US3229439A - Ubietous block - Google Patents

Ubietous block Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3229439A
US3229439A US20668362A US3229439A US 3229439 A US3229439 A US 3229439A US 20668362 A US20668362 A US 20668362A US 3229439 A US3229439 A US 3229439A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
block
building
figure
pyramidical
surface
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Gordon F Strobel
Original Assignee
Gordon F Strobel
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/02Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls built-up from layers of building elements
    • E04B2/04Walls having neither cavities between, nor in, the solid elements
    • E04B2/12Walls having neither cavities between, nor in, the solid elements using elements having a general shape differing from that of a parallelepiped

Description

Jan. 18, 1966 s o 3,229,439

UBIETO UUUUU CK Filed July 2, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet l 7 E 12" d. 30 34 27c ,3 2

32 30c 25 I k 326 INVENTO GORDON E STRO A TTO/PNEV Jan. 18, 1966 G. F. STROBEL 3,229,439

UBIETOUS BLOCK Filed July 2, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. 33; GORDON E .STROBEL A T TOR/V57 United States Patent 3,229,439 UBIETOUS BLOCK Gordon F. Strobel, 1712 Jaynes St., Berkeley, Calif. Filed July 2, 1962, Ser. No. 206,683 3 Claims. (Cl. 52591) The invention relates to a six-sided block which has inherent advantages for interlocking strength, for texture and for design. It finds particular usefulness as a building block much the same as common brick, and for numerous other uses and purposes.

The common six-sided brick has been in use for hundreds of years as a primary building element, and although it has varied in size, it has always had dimensions which would permit modular use in almost any combination. In general it has always been twice as long as its width and one-fourth as thick as it is long. With such a modular shape it was possible to use half bricks, quarter bricks and even eighth bricks in combination with whole bricks in order to achieve various designs, shapes and contours with respect to any particular building unit.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a building unit element which will maintain the advantages of the common brick form and which will achieve in addition an increased usefulness, both in structural integrity and in aesthetic appeal.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a primary building element or block which is based upon a surface configuration of one male and one female, or one convex and one concave portion of any suitable geometric design, mating with each other with respect to any of its six faces.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a primary building element which mates with another similar building element or portion thereof on any of its six sides to form a building unit.

It is a further object to provide primary building elements which are mutually self-aligning and will lay up in true vertical, lateral or angled positions with a minimum of skill and without the use of special tools.

While it is not quite accurate to say that the building unit of the present invention interlocks with other similar units, nevertheless there is a sufiicient mating to provide an interrelationship or interlocking so that it is reasonable to state that it is an object of the present invention to provide an interlocking building unit which will accomplish this function on all six sides and provide higher shear strength than has heretofore been obtainable with fiat-sided building units such as brick.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a building unit or block in which the interlocking effect is sufiicient to require a minimum of mortar or other adhesive to join them together into a unitary structure.

t is a further object of this invention to provide a unit building block where the joints can be staggered at any multiple of the primary element.

It is another object to provide an inter-related or interlocked building block unit where the joints have superior resistance to moisture penetration.

It is-still another object of the invention to provide a unitary building block which can be made of any suitable material such as glass, plastics, clay, concrete or other natural or artificial solid building material.

It is a further object of this invention to provide interlocking or inter-mating building block units which are suitable for non-mortared or temporary work, for professional model building, architectural treatments of walls, artistic displays, or any other work where stability and an attractive surface are desired.

Instead of the plain face of a brick wall, it is an object Patented Jan. 18, .1966

of the present invention to present a design or textured surface based upon the particular male and female shapes employed in the unit block.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a building block unit of cubes, tetrahedrons and the like, which will function to interlock in a similar manner, in all cases where the turns are the conventional angles and in all other angles with no mating at the ends.

Further objects are to provide a construction of maximum simplicity, economy and ease of assembly and disassembly, also such further objects, advantages and capabilities as will fully appear and as are inherently possessed by the device and invention described herein.

The invention further resides in the combination, construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and while there is shown therein a preferred embodiment thereof, and several variant forms, it is to be understood that the same is merely illustrative of the invention and that the invention is capable of modification and change and comprehends other details of construction without departing from the spirit thereof or the scope of the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a top plan view of a building unit block where the alternating male and female forms are foursided equilateral pyramids having a very low elevation, or depression as the case may be;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the basic building unit;

FIGURE 3 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line III-III of FIGURE 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse sectional view taken on the line IVIV of FIGURE 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal section taken on the line V-V of FIGURE 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of the block shown in plan view in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 7 illustrates schematically the use of this building block unit in staggered relation as is customary in the laying of bricks in the making of a wall having a right angle turn;

FIGURE 8 is a schematic side elevational view of one block shown making a 90 vertical turn with another block;

FIGURE 9 is a variation of the block in which a cube or cylinder is used instead of the pyramidical forms shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 10 is another variant form where the foursided pyramidical form or a cone form interlocking extensions have depressions inward of the faces of the nor? mal building element;

FIGURE 11 is a sectional view of a building unit where the male and female forms are spherical; and

FIGURE 12 is still another variant where the interlocking forms are either extending domes or hemispherical depressions spaced inwardly. I

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, and particularly to the basic forms which are shown in FIG- URES l to 8 inclusive, it will be seen that fundamentally the rectangular shape of the building block 20 is maintained. For ease of explanation and for better understanding of the present invention, the block 20 will be divided into four quarters, 20a, 20b, 20c, and 20d, each one of the quarters containing a system of male and female extensions or depressions. The numeral 21 represents the line for the top surface and 22 for the bottom surface. Likewise, the vertical planes of the end walls 23 and 24 are provided with male and female shapes or portions. Furthermore, the sidewalls 25 and 26 are provided with alternately arranged male and female shapes. Looking at the quarter unit 20a and with particular reference to FIGURES 1, 2 and 3, it will be observed that the upper half is the male unit and. is provided with a foursided equilateral pyramidical extension 27 rising above the top surface 21. The end wall 23 is provided with a substantially identical equilateral pyramidical form 28 and the sidewall 26 has its pyramidical extension 30, while the bottom surface 22 has a substantialy identical pyramidical extension 31. Thus the four adjacent surfaces have substantially identical outwardly extending pyramids which cover all of the available area in each instance.

The lower half of the quarter section 20a is the female portion integral with the male portion having a corresponding equilateral pyramidical depression 32 in the top surface 21; a substantially identical depression 33 in the bottom surface 22; a substantially identical depression 34 in the sidewall 25, and still another depression 35 in the end wall 23. Thus, in the end quarter 20a the four exposed surfaces have substantially identical geometric pyramidical forms 27, 28, 30 and 31 rising above their respective surfaces and the other half have identical and conforming pyramidical depressions 32, 33, 34 and 35 in its four surfaces. The transverse mid-section of the quarter 20a is shown in FIGURE 3. The angle of the pyramidical extensions and depressions may be from one to forty-four degrees in altitude but it has been found in tests and by experience that the ten degrees of elevation or depressions shown in the drawings is superior and provides the optimum results.

Referring now to the next adjacent quarter section 20b and with reference to FIGURE 4, the male pyramidical extensions are in reverse position on the top and bottom surfaces 21 and 22 respectively, and are indicated as 27b, 30b and 31b. Since the section 20b is contiguous and integral with sections 20a and 20c, it has no end walls. The corresponding female pyramidical depressions are indicated 32b, 33b and 34b. Here again, only the top, side and bottom surfaces are considered because of the integrity of the sections.

The next unit for purposes of description is 200 and this likewise is contiguous and integral with 20b. It is substantially identical with section 20a. On its top surface 21 it has the raised pyramid 27c and the corresponding depressed pyramidical shape 320. On the vertical sidewall 26, it has the outward extending pyramid 30c and on its opposite sidewall 25 it has the depressed pyramidical shape 340. On the bottom surface 22 it has the pyramid 31c and the pyramidical depression 330.

The next contiguous section is 20d and this conforms substantially with the section 20b except it has the end wall 24 in addition. It will be observed that section 20d is the reverse of section 20a. This section has the pyramid 27d in the corresponding position of 27b and the pyramidical depression 32d adjacent thereto on the top surface 21. On the bottom surface 22 it has the pyramidical depression 33d and the raised pyramid 31d. On the sidewall 25 it has the raised pyramid 30d and on the opposite sidewall 26 it has the pyramidical depression 34d. On the end wall 24 it has the raised pyramid 28d and the pyramidical depression 35d.

It will be observed that on every surface the relationship of pyramids and pyramidical depressions alternate and reverse so that on each surface there is alternately a raised pyramid and a depressed pyramidical portion. This is not true, however, of the juncture of the surfaces as will be observed from FIGURES 1, 2, 3 and 4 where there is a raised pyramid on the top surface, there is a corresponding raised pyramid on the bottom surface and a raised pyramid on the sidewall between the juncture of the top and bottom surfaces. Where an end wall i involved there is likewise a raised pyramid between the top and bottom surfaces.

The converse is also true with respect to the pyramidical depressions. The top and bottom surfaces having pyramidical depressions are in the same relative location and the intersecting sidewalls between said sections have corresponding pyramidical depressions. Where an end wall is concerned, the end wall between the two surfaces likewise has a depression.

It is thus apparent that a block such as shown in FIG- URE 1 will readily mate or nest with another block in exactly the same relative position, i.e., bottom surface 22 against the upper surface 21, by moving the upper block either one quarter section or three quarters section. If placed in a continuous, contiguous line, the pyramid 28 of one block will be received in the pyramidical depression 35d of the next block, while the pyramid 28d will enter into and be received by the depression 35. If placed side-by-side in a horizontal plane, the corresponding pyramids and depressions will mate precisely where the blocks are not offset relative to each other, or offset one half block.

011 the other hand, if a half block vertical sequence is indicated, then the next upper row of blocks is rotated so that the pyramid 27 will be received in the depression 32.

Thus, in every position whether by half or by quarter increments or by whole increments, the blocks will mate one with the other and interlock to an extent that very little mortar or other cementitious material is required to hold them in interlocked position giving especial integrity and unusual strength to the wall formed thereby.

Referring to FIGURE 7, the conventional positioning of blocks in one half overlapping relationship, according to brick laying procedures, is shown and as indicated above, the blocks such as shown in FIGURE 1 will mate perfectly in forming such a wall. Obviously it is intended that the blocks 20 shall be the same for the entire wall and that it is not intended for use in conjunction with normal bricks or blocks. The rectangular blocks of FIGURE 7 are intended to be the same as the block 20 and only one block 20 is shown because of the difliculty of satisfactory representation by drawing.

FIGURE 8 shows the interlocking of the block 20 with a similar block 20 in a diagrammatic side elevational view.

Referring now to FIGURES 9 through 12, these all represent variant geometric forms which may be substituted for the raised pyramids and depressed pyramidical shapes shown and described with respect to FIGURE 1. FIGURES 9, 10, 11 and 12 are transverse vertical sections taken on a line which would correspond with the line IV-IV of FIGURE 1.

In FIGURE 9, the shapes 27W, 30w and 31w extend out from the top surface 21, the sidewall 25 and the bottom surface 22. It is noted, however, that the shapes do not cover the entire area of the portion corresponding to the pyramids 27, but are spaced inwardly and centrally in their respective areas. Exactly the same type of interlocking is obtained, only perhaps more positively because of the greater depth and the greater amount of angular contact and interlocking. However, precisely the same result is obtained in precisely the same manner as before described in connection with the building block member 20. It should also be noted that the drawing of FIG- URE 9 represents cylindrical shapes as well as cubes.

In FIGURE 10, there is a raised pyramid 27x, 30x, and 31x, but as in the case of the block 20w, the pyramid does not cover the entire area of the pyramid 27 and is higher in altitude. Accordingly, the depressions for receiving the pyramids, which are depressions 32x, 33x and 34x are correspondingly deep and centered within the area. Here again, the drawing of FIGURE 10 represents cone shapes as well as pyramidical shapes.

As shown by FIGURES 11 and 12, it is not necessary to maintain any angularity in order to obtain the advantages of this invention. A dome 27y, 30y and 31y covering the entire area may be used to mate with corresponding spherical dimples 32y, 33y and 34y.

Even the domes do not need to be of a size to cover the entire area but may be less in area as shown by the domes in block 20z of FIGURE 12. Here the domes 27z, 30z and 31z are spaced inwardly and centrally of the area and are adapted to be received in the corresponding dimples such as 321, 332 and 341.

It is apparent that in all or any forms either illustrated in the drawings or devised by those skilled in the art, will all operate identically and will accomplish each and all of the advantages set forth in addition to many others. The term ubietous is particularly appropriate because of the importance of the face-to-face relationship, regardless of which face, which is characteristic of this type of block. The interlocking of the various forms provides a stable integral wall of great integrity and strength with a minimum of mortar and cementitious material, and at the same time providing an interesting and unusual texture to the Wall surface.

It is equally apparent that the interlocking forms and shapes may be of almost infinite variety but that the essentials and fundamental concept is described with respect to the block 20 of FIGURES 1 to 5 inclusive.

It will be observed that the building block of the present invention is a parallelepiped with all faces rectangular.

As shown in FIGURE 7 the bottom blocks should have a flat surface in order to rest properly on a foundation or mud sill. Likewise it may be necessary to have the top of a wall, for example, flat. Both can be accomplished by having at least one surface plain and without any raised or depressed portions. Various combinations may be required, such as having one or both of the ends plain either alone or in combination with another flat surface. All of these are contemplated as a part of this invention.

I claim:

1. A six sided building block interlocking at any one of its six sides with any other such block at any one of its six sides, comprising a plurality of juxtaposed integral primary elements, each primary element composed of a pair of uniform size cubes joined symmetrically at one entire face, one cube having a convex pattern form on its exposed faces and the other having a complementary concave pattern on its exposed faces each interlocking with similar complementary concave and convex pat terned faces of other identical blocks, said primary elements being juxtaposed in reverse units, each of said building blocks when composed of one or more of said primary elements having the convex patterned faces on all exposed surfaces at one corner thereof with the mating concave patterned faces on all exposed faces at the adjacent corner.

2. A modular six sided building block having a plurality of primary elements joined integraly side by side, said block having surfaces interlocking with identical blocks on any of its six sides, said primary elements being a pair of uniform size cubes joined symmetrically at one face, one cube having a uniform raised pattern on each of its exposed faces and the other cube having a uniform complementary depressed pattern on each of its exposed faces, said primary elements being arranged side by side alternately reversed, each of said building blocks when composed of an even number of said primary elements having the raised symmetrical shape on all exposed faces of one corner cube with the complementary depressed symmetrical shape on all exposed faces on the adjacent corner cube.

3. A self-aligning uniform building block having the six surfaces of a rectangular parallelepiped comprising a plurality of integral primary elements arranged side by side, each of said primary elements being uniformly sized cubes symmetrically joined at one face, one of said cubes having a raised symmetrical geometric shape on each of its exposed surfaces and the other cube having a depressed complementary symmetrical geometric shape in each of its exposed surfaces, said primary elements being in alternately reversed side by side arrangement, so that each of its six surfaces will interlock and receive the raised and depressed complementary geometric shapes of any other such block on any one of its six surfaces, each of said building blocks when composed of an even number of said primary elements having the raised symmetrical shape on all exposed faces of one corner cube with the complementary depressed symmetrical shape on all exposed faces on the adjacent corner cube.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 470,377 3/ 1892 Graham 94-13 903,907 11/1908 Soss 52S94 1,045,328 11/1912 Sammis 94-13 1,096,267 5/1914 Sammis 9413 FOREIGN PATENTS 23,328 10/ 1906 Great Britain. 117,142 7/1918 Great Britain. 518,217 3/ 1955 Italy.

FRANK L. ABBOTT, Primary Examiner.

WILLIAM I. MUSHAKE, JACOB L. NACKENOFF,

Examiners.

Claims (1)

1. A SIX SIDED BUILDING BLOCK INTERLOCKING AT ANY ONE OF ITS SIX SIDES WITH ANY OTHER SUCH BLOCK AT ANY OF ITS SIX SIDES, COMPRISING A PLURALITY OF JUXTAPOSED INTEGRAL PRIMARY ELEMENTS, EACH PRIMARY ELEMENT COMPOSED OF A PAIR OF UNIFORM SIZE CUBES JOINED SYMMETRICALLY AT ONE ENTIRE FACE, ONE CUBE HAVING A CONVEX PATTERN FORM ON ITS EXPOSED FACES AND THE OTHER HAVING A COMPLEMENTARY CONCAVE PATTERN ON ITS EXPOSED FACES EACH INTERLOCKING WITH SIMILAR COMPLEMENTARY CONCAVE AND CONVEX PATTERNED FACES OF OTHER IDENTICAL BLOCKS, SAID PRIMARY ELEMENTS BEING JUXTAPOSED IN REVERSE UNITS, EACH OF SAID BUILDING BLOCKS WHEN COMPOSED OF ONE OR MORE OF SAID PRIMARY ELEMENTS HAVING THE CONVEX PATTERNED FACES ON ALL EXPOSED SURFACES AT ONE CORNER THEREOF WITH THE MATING CONCAVE PATTERNED FACES ON ALL EXPOSED FACES AT THE ADJACENT CORNER.
US3229439A 1962-07-02 1962-07-02 Ubietous block Expired - Lifetime US3229439A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3229439A US3229439A (en) 1962-07-02 1962-07-02 Ubietous block

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3229439A US3229439A (en) 1962-07-02 1962-07-02 Ubietous block

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3229439A true US3229439A (en) 1966-01-18

Family

ID=22767481

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3229439A Expired - Lifetime US3229439A (en) 1962-07-02 1962-07-02 Ubietous block

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3229439A (en)

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3435576A (en) * 1965-11-19 1969-04-01 John Giannelia Interlocking building block
US3974611A (en) * 1973-03-26 1976-08-17 Satterthwaite Edward W Modular architectural educational toy and playground erector-set and building system
US4288960A (en) * 1977-08-01 1981-09-15 Auras Olivier W Interlocking building block
US4498268A (en) * 1981-02-18 1985-02-12 Inman Calvin R Undersea platform construction
US4512685A (en) * 1981-09-08 1985-04-23 Ameron, Inc. Mortarless retaining-wall system and components thereof
US4681481A (en) * 1985-05-29 1987-07-21 Kapusta Janusz J Decorative, functional element for construction and the like
FR2601710A1 (en) * 1986-07-18 1988-01-22 Dalloz Jean Francois Construction element whose external surface essentially consists of fittings in the shape of a hyperbolic paraboloid
EP0294522A1 (en) * 1987-06-09 1988-12-14 Janusz Josef Kapusta A decorative, functional element for construction and the like
WO1994004767A1 (en) * 1992-08-12 1994-03-03 Ronald Patrick Murphy Building block having interlocking formations
US6536988B2 (en) * 1998-04-22 2003-03-25 Peter Geiger Construction kit made of concrete paving stones
US20040161298A1 (en) * 2001-07-06 2004-08-19 Michael Lazar Paving unit
US20080073147A1 (en) * 2006-09-25 2008-03-27 Partscience, Llc Three-dimensional tessellated acoustic components
US20090162143A1 (en) * 2007-12-19 2009-06-25 I-Cheng Chiu Wavy Tactile Walk Path
US20090260314A1 (en) * 2008-04-18 2009-10-22 Mugge Jimmie L Dry cast block arrangement and methods
US20110072736A1 (en) * 2009-09-30 2011-03-31 Atlas Roofing Corporation Drainage members for flat roofs and methods of making same
US20110131915A1 (en) * 2009-12-09 2011-06-09 Kaump Donald L Partition modules and assembly system thereof
US8667752B2 (en) 2010-06-25 2014-03-11 Robert Pollack Interlocking construction systems and methods
US8800236B2 (en) * 2010-10-01 2014-08-12 Tetraloc Pty Ltd Construction block
US9175473B2 (en) 2013-08-19 2015-11-03 Modular Arts, Inc. Ceiling tile system
US9238169B1 (en) * 2013-12-20 2016-01-19 Yen-Po Chiu Multi-functional combinatorial game apparatus
US9732523B2 (en) * 2015-07-24 2017-08-15 Keystone Retaining Wall Systems Llc Connection surface for a structural unit and method of making same

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US470377A (en) * 1892-03-08 Building or paving block
GB190623328A (en) * 1906-10-20 1907-10-19 Joseph Soss Improvements in Bricks or Blocks for Building Purposes.
US903907A (en) * 1906-12-01 1908-11-17 Joseph Soss Building brick or block.
US1045328A (en) * 1911-03-03 1912-11-26 Albert V Sammis Paving-block.
US1096267A (en) * 1913-07-19 1914-05-12 Albert V Sammis Paving-block.
GB117142A (en) * 1917-07-11 1918-07-11 Walter Wright Improvements in Walls for Buildings (not Subaqueous).

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US470377A (en) * 1892-03-08 Building or paving block
GB190623328A (en) * 1906-10-20 1907-10-19 Joseph Soss Improvements in Bricks or Blocks for Building Purposes.
US903907A (en) * 1906-12-01 1908-11-17 Joseph Soss Building brick or block.
US1045328A (en) * 1911-03-03 1912-11-26 Albert V Sammis Paving-block.
US1096267A (en) * 1913-07-19 1914-05-12 Albert V Sammis Paving-block.
GB117142A (en) * 1917-07-11 1918-07-11 Walter Wright Improvements in Walls for Buildings (not Subaqueous).

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3435576A (en) * 1965-11-19 1969-04-01 John Giannelia Interlocking building block
US3974611A (en) * 1973-03-26 1976-08-17 Satterthwaite Edward W Modular architectural educational toy and playground erector-set and building system
US4288960A (en) * 1977-08-01 1981-09-15 Auras Olivier W Interlocking building block
US4498268A (en) * 1981-02-18 1985-02-12 Inman Calvin R Undersea platform construction
US4512685A (en) * 1981-09-08 1985-04-23 Ameron, Inc. Mortarless retaining-wall system and components thereof
US4681481A (en) * 1985-05-29 1987-07-21 Kapusta Janusz J Decorative, functional element for construction and the like
FR2601710A1 (en) * 1986-07-18 1988-01-22 Dalloz Jean Francois Construction element whose external surface essentially consists of fittings in the shape of a hyperbolic paraboloid
EP0294522A1 (en) * 1987-06-09 1988-12-14 Janusz Josef Kapusta A decorative, functional element for construction and the like
WO1994004767A1 (en) * 1992-08-12 1994-03-03 Ronald Patrick Murphy Building block having interlocking formations
GB2269606B (en) * 1992-08-12 1996-04-10 Ronald Patrick Murphy Building block having interlocking formations
US6536988B2 (en) * 1998-04-22 2003-03-25 Peter Geiger Construction kit made of concrete paving stones
US20040161298A1 (en) * 2001-07-06 2004-08-19 Michael Lazar Paving unit
US6988847B2 (en) * 2001-07-06 2006-01-24 Michael Lazar Paving unit
US7703575B2 (en) 2006-09-25 2010-04-27 Partscience, Llc Three-dimensional tessellated acoustic components
US20080073147A1 (en) * 2006-09-25 2008-03-27 Partscience, Llc Three-dimensional tessellated acoustic components
US7594777B2 (en) * 2007-12-19 2009-09-29 I-Cheng Chiu Wavy tactile walk path
US20090162143A1 (en) * 2007-12-19 2009-06-25 I-Cheng Chiu Wavy Tactile Walk Path
US20090260314A1 (en) * 2008-04-18 2009-10-22 Mugge Jimmie L Dry cast block arrangement and methods
US7849656B2 (en) * 2008-04-18 2010-12-14 Anchor Wall Systems, Inc. Dry cast block arrangement and methods
US20110072736A1 (en) * 2009-09-30 2011-03-31 Atlas Roofing Corporation Drainage members for flat roofs and methods of making same
US20110131915A1 (en) * 2009-12-09 2011-06-09 Kaump Donald L Partition modules and assembly system thereof
US8375665B2 (en) * 2009-12-09 2013-02-19 Modular Arts, Inc. Partition modules and assembly system thereof
US8667752B2 (en) 2010-06-25 2014-03-11 Robert Pollack Interlocking construction systems and methods
US8800236B2 (en) * 2010-10-01 2014-08-12 Tetraloc Pty Ltd Construction block
US9175473B2 (en) 2013-08-19 2015-11-03 Modular Arts, Inc. Ceiling tile system
US9238169B1 (en) * 2013-12-20 2016-01-19 Yen-Po Chiu Multi-functional combinatorial game apparatus
US9732523B2 (en) * 2015-07-24 2017-08-15 Keystone Retaining Wall Systems Llc Connection surface for a structural unit and method of making same

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3788020A (en) Foamed plastic concrete form with fire resistant tension member
US3422588A (en) Interlocking building block
US4891925A (en) Interconnected construction blocks
US7393155B2 (en) Irregular tessellated building units
US4640071A (en) Interlocking building block
US3609926A (en) Block structure
US3998022A (en) Interlocking building blocks
US3888060A (en) Construction assembly and method including interlocking blocks
US6161357A (en) Bidirectionally interlocking, hollow brick wall system
US3296758A (en) Superimposed building blocks with vertically spaced flat bars interfitted therewith connected by threaded stud members
US4967528A (en) Construction block
US4124961A (en) Building brick
US4593513A (en) Building block or panel
US2732706A (en) Friedman
US3602111A (en) Paving blocks
US4258522A (en) Construction blocks
US2826906A (en) Wall of building blocks
US3717967A (en) Block and buidling construction using same
US5740648A (en) Modular formwork for concrete
US6588168B2 (en) Construction blocks and structures therefrom
USRE37278E1 (en) Retaining wall block
US1092621A (en) Shaped or molded block for making ceilings.
US2882689A (en) Dry wall of bricks
US5653621A (en) Toy building block puzzle
US4473985A (en) Building block