US3233348A - Laminated insole - Google Patents

Laminated insole Download PDF

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Publication number
US3233348A
US3233348A US157443A US15744361A US3233348A US 3233348 A US3233348 A US 3233348A US 157443 A US157443 A US 157443A US 15744361 A US15744361 A US 15744361A US 3233348 A US3233348 A US 3233348A
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insole
layer
shape determining
insert
bottom
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US157443A
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Francis M Gilkerson
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Francis M Gilkerson
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/141Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form having an anatomical or curved form
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/38Built-in insoles joined to uppers during the manufacturing process, e.g. structural insoles; Insoles glued to shoes during the manufacturing process

Description

Feb- 8, 1966 F. M. GILKERsoN 3,233,348

LAMINATED INSOLE Filed Dec. 6. 1961 9 ME #s United States Patent O 3,233,348 LAMINATED INSOLE Francis M. Gilkerson, 5029 N. Lake Drive,

Milwaukee 17, Wis. Filed Dec. 6, 1961, Ser. No. 157,443 Claims. (Cl. 36- 44) The present invention relates generally to the shoe insole art, and more particularly to a novel precast contoured insole of two or more layers, or partial layers, of materials varying in density, fiexibility, rigidity, and thickness, and to a method of forming the same.

Heretofore, there have been used various forms and types of insoles for shoes. The structures run a wide range of materials and congurations. However, the shoe art has long needed a precast insole capable of use in mass production of mens, womens and childrens shoes which is contoured to the average foot and which incorporates materials for thecrm reception of nails, for stitching, or the like, yet includes flexibility, rigidity, resiliency and varying thickness in predetermined areas for foot comfort and fit.

Therefore, an object of the present invention is to provide a novel, preformed insole which fullls the long existing need'setl forth in the preceding paragraph, and a novel method `of forming the same.

In brief, an 'exem-plication of the present novel cast insole includes a shape determining layer, which is heat and pressure sensitive, of iinely ground cork and resin, rubber compound, or the like, a segmental inner layer or layers of fiber board, or the like, and a bottom layer of exible paper and latex, cotton and latex, or the like. An upper layer of leather or other suitable material may be used. The shape determining layer is contoured for the average foot to support the arch and to provide comfortable wearing characteristics. The several parts of the insole are cast in a mold under predetermined pressure and heat, and in accordance with the present novel method of forming the same.

Hence, another object of the present invention is to provide a novel, precast contoured insole for mass production, which is stili or rm in predetermined areas and adapted to receive nails, and which is flexible 0r resilient in other predetermined areas for comfort of the wearer.

Another object is to provide a novel precast contoured insole which can be employed in the mass production of mens, womens and childrens shoes, thereby eliminating equipment and personnel of the stock fitting department.

Another object is to provide a novel precast contoured insole of multiple layers of materials of varying density, flexibility and thickness.

Another object is to provide a novel precast contoured insole which achieves a high degree of foot comfort for the wearer, yet is relatively inexpensive and adapted for mass production of shoes for men, women and children.

Another object is to provide a novel method of forming the present novel insole which is effective, economical and readily used.

Another object is to provide a novel precast contoured insole which, while flexible in predetermined areas for foot comfort, yet is rigid enough in predetermined areas to hold the foot of a wearer in the correct walking positron.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages are apparent from the foregoing description taken with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE l is a bottom plan view of an insole made in accordance with the teachings of the present inventlon;

FIGURE 2 is a top .pian view thereof;

FIGURES 3, 4 and 5 are transverse, vertical, crosssectional views taken on substantially the lines 3 3, 4 4, and 5- 5 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 6 is a bottom plan View of a heel insert forming part of the insole illustrated in FIGURES 1 3;

FIGURE 7 is a bottom plan view of a toe insert forming part of the insole illustrated in FIGURES 1 3;

FIGURE 8 is a bottom plan view of a lower layer of material of the insole of FIGURES 1 3;

FIGURE 9 is a diagrammatic view in cross section of a mold and an insole being formed therein, which includes the teachings of the present invention, the section being on substantially a longitudinal center line of such an insole; and

FIGURES l() and ll are cross-sectional views similar to FIGURES 3 and 4, respectively, of a modified arrangement.

Referring to FIGURE 1, reference numeral 10 indicates generally an insole formed to incorporate the principles of the present invention. The contoured nature of the insole 10 is apparent from an inspection of FIG- URES 3 5 and 9.

The insole 10 includes a shape determining layer 12, a bottom layer 14, an intermediate heel insert 16, and an intermediate toe insert 1S. The shape determining layer 12 may be formed of cork and resin, a rubber compound, or the like. It is desirable that this material be exible and resilient in the final form and that it be flowable under heat and pressure in a mold in its raw form. The intermediate heel and vtoe inserts 16 and 18 may be of fiber board, or the like. It is essential that this material be stiff or rm enough to receive nails, or other holding or securing means ofthis nature. The bottom layer 14 isof exible paper and latex, cotton and latex, or the like. The bottom layer prevents stretching and is capable of adhering to a shoe upper when cement is applied, thereby ensuring dimensional stability laterally and longitudinally.

The bottom layer 14 may be provided with apertures 20 and 22. Similarly, the intermediate heel insert 16 land the toe insert 18 may be provided with apertures 24 and 26, respectively.

The insole 10 is formed in -any suitable mold 27 under .pressure and yheat. The several layers of material and insert-s, including a sock lining, if desired, are disposed in the mold 27 in the relationship as sho-wn. The amount of pressure and the degree of heat necessary depend upon the materials employed for the layer 12, being well known factors. In form-ing the insole 10, some of the material ultimately comprising t-he layer 12 flows into the apertures or openings 20, 22, 24 and 26, forming plugs 28 Iand 30, which fuse wit-h the Walls of the apertures and assist in maintaining the several layers of the insole 10 together.

The facing surfaces of the Iparts of the mold 27 designated 32 and 34 are formed to the ultimate desired contours of the top and bottom of the insole 10, the former being determined by the bottom face of a special l-ast. The desired longitudinal and transverse cross sections may be readily determined for each shoe size for men, women and children.

The present invention also contemplates and includes disposition of fiber board inserts, or an insert, with the upper surface as a continuation of the upper surface of the shape determining layer 12, material of the shape determining layer 12 being disposed ybetween the bottom of the inserts, or insert, and the bottom layer, as is shown in FIGURES l0 and l1 for the heel insert 16. This improves nail-ing, since there is rm engagement of the nails against the hard ber board insert 16' instead of against the composition of the shape detenmining layer 12. The inserts 16 and 16 generally are of less width than the shape determining layer 12, as is clear from FIGURES 3, l() and 11, the Width being determined as required, so that material of the shape determining layer 12 will |be disposed at the sides of the insert 16 in the relationship shown in FIGURES and 11. Irf desired, the heel insert 16 may extend forwardly over the shank, as shown; the toe insert may be omitted. The over-all bonding of the bottom layer 14 is also improved, thereby eliminating bubbles, fo-r there is a firmer, more consistent engagement between it and the shape determining layer 12 than between it and the inserts 16 and 18.

Further, ra rib may he bonded to the bottom of the insole 1@ in the casting operation for use with lthe Goodyear welt. It is simply necessary to provide one mold face with a suitable channel for receiving the rib. Normally, such rib extends around the toe and along both sides to points short Off the heel end, as desired.

It is apparent that there has been provided a novel cast insole and method off forming the same which fuliilll the object-s and advantages sought therefor.

t is to be understood that lthe lforegoing description rand the accompanying drawing have been given by way of illustration and example. It is also to be understood that changes in form of the elements, rearrangement of parts and steps, and substitution of equivalent elements and steps, which will he obvious to those skilled in the art, are contemplated as within the scope of the present invention which is limited only by the claims which follow.

What is claimed is:

1. An insole comprising multiple layers of materials of different densities and exibilities bonded together as a unit, a shape determining layer being formed with the upper surface thereof contoured and adapted to fit a foot of a wearer, an insert layer of material rm enough to receive and reta-in nails #being disposed in the heel area and extending a substantial distance forwardly therefrom, and a bottom layer of less thickness than the shape determining layer maintaining the dimensional integrity of the insole bonded to the bottom of said shape determining layer.

2. An insole comprising multiple iayers of materials of different densities and fiexibilities bonded together as a unit, a shape determining layer being formed with the upper surface thereof contoured and adapt-ed to t a foot of a wearer, and an insert layer of material rm enough to receive and retain nails being disposed in the heel area and extending a substantial distance forwardly therefrom and having the upper surface substantially coextensive with the upper surface of said shape determining layer, said sha-pe `determining layer extending along the longitudinal sides of sa-id insert layer.

3. An insole comprising multiple layers of materials of different densities and -flexibrilities bonded together as a. unit, a shape determining layer being formed with the upper surface thereof contoured and adapted to fit a foot of a wearer, an insert layer of material rm enough to receive and retain nails being disposed in the heel area and extending a substantial distance forwardly therefrom and having the upper surface substantially eoextensive with the upper surface of said shape determining layer, said shape determining layer extending along the longitudinal sides of said insert layer, and a bottom layer of material of less thickness than the shape determining layer maintaining :the dimensional integrity of the insole bonded to the bottom of said shape determining layer.

4. The combination of claim 1 in which said bottom layer and said insert layer have at least one aperture through each, and material integral With and of the same kind las the shape determining layer disposed in said apertures and fbonded to `the walls thereof.

5. The combination of claim 4 in which at least one aperture in said bottom layer and in said insert are disposed in superposed relation.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,206,750 11/1916 Burnham 36-44 X 2,177,156 10/1939 Shapiro 36-44 2,414,542 1/1947 Miller er a1. 36-44 2,658,288 11/1953 s811011 36-44 2,736,109 2/1956 s011011 36- 44 2,772,488 12/1956 Meiner 36-44x 2,808,663 10/1957 Frieder et al. 36-44 2,920,008 1/1960 Frieder er ai. 36-44 X 2,979,835 4/1961 schon 36- 44 v FOREIGN PATENTS 771,773 4/1957 Great Britain. 842,740 7/1960 Great Britain.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner. EDWARD V. BENI-IAM, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. AN INSOLE COMPRISING MULTIPLE LAYERS OF MATERIALS OF DIFFERENT DENSITIES AND FLEXIBILITIES BONDED TOGETHER AS A UNIT, A SHAPE DETERMINING LAYER BEING FORMED WITH THE UPPER SURFACE THEREOF CONTOURED AND ADAPTED TO FIT A FOOT OF A WEARER, AN INSERT LAYER OF MATERIAL FIRM ENOUGH TO RECEIVE AND RETAIN NAILS BEING DISPOSED IN THE HEEL AREA AND EXTENDING A SUBSTANTIAL DISTANCE FORWARDLY THEREFROM, AND A BOTTOM LAYER OF LESS THICKNESS THAN THE SHAPE DETERMINING LAYER MAINTAINING THE DIMENSIONAL INTEGRITY OF THE INSOLE BONDED TO THE BOTTOM OF SAID SHAPE DETERMINING LAYER.
US157443A 1961-12-06 1961-12-06 Laminated insole Expired - Lifetime US3233348A (en)

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3398469A (en) * 1967-12-08 1968-08-27 Bressan Ezio Cushioned shoe innersole construction
US3601908A (en) * 1969-05-15 1971-08-31 Francis M Gilkerson Molded insole
EP0117758A2 (en) * 1983-02-28 1984-09-05 James B. Sullivan Molded shoe innersoles and their preparation
US4674204A (en) * 1983-02-28 1987-06-23 Sullivan James B Shock absorbing innersole and method for preparing same
US4694589A (en) * 1983-02-28 1987-09-22 Sullivan James B Elastomeric shoe innersole
US4718179A (en) * 1986-03-07 1988-01-12 Northwest Podiatric Laboratories, Inc. Orthotic and method of making of the same
EP0274179A2 (en) * 1987-01-08 1988-07-13 CJC (UK) Limited Manufacture of insole assemblies
US4823483A (en) * 1986-09-23 1989-04-25 Bernard Chapnick Shoe insert and laminating method
US4910886A (en) * 1983-02-28 1990-03-27 Sullivan James B Shock-absorbing innersole
US4962593A (en) * 1986-03-07 1990-10-16 Northwest Podiatric Laboratory, Inc. Orthotic and method of making of the same
US5282328A (en) * 1989-12-13 1994-02-01 Peterson Technology Trust Custom foot beds for footwear
US5285583A (en) * 1990-07-27 1994-02-15 Terra Nova Shoes Ltd. Puncture resistant insole for safety footwear
US5311677A (en) * 1991-08-02 1994-05-17 Interco Incorporated Shoe having impact absorption means
US5542196A (en) * 1994-04-15 1996-08-06 Donna Karan Shoe Company Insole
US5787610A (en) * 1996-05-29 1998-08-04 Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc. Footwear
US6192607B1 (en) * 1993-10-08 2001-02-27 Secondwind Products, Inc Insole assembly for footwear
US6854198B2 (en) 1996-05-29 2005-02-15 Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc. Footwear
US20050193591A1 (en) * 2004-02-25 2005-09-08 Bauerfeind Ag Insole for footwear
US20080072461A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Howlett Harold A Cushioned orthotic
US20090031583A1 (en) * 2007-08-03 2009-02-05 Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc. Foot Support For Alleviating Knee Pain
US20100031531A1 (en) * 2008-08-06 2010-02-11 Nike, Inc. Customization of Inner Sole Board
US20110023324A1 (en) * 2009-08-03 2011-02-03 Dananberg Howard J Footwear sole
US20130185957A1 (en) * 2012-01-24 2013-07-25 Fusco Industrial Corporation Shoe Insole
US10390587B2 (en) 2016-03-01 2019-08-27 Hbn Shoe, Llc Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
US10477915B2 (en) 2016-03-01 2019-11-19 Hbn Shoe, Llc Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1216750A (en) * 1916-10-06 1917-02-20 Arcade Mfg Co Sand-molding apparatus.
US2177156A (en) * 1937-06-04 1939-10-24 Athletic Shoe Company Shoe insole
US2414542A (en) * 1945-08-31 1947-01-21 Bird & Son Insole
US2658288A (en) * 1951-07-28 1953-11-10 William M Scholl Molded and tapering latex insole for footwear
US2736109A (en) * 1956-02-28 Laminated insole
US2772488A (en) * 1955-07-20 1956-12-04 Meltzer Jack Shoe having covered insole body and nailed-on heel
GB771773A (en) * 1954-12-04 1957-04-03 Helsingborgs Gummifabriks Improvements in or relating to insoles for rubber shoes
US2808663A (en) * 1955-02-10 1957-10-08 Frieder Laminated protective sole
US2920008A (en) * 1955-02-10 1960-01-05 Gentex Corp Laminated protective sole
GB842740A (en) * 1956-09-24 1960-07-27 Continental Gummi Werke Ag Improvements in or relating to heel- or sole-taps
US2979835A (en) * 1958-04-28 1961-04-18 William M Scholl Foot cushioning device

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2736109A (en) * 1956-02-28 Laminated insole
US1216750A (en) * 1916-10-06 1917-02-20 Arcade Mfg Co Sand-molding apparatus.
US2177156A (en) * 1937-06-04 1939-10-24 Athletic Shoe Company Shoe insole
US2414542A (en) * 1945-08-31 1947-01-21 Bird & Son Insole
US2658288A (en) * 1951-07-28 1953-11-10 William M Scholl Molded and tapering latex insole for footwear
GB771773A (en) * 1954-12-04 1957-04-03 Helsingborgs Gummifabriks Improvements in or relating to insoles for rubber shoes
US2808663A (en) * 1955-02-10 1957-10-08 Frieder Laminated protective sole
US2920008A (en) * 1955-02-10 1960-01-05 Gentex Corp Laminated protective sole
US2772488A (en) * 1955-07-20 1956-12-04 Meltzer Jack Shoe having covered insole body and nailed-on heel
GB842740A (en) * 1956-09-24 1960-07-27 Continental Gummi Werke Ag Improvements in or relating to heel- or sole-taps
US2979835A (en) * 1958-04-28 1961-04-18 William M Scholl Foot cushioning device

Cited By (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3398469A (en) * 1967-12-08 1968-08-27 Bressan Ezio Cushioned shoe innersole construction
US3601908A (en) * 1969-05-15 1971-08-31 Francis M Gilkerson Molded insole
US4910886A (en) * 1983-02-28 1990-03-27 Sullivan James B Shock-absorbing innersole
EP0117758A3 (en) * 1983-02-28 1985-12-18 Richard B. Fox Molded shoe innersoles and their preparation
US4674204A (en) * 1983-02-28 1987-06-23 Sullivan James B Shock absorbing innersole and method for preparing same
US4694589A (en) * 1983-02-28 1987-09-22 Sullivan James B Elastomeric shoe innersole
EP0117758A2 (en) * 1983-02-28 1984-09-05 James B. Sullivan Molded shoe innersoles and their preparation
US4718179A (en) * 1986-03-07 1988-01-12 Northwest Podiatric Laboratories, Inc. Orthotic and method of making of the same
US4962593A (en) * 1986-03-07 1990-10-16 Northwest Podiatric Laboratory, Inc. Orthotic and method of making of the same
US5394626A (en) * 1986-03-07 1995-03-07 Northwest Podiatric Laboratory, Inc. Orthotic and method of making of the same
US4823483A (en) * 1986-09-23 1989-04-25 Bernard Chapnick Shoe insert and laminating method
EP0274179A3 (en) * 1987-01-08 1989-11-29 CJC (UK) Limited Manufacture of insole assemblies
EP0274179A2 (en) * 1987-01-08 1988-07-13 CJC (UK) Limited Manufacture of insole assemblies
US5282328A (en) * 1989-12-13 1994-02-01 Peterson Technology Trust Custom foot beds for footwear
US5285583A (en) * 1990-07-27 1994-02-15 Terra Nova Shoes Ltd. Puncture resistant insole for safety footwear
US5311677A (en) * 1991-08-02 1994-05-17 Interco Incorporated Shoe having impact absorption means
US6192607B1 (en) * 1993-10-08 2001-02-27 Secondwind Products, Inc Insole assembly for footwear
US5542196A (en) * 1994-04-15 1996-08-06 Donna Karan Shoe Company Insole
US6854198B2 (en) 1996-05-29 2005-02-15 Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc. Footwear
US5787610A (en) * 1996-05-29 1998-08-04 Jeffrey S. Brooks, Inc. Footwear
US20050193591A1 (en) * 2004-02-25 2005-09-08 Bauerfeind Ag Insole for footwear
US7178269B2 (en) * 2004-02-25 2007-02-20 Bauerfeind Ag Insole for footwear
US7958653B2 (en) * 2006-09-21 2011-06-14 Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc. Cushioned orthotic
US20080072461A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2008-03-27 Howlett Harold A Cushioned orthotic
US8800169B2 (en) 2006-09-21 2014-08-12 Msd Consumer Care, Inc. Cushioned orthotic
US20110277354A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2011-11-17 Msd Consumer Care, Inc. Cushioned orthotic
US20090031583A1 (en) * 2007-08-03 2009-02-05 Schering-Plough Healthcare Products, Inc. Foot Support For Alleviating Knee Pain
US9003679B2 (en) * 2008-08-06 2015-04-14 Nike, Inc. Customization of inner sole board
US20100031531A1 (en) * 2008-08-06 2010-02-11 Nike, Inc. Customization of Inner Sole Board
US9844242B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2017-12-19 Nike, Inc. Customization of inner sole board
US9808046B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2017-11-07 Nike, Inc. Customization of inner sole board
US20110023324A1 (en) * 2009-08-03 2011-02-03 Dananberg Howard J Footwear sole
US8166674B2 (en) 2009-08-03 2012-05-01 Hbn Shoe, Llc Footwear sole
US20130185957A1 (en) * 2012-01-24 2013-07-25 Fusco Industrial Corporation Shoe Insole
US8776399B2 (en) * 2012-01-24 2014-07-15 Fusco Industrial Corporation Shoe insole
US10390587B2 (en) 2016-03-01 2019-08-27 Hbn Shoe, Llc Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe
US10477915B2 (en) 2016-03-01 2019-11-19 Hbn Shoe, Llc Device for high-heeled shoes and method of constructing a high-heeled shoe

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