the juncture of the wall and floor, the baseboard, when installed, providing a path for the flow of air through the expansion joint and underneath the floor.

The foregoing and other objects are achieved by the provision of a baseboard member of resilient, elastomer materials which preferably is substantially L-shaped in cross-section.

Formed in the rear face of the vertical leg of the L- shaped baseboard is a T-shaped groove which cooperates with a line of anchor members mounted in the wall at the periphery of the floor. Each of the anchor members is formed with a spacer flange as well as a neck and head portion which cooperate with the T-shaped groove of the baseboard to detachably secure the vertical leg in opposed horizontal relationship with the wall, while at the same time the spaced member positions the rear face of the vertical leg outwardly from the surface of the wall to provide an air space as well as to accommodate irregularities of the surface of the wall. Extending from the lower end of the vertical leg is a horizontal leg which projects over the upper surface of the floor adjacent its marginal edge and bridges the expansion void which is provided between the floor and the wall. The horizontal leg is spaced above the surface of the floor so as not to interfere with expansion or contraction of the floor and to provide a path for the flow of air in the expansion void. The construction of the baseboard is such that no fasteners or nails are visible at the outer surface of the baseboard, and the resiliency of the baseboard permits quick and easy installation and removal of the baseboard from the anchor member.

Further objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a detachable baseboard embodying the invention in its pref-erred form;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the baseboard in FIG. 1 installed at the junction of a wall and floor, the marginal edge of the floor being spaced from the wall to provide an expansion void;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 illustrating the manner in which the baseboard assembly is removed and installed; and

FIGS. 4 through 8 are sectional detailed views of various types of ventilated flooring construction to which the present invention is applicable.

With reference to FIG. 1, a baseboard of substantially Lshaped cross-section is indicated generally by reference numeral 10 and includes a vertical leg member 12 and a horizontal leg member 14. Baseboard 10 is preferably of resilient material such as rubber, or one of the several resilient plastic materials, such as polyethylene, polyurethane or polystyrene, so that it can be flexed to the extent necessary to install and remove the baseboard from anchoring devices in a manner to be presently described.

Vertical leg member 12 has a front or outer face 16 I by the tool.

which is joined to the upper face 18 of leg member 14 by a fillet 20, and a rear or inner face 22 extending between a lower edge 23 formed by the intersection of face 22 with a bottom face 24 of leg member 14, and an upper edge 25. Formed in the rear surface 22 is a longitudinal groove 26, preferably T-shaped in cross-section, which extends along the length of leg member 12 parallel to the lower edge 23. Groove 26 is formed with a reduced portion 28 and an enlarged portion 30.

With reference to FIGS. 2 and 3, a concrete base or slab 32 abuts a vertical wall 36 of concrete, plaster or other conventional material. Overlying slab 32 is surface flooring 34, the marginal edge 38 of which is spaced from wall 36 to define an expansion void.

Mounted in wall 36 along a horizontal line parallel to flooring 34 is a plurality of anchor members (one only being shown in the drawing) identified generally by reference numeral 42. Anchor members 42 include a threaded stem 44 which is received in a cylindrical spacer member 46 of soft metal or the like which is embedded in the wall. Formed on the outer end of stem 44 is a circular spacer flange 48, the rear face of which abuts the outer surface of wall 36. Projecting from the forward face of spacer 48 is a neck 50, on the outer end of which is formed an enlarged head 52.

As shown in FIG. 2, when baseboard is attached to anchor members 42, the reduced portion 28 of groove 26 receives neck 50 and enlarged portion 30 receives head 52 to prevent relative movement between the baseboard and wall. Spacer 48 provides an air space between rear face 22 of the vertical leg member 12 and wall 36. The horizontal leg 18 extends over the upper surface of flooring 34 and preferably is spaced slightly above the surface to provide a passage for air as well as to accommodate vertical expansion of the floor.

.FIG. 3 illustrates one method of installing and removing baseboard 10 from anchor member 42 by a tool 54. Tool 54 is formed with a handle 55 and a gripping head 57 at one end of the handle. Gripping head 57 is formed with a generally curved heel portion 56 and a toe portion 58 connected together by an arcuate recess 60 conforming generally to, but slightly larger than the upper, outer contour of leg 12. Toe portion 58 is of a thickness such that it can be received within the air space between face 22 and the wall surface to grip face 22 adjacent edge 25.

With toe 58 in the position shown in FIG. 3, heel portion 56 engages face 16 opposite head 52. Consequently, counterclockwise movement of handle 55 causes the upper half of leg 12 to bend or flex substantially about the longitudinal axis of groove 26 and spread the marginal edges of reduced portion 28 sufficiently to permit head 52 to clear reduced portion 28 and be inserted or removed from the groove. By engaging the portion of the baseboard with tool 54 in the foregoing manner at each anchor member, the baseboard may be quickly and easily snapped on or off the anchor members, the resiliency of leg member 12 causing it to resume its normal position when released Thus, each length of the baseboard or trim member 10 can be removed and replaced as desired to obtain varying color combinations.

The spacing between the upper surface of flooring 34 and the bottom face 24 of member 10 can be increased if desired to accommodate carpeting or other floor covering material.

FIG. 4 illustrates a typical rubber cushioned, sleepered flooring construction in which a wall 62 is supported above a concrete slab 64. The juncture between wall 62 and slab 64 is caulked at 66. Damp proofing may include a waterproof membrane 68 such as kraft paper overlying the upper surface of slab 64. Sleepers 70, typically 2 x 3 spaced at 12 inch centers, are supported on rubber cushions 72, spaced, for example, at 12 inch centers. The finished flooring 78 is supported on the sleeper members and the space 74 beneath the finished floor provides ventilati on underneath the floor, In order for the air to flow freely in and out of space 74 and the expansion void 76, the baseboard 10 of this invention is supported on anchor members 42 outward from the surface of wall 62 and slightly above the upper surface of flooring 78 as in the previously described figures.

In FIG. 5, another form of ventilated flooring is illustrated in which nailing strips 82 are elevated above the surface of slab 64 by fiber shims and extend between headers 84. The headers are elevated above the surface of slab 64 to provide air flow channels. In the construction shown in FIG. 5, an asphalt bedding fill or mastic cushion is poured over the entire concrete surface, generally to a depth of approximately to /2 inch and is brought up on the sides of the nailers approximately of an inch. Sub-flooring 86 is supported on the nailers and headers, and the finished flooring 88 overlies the subfloor and is spaced from wall 62 to provide the expansion void 76.

In FIG. 6, pine or fir sub-flooring members 92 are supported on slab 64 with the joints between the sub-flooring strips filled with mastic or asphalt 90. The finished flooring 94 of hardwood such as maple overlies the sub-flooring and joints and asphalt or mastic 96 partially fills expansion void 76.

FIG. 7 illustrates a ventilated rubber cushioned flooring in which pneumatic pads or cushions, usually 1% x 1% x 26., of an inch in section are glued or stapled to the underside of a bottom layer 100 of plywood. An upper layer 102 of plywood overlies layer 100 and is applied at an angle of approximately 45 to layer 100. Pinished flooring 104 is laid over the plywood, and since the space beneath the plywood sub-floor communicates with expansion void 76, baseboard 10 permits free circulation of air.

FIG. 8 illustrates a floor construction including an air duct 106 formed in the slab. Nailing strips 108 and headers 110 support a sub-floor 112 over which is laid a finished flooring 114. In this case, the spacing or baseboard 10 from the surface of wall 62 and flooring 114 provides a cold air return for a hot air heating system, as well as ventilation. Ventilation may be aided, particularly during periods of high humidity by the provision of exhaust fans in duct 106. With the present baseboard construction, there is no interference with ventilation, and no unsightly vent openings or fasteners are visible as would be necessary with conventional baseboard construction. With adequate ventilation provided, the constant circulation of air beneath the floor tends to equalize the room temperature eliminating cold areas adjacent the floor surface.

While a specific embodiment of the invention has been illustrated for purposes of description, it should be understood that the invention is not confined to the exact construction shown and that various alterations and modifications can be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In flooring trim construction;

a vertical wall intersecting said sub-floor,

a surface flooring overlying said sub-floor and terminating in a marginal edge disposed in spaced relation from said wall to accommodate lateral expansion of said flooring,

a plurality of laterally spaced anchor members secured to said wall along a line parallel to the upper surface of said flooring,

each of said anchor members being formed with an enlarged spacer flange having a front and rear face with said rear face in surface to surface contact with said wall,

a neck projecting outwardly from the front face of said spacer flange,

and an enlarged head formed on the outer end of said neck,

a substantially L-shaped baseboard of resilient elastomer material detachably mounted on said anchor members including,

a vertical leg having an inner surface disposed in opposed, parallel relationship with said vertical wall,

a substantially T-shaped groove formed in said vertical leg having a reduced portion receiving said neck portion and an enlarged portion receiving said enlarged head,

said groove cooperating with the neck and head portions of said anchor members to position said inner surface of said vertical leg against the front face of said enlarged spacer flange to provide an air space between the inner sur-face of the vertical leg and said vertical Wall,

and a horizontal leg extending from said vertical leg,

said horizontal leg overlying and spaced above the upper surface of said flooring adjacent its marginal edge.

2. In flooring trim construction the combination including;

a vertical wall abutting the edge of said sub-floor,

surface flooring overlying said sub-floor having a marginal edge spaced from said Wall to define an expansion void,

a number of anchor members mounted on said wall,

each anchor member including a neck portion extending from the wall, an enlarged head portion formed at the outer end of the neck portion and a spacer flange formed on the opposite end of said neck portion and engaging, on one side, said vertical wall,

an elongate trim member bridging said expansion void having upper and lower edges, an inner face extending between said edges and engaging the other side of said spacer flange to define an air space between said inner face and vertical wall, and a horizontal leg projecting from said trim member in overlying and spaced relationship with the upper surface of said surface flooring adjacent said marginal edge, and

a longitudinal substantially T-shaped groove formed in said inner face of said trim member, said groove having a reduced portion extending to the surface of said inner face and receiving the neck portion of said anchor member, and an enlarged portion receiving the head portion of said anchor member, said groove being dimensioned such that said head portion engages a shoulder defined by said reduced portion to prevent relative displacement between the trim memher and anchor member.

3. Flooring trim construction as defined in claim 2 wherein;

said T-shaped groove is positioned midway between said upper and lower edges of said trim member, and

said trim member is formed of flexible and deformable material so that the trim member may be deformed about the longitudinal axis of said groove to increase the size of said reduced portion of said groove for assembly and dis-assembly of said trim member relative to said anchor member.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 654,450 7/1900 Gude 52-480 2,029,808 9/1934 Bruce 52-573 2,133,916 10/1938 Churchill 29-453 2,142,438 1/ 1939 Faiveley 29-453 2,823,427 2/1958 Kuhlman 20-92 2,991,516 7/1961 Boettcher 52-287 3,045,294 7/1962 Livezey 52-403 3,049,337 8/1962 Griggs 254-131 3,161,926 12/1964 Schaub 52-287 3,168,285 2/1965 Russac 254-131 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,171,718 of 1958 France.

705,062 of 1941 Germany.

456,171 1936 Great Britain.

835,967 1960 Great Britain.

575,249 1958 Italy.

40 FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

JACOB NACKENOFF, Examiner.

J. E. MURTAGH, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

  1. 2. IN FLOORING TRIM CONSTRUCTION THE COMBINATION INCLUDING; A SUB-FLOOR, A VERTICAL WALL ABUTTING THE EDGE OF SAID SUB-FLOOR, SURFACE FLOORING OVERLYING SAID SUB-FLOOR HAVING A MARGINAL EDGE SPACED FROM SAID WALL TO DEFINE AN EXPANSION VOID, A NUMBER OF ANCHOR MEMBERS MOUNTED ON SAID WALL, EACH ANCHOR MEMBER INCLUDING A NECK PORTION EXTENDING FROM THE WALL, AN ENLARGED HEAD PORTION FORMED AT THE OUTER END OF THE NECK PORTION AND A SPACER FLANGE FORMED ON THE OPPOSITE END OF SAID NECK PORTION AND ENGAGING, ON ONE SIDE, SAID VERTICAL WALL, AN ELONGATE TRIM MEMBER BRIDGING SAID EXPANSION VOID HAVING UPPER AND LOWER EDGES, AN INNER FACE EXTENDING BETWEEN SAID EDGES AND ENGAGING THE OTHER SIDE OF SAID SPACER FLANGE TO DEFINE AN AIR SPACE BETWEEN SAID INNER FACE AND VERTICAL WALL, AND A HORIZONTAL LEG PORJECTING FROM SAID TRIM MEMBER IN OVERLYING AND SPACED RELATIONSHIP WITH THE UPPER SURFACE OF SAID SURFACE FLOORING ADJACNET SAID MARGINAL EDGE, AND A LONGITUDINAL SUBSTANTIALLY T-SHAPED GROOVE FORMED IN SAID INNER FACE OF SAID TRIM MEMBER, SAID GROOVE HAVING A REDUCED PORTION EXTENDING TO THE SURFACE OF SAID INNER FACE AND RECEIVING THE NECK PORTION OF SAID ANCHOR MEMBER, AND AN ENLARGED PORTION RECEIVING THE HEAD PORTION OF SAID ANCHOR MEMBER, SAID GROOVE BEING DIMENSIONED SUCH THAT SAID HEAD PORTION ENGAGES A SHOULDER DEFINED BY SAID REDUCED PORTION TO PREVENT RELATIVE DISPLACEMENT BETWEEN THE TRIM MEMBER AND ANCHOR MEMBER.
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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3505773A (en) * 1967-03-10 1970-04-14 Monoclad Systems Ltd Finishing strips
US3851858A (en) * 1973-10-29 1974-12-03 Sybron Corp Toeboard
US3988187A (en) * 1973-02-06 1976-10-26 Atlantic Richfield Company Method of laying floor tile
US4040215A (en) * 1975-05-26 1977-08-09 Totsuka Komuten Co., Ltd. Decay-resisting construction of lower structure for wooden buildings
US4333281A (en) * 1980-02-14 1982-06-08 Scarfone Construction Limited Basement wall draining molding
US4879857A (en) * 1985-06-13 1989-11-14 Sport Floor Design, Inc. Resilient leveler and shock absorber for sport floor
US5303526A (en) * 1989-02-08 1994-04-19 Robbins, Inc. Resilient portable floor system
US5365710A (en) * 1993-02-12 1994-11-22 Connor/Aga Sports Flooring Corporation Resilient subfloor pad
US5433052A (en) * 1989-02-08 1995-07-18 Robbins, Inc. Kerfed hardwood floor system
US5904017A (en) * 1996-05-17 1999-05-18 Duramax, Inc. Photoluminescent emergency egress accessory
US6742312B2 (en) 2001-04-25 2004-06-01 Citizens State Bank Shock absorber for sports floor
US20090107058A1 (en) * 2007-10-24 2009-04-30 Schulze Todd M Slab saver form attachment device
US20100096874A1 (en) * 2006-07-14 2010-04-22 Leblanc Sheri Sidewall panel and tarpaulin cover system for flat bed trailers, and truck trailer incorporating same
DE102008059459A1 (en) * 2008-11-28 2010-06-02 Andree Kube Method for producing floor construction in room of building, involves directly/indirectly arranging mopboard in edge region between floor covering and wall, where mopboard runs at distance to wall

Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US654450A (en) * 1899-11-07 1900-07-24 Franz Gude Flooring.
US2029808A (en) * 1934-09-10 1936-02-04 Bruce E L Co Wood floor
GB456171A (en) * 1934-06-14 1936-11-04 Bruce E L Co Wood block flooring or panelling
US2133916A (en) * 1936-10-24 1938-10-18 United Carr Fastener Corp Method of fastening parts by selfpiercing means
US2142438A (en) * 1936-06-15 1939-01-03 Faiveley Louis Method of constructing metal doors
DE705062C (en) * 1935-06-18 1941-04-16 Franz Merkel Device for venting of terracotte
US2823427A (en) * 1956-03-08 1958-02-18 Leo E Kuhlman Resilient floor construction
FR1171718A (en) * 1957-04-18 1959-01-29 Improvements to baseboards and similar
GB835967A (en) * 1957-10-28 1960-05-25 Harold Frank Edwin Cirket Method of and means for finishing corners, especially between walls and floors of buildings
US2991516A (en) * 1958-03-10 1961-07-11 William A Boettcher Flooring trims
US3045294A (en) * 1956-03-22 1962-07-24 Jr William F Livezey Method and apparatus for laying floors
US3049337A (en) * 1960-02-29 1962-08-14 Griggs Virgil Pry bar
US3161926A (en) * 1961-01-13 1964-12-22 Dennis E Schaub Detachable baseboard assembly
US3168285A (en) * 1963-02-11 1965-02-02 Andrew S Russac Hand tool for separating plank boards

Patent Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US654450A (en) * 1899-11-07 1900-07-24 Franz Gude Flooring.
GB456171A (en) * 1934-06-14 1936-11-04 Bruce E L Co Wood block flooring or panelling
US2029808A (en) * 1934-09-10 1936-02-04 Bruce E L Co Wood floor
DE705062C (en) * 1935-06-18 1941-04-16 Franz Merkel Device for venting of terracotte
US2142438A (en) * 1936-06-15 1939-01-03 Faiveley Louis Method of constructing metal doors
US2133916A (en) * 1936-10-24 1938-10-18 United Carr Fastener Corp Method of fastening parts by selfpiercing means
US2823427A (en) * 1956-03-08 1958-02-18 Leo E Kuhlman Resilient floor construction
US3045294A (en) * 1956-03-22 1962-07-24 Jr William F Livezey Method and apparatus for laying floors
FR1171718A (en) * 1957-04-18 1959-01-29 Improvements to baseboards and similar
GB835967A (en) * 1957-10-28 1960-05-25 Harold Frank Edwin Cirket Method of and means for finishing corners, especially between walls and floors of buildings
US2991516A (en) * 1958-03-10 1961-07-11 William A Boettcher Flooring trims
US3049337A (en) * 1960-02-29 1962-08-14 Griggs Virgil Pry bar
US3161926A (en) * 1961-01-13 1964-12-22 Dennis E Schaub Detachable baseboard assembly
US3168285A (en) * 1963-02-11 1965-02-02 Andrew S Russac Hand tool for separating plank boards

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3505773A (en) * 1967-03-10 1970-04-14 Monoclad Systems Ltd Finishing strips
US3988187A (en) * 1973-02-06 1976-10-26 Atlantic Richfield Company Method of laying floor tile
US3851858A (en) * 1973-10-29 1974-12-03 Sybron Corp Toeboard
US4040215A (en) * 1975-05-26 1977-08-09 Totsuka Komuten Co., Ltd. Decay-resisting construction of lower structure for wooden buildings
US4333281A (en) * 1980-02-14 1982-06-08 Scarfone Construction Limited Basement wall draining molding
US4879857A (en) * 1985-06-13 1989-11-14 Sport Floor Design, Inc. Resilient leveler and shock absorber for sport floor
US5433052A (en) * 1989-02-08 1995-07-18 Robbins, Inc. Kerfed hardwood floor system
US5303526A (en) * 1989-02-08 1994-04-19 Robbins, Inc. Resilient portable floor system
US5566930A (en) * 1989-02-08 1996-10-22 Robbins, Inc. Kerfed hardwood floor system
US5365710A (en) * 1993-02-12 1994-11-22 Connor/Aga Sports Flooring Corporation Resilient subfloor pad
US5904017A (en) * 1996-05-17 1999-05-18 Duramax, Inc. Photoluminescent emergency egress accessory
US6742312B2 (en) 2001-04-25 2004-06-01 Citizens State Bank Shock absorber for sports floor
US20100096874A1 (en) * 2006-07-14 2010-04-22 Leblanc Sheri Sidewall panel and tarpaulin cover system for flat bed trailers, and truck trailer incorporating same
US8303017B2 (en) * 2006-07-14 2012-11-06 Leblanc Sheri Sidewall panel and tarpaulin cover system for flat bed trailers, and truck trailer incorporating same
US9010838B2 (en) 2006-07-14 2015-04-21 Sheri LeBlanc Sidewall panel and tarpaulin cover system for flat bed trailers, and truck trailer incorporating same
US20090107058A1 (en) * 2007-10-24 2009-04-30 Schulze Todd M Slab saver form attachment device
US7600352B2 (en) * 2007-10-24 2009-10-13 Schulze Todd M Slab saver form attachment device
DE102008059459A1 (en) * 2008-11-28 2010-06-02 Andree Kube Method for producing floor construction in room of building, involves directly/indirectly arranging mopboard in edge region between floor covering and wall, where mopboard runs at distance to wall

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