US3242360A - Submersible motor with plural cooling paths - Google Patents

Submersible motor with plural cooling paths Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3242360A
US3242360A US88223A US8822361A US3242360A US 3242360 A US3242360 A US 3242360A US 88223 A US88223 A US 88223A US 8822361 A US8822361 A US 8822361A US 3242360 A US3242360 A US 3242360A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
motor
fluid
chamber
shaft
cooling
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US88223A
Inventor
Joseph T Carle
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Centrilift Hughes Inc
Borg-Warner Corp
Hughes Tool Co
Original Assignee
Borg-Warner Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Borg-Warner Corp filed Critical Borg-Warner Corp
Priority to US88223A priority Critical patent/US3242360A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3242360A publication Critical patent/US3242360A/en
Assigned to CENTRILIFT-HUGHES, INC. reassignment CENTRILIFT-HUGHES, INC. CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CENTRILIFT, INC.
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Assigned to HUGHES TOOL COMPANY reassignment HUGHES TOOL COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF A PART OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST Assignors: CEBTRILIFT-HUGHES INC.
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D29/00Details, component parts, or accessories
    • F04D29/58Cooling; Heating; Diminishing heat transfer
    • F04D29/586Cooling; Heating; Diminishing heat transfer specially adapted for liquid pumps
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K5/00Casings; Enclosures; Supports
    • H02K5/04Casings or enclosures characterised by the shape, form or construction thereof
    • H02K5/12Casings or enclosures characterised by the shape, form or construction thereof specially adapted for operating in liquid or gas
    • H02K5/132Submersible electric motors

Description

March 22, 1966 J. 'r. CARLE 3,242,360

SUBMERSIBLE MOTOR WITH PLURAL COOLING PATHS Filed Feb. 9, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. JOSEPH T. CARLE BYWKW ATTORNEY.

J. T. CARLE March 22, 1966 SUBMERSIBLE MOTOR WITH PLURAL COOLING PATHS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 9, 1961 G 3 G F 82 INVENTOR.

\IJOSEPH T. CARLE BY M g M ATTORNEY.

J. T. CARLE March 22, 1966 'SUBMERSIBLE MOTOR WITH PLURAL COOLING PATHS 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Feb. 9, 1961 ATTORNEY.

United States Patent 3,242,360 SUBMERSIBLE MOTOR WITH PLURAL COOLING PATHS Joseph T. Carle, Tulsa, Okla, assignor to Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed Feb. 9, 1961, Ser. No. 88,223 1 Claim. (Cl. 31087) This invention relates to submersible electric motors adapted for insertion in deep wells for driving a pump therein and has for its principal object the provision of such motors with a new and improved means for circulating lubricating fluid therethrough for improved cooling, lubrication and better filtering.

A general object of this invention is to provide for better cooling, lubrication and filtering in the motor elements of motors which are limited in their diameter.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a submersible motor with means for directing cooling and lubricating fluid in primary and secondary circulating zones so that a major portion of the fluid is circulated through a heat exchanging zone for efiicient cooling .and filtering while a portion of this main circulation is further directed through the secondary zone for circulation throughout the remainder of the motor.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a submersible motor with means for circulating cooling and lubricating fluid in primary and secondary circulating zones and also to provide a means for circulating such fluid to and from a bearing for heat exchanger zone of a seal section used in connection with the motor; the latter zone forming a portion of or an adjunct to the secondary zone.

A still further object of this invention is to provide the motor with a means for directing cooling and lubricating fluid throughout the length of the rotor shaft and into the bearings thereof as well as along a portion of the outer periphery of the shaft intermediate the motor rotor providing for greater circulation of cooling fluid without a loss in horsepower and for a reduction in the number of hot spots in the motor and a reduction in the average operating temperature of the motor.

These and other objects of this invention will become apparent from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is an elevational view of the submersible motor constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 22 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3a is a partial elevatioual cross-sectional view taken along line 33 of FIG. 2 and illustrating to advantage the details of the upper portion of the submersible motor, FIG. 3a being only a portion of the entire motor by reason of the length thereof, for purposes of illustration in these drawings;

FIG. 3b is a partial elevational cross-sectional view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2 and showing a portion of the mid-section of the motor normally below that portion shown in FIG. 3a;

FIG. 30 is a partial elevational cross-sectional view taken along line 33 of FIG. 2 and illustrating the details of the lower portion of the motor; FIG. 3c being normally disposed below trail portion shown in FIG. 3b;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional partial schematic view taken along line 44 of FIG, 3 showing the connection means for the outside source of electrical power to be supplied to the electric motor;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 3a, looking in the direction of the arrows, and illustrating to advantage the flow path of the cooling and lubricating fluid in the motor shaft;

3,242,360 Patented Mar. 22, 1966 FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 3a, looking in the direction of the arrows, and illustrating to advantage the centrifugal impeller mounted on the motor shaft for the circulation of the cooling and lubricating fluid; and

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 77 of FIG. 3a, looking in the direction of the arrows, and illustrating to advantage a bearing shoe through which cooling and lubricating fluid flows.

As can be seen in FIG. 1, a submersible motor for insertion in deep wells, constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention, is indicated in its entirety as 10.

Submersible motor 10 has an outer multi-part housing or casing 11, suitably sealed, as by threading and welding as shown at 12, 13 and 14 (FIGS. 31: and 30), so as to be fluid-tight to protect the inner motor elements from the fluid in the well. A stator 15, of the motor 10, is aflixed in any suitable manner to the inner side of the casing, as by snap rings 16 and 17, and a motor rotor 18, is maintained on a motor shaft 19 in any suitable manner as by a key 20. The motor 10 is supplied with electrical power from a suit-able and conventional outside source through wiring connection shown schematically at 21 (FIG. 4).

Shaft 19 is maintained for vertical operation in upper bearings, indicated in their entirety as 22 (FIG. 3a), intermediate bearings indicated in their entirety as 23 (one only showing 3b) and lower bearings indicated in their entirety as 24 (FIG. 30), so that, upon the application of electric power through the stator coils 25, the rotor 18 drives the shaft 19 to rotate a deep well pump (not shown). The upper end of the shaft 19 is externally splined, as illustrated at 26, to be connected to a suitable seal assembly (not shown) usually and conventionally interposed between the deep well pump vand the submersible motor. Since the deep well pump and the seal may be of conventional construction and do not form a part of the present invention, no further description thereof is deemed necessary herein.

As previously mentioned herein, an important feature of this invention is the provision of means for circulating cooling and lubricating fluid so that this fluid maintains the motor cool as well as properly lubricated. This is accomplished preferably by the circulation of the fluid into two flow paths-a primary flow path and a secondary flow path-and in such a manner that there is no reduction in the power output of the motor. This feature will now be described.

At the lower end of the shaft 19, a centrifugal impeller 27 (FIGS. 30 and 6) is suitably afiixed for rotation with the shaft 19, as by key 28. Outlet 29 of the impeller is in open communication with a passage 30 formed in a bearing housing 31. Passage 30 is in turn in open communication with a cylindrical passage or space 32 formed in part by the inner wall 33 of the casing 11 and in part by the outer wall 34 of a heat-resistant tube 35 of a smaller outer diameter than the inner diameter of the easing 11. This heat-resistant tube 35 is 'aflixed to the lower end of the bearing housing 31 and is formed of laminated plastic material or the like, of any suitable type, to insulate chamber 36 formed in part by such tube in cooperation with the bottom wall 37 of the casing 11. Thus, fluid pumped by the impeller 27 will travel from the outlet 29 into and through passage 30 and between, down the inner side wall 33 of the casing, and then into the inner chamber 36 through a plurality of ports 38 formed in the insulating tube 35. The casing 11 serves as a 'heat exchanger to cool the coolant as it travels through passages 30' and 32 to the chamber.

Chamber 36 is normally filled with the cooling and lubricating fluid, such as oil, for lubricating the various parts of the motor, bearings, and the like, and as clearly seen, the shaft 19 is provided with an internal concentric axial bore 40 throughout its length, the lower end of which is in open communication with the chamber 36.

In FIG. 3c it is to be noted that a chamber 41 is formed immediately below and in part by the rotor and stator and in part by the upper end of the bearing housing 31. There is also provided a pair of radial passages 42 which communicate with the shaft bore 40 and chamber 41. Thus, the cooling and lubricating fluid flowing up through the passage 40 will flow or be thrown by the rotation of the shaft, out the radial passages 42 into the chamber 41 where it communicates with a pair of vertical inlet passages 43 and 44 in the bearing housing 31. These passages in turn are in open communication with an inlet chamber 45 immediate the inlet 46 to the impeller 27. Passages 43 and 44 are suitably spaced from the shaft 19 to permit a conventional sleeve bearing 47 and bushing 48 of previously identified lower bushing 24 to be operatively interposed between the bearing housing 31 and the shaft, and to permit some circulation of the lubricating fluid to pass therebetween for proper lubrication and cooling.

Thus, it can be seen that, in this invention, there is a path of cooling and lubricating fluid from the impeller 27 past the 'heat exchanger formed by the casing 11, into the chamber 36 past a suitable filter 50 interposed operatively between the shaft bore 40 and the chamber 36 (filter 50 being shown in chamber), up the passage 40, out passages 42 into chamber 41, and thence down the inlet passages 43 and 44 into the inlet chamber 45 to be again recirculated by the impeller past the heat exchanger. This forms a primary path of circulation of fluid and provides a means of cooling and filtering a major portion of the oil during operation of the motor.

As will be seen, a secondary path of circulation is provided comprising a portion of fluid taken from the abovedescribed primary fluid so that the secondary circulation is always provided with a cool and filtered fluid without attempting to force the impeller to drive all of the cooling and lubricating fluid through the entire motor and back to the sump chamber. This maintains the coolant at an overall lower tempenature than could otherwise be accomplished.

Turning again to FIGS. 3a, 3b and 3c, it will be seen that the central shaft bore 40, above the radial passages 42, continues on throughout substantially the entire shaft up to and past the upper bearings 22. Intermediate the upper and lower hearings, pairs of radial passages 51 are provided in the shaft Where necessary to provide the intermediate bearings 23 with proper cooling and lubricating fluid thrown out by the rotating shaft from the passage 40. Intermediate bearings 23 comprise, in the embodiment shown, bushing 52 and a bearing ring 53, both of which have suitable means, such as openings 54, 55, to permit the flow of lubricant past the friction faces 56 and down between the stator or the rotor. Inasmuch as these hearings are of conventional construction, no further description thereof is deemed necessary. As the number of intermediate hearings will vary according to the length of the motor to give stability to the rotating parts, the number of such radial passages 51 will vary accordingly, one pair of such passages 51 being shown in FIG. 3b for the purposes of illustration.

Another pair of radial passages 57 are provided intermediate the intermediate bearing passages 51 to properly lubricate between the long bushing guide 58 and the shaft '19 and between the pair of bushings 60, 61, the former being provided between the upper part 62 of the casing and the shaft, as more clearly seen in FIG. 3a. Thus, there is a flow of fluid firomthese passages down the inner side of the bush ing guide and bushing and thence into upper chamber 63 provided by the casing, the upper end of the stator and rotor, and the upper casing part 62. The bushing guide and bushing are operatively held in their proper location by any suitable means, such as by snap ring 64.

Still another, but somewhat larger pair of radial passages 65 are provided in shaft 19 to communicate the shaft bore 40 with the upper bearings 22. Passages 65 communicate with a pair of radial passages 66 provided in a thrust ring 67 which is turn is maintained for roe tation with the shaft 19 by any suitable means; split ring 68, cap screws 70, lock ring 71 and key 72, being shown. Lubricating fluid is thrown out onto the bearing surfaces, onto thrust ring 67, and onto a non-rotating bearing shoe or ring 73 for proper lubrication and cooling thereof. Casing part 62 is provided with a cavity 74 enlarged radially opposite the bearing ring to receive the lubricant thrown out of the radial passage 66 and to permit the flow of such fluid down and through a plurality of such passages or slots 75 in the bearing ring; such slots being more clearly shown in FIG. 7. Slots 75 are in open communication with a pair of Iongitudinal passages or bores 76 and 77 formed in the casing part 62. Bores 76 and 77 are, in turn, in open communication with chamber 63 so that there is circulation of lubricant from the passage 40 in the shaft through the upper bearings 22. A suitable. restriction, as at 78, formed between the casing part 62 and the thrust bearing 67 is provided so that the main flow of fluid from the passages 65 and 66 will be downward towards the passages 75.

The shaft 19 is provided with a pair of longitudinal or coaxial grooves, diametrically opposed from one an-.

other, and, as more clearly shown in FIG. 5, at 90 from the key 20 as indicated at 80 and 81. These longitudinal grooves extend from that part of the shaft immediately above the rotor so that they open into the chamber 63 and continue below the rotor so that they open into the chamber 41, as more clearly shown in FIGS. 3a and 3c. Thus, fluid in the chamber 63 will flow down through these passages 80 and 81 between the shaft and the rotor to cool the same. Consequently, for proper lubrication and cooling it is not necessary to rely upon the spacing normally between the rotor and the stator, such spacing being indicated at 82, to supply cooling fluid through the motor. As taught by this invention, the motor may be properly cooled by the circulation of more fluid than heretofore possible without attempting to provide more circulation by enlarging the spacing or gap 82 to accomplish this purpose thus reducing the efficiency of the motor.

As can also be seen at the top of FIG. 3a, the bore 40 of the shaft 19 continues on through to be connected to a seal section (not shown) conventionally used in connection with the motor to isolate the motor from the Well fluid being pumped. As is conventional in such seal sections, a chamber is provided, as indicated schematically at 83. Such chamber in the embodiment shown is also connected with the motor by a passage illustrated schematically as connected to the bore 40 so that the cooling and lubricating fluid circulating in the secondary zone of the motor may enter this chamber and be circulated by such flow of fluid. Return flow may be provided by the passage, shown schematically at 85, so that fluid may pass through the restriction 78 to return tothe primary zone.

The chamber 83 has for its purpose a means for compensating for the expansion and contraction of fluid in the motor due to the heating and cooling thereof during operation of the motor. This chamber receives the expanded fluid during the running of the motor and permits the contracting fluid to return to the motor and also prevents any well fluid from entering the motor as it contracts.

As more particularly explained in the submersible seal disclosed and claimed in the co-pending patent application of Joseph T. Carle entitled Submersible Seal, Serial No. 88,096, now Patent No. 3,153,160, filed concurrently herewith, the chamber 83 may have other functions. In that application, such a chamber is a bearing and heat exchanger chamber so that an important bearing in the seal chamber may be lubricated and cooled by the circulation of fluid in this chamber and also this chamber functions as a heat exchanger to cool such fluid as it returns to the motor. Thus, by the provision of a means of circulating this fluid in the chamber during the operation of the pump, this fluid can be maintained at a lower temperature than could otherwise be accomplished to reduce the temperature of the bearing in the seal. It is to be noted, however, that while this motor is particularly adapted to be' used with the seal section disclosed and claimed in said co-pending application, this motor may be utilized with any seal section having such a chamber, or with any other means for allowing for the expansion and contraction of fluid during operation of the motor; chamber 83 as shown herein schematically, being illustrative of any expansion chamber which may be utilized.

From the above description it can be seen that there are two flow paths in the submersible motor constructed in accordance with the teachings of this invention; a primary flow path to provide a large circulation of circulant past the heat exchanger for greater cooling and better filtering and, the secondary flow path so constructed and arranged to utilize a :portion of the flow from the primary flow path through the remainder of the motor and a portion of the expansion chamber and with a further improvement of introducing cooling fluid down the outer periphery of the shaft on the inner side of the rotor to cool the latter without interference and/or loss of efliciency of the motor.

While the various parts herein have been described as upper and lower or in a right or left position, such description refers only to the relative position of the parts as shown in the drawings and is not intended to be a limitation of the invention; it being understood that the appended claim should be construed as broadly as the prior art will permit.

What is claimed is:

In a submersible motor, the combination of:

a motor casing;

a stator in said casing;

a motor shaft rotatably mounted in said casing;

a rotor mounted on and carried by said shaft;

an impeller having an inlet and an outlet adapted to circulate cooling and lubricating fluid within said motor casing;

spaced apart bearings rotatably supporting said shaft within said motor casing;

an internal longitudinal bore formed within said shaft providing means to circulate fluid therethrough;

radial passages formed in said shaft providing fluid communication from said internal longitudinal bore to said bearings;

a first chamber formed in said casing above said rotor;

a heat exchange chamber formed in said casing below said rotor;

a groove formed in said shaft extending a distance from a location above said rotor to a location below said rotor to provide fluid communication between said shaft and said rotor; and

a gap formed between said rotor and said stator;

said internal bore providing fluid communication from said heat exchange chamber to said first chamber;

said groove and said gap providing parallel fluid communication paths from said first chamber to said inlet;

said 'inlet being in fluid communication with said groove;

said heat exchange chamber being in fluid communication with said outlet.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,285,436 6/1942 Hoover 3l087 2,315,917 4/1943 Arutunolf 31087 2,568,548 9/1951 Howard 31087 2,736,825 2/ 1956 Hill 310-87 2,894,155 7/1959 Labastie 310-59 2,897,383 7/1959 Barrows et a1. 31068 2,938,131 5/1960 Maynard 31087 2,951,165 8/1960 Arutunoff 310-87 X 2,974,240 3/ 1961 Arutunoif 310-87 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,087,959 3/ 1955 France.

ORIS L. RADER, Primary Examiner.

MILTON O. HIRSHFIELD, Examiner.

US88223A 1961-02-09 1961-02-09 Submersible motor with plural cooling paths Expired - Lifetime US3242360A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US88223A US3242360A (en) 1961-02-09 1961-02-09 Submersible motor with plural cooling paths

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US88223A US3242360A (en) 1961-02-09 1961-02-09 Submersible motor with plural cooling paths
GB414062A GB983643A (en) 1961-02-09 1962-02-02 Submersible electric motor
AT103862A AT253611B (en) 1961-02-09 1962-02-08 submersible
NL274650A NL112015C (en) 1961-02-09 1962-02-09

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3242360A true US3242360A (en) 1966-03-22

Family

ID=22210108

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US88223A Expired - Lifetime US3242360A (en) 1961-02-09 1961-02-09 Submersible motor with plural cooling paths

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US3242360A (en)
AT (1) AT253611B (en)
GB (1) GB983643A (en)
NL (1) NL112015C (en)

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3502919A (en) * 1969-01-02 1970-03-24 Borg Warner Submersible motor seal section
US3519861A (en) * 1969-03-17 1970-07-07 Westinghouse Electric Corp Cleaning and cooling system for canned motors
US3590290A (en) * 1968-12-23 1971-06-29 Alsthom Cgee Cooling systems for amortisseur windings of dynamo electric machines
US3736548A (en) * 1971-07-28 1973-05-29 R Double Electrical coupler
US4350911A (en) * 1979-06-04 1982-09-21 Oil Dynamics, Inc. Tandem connected submersible oil well pump motors
US4415823A (en) * 1980-08-04 1983-11-15 Christensen, Inc. Generator for the production of electrical energy
US4496863A (en) * 1982-04-22 1985-01-29 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Salient-pole rotor of a rotary electric machine
US4575315A (en) * 1982-06-04 1986-03-11 Moteurs Leroy-Somer Device for providing fluid-tightness of a submersible motor and a motor incorporating said device
US4625133A (en) * 1983-12-23 1986-11-25 Sundstrand Corporation Rotary electric machine with centrifugal filter
US4647804A (en) * 1983-07-15 1987-03-03 Sundstrand Corporation High speed generator rotor oil path air vent
US5028218A (en) * 1988-06-11 1991-07-02 Grundfos International A/S Immersion pump assembly
US6099271A (en) * 1999-04-02 2000-08-08 Baker Hughes Incorporated Downhole electrical submersible pump with dynamically stable bearing system
US20050269885A1 (en) * 2001-04-19 2005-12-08 Baker Hughes Incorporated Pressurized bearing system for submersible motor
US20090269224A1 (en) * 2008-04-29 2009-10-29 Daniel Francis Alan Hunt Submersible pumping system with heat transfer mechanism
US20100102648A1 (en) * 2008-10-24 2010-04-29 Baker Hughes Incorporated Enhanced thermal conductivity material in annular gap between electrical motor stator and housing
US20100143160A1 (en) * 2008-12-08 2010-06-10 Baker Hughes Incorporated Submersible pump motor cooling through external oil circulation
US20100150739A1 (en) * 2008-12-16 2010-06-17 Baker Hughes Inc. Heat transfer through the electrical submersible pump
US20100329908A1 (en) * 2009-06-29 2010-12-30 Baker Hughes Incorporated Heat exchanger for esp motor
US8708675B2 (en) 2009-06-29 2014-04-29 Baker Hughes Incorporated Systems and methods of using subsea frames as a heat exchanger in subsea boosting systems
US10167895B2 (en) * 2015-02-24 2019-01-01 Safran Transmission Systems Hydrodynamic bearing
US10519756B2 (en) 2018-02-23 2019-12-31 Extract Production Systems, LLC Electric submersible pumping unit
US10538999B2 (en) 2019-02-22 2020-01-21 Extract Production Systems, LLC Electric submersible pumping unit

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2285436A (en) * 1940-07-30 1942-06-09 Byron Jackson Co Motor and cooling means therefor
US2315917A (en) * 1937-09-30 1943-04-06 Reda Pump Company Submergible electric motor for deep well pumps
US2568548A (en) * 1945-02-20 1951-09-18 Howard Giles Philip Eliot Electric motor pump of the submersible type
FR1087959A (en) * 1953-05-04 1955-03-02 Vogel Pumpen Device for cooling the rotor submersible motors
US2736825A (en) * 1951-06-12 1956-02-28 Perfect Circle Corp Electric motor
US2894155A (en) * 1955-03-21 1959-07-07 Gen Electric Liquid cooled dynamoelectric machine
US2897383A (en) * 1957-03-12 1959-07-28 Westinghouse Electric Corp Alternating current dynamoelectric machine
US2938131A (en) * 1957-07-15 1960-05-24 Smith Corp A O Liquid filled submersible motor
US2951165A (en) * 1957-08-08 1960-08-30 Reda Pump Company Heat exchanger for submergible pumping assembly
US2974240A (en) * 1958-01-29 1961-03-07 Reda Pump Company Combined heat exchanger and protector for submergible electric motors

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2315917A (en) * 1937-09-30 1943-04-06 Reda Pump Company Submergible electric motor for deep well pumps
US2285436A (en) * 1940-07-30 1942-06-09 Byron Jackson Co Motor and cooling means therefor
US2568548A (en) * 1945-02-20 1951-09-18 Howard Giles Philip Eliot Electric motor pump of the submersible type
US2736825A (en) * 1951-06-12 1956-02-28 Perfect Circle Corp Electric motor
FR1087959A (en) * 1953-05-04 1955-03-02 Vogel Pumpen Device for cooling the rotor submersible motors
US2894155A (en) * 1955-03-21 1959-07-07 Gen Electric Liquid cooled dynamoelectric machine
US2897383A (en) * 1957-03-12 1959-07-28 Westinghouse Electric Corp Alternating current dynamoelectric machine
US2938131A (en) * 1957-07-15 1960-05-24 Smith Corp A O Liquid filled submersible motor
US2951165A (en) * 1957-08-08 1960-08-30 Reda Pump Company Heat exchanger for submergible pumping assembly
US2974240A (en) * 1958-01-29 1961-03-07 Reda Pump Company Combined heat exchanger and protector for submergible electric motors

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3590290A (en) * 1968-12-23 1971-06-29 Alsthom Cgee Cooling systems for amortisseur windings of dynamo electric machines
US3502919A (en) * 1969-01-02 1970-03-24 Borg Warner Submersible motor seal section
US3519861A (en) * 1969-03-17 1970-07-07 Westinghouse Electric Corp Cleaning and cooling system for canned motors
US3736548A (en) * 1971-07-28 1973-05-29 R Double Electrical coupler
US4350911A (en) * 1979-06-04 1982-09-21 Oil Dynamics, Inc. Tandem connected submersible oil well pump motors
US4415823A (en) * 1980-08-04 1983-11-15 Christensen, Inc. Generator for the production of electrical energy
US4496863A (en) * 1982-04-22 1985-01-29 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Salient-pole rotor of a rotary electric machine
US4575315A (en) * 1982-06-04 1986-03-11 Moteurs Leroy-Somer Device for providing fluid-tightness of a submersible motor and a motor incorporating said device
US4647804A (en) * 1983-07-15 1987-03-03 Sundstrand Corporation High speed generator rotor oil path air vent
US4625133A (en) * 1983-12-23 1986-11-25 Sundstrand Corporation Rotary electric machine with centrifugal filter
US5028218A (en) * 1988-06-11 1991-07-02 Grundfos International A/S Immersion pump assembly
US6099271A (en) * 1999-04-02 2000-08-08 Baker Hughes Incorporated Downhole electrical submersible pump with dynamically stable bearing system
US20050269885A1 (en) * 2001-04-19 2005-12-08 Baker Hughes Incorporated Pressurized bearing system for submersible motor
US7492069B2 (en) 2001-04-19 2009-02-17 Baker Hughes Incorporated Pressurized bearing system for submersible motor
US8696334B2 (en) 2008-04-29 2014-04-15 Chevron U.S.A. Inc. Submersible pumping system with heat transfer mechanism
US20090269224A1 (en) * 2008-04-29 2009-10-29 Daniel Francis Alan Hunt Submersible pumping system with heat transfer mechanism
US20100102648A1 (en) * 2008-10-24 2010-04-29 Baker Hughes Incorporated Enhanced thermal conductivity material in annular gap between electrical motor stator and housing
US8358043B2 (en) 2008-10-24 2013-01-22 Baker Hughes Incorporated Enhanced thermal conductivity material in annular gap between electrical motor stator and housing
US8696327B2 (en) 2008-12-08 2014-04-15 Baker Hughes Incorporated Submersible pump motor cooling through external oil circulation
US9109609B2 (en) 2008-12-08 2015-08-18 Baker Hughes Incorporated Submersible pump motor cooling through external oil circulation
US20100143160A1 (en) * 2008-12-08 2010-06-10 Baker Hughes Incorporated Submersible pump motor cooling through external oil circulation
US8435015B2 (en) 2008-12-16 2013-05-07 Baker Hughes Incorporated Heat transfer through the electrical submersible pump
US20100150739A1 (en) * 2008-12-16 2010-06-17 Baker Hughes Inc. Heat transfer through the electrical submersible pump
US20100329908A1 (en) * 2009-06-29 2010-12-30 Baker Hughes Incorporated Heat exchanger for esp motor
US8708675B2 (en) 2009-06-29 2014-04-29 Baker Hughes Incorporated Systems and methods of using subsea frames as a heat exchanger in subsea boosting systems
US8740586B2 (en) 2009-06-29 2014-06-03 Baker Hughes Incorporated Heat exchanger for ESP motor
US10167895B2 (en) * 2015-02-24 2019-01-01 Safran Transmission Systems Hydrodynamic bearing
US10519756B2 (en) 2018-02-23 2019-12-31 Extract Production Systems, LLC Electric submersible pumping unit
US10538999B2 (en) 2019-02-22 2020-01-21 Extract Production Systems, LLC Electric submersible pumping unit

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
NL112015C (en) 1965-09-18
AT253611B (en) 1967-04-10
GB983643A (en) 1965-02-17

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3220350A (en) Motor driven pump
US3478689A (en) Circulating pump
US3184624A (en) Arrangement of cooling channels in a dynamoelectric machine
US5156579A (en) Lubricating device for a vehicle motor
CN1118920C (en) Liquid-cooled asynchronous dynamo
US4115038A (en) Motor driven pump
DE19843900B4 (en) Centrifugal pump with an integrated axial field motor
US3060335A (en) Fluid cooled dynamoelectric machine
US3653785A (en) Pump unit
US5332369A (en) Pump unit with cooling jacket for electric motor
EP0154324B1 (en) Scroll compressor
US2494200A (en) Electric machine
US3968388A (en) Electric machines, particularly turbogenerators, having liquid cooled rotors
US3480810A (en) Oil cooled generator
JP4225686B2 (en) Cooling screw type vacuum pump
US2556435A (en) Means for cooling lubricating oil in submerged motors
DE60100156T2 (en) Magnetorheological fluid coupling
CA1177328A (en) Canned motor pump for use in the high temperature
US20080272661A1 (en) Liquid cooled rotor assembly
US3733502A (en) Liquid cooled rotor for dynamoelectric machines
US2492141A (en) Submersible motor
US5659214A (en) Submersible canned motor transfer pump
US3924715A (en) Clutch-brake unit
EP1414134A2 (en) Cooling system for electric motor of vehicle
US3260872A (en) Oil cooled generator design

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: HUGHES TOOL COMPANY, P.O. BOX 2539, HOUSTON, TX. 7

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF A PART OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CEBTRILIFT-HUGHES INC.;REEL/FRAME:004123/0711

Effective date: 19821230