US3261491A - Fillers for vacuum bottles - Google Patents

Fillers for vacuum bottles Download PDF

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US3261491A
US3261491A US312768A US31276863A US3261491A US 3261491 A US3261491 A US 3261491A US 312768 A US312768 A US 312768A US 31276863 A US31276863 A US 31276863A US 3261491 A US3261491 A US 3261491A
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pad
inner
shells
outer
filler
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US312768A
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Bramming Carl
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Aladdin Industries LLC
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Aladdin Industries LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47JKITCHEN EQUIPMENT; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; APPARATUS FOR MAKING BEVERAGES
    • A47J41/00Thermally-insulated vessels, e.g. flasks, jugs, jars
    • A47J41/02Vacuum-jacket vessels, e.g. vacuum bottles
    • A47J41/022Constructional details of the elements forming vacuum space
    • A47J41/024Constructional details of the elements forming vacuum space made of glass

Description

July 19, 1966 c. BRAMMING 3,261,491

FILLERS FOR VACUUM BOTTLES Filed sept. so, 1965 4 sheets-sheet 1 Alm: 3

July 19, 1966 C. BRAMMING FILLERS FOR VACUUM BOTTLES 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 30. 1963 INVENTQR Carl Bram/H1139' Zz'ys July 19, 1966 c. BRAMMING FILLERS FOR VACUUM BOTTLES 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Sept. 30, 1965 INVENTQR. @arl Bm mmzn Y -Y M l July 19, 1966 c. BRAMMING 3,261,491

FILLERS FOR VACUUM BOTTLES Filed Sept. 30. 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTQR.

Carl rammzrg United States Patent O 3,261,491 FILLERS FR VACUUM BQTTLES Carl Bramming, Palm Desert, Calif., assignor to Aladdin dustries, Incorporated, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of mors Filed Sept. 30, 1963, Ser. No. 312,768 4 Claims. (Cl. 21S- 13) This invention relates to vacuum bottles of the type having a double-walled vacuum insulated filler or receptacle, normally made of glass, received within a protective outer jacket or casing which may be made of metal, plastic, or other suitable materials. This application is a continuation-inpart of my co-pending application Serial No. 210,350, iiled July 17, 1962, now abandoned.

One object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved vacuum insulated iiller having an improved arrangement for supporting and aligning the inner wall with respect to the outer wall.

A further object is t-o provide a new and improved iiller in which a single pad or supporting member is snugly received between centrally disposed seat formations on the lower walls of the inner and outer shells, so that the inner shell will be accurately aligned and iirmly supported relative to the outer shell.

Another object is to provide a new and improved vacuum insulated iiller of the foregoing character, in which the centrally disposed pad is formed with grooves or other passages for carrying silvering solution and air to and from the tubulation during the manufacture of the iiller.

A further object is to provide an improved filler which not only is stronger but also is easier to manufacture and more economical than heretofore.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will appear from the following description, taken with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view, partly in section, of a vacuum bottle having a vacuum insulated iiller to be described as an illustrative embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view of the iiller during the process of manufacture, before the tubulation has been sealed oit.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged elevational View, partly in section, of a pad employed in the iiller of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a bottom view of the pad of FIG 3.

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 2 but showing a modiiied form of pad.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged plan view of the modified pad shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view through the erally along aline 7-7 in FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged elevational view of the pad of FIG. 6.

FIG. 9 is a View similar rto FIG. 7 but showing a slight further modification.

pad, taken gen- FIG. 10 is a view similar to FIG. 2 but showing an-v other modiiied construction.

FIG. 11 is an enlarged plan view of the modified pad, shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a sectional view through the pad, taken generally along a line 12-12 in FIG. 11.

FIG. 13 is an enlarged elevational View of the pad of FIG. 11.

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary sectional View, somewhat similar to FIG. 5, but showing still another modified form of the pad or supporting member.

FIG. 15 is an enlarged plan view of the pad of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is an elevational view of the pad of FIG. 15.

FIG. 17 is a sectional view, taken generally along the line 17-17 in FIG. l5.

3,26 1,49 l Patented July I9, 1966 FIG. 18 is a fragmentary sectional view somewhat similar to FIG. 10 but showing the pad of FIGS. 15-17, in position between the inner and outer walls of a iiller similar to that of FIG. 10.

It will be seen that FIG. l illustrates a vacuum bottle 1 of the type having a double-walled vacuum insulated iiller or receptacle 2 received within a protective outer jacket or casing 3. Normally, the iiller 2 is made of glass and thus is quite fragile. The jacket 3 may be made of metal, plastics, or any other suitable materials.

The vacuum insulated iiller 2 is generally bottle-shaped and comprises inner and outer shells 4 and 5 with an evacuated space 6 therebetween. The inner and outer shells 4 and 5 are sealed or otherwise joined together at their upper ends to form a rounded top or rim 7. It will be seen that the iiller 2 has a reduced neck portion 8 adapted to receive a stopper or other closure 9.

The illustrated jacket 3 comprises a canister 10 having a cylindrical side wall 11 and a circular bottom wall 12. As shown, the canister 10 is made of metal, but it may be made of any suitable material. The upper end of the jacket 3 takes the form of a collar 13 which is screwed into or otherwise secured to the upper end of the canister 10. The collar 13 surrounds the neck portion 8 of the iiller 2. In this case, the closure 9 is adapted to be screwed onto the upper end of the collar 13. A cup 14 may also -be screwed onto or -otherwise mounted on the collar 13. At its upper end, the illustrated collar 13 is formed with an inwardly projecting liange 15 which overlies the rounded upper end 7 of the iiller 2. A sealing ring or gasket 16 is interposed between the flange 15 and the rounded upper end 7 of the filler 2. The sealing ring4 16 also has a skirt portion 17 which is received between the collar 13 and the upper end of the outer shell 5 so as to center the upper end of the iiller 2 in the jacket 3. At the outer rim of the flange 15, the illustrated collar 13 is formed with an outwardly projecting pouring lip 18 which may be of the construction disclosed and claimed in the Bramming Patent No. 2,832,492, patented April 29, 1958.

The illustrated inner and outer shells 4 and 5 of the iiller 2 hav'e curved bottom walls 19 and 20 which are generally in the shape of inverted domes. A substantially central, generally nipple-shaped projection 21 is formed on the bottom wall 19 of the inner shell 4. A similar nipple-shaped projection 22 is formed on the bottom wall 20 of the outer shell 5. In this case, the nippleyshaped projections 21 and 22 are directed downwardly. On the bottom wall 20 of t-he outer shell 5, the nipple- `shaped projection 22 is formed with a centrally disposed downwardly projecting tubulation 23 which tapers to `a point and is quite fragile. This tubulation 23 constitutes the last vestige of a tube 24 (FIG. 2) which eX- tends from the outer shell 20 and is employed during the manufacture of the iiller, for supplying silvering solution to the space between the inner and outer sh'ells 4 and 5 and for removing the air so as to evacuate the space between the shells. The tube 24 is then sealed off so as to form the vestigial tubulation 23. It will be understood that the silvering solution is introduc'ed into the space 6 through the tube 24 and is also removed through the tube. It will be noted that the silvering solution is effective to apply a coating of silver to the shells 4 and 5 so as to reduce the transmission of heat by radiation through the wall of the iiller 2.

In this case, the fragile tubulation is enclosed within a cup-shaped tubulation protector 25 which is cemented or otherwise secured to the bottom wall 20 of the outer `shell 5. The tubulation protector 25 may be made of plastic, metal or any other suitable material.

As shown, the iiller 2 is supported and centered within the jacket 3 by means of a flexible resilient sleeve 26,

made of rubber or the like, and received around a reduced lower portion 27 of the tubulation protector 25, in the manner disclosed and claimed in the Bramming Patent No. 2,963,187, patented December 6, 1960. The upper end of the sleeve 26 engages a downwardly facing shoulder 28 on the tubulation protector 25. In this case, the lower end of the rubber sleeve 26 is received within a seat 29 formed in a locating ring 30 which is mounted on the upper side of the bottom wall 12. The ring 30 may be retained in a central position on the bottom wall 12 by means of an upwardly projecting circular rib 31 formed on the bottom wall. The rubber sleeve 26 provides resilient support for the ller 2 so that the filler is pressed upwardly to maintain tight sealing engagement between the rounded upper end 7 of the filler and the sealing ring 16. Thus, the filler 2 is compressed between the sealing ring 16 at its upper end and the rubber supporting sleeve 26 at its lower end.

The filler 2 of FIG. 1 is provided with a single curved pad or spacer 32 which is snugly received between the nipple-shaped projections 21 and 22 on the inner and outer shell 4 and 5. The pad 32 supports and centers the inner shell 4 with respect to the outer shell 5 and is effective to protect the inner shell from breakage due to shock and vibration. The pad 32 is also effective to align the shells 4 and 5 during th'e manufacture of the filler 2. The pad 32 may be made of asbestos fibers or other suitable materials.

It will be seen that the pad 32 has a curved concave upper contour 33 which snugly receives the nipple-shaped projection 21 on the inner shell 4. Similarly, the pad 32 has a curved convex lower contour 34 which is snugly received within the nipple-shaped projection 22 on the outer shell 5.

It wil-l be seen that the pad 32 is disposed directly over the tubulation 23. A downwardly facing ree'ess 35 is formed in the lower side of the pad 32 and is aligned within the tubulation 23. A plurality of grooves or other passages 36 extend in the pad 32 between the recess 35 and the circular periphery 37 of the pad. The recess 35 and the grooves 36 are adapted to carry the silvering solution betwe'en the tube 24 and the space 6 between the inner and outer shells 4 and 5, during the manufacture of the filler 2. The recess 35 and the grooves 36 also provide passages through which the air is evacuated from the space 6 through the tube 24, in the final stage of the manufacture of the filler.

Heretofor'e it has been the usual practice to provide three or more disk-shaped pads between the bottom walls of the inner and outer shells. The handling and accurate placement of the multiplicity of disk-shaped pads has presented serious problems in the manufacture of fillers. The present invention, utilizing a single curved centrally disposed pad makes it much easi'er and more economical to manufacture the fillers. In the manufacture of each filler, the single curved pad 32 may be cemented to the nipple-shaped projection 21 on the inner shell 4 before the shells 4 and 5 are assembled. The outer sh'ell 5 is then slipped over the inner shell 4 and is automatically centered and aligned by engagement of the pad 32 with the inside of the nipple-shaped projection 22 on the outer shell. After the up-p'er ends of the shells have been welded together, the silvering solution is introduced and removed through the tube 24. The recess 35 and the grooves 36 provide passages for the silvering solution through the pad 32. The filler is then evacuated by withdrawing the air from the space 6 between the shells 4 and through the tub'e 24. Finally, the tube 24 is sealed off.

It will be observed that the inner shell 4 is centrally supported and aligned by the centrally `disposed pad 32. Likewise, the supporting force is applied to the lower end of the filler 2 through the medium of the centrally disposed tubulation protector 25. At its upper end, th'e filler 2 is pressed downwardly by the engagement of the sealing ring 16 with the rounded rim 7 between the inner and outer shells 4 and 5. Thus, the endwise supporting forces on the filler 2 tend to augment the supporting action of the centrally disposed pad 32 so that the filler is effectively protected against breakage due to shock and vibration. It will be evident that the present invention provides an improved vacuum insulated filler which nevertheless is easier to manufacture and more economical than heretofore.

FIG. 5 illustrates a vacuum insulated filler 38 which may be the same as the filler 2 of FIG. 2 except that a modified pad or supporting member 39 is employed instead of the pad 32 olf FIGS. 2-4. The modified pad 39 has the .advantage that it is reversible in position. Thus, both the bottom and the top of the pad 39 are the same so that either side of the pad may face upwardly or downwardly. This construction facilitates the place-v ment of the pad 39 between the nipple-shaped projections or seats 21 and 22 on the inner and outer walls 4 and 5. The feeding and placement of the pad by automatic machinery are thus greatly simplified.

As shown to advantage in FIGS. 6-8, the modi-fied pad 39 is generally in the form of a disk having a circular periphery 40.y On each side, the disk or pad 39 has a convex annular formation 41 and a concave annular formation 42. In this case, the convex formation 41 is adjacent the periphery 40 of the pad 39, while the concave formation 42 Lis spaced inwardly from the periphery. It will be seen from FIG. 5 that the convex formation 41 is adapted to be received within and seat against the concave inner surface of the nipple-shaped .projection 22 On the outer wall 5. The concave formation 42 is adapted to receive and seat against the outside of the nipple-shaped projection 21 on the inner wall 4. In the construction shown in FIGS. 6-8, a fiat web 43 extends across the center of the disk 39. The construction of FIG. 9 is slightly modified in that the web 43 is omitted so that a circular hole 44 is formed in the center of the disk 39. The construction of FIGS. 6-8 is somewhat stronger than the construction of FIG. 9.

The illustrated convex and concave annular formations 4i1 and 42 are frusto-conical in shape. However, it will be understood that they may be curved or of various other shapes.

On both sides, the pad or disk 39 is formed with a plurality of radical channels or grooves 45 to provide for the passage of silvering solution from the tube 24 to the space between the walls 4 and 5 during the manufacture of the filler 38. The channels 45 also permit air to pass outwardly through the tube 24 when the space -between the walls 4 and 5 is evacuated. In this case, three equally spaced channels 45 are formed in each side of the diskshaped pad 39. The channels 45 extend between the central portion 43 of the disk 39 and the periphery 40. It will be seen that the channels extend through the formations 41 and 42 and produce three equally spaced raised projections 45a on both the upper and the lower sides of the pad 39.

It wil-l Ibe observed that the pad 39 is symmetrical about its horizontal midplane. Thus, it makes no difference whether. one side or the other of the pad is facing upwardly or downwardly.

FIG. 10 illustrates another modified filler 46 having inner and outer walls 47 and 48. The outer ywall 48 may be the same as the outer wall 5 of FIG. 2 and thus may comprise a dome-shaped lower end portion 49 having a centrally disposed nipple-shaped projection or seat 50. A tube 51 is connected to the center of the nipple-shaped projection 50 for use in the manufacture of ,the filler 46. Thus, silvering solution is introduced through the tube 51 into the space 52 between the inner and outer shells 47 and 48. The silvering solution is also withdrawn through the tube 51. In addition, the tube 51 is employed for evacuating the space 52.

The inner shell 47 is similar to the inner shell 4 of FIG. 2 in that it has a dome-shaped lower wall 53. Moreover, the ylower wall 53 has a centrally disposed nippleshaped seat portion or formation 54. However, in this instance, the seat formation 54 projects upwardly rather than downwardly. Thus, the nipple-shaped seat 54 presents a downwardly facing concave surface, opposite the upwardly facing concave surface of the nipple-shaped formation 50 on the outer shell 48. A modified pad S5 is snugly received between the oppositely facing concave surfaces of the seat portions 50 and 54. As shown to advantage in FIGS. 11-13, the pad 55 is generally in the form of a disk havin-g a circular periphery 56. In this case, both sides of the disk-shaped pad 55 are formed with convex dome-shaped surfaces 57. It will be seen that the convex surfaces 57 are generally of spherical curvature. Either of the convex surfaces 57 is adapted to be received in the upwardly facing concave seat 50= on the outer wall 48. The other surface 57 is then received in the downwardly facing concave seat 54 on the inner wall 47. The disk-shaped pad 55 is symmetrical about its horizontal midplane so that either side may face upwardly or downwardly.

As before, radial channels or grooves 58 are formed in the pad 55 to serve as conduits for silvering solution and air during the manufacture of the filler 46. As shown, each side of the pad 55 has three equally spaced channels 58. Of course, the number and arrangement of the channels 58 may be varied. The illustrated pad 55 has a centrally disposed -hole 59 extending therethrough. It will be seen that the channels 58 extend between the hole 59 and the circular .periphery 56. The channels 58 extend through the convex formations 57 .and produce three equally spaced raised projections 59 on both sides of the pad or supporting member 55.

It should be noted that 'the seats 50 and 54 and the pad 55 are so formed that the loading on the pad 55 is strictly compressive. No tensile stress is ever produced in the pad by the forces exerted upon the pad by the inner and outer walls 47 and 48. This is a definite advantage in view of the fact that the pad may advantageously be made of materials such as asbestos which are considerably stronger in compression than in tension.

FIG. 14 illustrates a modified construction which employs the vacuum insulated filler 38 of FIG. 5, but utilizes a modified pad or supporting member 60 between the inner and outer walls 4 and 5 of the filler. The illustrated .pad 60 is reversible in position and is snugly received between the nipple-shaped formations 21 and 22 at the lower ends of the inner and outer walls 4 and 5.

As shown to best advantage in FIGS. 15-17, the modified pad 60 comprises three substantially spherical, equally spaced balls 61 which are connected together by a thin flat centrally disposed web 62 of generally triangular shape. The balls 61 and the web 62 may be molded or otherwise formed in one piece o-f asbestos or other suitable materials. It will be evident that the balls 61 provide three equally spaced raised projections 63 on both the upper and the lower sides of the pad 60. The projections 63- are substantially hemispherical or dome shaped. The web 62 provides three equally spaced interconnected openings or channels 64 between the projections 63, 4to conduct silvening solution and air during the manufacture and evacuation of the filler.

It will be seen from FIG. 14 that the spherically curved surfaces of the projections 63 engage the lower side of the nipple-shaped formation 21 on the inner wall 4, and the upper side of the nipple-shaped formation 22 on the outer wall 5. As a result, the pad 60 is automatically centered in the outer wall 5, and is effective to center and support the inner wall 4. Inasmuch as the pad 60 is symmetrical about its horizontal midplane, the pad may be inverted or reversed in its position. This reversability of the pad greatly facilitates the assembly of the vaouum insulated filler.

The modification shown in FIG. 18 employs the same pad 60 as illustrated in FIGURES 14-17, but the pad is employed in the vacuum insulated filler 46 of the construction shown in FIG. 10. This construction differs from the construction of FIG. 14 in that the nipple-shaped formation 54 on the inner wall 47 projects upwardly rather than downwardly. However, the pad 60 is fully adaptable to this construction inasmuch as the curved projections 63 on the upper side of the pad engage the lower side of the nipple-shaped formation 54 and are effective to center and support the inner wall 47.

It would be recognized that the pad 60 is of such a shape that it is easy to manufacture by a molding process. Moreover, the pad employs a very small amount of material and is in point contact with both the inner and outer walls of the filler so that the heat conducted by the pad is minimized.

It will be evident that the present invention provides a single pad which is retained between centrally disposed seats on the inner and outer shells of the vacuum-insulated filler. The .pad maintains the spacing and alignment of the inner and outer shells and transmits forces between the shells. Thus, the pad protects the vacuum-insulated filler from breakage due to shock or vibration. The present invention greatly facilitates the manufacture of the fillers, because the single pad may be fed and mounted very easily in its centrally disposed position.

Various other modifications, alternative constructions and equivalents may be employed without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention, as exemplified in the foregoing description and defined in the following claims I claim:

1. For a vacuum bottle,

a generally bottle-shaped vacuum insulated filler comprising inner and outer shells with an evacuated space therebetween,

each of said shells having a bottom wall formed with a substantially central seat portion, 4

said seat portion on said outer shell providing a cupshaped recess which is concave upwardly, said seat portion on said inner shell providing a cup-shaped recess which is concave downwardly and is opposite said recess in said outer shell,

and a single one piece generally button-shaped supporting member snugly received between said seat portions on said inner and outer shells for spacing and aligning said shells,

said supporting member being symmetrical about its horizontal midaplane and having curved convex projections on both its upper and lower sides, said projections being snugly received in said recesses in said outer and inner shells,

each of said projections having radial grooves affording communication between the central and edge portions of said supporting member to conduct air Iand silvering solution during the manufacture of said filler, said supporting member being reversible in position during the manufacture of said filler.

2. For a vacuum bottle,

a generally bottle-shaped vacuum insulated filler comprising inner and outer shells with an evacuated space therebetween,

each of said shells having a bottom wall formed with a substantially central seat portion,

said seat portion on said outer shell providing a cupshaped recess which is concave upwardly,

said seat portion on said inner shell providing a cupshaped recess which is concave downwardly and is opposite said recess in said outer shell,

and a single one piece generally button-shaped supporting member snugly received between said seat portions on said inner and outer shells for spacing and aligning said shells,

said supporting member being symmetrical about its horizontal mid-plane and having curved convex dome-shaped projections on both its upper and lower sides,

said projections being snugly received in said recesses in said outer and inner shells,

each of said projections having radial grooves aiording communication between the central and edge portions of said supporting member to conduct air and silvering solution during the manufacture of said ller, said supporting member being reversible in position during the manufacture of said filler.

3. For a vacuum bottle,

a generally bottle-shaped vacuum insulated filler cornprising inner and outer shells with an evacuated space therebetween,

each of said shells having a bottom wall formed with a substantially central sea-t portion,

said seat portion on said outer shell providing a cupshaped recess which is concave upwardly,

said seat portion on said inner shell providing a cupshaped recess which is concave downwardly and is opposite said recess in said outer shell.

and a single one piece generally buttonrshaped supporting member snugly received between said seat portions on said inner and outer shells for spacing and aligning said shells,

said supporting member being symmetrical about its horizontal mid-plane and having curved convex dome-shaped projections on both its upper Iand lower sides,

said projections being snugly received inrsaid recesses in said outer and inner shells,

each of said projections having three radial grooves affording communication between the central and edge portions of said supporting member to conduct air and silvering solution during the manufacture of said ller, said supporting member being reversible in position during the manufacture of said iller. 4. For a vacuum bottle, y a generally bottle-shaped vacuum insulated ller comprising inner and outer shells with an evacuated space therebetween, each of said shells having a bottom wall formed with a substantially central generally nipple-shaped seat, and a single one piece pad snugly received between said nipple-shaped seats on said innerA and outer shells for spacing and aligning said shells,

i said pad being symmetrical about its horizontal mid- References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 6/1909 Altenberg 21S-13 3/1918 Recker 21S-13 JOSEPH R. LECLA1R,Prfmary Examiner.

GEORGE O. RALSTON, Examiner.

R. PESHOCK, Assistant Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. FOR A VACUUM BOTTLE, A GENERALLY BOTTLE-SHAPED VACUUM INSULATED FILLER COMPRISING INNER AND OUTER SHELLS WITH AN EVACUATED SPACE THEREBETWEEN, EACH OF SAID SHELLS HAVING A BOTTOM WALL FORMED WITH A SUBSTANTIALLY CENTRAL SEAT PORTION, SAID SEAT PORTION ON SAID OUTER SHELL PROVIDING A CUPSHAPED RECESS WHICH IS CONCAVE UPWARDLY, SAID SEAT PORTION ON SAID INNER SHELL PROVIDING A CUP-SHAPED RECESS WHICH IS CONCAVE DOWNWARDLY AND IS OPPOSITE SAID RECESS IN SAID OUTER SHELL, AND A SINGLE ONE PIECE GENERALLY BUTTON-SHAPED SUPPORTING MEMBER SNUGLY RECEIVED BETWEEN SAID SEAT PORTIONS ON SAID INNER AND OUTER SHELLS FOR SPACING AND ALIGNING SAID SHELLS, SAID SUPPORTING MEMBER BEING SYMMETRICAL ABOUT ITS HORIZONTAL MID-PLANE AND HAVING CURVED CONVEX PROJECTIONS ON BOTH ITS UPPER AND LOWER SIDES, SAID PROJECTIONS BEING SNUGLY RECEIVED IN SAID RECESSES IN SAID OUTER AND INNER SHELLS, EACH OF SAID PROJECTIONS HAVING RADIAL GROOVES AFFORDING COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE CENTRAL AND EDGE PORTIONS OF SAID SUPPORTING MEMBER TO CONDUCT AIR AND SILVERING SOLUTION DURING THE MANUFACTURE OF SAID FILLER, SAID SUPPORTING MEMBER BEING REVERSIBLE IN POSITION DURING THE MANUFACTURE OF SAID FILLER.
US312768A 1963-09-30 1963-09-30 Fillers for vacuum bottles Expired - Lifetime US3261491A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3845873A (en) * 1973-02-09 1974-11-05 Aladdin Ind Inc Vacuum insulated container
JPS5812142U (en) * 1981-07-16 1983-01-26
WO1994021159A1 (en) * 1993-03-18 1994-09-29 Sobral Invicta S.A. Method and apparatus for improving the vacuum inside liners for vacuum bottles
US20030189054A1 (en) * 2002-04-08 2003-10-09 Isao Watanabe Heat insulating container and its manufacturing method

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US923236A (en) * 1908-05-11 1909-06-01 George P Altenberg Double-walled vessel.
US1260046A (en) * 1917-01-12 1918-03-19 Waterbury Mfg Co Vacuum-bottle.

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US923236A (en) * 1908-05-11 1909-06-01 George P Altenberg Double-walled vessel.
US1260046A (en) * 1917-01-12 1918-03-19 Waterbury Mfg Co Vacuum-bottle.

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3845873A (en) * 1973-02-09 1974-11-05 Aladdin Ind Inc Vacuum insulated container
JPS5812142U (en) * 1981-07-16 1983-01-26
JPS6121379Y2 (en) * 1981-07-16 1986-06-26
WO1994021159A1 (en) * 1993-03-18 1994-09-29 Sobral Invicta S.A. Method and apparatus for improving the vacuum inside liners for vacuum bottles
US20030189054A1 (en) * 2002-04-08 2003-10-09 Isao Watanabe Heat insulating container and its manufacturing method
US6915917B2 (en) * 2002-04-08 2005-07-12 Thermos K.K. Heat insulating container and its manufacturing method

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