US3227228A - Rotary drilling and borehole coring apparatus and method - Google Patents

Rotary drilling and borehole coring apparatus and method Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3227228A
US3227228A US283023A US28302363A US3227228A US 3227228 A US3227228 A US 3227228A US 283023 A US283023 A US 283023A US 28302363 A US28302363 A US 28302363A US 3227228 A US3227228 A US 3227228A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
coring
devices
drill string
collar
firing
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US283023A
Inventor
Clyde E Bannister
Original Assignee
Clyde E Bannister
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Clyde E Bannister filed Critical Clyde E Bannister
Priority to US283023A priority Critical patent/US3227228A/en
Priority claimed from US47028965 external-priority patent/US3280922A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3227228A publication Critical patent/US3227228A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B49/00Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells
    • E21B49/02Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells by mechanically taking samples of the soil
    • E21B49/04Testing the nature of borehole walls; Formation testing; Methods or apparatus for obtaining samples of soil or well fluids, specially adapted to earth drilling or wells by mechanically taking samples of the soil using explosives in boreholes; using projectiles penetrating the wall

Description

Jan. 4, 1966 BANNlSTER 3,227,228

ROTARY DRILLING.AND BOREHOLE CORING APPARATUS AND METHOD Filed May 24, 1963 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 C/ ya e 150/7)? fer INVENTOR.

A Trek/v5 VJ Jan. 4, 1966 c, BANNISTER 3,227,228

ROTARY DRILLING AND BOREHOLE CORING APPARATUS AND METHOD Filed May 1963 e Sheets-Sheet s P/FEJJ ums PREJJURE PUZ JE PUL JE GENERATOR GENERATOR 30 M A /d/ THRESHOL 0 L/M/TER $2 20 l w/ wam me J TEPPl/VG /fl6 JW/TCH h /05 1 C/yc/e .5. 50/7/70 fer INVENTOR BY Mam e- Jan. 4, 1966 c. E. BANNISTER 3,227,223

ROTARY DRILLING AND BOREHOLE GORING APPARATUS AND METHOD Filed May 24, 1963 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 BY M ATTOIP/Vfyj 1966 A c. E. BANNISTER 3,

ROTARY DRILLING AND BOREHOLE CURING APPARATUS AND METHOD 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed May 24, 1965 I V m C/yc/e E. 5000/: fer

INVENTOR.

United States Patent Filed May 24, 1963, Ser- No. 283,023 16 Claims. (Cl. 175-4) This invention pertains to the improvement of subsurface drilling techniques and more especially to novel apparatus and method for sampling the formation (frequently called coring) in a borehole drilled with a rotary r1 g The prior art techniques are well known and will be considered just briefly to point up the unsual significance of the invention.

It is conventional practice in certain localities to sample a formation at different levels in a borehole to ascertain the proximity of an oil bearing formation. The borehole is drilled by a rotary rig, a term used herein to describe a drill assembly having a drill string comprising drill pipe, drill collars, a bit, and apparatus for rotating the drill string in one direction during the drilling operation. Drill mud is pumped through the drill string and circulated upwards, around the drill string, to wash out cuttings, and is maintained at a relatively heavy weight to prevent borehole cave-ins. When samples of the formation are desired the drill string is removed and a side-wall sampling tool the drill string. The mud circulation is stopped and the kelly is removed to gain access to the drill pipe central passage. Obviously, the selection of cutting bits is limited if core samples have to be taken in this manner and cores can only be taken from the bottom of the bore hole.

Recognizing the continued importance of formation sampling, I have devised an invention with the object of taking cores without the inconvenience of the time honored coring techniques used with rotary drilling. The drill string need not be removed from the hole and core samples can be taken at any level without interfering with the drilling operation. There is no need to use a special drill bit, leaving the operator free to make his choice based on performance. And, certainly not last by any means, a cable is not required to control the taking of cores.

My invention also includes a coring device having general utility which is an improvement over the device described and claimed in my United States Patent 2,717,760; The sample-taking projectile will shoot-back, i.e., return to the barrel or casing, irrespective of how far the projectile enters the formation, making the coring device useful in all types of formations.

These and many otherobjects and advantages of my invention are accomplished in one embodiment by having one of the drill collars (hereinafter called a coring collar) in the drill string of a rotary rig contain a plurality of sample-taking devices and means for firing the devices in response to a remotely located wave energy source. The. wave energy can be a controlled vibration of the drill string, a radio wave transmission, or a pressure variation transmitted down the drill mud. My method offdrilling and coring in one form involves inserting the unit mounting the coring devices and remotely controlled firing means inthe drill string adjacent the bit, disposing the drill string inthe borehole, and commencing rotary operation of one or more coring devices is selectively controlled by wave energy transmission from a remote location.

The improvement of my coring device includes in one embodiment the arrangement of the second explosive means (the one that provides positive shoot-back) on the sample-taking projectile and the provision of means on the projectile to fire the second explosive means at a predetermined time after the explosive means fires.

A description of my invention commences herewith, reference being made to the attached drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a part schematic and part pictorial presentation of a conventional rotary drilling rig showing three Ways of remotely controlling the firing of coring devices in a coring collar.

FIG. 2 is an elevation sectional view showing partially in schematic form a coring collar having coring devices and remotely controlled firing means mounted therein. FIG. ,3 is an elevation sectional view taken along the lines 3-3 of FIG. 1, illustrating one form of vibrator for vibrating a drill string to remotely control the firing of the coring devices in a coring collar.

FIG. 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the lines 4-4 of FIG. 2, illustrating one arrangement for locating the firing means in a coring collar.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary, elevation sectional view of one type of drill string vibration responsive firing means mounted with coring devices in a coring collar.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary, elevation sectional view of one type of pressure responsive firing means mounted with coring devices in a coring collar.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary, elevation sectional view of another type of pressure responsive firing means mounted with coring devices in a coring collar. FIG. 8 is a schematic representation of a radio transmitter for firing coring devices and a fragmentary, elevation sectional view of a radio wave responsive firing means mounted with coring devices in a coring collar.

FIG. 9 is a horizontal section of one form of my improved coring device, taken along the lines 9-9 of FIG. 2, and illustrating the arrangement of parts in the normal, firing position.

FIG. 9A is an enlarged view of the locking means on the reaction member shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 10 is a horizontal section of the coring device illustrated in FIG. 2, taken along the same section lines a as FIG. 9, with the parts shown in the position after cordrilling. When a formation sample is to be taken the ing and before shoot-back.

FIG. 11 is a horizontal section, as FIGS. 9 and 10 with the coring device parts shown in their position after shoot-back.

FIG. 12 is a horizontal section of another coring device suitable for use in a coring collar, illustrating the arrangement of parts before firing of any explosive.

FIG. 13 is a horizontal section of the same coring device as illustrated in FIG. 12, showing the arrangement of parts during ejection of the plug.

FIG. 14 is an enlarged View of the check valve shown in FIGS. 12 and 13.

The figures use block diagrams and schematic representations to simplify the presentation of the electrical aspects of my invention. In each such arrangement it must be recognized that several types of apparatus can be used, the ones suggested being merely examples of preferred types readily available to one skilled in the art to perform the desired function. Further, it is apparent to one skilled in the art that the mechanical apparatus can take several forms and still carry out the desired function.

In applying my invention any rotary rig can be used, such as the conventional one identified by reference numeral 1 in FIG. 1, that includes derrick 2 from which travel- Patented Jan. 4, 1966 ing block 3 is suspended, and swivel 4 pivotally connected to traveling block 3 and receiving hose 5 that carries the drill mud 6 from standpipe 7 to drill string 8 through kelly 9. Drill string 8 is composed of drill pipe 10 and drill collars 11 and a bit 12 is attached at the lower end. The drilling action is the result of the drill string weight applied to the bit 12 as the drill string 8 rotates in one direction in rotary table 13 motivated by a prime mover (not shown). The cuttings are removed from the borehole 14 by the drill mud 6 circulated by a mud pump (not shown) connected at inlet pipe 15 and exhausted from the casing 16 at outlet pipe 17.

The above thumbnail description of a rotary rig is sufficient for introducing my invention, reference being made to the numerous texts and articles on this subject for the more specific details of the operation and apparatus connected with a rotary rig.

As mentioned previously, it is very important under some circumstances to take samples of the formation in the borehole 14. The conventional practice is to remove the drill string 8 piece-by-piece, stacking it, and lowering a coring tool, generally referred to as a side-wall sampler. A day or more can be consumed each time to take the samples and resume drilling, so that samples are not taken until the need is definitely apparent and only after a considerable length of borehole has been drilled. Alternatively, a special coring bit is used and the core is manipulated up from within the drill string by a wire line.

In my invention, the cores can be taken by a coring collar 20 in the drill string 8. The coring collar 20 mounts a number of coring devices 21 that are fired by a firing selector 22 (FIG. 2) controlled by wave energy transmitted from a wave energy source at the surface to a receiver 23 located in coring collar 20. The coring devices 21 can be fired selectively at any desired formation level.

The coring collar 20 has many of the characteristics of the conventional drill collar, being located adjacent the bit 12, having a central passage for the flow of drill mud 6 to hit 12, and tool joints 31 and 32 at the ends to connect between two drill collars, or to a drill collar 11 and the bit 12 as shown in the disclosed embodiment of FIG. 1. The receiver 23 and firing selector 22 can be stored in coring collar 20 in a number of ways, such as in body recesses covered with plates 33, as illustrated in FIG. 4, fastened to provide a water tight closure. The length of the coring collar 26 can be the standard 30 feet for a drill collar, allowing ample room to house many coring devices 21 and the remotely controlled firing apparatus.

The details of the illustrated improved coring device will be described later, but other types of coring devices can be used in the coring collar 20. For example only, the coring device describd in my United States Patent 2,717,760 can be employed. No matter what type of coring device is used, each performs the function of moving a sample-taking projectile into the formation to take a core that can be recovered at the surface for analysis. In the illustrated embodiment, coring device 21 has the valuable feature of retrieving the core into the coring collar 20.

The compatibility of my invention to the rotary drilling technique is immediately apparent. A coring collar 20 is inserted in the drill string 8, lowered with the bit 12, and drilling commences. When a core is desired, one or more of the coring devices 21 is fired and the drilling continues. Enough coring devices can be incorporated in the coring collar 20, or in additional coring collars, to take all the cores desired until the drill string has to be removed for other reasons. Since a bit usually needs replacement every 24 hours or so, the coring collar 20 can be replaced with another coring collar at that time and the cores are neatly collected for analysis.

The coring devices 21 can be fired by several forms of controlled wave energy originating from wave energy sources at the surface. The wave energy can be a vibration transmitted down the drill string 8 from a vibration wave energy source (FIG. 1), a pressure variation from a pressure wave energy source 41, or an electromagnetic transmission from a radio wave source 42. Each of these wave energy sources is conveniently associated with a rotary rig without interfering or significantly delaying the operation, as will be described hereinafter.

The vibration wave energy source 40 makes use of the fact that mechanical vibration travels quite readily along a hard body, such as drill string 8. The vibration can have a distinctive characteristic to prevent external vibrations from duplicating the vibration and firing the coring devices 21. For example, this characteristic can be the vibration frequency, selected to avoid any natural or harmonic vibration frequencies of the rig apparatus. Different frequencies can be used to fire each coring device. Alternatively, transmission of a vibration pulse can successively fire the coring devices.

One typical embodiment of a mechanical vibratory system for firing the coring devices 21 is illustrated in FIGS. 1, 3, and 5. The vibratory wave energy source 40 includes an A.C. generator that has a variable frequency capability, with a range of 5000 to 20,000 c.p.s., for example. The A.C. signal from the generator 45 is amplified in AC. amplifier 46 and coupled to a vibrator 47 attached to kelly 9. The mechanical vibrations in the drill string 8 are sensed by a transducer 48, preferably of the piezoelectric type, mounted by bracket 4-9 against wall 50. The transducer output is coupled through an amplifier 53 to a filter 51 having a separate band-pass filter channel and output for each of the frequencies selected to operate the coring devices. When a vibration at one frequency is transmitted, the filter channel and output corresponding to that frequency produces a sufiicient signal to fire an electric detonator (to be pointed out later) on one coring device, the signal being carried over a separate conductor of output cable 52 to the respective coring devices 21.

The vibrator 47 is illustrated in detail in FIG. 3, wherein a frame formed by two arms 55 and 56 pivotally attached by pin (like a pair of pliers) is clamped against kelly faces 65, 66 and 67 and secured by locking bolt 57. Arm 55 is bent to provide an inner space beside kelly side 71 for an armature plate 58, pivotally mounted at one end 62, that vibrates at the frequency of the AC. signal applied to coil 59 wrapped on post 61. A closed magnetic circuit is formed by cup 60 fixed to arm 55 and centrally fixed post 61, both of ferromagnetic material, to draw armature 58 upward, as viewed in FIG. 3, against the force of a spring 63. The armature 58 carries a striker 64 of a hard metal that sets up the vibrations in kelly 9. By disengaging the bolt 57 the arms 55 and 56 can be spread apart to easily and quickly remove vibrator 47.

Any one of coring devices 21 is fired simply by setting generator 45 to the appropriate frequency and closing switch 40 to connect the generator 45 to vibrator 47 The corresponding filter channel and output in coring collar 20 is energized to fire the associated coring device 21. A squelch or other limitingv circuit can be incorporated following the filter output to prevent firing of the coring device 21 unless a given vibration intensity is received at the coring collar 20.

The coring devices can be fired by a pressure vibration having a distinctive characteristic transmitted down the drill mud 6. A pulse or a wave having a preset frequency can select which coring device is to be fired.

One embodiment of a pressure pulse firing system is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 6. The pressure pulse source 41 fires an explosive charge 75 when switch 76 is closed in a fluid filled explosion chamber 77 connected through valve 78 to the standpipe 7. Drill mud circulation is stopped, normally closed valve 78 is opened and normally opened valves 79 and- 85 in the inlet and outlet pipes 17 and 15, respectively, are closed. The explosion creates a steep front, high amplitude pressure variation that travels down the drill mud 6 inside drill string 8 to the coring collar 20.

Disposed within coring collar 20 is a pressure responsive receiving means 80 (FIG. 6) that actuates a firing selector 81 to selectively fire the coring devices 21. The pressure variation flexes a diaphragm 94 disposed in the wall of passage 30, transmitting a force through an incompressible fiuid 82 to apiston 83. An outward force (to the left as viewed in FIG. 6) is applied to piston 83 by a spring 84 keeping contact 86 at the endof piston rod 37 from stationary contact 88. When the high amplitude pressure variation reaches the coring collar 20, the contacts 86 and 88 close an energizing circuit including battery 89 to a solenoid 96 that operates a pawl 90 and rotates a ratchet wheel 91 to a new position. At each position of ratchet wheel 91 an attached contact arm 92 connects with a fixed contact that closes an energizing circuit including battery 93 to fire the electric detonator in one of coring devices 21. Each pressure pulse fires another one of coring devices 21 as the ratchet wheel 91 is progressively moved to new positions.

Another form of pressure responsive receiving means that uses electronic techniques to duplicate the above described electromechanical system'is illustrated in FIG. 7. The present day miniaturization of electronic components facilitates the compact arrangement of this apparatus, wherein the pressurevariation is sensed by a pressure responsive transducer 100, preferably a piezoelectric device, and a voltage proportional to the pressure, after being amplified by amplifier 101, is coupled to a threshold limiter 102. The thresholdlimiter 102 serves to prevent normal pressure variations in the drill rnud 6 from firing the coring devices 21 by producing an output signal only if the pressure-proportional input voltage exceeds a preset minimum. A Schmidt trigger circuit is one suitable type of threshold limiter, producing for each input pulse about a preset level an output pulse that is coupled to a univibrator 107 (a mono-stable multivibrator) to produce a pulse that is amplified in amplifier 103. Each pulse activates a stepping switch 104 having an input to successively connect an input 105 to each of outputs 106, closing an energizing circuit including battery 108 for the electric detonator'of one of the coring devices 21.

It is apparent that the vibration wave system previously described can be modified to operate on a series of pulses as in the pressure responsive system embodiment just described with reference to FIG. 7. In such an arrangement only one frequency need be used and the A.C. generator 45 would be connected to vibrator 47 only for a moment to produce each vibratory pulse. The vibration response receiver would include a band-pass filter preferably following amplifier 101 that responds only to the selected frequency.

Another pressure wave firing system suitable for use in the present invention utilizes a pressure source that generates an alternating pressure variation at a single frequency in the drill mud 6. The pressure wave responsive receiver includes a pressure variation transducer that produces an A.C. signal from the transmitted pressure wave, using a filter channel to fire one of the coring devices. As in the mechanical vibration arrangement, other frequencies and filter channels can be incorporated to selectively fire additional coring devices 21. l

The coring devices 21 can be fired selectively using electromagnetic wave radio energy transmitted through i the earth to the coring collar 20. A pulse system, similar to the arrangement for the pressure wave energy system can be used, wherein a suitable radio receiver is mounted in coring collar 20 to activate a stepping switch. Alternatively, the radio wave can be modulated with signals that operate receiving means in the coring collar to select and fire different coring devices.

One typical embodiment of a modulated radio wave system is illustrated in FIG. 8, wherein a carrier, produced by radio frequency generator is modulated with a single frequency audio signal from audio signal generator 121 by modulator 122. The modulated carrier is radiated by antenna 123, and picked up by radio receiver 124 in receiving antenna 127 in coring collar 20. The receiving antenna 127 can be embedded in a plastic insert in plate 33 and appropriately loaded to suificiently match for the range of frequencies being used, for example, low frequencies in the range of 15 to 30 kilocycles, or higher frequencies. After demodulation of the received signal the audio frequency is selected by a separate band-pass channel in filter 125 and coupled to a separate firing channel in control device 126 and thence to an electric detonator on one of the coring devices 21. Each control device channel has a relay (not shown) that is activated by the received audio signal to closea battery activated firing circuit. With each of coring devices responding to a different modulated audio signal, the coring devices 21 can be selectively fired.

One embodiment of my improved coring device, illustrated in FIGS. 9 through 11, has the advantage of positive shoot-back of the sample-taking projectile. When used with the aforementioned coring collar 20 the cores are retrieved and conveniently stored until the drill string is removed.

In my prior form of coring device, described in United States Patent 2,717,760, a second explosive mounted in the barrel or casing at the opposite end from the first explosive shoots the sample-taking projectile back. The firing of the second explosive is dependent on the sampletaking projectile moving at least a given distance into the formation to ignite a powder train housed in the casing. In especially hard formations the projectile may not have a sufiicient distance, even though an adequate sample is taken, to fire the second explosive. And, even if the projectile moves far enough to just fire the second explosive, a large chamber volume is present, diminishing the initial shoot-back force on the projectile. 1

'In accordance with my improved coring device, the

second explosive means and means for firing same at a predetermined time after the first explosive fires are carried by the sample-taking projectile. No matter how far the projectile moves the second explosive is fired and exerts a substantial shoot-back force. With specific reference to FIG. 9, one embodiment of my improved coring device 21 is mounted in coring collar 20 disposed in borehole 150. The coring device casing 151 is annular, having one end 152 that firmly seats in an inside wall recess 155 of coring collar 20 and an opposite end 156 threaded to engage with mating threads 153 in the wall of coring collar aperture 154, thereby providing easy access for removal of the coring device 21. The coring device casing 151 is constructed of a heavy metal and of sufiicient size to prevent expansion due to the explosions therein.

Disposed'within coring device casing 151 is the sampletaking projectile 160 having cylindrical head 161 and a narrower cylindrical body 162 extending axially through and supported by an annular plug 163 threaded into the opening at casing end 152. A suitable seal, such as O- ring 164, between the body 162 and plug 163 prevents drill mud 6 from entering. Samples are taken by the hollow end 165 of body 162, which is closed by a plug 166 to prevent drill mud 6 from entering but sufficiently flexible to bend inwardly and to be forced into the projectile hollow with the formation sample (see FIG. 11), as air or fluid therein escapes through ports 167. Air or fluid can pass only out from the hollow of body 162 through ports 167 due to check valves 250 composed of a fiat spring 253 attached at one end in a recess 252 by fastener 254. Coring collar 20 has an aperture that receives the 7 body end 165 and allows movement into a formation. Movement of projectile head 161 past the check valves 210 is prohibitedby a lock ring 211 retained in a slot in the inner casing wall just adjacent the check valves 210 and after lip 191.

The projectile 160 is propelled into the formation by a packaged charge of explosive 170 disposed in the closed casing end 156 adjacent head 161, the explosive 170 being fired by an electric detonator 171 activated with a current received over cable 172 recess mounted in the outer wall of coring collar 20. Air or fluid forward of the head 161 escapes through check valves 210 in ports 183 at the casing end 152 that allow fluid to flow out but not into casing 151.

The check valves 210 can be of several conventional constructions. FIGS. 9 and 14 illustrate the details of one form of suitable check valve and the other figures show the check valves 210 in schematic form.

Fluid from within casing 151 moves a pop valve member 216 away from a seat 217 threaded in part 183. The valve member 216 is supported in a spider 218 threaded in part 183 and having ports 219 for the fluid to pass through. A closing force provided by a helical spring 215 holds valve member 216 against seat 217 to prevent fluid from outside casing 151 from passing into casing 151.

When explosive 1'70 is fired, vent ports 173 in casing end 156 are closed by an annular sleeve 174 axially disposed within casing 151 about projectile 169, as shown in FIG. 9, and a tight gas seal is provided by suitable means, such as O-ring 175 in the outer circumference of head 161. The aforementioned parts in coring device 21 take the position shown in FIG. after the explosive 171i is fired.

The projectile 161) carries an annular packed charge of explosive 177 immediately adjacent the opposite side of head 161 from explosive 170, which is fired by a delay fuse 178, such as an impregnated cloth or black powder train, being ignited at one end by the explosion of explosive 170 and firing explosive 177 at a predetermined time later.

The projectile 160 also carries an annular reaction member 180 that moves with projectile 160 in the forward direction but is slidable on body 162 and relative to sleeve 174, with a gas seal provided by O-rings 181, to allow the reaction member 180 to move separately relative to sleeve 174 and projectile 160 after explosive 177 is fired.

Reaction member 180 includes a locking means 184 composed of separate pins 18? that slide freely in radial passages 187 (see FIG. 9A) opening to sleeve 174 and having tapered heads 185 (see FIG. 9A) that can engage in circumferential slots 186 in the inner wall of sleeve 174. As shown only in FIG. 9A, the passages 187 have tooth-shaped walls 195 arranged to permit free radial outward movement of a pin attached flexible washer 188 but to prevent rearward movement, thereby firmly locking the pins 189 to sleeve 174.

After the predetermined time delay controlled by delay fuse 178, the projectile 160 will be in some forward position, such as shown in FIG. 10, the explosive 177 fires and forces reaction member 180 towards casing end 152. Explosion gases enter through separate ports 19!) to act on the rear of each of pins 189, forcing them radially outward, and very quickly lodging them firmly in one of sleeve slots 186. Then sleeve 174 moves a small distance towards casing end 152 to engage a lip 191 in the inner wall of casing 151, aligning sleeve ports 196 with vent ports 173 at casing end 156, permitting the gases from the explosion to escape. The reaction member 180 cannot move further in the direction of casing end 152 and the explosive gases force projectile head 1 61 rearward, towards casing end 156, withdrawing the projectile body 162 from the formation.

FIG. 11 illustrates the position of the coring device parts after the projectile with the core therein has been retrieved.

Another embodiment of my improved coring device is 8 shown in FIGS. 12, 1-3 and 14. In this arrangement the number of parts is reduced and the gases from the first explosive are exhausted from a port, irrespective of how far the projectile moves, by opening the port at a predetermined time after the explosion of the first explosive.

Several of the parts are the same as in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 9 through 11 and bear the same reference numerals.

The sleeve 174 is eliminated and the projectile fits slidably within the casing 151, O-ring 175 sealing the head 161 against the inner casing wall. The projectile 160 carries the explosive 171 and locking means 184 as described previously in detail, the slots 186 being in the inner wall of casing 151.

Gases are vented from within casing 151 through oneway check valves 200 during the forward movement of projectile 160. The gases from the explosion of explosive are exhausted by blowing out a conical frustrum shaped metal plug 291 disposed in tapered port 205 in casing end 156 with the larger diameter side facing within casing 151. The plug 201 is surrounded by a packaged ring of explosive 2 02 disposed in a circumferential groove 215 and connected to one end of delay fuse 203. The opposite end of delay fuse 203 connects with explosive 171) and is ignited at the same time. Plug 201 has an eccentric outer lip 20 that causes plug 261 to travel out of alignment with the port 265, reducing the possibility that the lug 291 will be reinserted as the projectile 16%) moves rearward during shoot-back.

The time relation of the explosions is controlled by the delay fuses 178 and 203. The explosive 170 fires and ignites one end of delay fuses 178 and 203. After a predetermined time period the explosive 202 fires, ejecting plug 201. The projectile 160 may have completed taking a sample by that time. Next, the explosive 171 fires, shooting the projectile 160 back, as the gases from explosive 170 escapes out of port 205. Thus, the time delay of fuse 203 is shorter than fuse 178.

The locking means 184 functions as described previ ously, the only difference being that the slots 184 are in casing 151 and pins 189 lock reaction member 189 and casing 151 together.

The disclosed embodiments of my invention are presented merely as examples of suitable apparatuses and methods. Changes, modifications and other embodiments arranged in accordance with the teaching of my invention are part of my claimed invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A well drilling and core sampling mechanism, comprising,

a rotary rig including a drill string having a cutting bit and drill collars at one end,

a coring collar in said drill string having mounted therein a plurality of sample-taking devices and means for firing said devices,

said firing means comprising a receiving means responsive to transmission of wave energy from a remote source to selectively fire said devices, source means to be disposed at a remote location for providing transmission of said wave energy.

2. Apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein,

said source means produces wave energy which is a substantial pressure variation transmitted through the drill mud to said receiving means that responds to said pressure variation to fire at least one of said devices.

3. Apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein,

said source means produces wave energy which is a mechanical vibration coupled to said drill string to which said receiving means responds to actuate at least one of said devices.

4. Apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein,

said Source means produces wave energy which is a radio transmission to which said receiving means responds to actuate at least one of said devices.

5. Apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein,

said source means produces wave energy which is a pressure pulse set up by exploding a charge in the drill mud and said receiving means includes a pressure sensitive means that actuates a stepping switch means to successively fire said devices.

6. Apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein,

said source means produces wave energy which is a radio transmission having selected modulation frequencies that energize said receiving means to fire difierent ones of said devices.

7. Apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein,

said source means produces wave energy which is a mechanical vibration of a selected frequency that is transmitted down the drill string to said receiving means that includes a frequency sensitive means responsive to said mechanical vibration to fire at least one of said devices.

8. A well drilling and core sampling mechanism, comprising,

a rotary rig including a drill string having a cutting bit and drill collars at one end,

a coring collar in said drill string having a plurality of sample-taking devices including means that retrieve the core sample into said coring collar, and

means in said coring collar for selectively firing said devices in response to a remotely located wave energy source,

source means to be disposed at a remote location for providing transmission of said wave energy.

9. The apparatus as described in claim 8, wherein,

said coring devices are propelled outward and retrieved by explosive charges.

10. The apparatus as described in claim 8, wherein,

said source means produces wave energy which is a pressure variation transmitted through the drill mud.

11. The apparatus as described in claim 8, wherein,

til

said source means produces wave energy which is a radio transmission.

12. The apparatus as described in claim 8, wherein,

said source means produces wave energy which is a mechanical vibration transmitted down the drill string.

13. A method of taking samples from a borehole wall,

comprising the steps of,

inserting a unit having a number of coring devices in the drill string of a rotary rig,

disposing said drill string in the borehole,

commencing drilling in said borehole,

initiating operation of the core devices at desired levels by controlled wave. energy transmission from a remote location.

14. The method as described in claim 13, wherein,

selective initiation of said coring devices is controlled by radio transmission.

15. The method as described in claim 13, wherein,

selective initiation of said coring devices is controlled by pressure variation transmitted through the drill mud.

16. The method as described in claim 13, wherein,

selective initiation of said coring devices is controlled by vibration transmitted down the drill string.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 20,120 9/1936 Schlumberger l-4 1,757,288 4/1930 Bleecker 10221 X 2,304,408 12/1942 Holifield 16655.4 2,356,082 8/1944 Otis 16635 2,408,419 11/1946 Foster -4 X 2,761,385 9/1956 Schlumberger 1754 2,917,280 12/1959 Castel 1755 3,016,959 l/1962 Berthelin 175-4 3,072,202 1/ 1963 Brieger 175-4 CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner.

BENJAMIN HERSH, Examiner.

Claims (2)

1. A WELL DRILLING AND CORE SAMPLING MECHANISM, COMPRISING, A ROTARY RIG INCLUDING A DRILL STRING HAVING A CUTTING BIT AND DRILL COLLARS AT ONE END, A CORING COLLAR IN SAID DRILL STRING HAVING MOUNTED THEREIN A PLURALITY OF SAMPLE-TAKING DEVICES AND MEANS FOR FIRING SAID DEVICES, SAID FIRING MEANS COMPRISING A RECEIVING MEANS RESPONSIVE TO TRANSMISSION OF WAVE ENERGY FROM A REMOTE SOURCE TO SELECTIVELY FIRE SAID DEVICES, SOURCE MEANS TO BE DISPOSED AT A REMOTE LOCATION FOR PROVIDING TRANSMISSION OF SAID WAVE ENERGY.
13. A METHOD OF TAKING SAMPLES FROM A BOREHOLE WALL, COMPRISING THE STEPS OF, INSERTING A UNIT HAVING A NUMBER OF CORING DEVICES IN THE DRILL STRING OF A ROTARY RIG, DISPOSING SAID DRILL STRING IN THE BOREHOLE, COMMENCING DRILLING IN SAID BOREHOLE, INITIATING OPERATION OF THE CORE DEVICES AT DESIRED LEVELS BY CONTROLLED WAVE ENERGY TRANSMISSION FROM A REMOTE LOCATION.
US283023A 1963-05-24 1963-05-24 Rotary drilling and borehole coring apparatus and method Expired - Lifetime US3227228A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US283023A US3227228A (en) 1963-05-24 1963-05-24 Rotary drilling and borehole coring apparatus and method

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US283023A US3227228A (en) 1963-05-24 1963-05-24 Rotary drilling and borehole coring apparatus and method
US47028965 US3280922A (en) 1963-05-24 1965-06-02 Coring device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3227228A true US3227228A (en) 1966-01-04

Family

ID=23084162

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US283023A Expired - Lifetime US3227228A (en) 1963-05-24 1963-05-24 Rotary drilling and borehole coring apparatus and method

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3227228A (en)

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3485299A (en) * 1965-10-24 1969-12-23 Schlumberger Technology Corp Methods for controlling well tools in well bores
US4609056A (en) * 1983-12-01 1986-09-02 Halliburton Company Sidewall core gun
US4702168A (en) * 1983-12-01 1987-10-27 Halliburton Company Sidewall core gun
US4971160A (en) * 1989-12-20 1990-11-20 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Perforating and testing apparatus including a microprocessor implemented control system responsive to an output from an inductive coupler or other input stimulus
US5445228A (en) * 1993-07-07 1995-08-29 Atlantic Richfield Company Method and apparatus for formation sampling during the drilling of a hydrocarbon well
WO1996024752A2 (en) * 1995-02-10 1996-08-15 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and appartus for remote control of wellbore end devices
WO1998045731A1 (en) 1997-04-07 1998-10-15 Carstensen Kenneth J High impact communication and control system
US6018501A (en) * 1997-12-10 2000-01-25 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Subsea repeater and method for use of the same
US6144316A (en) * 1997-12-01 2000-11-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Electromagnetic and acoustic repeater and method for use of same
US6177882B1 (en) * 1997-12-01 2001-01-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Electromagnetic-to-acoustic and acoustic-to-electromagnetic repeaters and methods for use of same
US6208586B1 (en) 1991-06-14 2001-03-27 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and apparatus for communicating data in a wellbore and for detecting the influx of gas
US6384738B1 (en) 1997-04-07 2002-05-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Pressure impulse telemetry apparatus and method
US6439306B1 (en) 1999-02-19 2002-08-27 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Actuation of downhole devices
US20030098157A1 (en) * 2001-11-28 2003-05-29 Hales John H. Electromagnetic telemetry actuated firing system for well perforating gun
EP1315881A1 (en) * 2000-09-07 2003-06-04 Marathan Oil Company Method and system for perforating
WO2005017301A2 (en) * 2003-08-05 2005-02-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Electroactive fluid controlled mud pulser
US20050194134A1 (en) * 2004-03-04 2005-09-08 Mcgregor Malcolm D. Downhole formation sampling
US20060060355A1 (en) * 2003-01-09 2006-03-23 Bell Matthew R G Perforating apparatus, firing assembly, and method
US20070285275A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2007-12-13 Petrowell Limited Remote Actuation of a Downhole Tool
US20100200244A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2010-08-12 Daniel Purkis Method of and apparatus for completing a well
US7775276B2 (en) 2006-03-03 2010-08-17 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for downhole sampling
US20110187372A1 (en) * 2010-02-03 2011-08-04 Baker Hughes Incorporated Acoustic Excitation With NMR Pulse
US8827238B2 (en) 2008-12-04 2014-09-09 Petrowell Limited Flow control device
US9103197B2 (en) 2008-03-07 2015-08-11 Petrowell Limited Switching device for, and a method of switching, a downhole tool
US9488046B2 (en) 2009-08-21 2016-11-08 Petrowell Limited Apparatus and method for downhole communication
US10262168B2 (en) 2007-05-09 2019-04-16 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Antenna for use in a downhole tubular

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1757288A (en) * 1926-09-07 1930-05-06 Warren F Bleecker System for shooting wells by radio
USRE20120E (en) * 1936-09-29 Core taking device
US2304408A (en) * 1942-03-30 1942-12-08 E H Planck Gun perforator
US2356082A (en) * 1943-05-26 1944-08-15 Lane Wells Co Method of and apparatus for firing gun perforators
US2408419A (en) * 1939-03-17 1946-10-01 Foster James Lewis Well explosive device
US2761385A (en) * 1951-01-30 1956-09-04 Schlumberger Prospection Devices for controlling the firing of charges of powder or explosives from a distance
US2917280A (en) * 1952-10-04 1959-12-15 Pgac Dev Company Sample taking apparatus
US3016959A (en) * 1958-05-20 1962-01-16 Schlumberger Prospection Core sampling arrangement for operation inside geological layers
US3072202A (en) * 1960-03-09 1963-01-08 Schlumberger Well Surv Corp Core taker devices

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USRE20120E (en) * 1936-09-29 Core taking device
US1757288A (en) * 1926-09-07 1930-05-06 Warren F Bleecker System for shooting wells by radio
US2408419A (en) * 1939-03-17 1946-10-01 Foster James Lewis Well explosive device
US2304408A (en) * 1942-03-30 1942-12-08 E H Planck Gun perforator
US2356082A (en) * 1943-05-26 1944-08-15 Lane Wells Co Method of and apparatus for firing gun perforators
US2761385A (en) * 1951-01-30 1956-09-04 Schlumberger Prospection Devices for controlling the firing of charges of powder or explosives from a distance
US2917280A (en) * 1952-10-04 1959-12-15 Pgac Dev Company Sample taking apparatus
US3016959A (en) * 1958-05-20 1962-01-16 Schlumberger Prospection Core sampling arrangement for operation inside geological layers
US3072202A (en) * 1960-03-09 1963-01-08 Schlumberger Well Surv Corp Core taker devices

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3485299A (en) * 1965-10-24 1969-12-23 Schlumberger Technology Corp Methods for controlling well tools in well bores
US4609056A (en) * 1983-12-01 1986-09-02 Halliburton Company Sidewall core gun
US4702168A (en) * 1983-12-01 1987-10-27 Halliburton Company Sidewall core gun
US4971160A (en) * 1989-12-20 1990-11-20 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Perforating and testing apparatus including a microprocessor implemented control system responsive to an output from an inductive coupler or other input stimulus
US6208586B1 (en) 1991-06-14 2001-03-27 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and apparatus for communicating data in a wellbore and for detecting the influx of gas
US5445228A (en) * 1993-07-07 1995-08-29 Atlantic Richfield Company Method and apparatus for formation sampling during the drilling of a hydrocarbon well
GB2302607B (en) * 1995-02-10 2000-06-28 Baker Hughes Inc Method and apparatus for remote control of wellbore end devices
WO1996024752A3 (en) * 1995-02-10 1996-11-28 Baker Hughes Inc Method and appartus for remote control of wellbore end devices
WO1996024752A2 (en) * 1995-02-10 1996-08-15 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and appartus for remote control of wellbore end devices
US20030000706A1 (en) * 1997-04-07 2003-01-02 Carstensen Kenneth J. High impact communication and control system
US20040238184A1 (en) * 1997-04-07 2004-12-02 Carstensen Kenneth J. High impact communication and control system
US6760275B2 (en) 1997-04-07 2004-07-06 Kenneth J. Carstensen High impact communication and control system
WO1998045731A1 (en) 1997-04-07 1998-10-15 Carstensen Kenneth J High impact communication and control system
US6384738B1 (en) 1997-04-07 2002-05-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Pressure impulse telemetry apparatus and method
US6388577B1 (en) 1997-04-07 2002-05-14 Kenneth J. Carstensen High impact communication and control system
US6710720B2 (en) 1997-04-07 2004-03-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Pressure impulse telemetry apparatus and method
US7295491B2 (en) 1997-04-07 2007-11-13 Carstensen Kenneth J High impact communication and control system
US6177882B1 (en) * 1997-12-01 2001-01-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Electromagnetic-to-acoustic and acoustic-to-electromagnetic repeaters and methods for use of same
US6144316A (en) * 1997-12-01 2000-11-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Electromagnetic and acoustic repeater and method for use of same
US6018501A (en) * 1997-12-10 2000-01-25 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Subsea repeater and method for use of the same
US6439306B1 (en) 1999-02-19 2002-08-27 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Actuation of downhole devices
EP1315881A1 (en) * 2000-09-07 2003-06-04 Marathan Oil Company Method and system for perforating
EP1315881A4 (en) * 2000-09-07 2005-04-13 Marathan Oil Company Method and system for perforating
US6820693B2 (en) 2001-11-28 2004-11-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Electromagnetic telemetry actuated firing system for well perforating gun
US20030098157A1 (en) * 2001-11-28 2003-05-29 Hales John H. Electromagnetic telemetry actuated firing system for well perforating gun
US7975592B2 (en) * 2003-01-09 2011-07-12 Shell Oil Company Perforating apparatus, firing assembly, and method
US20060060355A1 (en) * 2003-01-09 2006-03-23 Bell Matthew R G Perforating apparatus, firing assembly, and method
WO2005017301A3 (en) * 2003-08-05 2005-09-22 Halliburton Energy Serv Inc Electroactive fluid controlled mud pulser
US7082078B2 (en) * 2003-08-05 2006-07-25 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Magnetorheological fluid controlled mud pulser
WO2005017301A2 (en) * 2003-08-05 2005-02-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Electroactive fluid controlled mud pulser
US7958936B2 (en) 2004-03-04 2011-06-14 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Downhole formation sampling
US20050194134A1 (en) * 2004-03-04 2005-09-08 Mcgregor Malcolm D. Downhole formation sampling
US20070285275A1 (en) * 2004-11-12 2007-12-13 Petrowell Limited Remote Actuation of a Downhole Tool
US9115573B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2015-08-25 Petrowell Limited Remote actuation of a downhole tool
US7775276B2 (en) 2006-03-03 2010-08-17 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for downhole sampling
US10262168B2 (en) 2007-05-09 2019-04-16 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Antenna for use in a downhole tubular
US9359890B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2016-06-07 Petrowell Limited Method of and apparatus for completing a well
US8833469B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2014-09-16 Petrowell Limited Method of and apparatus for completing a well
US9085954B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2015-07-21 Petrowell Limited Method of and apparatus for completing a well
US20100200244A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2010-08-12 Daniel Purkis Method of and apparatus for completing a well
US9631458B2 (en) 2008-03-07 2017-04-25 Petrowell Limited Switching device for, and a method of switching, a downhole tool
US9103197B2 (en) 2008-03-07 2015-08-11 Petrowell Limited Switching device for, and a method of switching, a downhole tool
US10041335B2 (en) 2008-03-07 2018-08-07 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Switching device for, and a method of switching, a downhole tool
US8827238B2 (en) 2008-12-04 2014-09-09 Petrowell Limited Flow control device
US9488046B2 (en) 2009-08-21 2016-11-08 Petrowell Limited Apparatus and method for downhole communication
US20110187372A1 (en) * 2010-02-03 2011-08-04 Baker Hughes Incorporated Acoustic Excitation With NMR Pulse
US8836328B2 (en) * 2010-02-03 2014-09-16 Baker Hughes Incorporated Acoustic excitation with NMR pulse

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9388669B2 (en) Well tools operable via thermal expansion resulting from reactive materials
CA2883674C (en) Friction reduction assembly for a downhole tubular, and method of reducing friction
US8684084B2 (en) Method and apparatus for selective down hole fluid communication
US9689247B2 (en) Location and stimulation methods and apparatuses utilizing downhole tools
AU716324B2 (en) Method and apparatus for remote control of wellbore end devices
CA2451822C (en) Intelligent perforating well system and method
CA1285215C (en) Method and apparatus for perforating formations in response to tubing pressure
EP1045113B1 (en) Deployable sensor apparatus and method
US5586084A (en) Mud operated pulser
EP1102916B1 (en) Apparatus and method for perforating and stimulating a subterranean formation
US7257050B2 (en) Through tubing real time downhole wireless gauge
US5680905A (en) Apparatus and method for perforating wellbores
US3693717A (en) Reproducible shot hole
US4544034A (en) Actuation of a gun firing head
US5303772A (en) Well completion apparatus
US4432078A (en) Method and apparatus for fracturing a deep borehole and determining the fracture azimuth
US9638030B2 (en) Receiver for an acoustic telemetry system
DE69914838T9 (en) Formation pressure measurement with remote sensors in cased boreholes
CA1201376A (en) Bar actuated vent assembly
US4614156A (en) Pressure responsive explosion initiator with time delay and method of use
US8136608B2 (en) Mitigating perforating gun shock
US2708408A (en) Well perforating device
US7337850B2 (en) System and method for controlling actuation of tools in a wellbore
CA1235059A (en) Redundant detonation initiators for use in wells and method of use
US3058532A (en) Drill bit condition indicator and signaling system