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US3225463A - Air ventilated insole - Google Patents

Air ventilated insole Download PDF

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US3225463A
US3225463A US23022862A US3225463A US 3225463 A US3225463 A US 3225463A US 23022862 A US23022862 A US 23022862A US 3225463 A US3225463 A US 3225463A
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air
insole
pump
fig
valve
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Charles E Burnham
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Charles E Burnham
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/06Ventilated footwear
    • A43B7/08Footwear with air-holes, with or without closures
    • A43B7/081Footwear with air-holes, with or without closures the air being forced from outside
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B17/00Insoles for insertion, e.g. footbeds or inlays, for attachment to the shoe after the upper has been joined
    • A43B17/08Insoles for insertion, e.g. footbeds or inlays, for attachment to the shoe after the upper has been joined ventilated

Description

Dec. 28, 1965 E. BURNHAM 3,225,463

AIR VENTILATED INSOLE Filed on. 12, 1962 9 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 V/I/II INVENTOR.

F1- .1 BY

Dec. 28, 1965 c. E. BURNHAM AIR VENTILATED INSOLE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 12, 1962 Fig 10 United States Patent Ofifice Patented Dec. 28, 1955 3,225,463 AIR VENTILATED INSOLE Charles E. Burnham, Western Ave., Essex, Mass. Filed Oct. 12, 1962, Ser. No. 230,228 2 Claims. (Cl. 36-3) This invention relates to foot wearing apparel and more particularly to an air ventilated insole for a shoe.

The skin of the human foot exudes perspiration in varying degrees depending on such factors as the temperature of the air surrounding the foot, the amount of physical activity being performed by the foot, and the natural propensity of some persons to perspire more than others. The comfort and health of the foot is greatly influenced by the rate of evaporation of the perspiration generated by the foot. If the perspiration evaporates rapidly, the foot will be cool and comfortable. The rate of evaporation is controlled by the relative humidity of the air surrounding the foot and the rate of air circulation around the foot and between the toes.

The relative humidity of the air surrounding the foot is difficult to control, but various methods have been devised to increase the circulation of air between the toes and around the foot. Open toed shoes, shoes with ventilating holes, and sandals have all increased the natural circulation of air around the foot. However, these methods are not applicable to a regular shoe which substantially encases the entire foot with leather.

Accordingly it is the primary object of the present invention to provide an air ventilated insole for use with regular shoes.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an air ventilated insole which can be incorporated in the shoe during manufacture or inserted at a later time.

Still another object of the invention is to produce an air ventilated insole which utilizes the motion of walking to create a forced draft circulation of air around the foot and between the toes.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a simple and inexpensive air ventilated insole.

A still further object of the invention is to produce an air ventilated insole which is adaptable to any type of shoe.

These and other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of one form of an insole made in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-section on line 2-2 showing the air pump;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are cross-sections similar to FIG. 2 illustrating modifications of the air pump;

FIG. 5 is a cross-section on line 5-5 of the air pump;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of a finger air valve;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a flap air valve;

FIG. 8 is a cross-section on line 8-8 of a peripheral air vent;

FIG. 9 is a cross-section on line 9-9 showing the trough, air holes and passageway.

FIG. 10 is a plan view of a modification of the air ventilated insole;

FIG. 11 is a cross-section on line 11-11 illustrating the insole and air passageways;

FIG. 12 is a cross-section similar to that of FIG. 11 modification of the insole and passageways;

FIG. 13 is a partial plan view of the insole illustrating a modification of the air pump;

FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view of the rear portion of a shoe showing one form of air inlet passageway;

FIG. 15 is a cross-section on line 15-15 showing the attachment of the air passageway to the shoe; and

FIG. 16 is a cross-section on line 16-16 showing the modification of the air pump illustrated in FIG. 13.

Turning now to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates the construction of an air ventilated insole 1. The insole can be used as an insert in any conventional footwear such as in sneakers, loafers or sandals and can also be manufactured into an insole in a regular shoe modified in a manner to be described subsequently. The insole can be constructed of rubber, leather or any other suitable material. The insole 1 has a compressible and expansible chamber 2 located in the heel portion of the insole. The chamber 2 is adapted to operate as an air pump and is provided with an inlet valve 3 and an ex haust valve 4. A passageway 5 connects inlet valve 3 to the outside air. Passageway 6 connects exhaust valve 4 to the air distribution system indicated generally by 7. The air distribution system 7 is composed of branch passageways 8 and 9, peripheral passageways 10 and 11, connecting passageway 12 and toe passageways 13,

14, 15 and 16. Passageways 10, 11, 13, 14, 15 and 16 are provided with outlet holes 17 to permit the escape of air.

The operation of the air ventilated insole is dependent upon the walking action of the wearer. As the wearer steps forward, the heel portion of the foot strikes the ground first thereby compressing air pump 2. The compression of the air pump forces air out of the chamber through exhaust valve 4 into passageway 6 and then into the distribution system 7 where the air is vented through holes 17 to cool the foot. Troughs 18, 19, 20 and 21 are provided to increase the circulation of air in between and around the toes.

When the heel leaves the ground, air pump 2 expands and fresh air is drawn into the pump through passageway 5 and inlet valve 3. The cycle of alternate compression and expansion of the air pump is repeated each time the wearer steps down and lifts up his heel, thus insuring a constant forced draft circulation of air around the foot.

Since the same cycle of alternate compression and expansion can be obtained with an air pump located in the ball portion of the insole, it is contemplated that the insole could be constructed with the air pump lo cated in that position. If the air pump is located in the ball portion of the insole, the connecting passageway 6 can be eliminated and the airflow paths from pump to toes shortened considerably with a concomitant increase in the velocity of the air flow around the toes.

The air ventilated insole can be changed, altered, or modified in varying ways to reduce costs and simplify construction. For example, it is possible to eliminate exhaust valve 4 because the compression of passageways 6, 8 and 9 by the ball of the foot acts as a natural valve during the expansion of the air pump.

It is contemplated that the insole would be manufactured in two pieces with the necessary depressions formed in each piece to produce the air pump and passageways when the two pieces were mated together. If the two pieces are constructed of a moldable material, the depressions producing the air pump, passageways and venting system can be formed as an integral part of each piece. Since the entire ventilating system can be integrally formed in two matable pieces, the air ventilated insole oifers the shoe manufacturer a simple and relatively inexpensive means for producing ventilated shoes. It eliminates the separate, complicated and expensive heel air pumps taught by the prior art and provides a means for ventilating heelless shoes such as sneakers and the like as well as regular shoes.

FIG. 2 illustrates the general construction of the air pump. The upper portion of the insole is composed of two layers 22 and 23; the upper most layer 23 having an insert 24 of a material with substantially less flexibility than the upper layers 22 and 23. The lower portion of the insole is similarly composed of two layers 25 and 26 with an insert 27 in the lower layer 26. Insert 27 is also substantially less flexible than the lower layers 25 and 26. The upper insert 24 distributes the pressure of the heel over the air pump in such a manner that the rearward portion of the air pump is compressed first. The pressure distribution is produced by the airfoil shape of the upper insert. The lower insert 27 tends to maintain the air pump in its original configuration so that the lower portion of the air pump will not be substantially deformed by the pressure of the heel. Of course, the upper and lower portions of the insole may each consist only of the layers 22 and 25 with inserts 24 and 27 omitted or positioned over and under the air pump in the layers 22 and 25 FIG. 3 illustrates a modification of the air pump. Since the greatest deformation will occur in the upper portion of the air pump, it is possible to make the lower portion of the air pump completely flat as shown in FIG. 3. This will increase the relative compression of the air in the air pump and thereby create a much stronger air draft in the distribution system.

FIG. 4 shows a further modification of the insole which utilizes only one insert. Insert 27 is located underneath the air pump and tends to maintain the air pump in its original configuration so that the lower portion of the air pump will not be substantially deformed by the pressure of the heel.

FIG. 5 is a cross-section of the air pump taken at right angles to the cross-section illustrated in FIG. 2 showing the symmetrical nature of the two inserts 24 and 27.

FIG. 6 shows one of many possible forms of construction for the inlet and exhaust valves of the air pump. The valve 28 is called a finger valve because its construction resembles the five fingers of a hand which are pressed together at their tips to form a roughly conical shape. The spaces between the fingers are designated as slits which are identified as 43 in FIG. 6. If air is blown from the center of the hand i.e., from the palm towards the finger tips, the fingers will open allowing air to escape from the slits and from the small opening at the finger tips. If air is blown in the reverse direction, that is, from outside of the hand towards the finger tips, the air pressure on the outside of the fingers will tend to press the finger tips closely together, thus sealing the slits. From this description it can be seen that the finger valve 28 will permit the passage of air in only one direction. The valve may be formed as an integral part of the upper and lower portions of the insole.

FIG. 7 illustrates a simple flap valve also operable only in a single direction. The flap valve 29 may be formed as an integral flexible flap extending from either the upper or lower portions of the insole or may be a separate flap member attached to the upper or lower portions by adhesive o r similar means.

FIG. 8 shows the indentations which are necessary along the sides of the insole to provide a proper discharge of air through vents 17 in the two peripheral passageways 10 and 11. For purposes of clarity, only three indentations are shown in FIG. 1. However, such indentations may be located along the entire length of passageways 10 and 11. The indentations are formed by cutting wedge shaped portions from the outer edge of the insole. Vents 17 are cut in the sloping wall of the indentations and are connected to the peripheral passageways 10 and 11. If the indentations are cut deeply enough they will expose a portion of the passageways 10 and 11 thus forming a natural vent.

FIG. 9 illustrates a toe passageway 16, connecting vents 17 and trough 21. A similar construction is used for the trough-passageway combinations 13 and 18, 14 and 19, and 15 and 20.

A modification of the insole 1 is shown in FIG. 10. A series of tubes 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, and 36 is disposed in the heel and ball portions of the insole. Each of these tubes has a widened portion 37 which operates as an air pump. The heel tubes 30, 31, 32 and 33 will force air out of the holes 38 every time the heel compresses the air pump portion 37 of the tubes. Similarly, the ball portion tubes 34, 35 and 36 will force air out of holes 39 everytime the ball of the foot is pressed down on the air pumps 37. FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate two possible forms of construction for the widened portion of the heel and ball air pump tubes. In FIG. 11 the inserts 40 and 41 perform the same function as the inserts 24 and 27 described with respect to FIG. 2. FIG. 12 shows a modification similar to the modification illustrated in FIG. 3.

FIG. 13 illustrates a modification of the air pump which is adaptable for use in an insole.

A heart-shaped air pump 42 is formed with integral slits 43 in the base and apex of the cordate pump. The curving walls of the cordate pump at its base and apex coupled with the slits 43 define a finger valve similar to the finger valve discussed with respect to FIG. 6. The finger valves and their slits 43 are shown in cross-section in FIG. 16. Each valve is operable in one direction only; thus one valve is used as an intake valve while the other operates as an exhaust valve.

FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view of the insole used in a regular shoe. In order to provide a source of fresh air, passageway 44 is connected from the air pump passageway 5 to the outside air.

The connecting passageway 44 may be located in the rear portion of the shoe or may be a separate passageway attached to the rear portion of the shoe by known means such as leather strippings 45 and 46 as indicated in FIGS. 14 and 15. Of course, this passageway may have a different cross-sectional shape than that indicated in FIG. 15. It is also possible to use a number of connecting passageways all terminating at the air pump passageway 5.

Numerous modifications of the preferred embodiments of my invention will now be apparent to those skilled in the art and therefore, it is not intended to confine the invention to the precise forms shown herein, but rather to limit it in scope to the appended claims.

Having thus described and disclosed preferred embodiments of my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a shoe, insole ventilating means comprising: an insole, means providing a pump in said insole having a cordate configuration in plan view and side elevation with a sharply curved base and an apex whose inwardly curving walls define slits which form air inlet and exhaust valves, respectively, for a compressible and expandable chamber in said pump, said sharply curved base being positioned in the heel portion of said insole for alternate compression and expansion by the heel of the wearer of the shoe while walking; and means providing a passageway in said insole fluidly connected at one end to said exhaust valve and terminating at the other end in vents located in the upper surface of the toe portion of said insole.

2. In a shoe, insole ventilating means comprising: an insole, means providing a pump in said insole having a cordate configuration in plan view and side elevation with a sharply curved base and an apex whose inwardly curving walls define slits which form air inlet and exhaust valves, respectively, for a compressible and expand-able chamber in said pump, said sharply curved base being positioned in the heel portion of said insole for alternate compression and expansion by the heel of the wearer of the shoe while walking; and means providing a passageway in said insole fluidly connected at one endto said exhaust valve and terminating at the other end in means 5 forming a multiplicity of perforated passageways located in the upper surface of the toe portion of said insole and in means forming a perforated passageway disposed within the u per surface of the shank and heel portions of said ins-ole along the periphery thereof. 5

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 311,046 1/1885 Trask 363 426,495 4/ 1890 Falkner 36-3 10 2,010,151 8/1935 Helwig 363 2,080,499 5/ 1937 Nathanson 36--29 2,124,391 7/1938 Baron 363 2,239,211 4/1941 Wylie 363 2,474,815 7/1949 Brahm 363 15 2,524,764 10/1950 Burke 137-525.1 X

3/1951 Whittington 363 4/ 1954 Crawford 363 9/ 1960 Rychlik 230169 X 7/1962 Baumbach 137525.1

10/ 1962 Okuyama 363 FOREIGN PATENTS 3/ 1940 Denmark.

1/ 1953 France.

9/1955 France.

OTHER REFERENCES Bruner: German application 1,108,108, printed May JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A SHOE, INSOLE VENTILATING MEANS COMPRISING: AN INSOLE, MEANS PROVIDING A PUMP IN SAID INSOLE HAVING A CORDATE CONFIGURATION IN PLAN VIEW AND SIDE ELEVATION WITH A SHARPLY CURVED BASE AND AN APEX WHOSE INWARDLY CURVING WALLS DEFINE SLITS WHICH FORM AN INLET AND EXHAUST VALVES, RESPECTIVELY, FOR A COMPRESSIBLE AND EXPANDABLE CHAMBER IN SAID PUMP, SAID SHARPLY CURVED BASE BEING POSITIONED IN THE HEEL PORTION OF SAID INSOLE FOR ALTERNATE COMPRESSION AND EXPANSION BY THE HEEL OF THE WEARER OF THE SHOE WHILE WALKING; AND MEANS PROVIDING A PASSAGEWAY IN SAID INSOLE FLUIDLY CONNECTED AT ONE END OF SAID EXHAUST VALVE AND TERMINATING AT THE OTHER END IN VENTS LOCATED IN THE UPPER SURFACE OF THE TOE PORTION OF SAID INSOLE.
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Cited By (72)

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US3315379A (en) * 1966-10-10 1967-04-25 Ramon D Estandian Air circulating insole
US3331146A (en) * 1966-05-02 1967-07-18 Karras Elias Air circulating member for a shoe
US3475836A (en) * 1968-02-29 1969-11-04 Harry Brahm Air pumping insert for shoes
US3973336A (en) * 1975-04-29 1976-08-10 Chang Kun Ah Shoes having vents for ventilating fresh air into the inside of the shoes
US4102061A (en) * 1976-03-08 1978-07-25 Karhu-Titan Oy Shoe sole structure
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US4414760A (en) * 1982-04-16 1983-11-15 Kaepa, Inc. Air-cushion insole
US4445284A (en) * 1982-02-18 1984-05-01 Sakutori Eric M Footwear with integral cushioning and ventilating apparatus
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US4546555A (en) * 1983-03-21 1985-10-15 Spademan Richard George Shoe with shock absorbing and stabiizing means
US4577417A (en) * 1984-04-27 1986-03-25 Energaire Corporation Sole-and-heel structure having premolded bulges
US4674200A (en) * 1985-12-12 1987-06-23 Peter Sing Slip resistant footwear
FR2614510A1 (en) * 1987-04-30 1988-11-04 Technisynthese Sarl Sole incorporating a pump for ventilating the shoe
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US4974342A (en) * 1988-07-06 1990-12-04 Toshimitsu Nakamura Inner sole for shoe
US4991317A (en) * 1987-05-26 1991-02-12 Nikola Lakic Inflatable sole lining for shoes and boots
US5010661A (en) * 1987-12-07 1991-04-30 Chu Chi Kong Unidirectional airflow ventilating shoe and a unidirectional airflow ventilating insole for shoes
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US6178662B1 (en) 1999-02-02 2001-01-30 David K. Legatzke Dispersed-air footpad
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US7784196B1 (en) 2006-12-13 2010-08-31 Reebok International Ltd. Article of footwear having an inflatable ground engaging surface
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US8230874B2 (en) 2006-12-20 2012-07-31 Reebok International Limited Configurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US8256141B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2012-09-04 Reebok International Limited Article of footwear having an adjustable ride
US8414275B1 (en) 2007-01-11 2013-04-09 Reebok International Limited Pump and valve combination for an article of footwear incorporating an inflatable bladder
US8572786B2 (en) 2010-10-12 2013-11-05 Reebok International Limited Method for manufacturing inflatable bladders for use in footwear and other articles of manufacture
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Cited By (94)

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US3973336A (en) * 1975-04-29 1976-08-10 Chang Kun Ah Shoes having vents for ventilating fresh air into the inside of the shoes
US4102061A (en) * 1976-03-08 1978-07-25 Karhu-Titan Oy Shoe sole structure
USRE34102E (en) * 1978-09-18 1992-10-20 Energaire Corporation Thrust producing shoe sole and heel
US4312140A (en) * 1979-04-03 1982-01-26 Walter Reber Device to facilitate pedestrian locomotion
US4358902A (en) * 1980-04-02 1982-11-16 Cole George S Thrust producing shoe sole and heel
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US4414760A (en) * 1982-04-16 1983-11-15 Kaepa, Inc. Air-cushion insole
US4446634A (en) * 1982-09-28 1984-05-08 Johnson Paul H Footwear having improved shock absorption
US4546555A (en) * 1983-03-21 1985-10-15 Spademan Richard George Shoe with shock absorbing and stabiizing means
US4577417A (en) * 1984-04-27 1986-03-25 Energaire Corporation Sole-and-heel structure having premolded bulges
US4674200A (en) * 1985-12-12 1987-06-23 Peter Sing Slip resistant footwear
FR2614510A1 (en) * 1987-04-30 1988-11-04 Technisynthese Sarl Sole incorporating a pump for ventilating the shoe
US4991317A (en) * 1987-05-26 1991-02-12 Nikola Lakic Inflatable sole lining for shoes and boots
US6014823A (en) * 1987-05-26 2000-01-18 Lakic; Nikola Inflatable sole lining for shoes and boots
US5987779A (en) * 1987-08-27 1999-11-23 Reebok International Ltd. Athletic shoe having inflatable bladder
US5010661A (en) * 1987-12-07 1991-04-30 Chu Chi Kong Unidirectional airflow ventilating shoe and a unidirectional airflow ventilating insole for shoes
US4974342A (en) * 1988-07-06 1990-12-04 Toshimitsu Nakamura Inner sole for shoe
US5113599A (en) * 1989-02-08 1992-05-19 Reebok International Ltd. Athletic shoe having inflatable bladder
US5025575A (en) * 1989-03-14 1991-06-25 Nikola Lakic Inflatable sole lining for shoes and boots
WO1990010396A1 (en) * 1989-03-14 1990-09-20 Nikola Lakic Inflatable sole lining with pressure control
US5035068A (en) * 1989-11-09 1991-07-30 The Wind Pro Corporation Shoe and removable shoe insole system
WO1991019430A1 (en) * 1990-06-18 1991-12-26 Nikola Lakic Inflatable lining for footwear
WO1992011780A1 (en) * 1990-12-31 1992-07-23 Nikola Lakic Inflatable lining for footwear, gloves, helmets and shields
US5195254A (en) * 1991-06-24 1993-03-23 Tyng Liou Y Sole
US5333397A (en) * 1993-02-12 1994-08-02 Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc. Inflatable ventilating insole
US5524364A (en) * 1993-04-02 1996-06-11 Energaire Corporation Thrust producing shoe sole and heel improved stability
US5416986A (en) * 1993-04-02 1995-05-23 Energaire Corporation Thrust producing shoe sole and heel improved stability
US5375346A (en) * 1993-04-02 1994-12-27 Energaire Corporation Thrust producing shoe sole and heel improved stability
US5400526A (en) * 1993-09-14 1995-03-28 Sessa; Raymond V. Footwear sole with bulbous protrusions and pneumatic ventilation
ES2072220A1 (en) * 1993-09-15 1995-07-01 Kinger Huang Cooling system compression based on a sneaker.
US5341581A (en) * 1993-09-15 1994-08-30 Kinger Huang Compression cooling system of shoe midsole
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US5595004A (en) * 1994-03-30 1997-01-21 Nike, Inc. Shoe sole including a peripherally-disposed cushioning bladder
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US5686167A (en) * 1995-06-05 1997-11-11 Robert C. Bogert Fatigue resistant fluid containing cushioning device for articles of footwear
US5842291A (en) * 1995-10-26 1998-12-01 Energaire Corporation Thrust producing multiple channel-multiple chamber shoe and bladder
US5678328A (en) * 1995-11-30 1997-10-21 Energaire Corporation Heel and sole structure with opposite cavities
US6505420B1 (en) 1996-02-09 2003-01-14 Reebok International Ltd. Cushioning member for an article of footwear
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US6178662B1 (en) 1999-02-02 2001-01-30 David K. Legatzke Dispersed-air footpad
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US6092309A (en) * 1999-03-22 2000-07-25 Energaire Corporation Heel and sole structure with inwardly projecting bulges
US6553690B2 (en) 1999-08-04 2003-04-29 Opal Limited Ventilated footwear
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US6865824B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2005-03-15 Levert Francis E. Fluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
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US9474323B2 (en) 2002-07-02 2016-10-25 Reebok International Limited Shoe having an inflatable bladder
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USD485426S1 (en) 2002-08-16 2004-01-20 Opal Limited Insole
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US20050005473A1 (en) * 2003-07-07 2005-01-13 Oh Phillip J. Self-cushion airflow shoes
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US7437836B2 (en) * 2003-12-22 2008-10-21 Aison Co., Ltd. Insole assembly for increasing weight of footwear and heavy footwear having weight-increasing midsole/outsole
US20070245594A1 (en) * 2003-12-22 2007-10-25 Aison Co., Ltd. Insole assembly for increasing weight of footwear and heavy footwear having weight-increasing midsole/outsole
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US8540838B2 (en) 2005-07-01 2013-09-24 Reebok International Limited Method for manufacturing inflatable footwear or bladders for use in inflatable articles
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US8256141B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2012-09-04 Reebok International Limited Article of footwear having an adjustable ride
US7694438B1 (en) 2006-12-13 2010-04-13 Reebok International Ltd. Article of footwear having an adjustable ride
US9144266B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2015-09-29 Reebok International Limited Article of footwear having an adjustable ride
US8919013B2 (en) 2006-12-13 2014-12-30 Reebok International Limited Article of footwear having an adjustable ride
US8230874B2 (en) 2006-12-20 2012-07-31 Reebok International Limited Configurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US7934521B1 (en) 2006-12-20 2011-05-03 Reebok International, Ltd. Configurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US8858200B2 (en) 2007-01-11 2014-10-14 Reebok International Limited Pump and valve combination for an article of footwear incorporating an inflatable bladder
US8414275B1 (en) 2007-01-11 2013-04-09 Reebok International Limited Pump and valve combination for an article of footwear incorporating an inflatable bladder
US20080209762A1 (en) * 2007-01-26 2008-09-04 Krafsur Andrew B Spring cushioned shoe
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US20140182165A1 (en) * 2011-06-08 2014-07-03 Byung Hun Lee Structure of shoe sole having superior ventilation function and double- landing function
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US9877538B2 (en) 2015-11-09 2018-01-30 Nahyun Kim Ventilated shoe

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