US3221670A - Metal floor rack for refrigerator cars - Google Patents

Metal floor rack for refrigerator cars Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3221670A
US3221670A US224089A US22408962A US3221670A US 3221670 A US3221670 A US 3221670A US 224089 A US224089 A US 224089A US 22408962 A US22408962 A US 22408962A US 3221670 A US3221670 A US 3221670A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
slat
rack
car
hinge
bracket
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US224089A
Inventor
Lucien W Lemon
Kristjan H Palsson
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Pacific Car and Foundry Co
Original Assignee
Pacific Car and Foundry Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Pacific Car and Foundry Co filed Critical Pacific Car and Foundry Co
Priority to US224089A priority Critical patent/US3221670A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US3221670A publication Critical patent/US3221670A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60PVEHICLES ADAPTED FOR LOAD TRANSPORTATION OR TO TRANSPORT, TO CARRY, OR TO COMPRISE SPECIAL LOADS OR OBJECTS
    • B60P3/00Vehicles adapted to transport, to carry or to comprise special loads or objects
    • B60P3/20Refrigerated goods vehicles

Description

Dec. 7, 1965 L. w. LEMON ETAL 3,221,670

METAL FLOOR RACK FOR REFRIGERATOR CARS Filed Sept. 17, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR5 LUCIE/V W. LEM N KRISTJAN H. PHLSS N ITTOR/VE'YS L. w. LEMON ETAL 3,221,670

5 Sheets-Sheet 2 LEMON INVENTORD LUCI EN W. KRISTJHN HIP/55cm! ,47' TORNEKS Dec. 7, 1965 METAL FLOOR RACK FOR REFRIGERATOR CARS Filed Sept. 17, 1962 Dec. 7, 1965 w. LEMON ETAL METAL FLOOR RA CK FOR REFRIGERATOR CARS Filed Sept. 17, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS L-UCIEN' \M LEMON KRISTJAN H. PHLSSON BY United States Patent 3,221,670 METAL FLOOR RACK FOR REFRIGERATOR CARS Lucien W. Lemon and Kristian H. Palsson, Renton, Wash., assignors to Pacific Car and Foundry Company, Renton, Wash., a corporation of Washington Filed Sept. 17, 1962. Ser. No. 224,089

2 Claims. (Cl. 105375) This invention relates to the construction of refrigerator cars, and particularly the sectional secondary floors with which refrigerator cars are generally equipped.

Commonly referred to as floor racks, these sectional floors have as their purpose to elevate freighted goods above the floor proper of the car so that refrigerated air will be enabled to pass under the goods. The floor racks are made sectional so as to be of a size which permits the racks to be conveniently lifted into an out-of-the-way position for cleaning the car. To facilitate such lifting, the sections which lie at each end of the car, namely between such ends and the centrally placed door openings, are individually hinged to the car along an outer side edge of the concerned section, and are swung upwardly about the center of the hinge as a longitudinal axis into upstanding positions overlying the adjacent side wall. Catches mounted on the side walls engage the upstanding racks to releasably hold the same while the cleaning operation is being performed.

In the centrally placed area of the car doors, the floor racks are not hinged to the car but rather are hinged by anend edge to the end edge of an adjacent car-hinged section, the procedure-when exposing the floor for cleaning-being to fold the center rack sections upon their car-hinged sections after swinging the latter upwardly about their car-carried hinges.

Floor racks have been long used, the early racks consisting simply of wood slats nailed or screwed to wood stringers. With the advent of the lift, truck it was found that wood would not withstand the destructive driving and braking stresses passed into the racks from the wheels of the trucks, and metal was substituted for wood as the material from which the slats were produced. Later the stringers were also drawn from metal stock.

For its principal object the present invention aims to provide a strong and durable metal rack having unusually light weight and which admits of being produced at minimum cost. Employing transverse slats welded or bonded to longitudinal stringers, the invention further aims to provide a rack in which the stringers are so formed as to give unusually high transverse rigidity and in which the slats are interiorly braced to absorb the forces imposed by the motion and sudden stopping of the lift trucks more effectively than has been heretofore possible.

The above and still additional objects and advantages in view will appear and be understood in the course of the following description and claims, the invention consisting in the novel construction and in the adaptation and combination of parts hereinafter described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating a railway car equipped with floor racks constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, the racks as here portrayed having been swung upwardly against the cars side wall and being those in the area of the cars side door in order to show the manner in which one rack is hinged to and folded against another rack.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary transverse vertical sectional view through the car and one of the racks with the operative and inoperative positions of the latter being shown by full and dotted lines, respectively, the scale being enlarged from that of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view drawn to an enlarged view on line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary transverse vertical sectional view illustrating a rack of modified construction, particularly one which admits of being made of steel as distinguished from aluminum for which the rack of the preceding views is expressly engineered. The scale here employed is reduced from that of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view drawn on line 55 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view on line 66 of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view drawn to an enlarged scale on line 77 of FIG. 1.

In said drawings, the floor of a conventional refrigeration car is denoted by the numeral 10, and a flue-forming side wall thereof by 11.

In both the aluminum and steel embodiments, the individual racks are of rectangular plan configuration with a width moderately less than one-half the transverse span of the car. The racks are made in two lengths, long and short. The long racks A are dimensioned so that two pairs, one pair at one side and the other pair at the other side, collectively cover the area lying between an end wall and the opening 12 (for the car door 13) which is located at the center of the car. The short racks B have a length approximately one-half that of the long racks. Two pairs of such short racks, one pair extending along one side and the other pair along the other side of the car, collectively cover the cars door area. The long racks A are each hinged either to the floor 14 or to the side wall 15 of the car along the outside edge of the rack. The short racks B are each hinged to an adjacent long rack A along the meeting edges. The stringers of the racks rest upon the floor and extend longitudinally of the car. The slats overlie the stringers and extend transversely of the car. As before stated the two are fixedly secured, one to the other, by welding or bonding.

First describing the aluminum embodiment, both the slats 20 and the stringers 21 are produced by the extrusion process. In the instance of the stringers, the crosssectional configuration is that of a knee brace with the post leg 22 and the diagonal leg 23 diverging upwardly at an approximate 60 angle, placing the bench component 24 at the top. This bench component is or may be made with a thickened overhang 25. A moderately wide foot 26 is provided. As can be best seen from an inspection of FIG. 2, the diagonal legs point in opposite directions as between the two end stringers, preferably inwardly.

The sectional configuration of the aluminum slats can be best seen from an inspection of FIG. 3, being in the nature of a doubled downwardly facing channel with the outer legs 30 each flanged to form an inwardly directed foot 31. Merging at the top, the inner legs 32 diverge downwardly at a moderately steep angle and perform a bracing function, each being flanged at the bot-tom to form an outwardly directed foot 33. The upper face of the slat is ribbed longitudinally, as at 34. In order to increase the footing surface, and to better withstand racking influence of the lift trucks, all of the slats other than the two end slats and a respective adjacent adapter slat 20' are biased in a moderate degree (see FIG. 1) so as to lie diagonal to the longitudinal center line of the railway car.

-In pivoting the racks to the car, two of the slats spaced more or less equidistantly from the transverse center line of the rack are mutilated at their inner end, namely the end proximal to the cars side :wall, by having the inner legs 32 cut back for, say, 2". The space provided by each of these mutilations, between the inturned bearing feet 31 of the outer legs 30, accommodates a respective forked bracket 35 bolted or otherwise rigidly secured to the car A cross-pin 36 has its ends journaled for rotation in the fork arms 39 of the bracket. A hinge butt 37 is welded to the proximal stringer of the rack and is formed with a projecting hook 38 which saddles the crosspin in the space between the fork-arms of the bracket, such hook being releasably fixed to the pin by a clamping bolt 40. When the racks are swung upwardly about the coinciding centers of the cross-pins as a-hinge axis, the same are releasably held by catches 42 mounted on the cars side wall. Complements 43 of said catches are fixed to the free ends of the racks.

The hinge connections previously mentioned by which racks in the door area are attached to the racks which are hinged to the car are comprised of twin links 43 (see FIGS. 1 and 7) pivoted by pins 44 to the post legs of the stringers. The bracing legs are cut back in the degree necessary to accommodate the links, and the post legs are beefed up by facing plates 45.

Proceeding to a description of the steel rack illustrated in FIGS. 4, and 6, the slats 50 have much the same sectional appearance as the aluminum slats but are fabricated from two channel members brought into touching engagement and skip welded. The outer bearing feet 51 have their free ends 52 upturned, and each facing surface of the joined channels is reinforced by a longitudinally extending recessed crimping 53. The stringers 54 may have either a channel or Z sectional configuration, and have their vertical legs 55 reinforced at spaced intervals of the length by vertical crimps 56. One or more of the stringers are made to function as a knee brace by the employment of weld-connected diagonal legs 57.

The invention will, it is believed, have been clearly understood from the foregoing detailed description of our now-preferred embodiments of the invention. Changes in the details of construction can be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention and it is accordingly our intention that no limitations be implied and that the hereto annexed claims be given a scope fully commensurate with the broadest interpretation to which the employed language fairly admits.

What we claim is:

1. In a refrigeration chamber which comprises the interior of a railway car, a plurality of all-metal racks collectively covering the floor of said chamber and each comprised of paralleling spaced-apart stringers bearing upon the floor with closely spaced slats disposed in overlying cross-angular relation to the stringers and secured rigidly thereto, the individual slats, sectionally considered, having the shape of two downwardly facing touching channels, the side edge of said rack which lies proximal to a side wall of the chamber being hinged to the car so that the rack may be swung upwardly about the center of the hinge as an axis into an out-of-the-way position against said side wall, said hinge comprising a forked bracket fixed to the car, with a hinge pin extending between and journaled by its ends for rotation in the two arms of the fork, the bracket occupying a position centered with respect to the end of one of the slats, said end of the slat overhanging a side stringer of the rack, the span of the bracket being less than the width of the slat, and a hinge butt fixed to said side stringer of the rack in a position underlying said overhanging end of the slat and centered relative to the width of said slat and formed to provide a hook-shaped projection which has a saddling fit over the pin in the interstice between said fork arms and is clamped thereto, the concerned slat being mutilated by having the legs of its two channels which lies at the center of the slat cut back in the degree necessary to produce a covered pocket of a depth sufficient to accommodate said butt and the portion of the bracket which receives the ends of the hinge pin.

2. In a refrigeration chamber comprising the interior of a railway car and characterized in that the predominant flow of traffic as goods are moved into and out of the chamber is longitudinal to the chamber, a plurality of all-metal racks collectively covering the fioor of said chamber and each comprised of paralleling spaced-apart longitudinal stringers with closely spaced slats disposed in overlying cross-angular relation to the stringers and secured rigidly thereto, the individual slats, sectionally considered, having the shape of two touching channels flanged along the bottom to form a bearing foot at the base of each of the vertical legs of the channels, the vertical legs of said two touching channels which lie at the center of the slat diverging downwardly at angles steeply inclined in opposite directions from a plane which includes the line of contact between the channels and lies perpendicular to the upper face of the slat, the side edge of said rack :which lies proximal to a side Wall of the chamber being hinged to the car so that the rack may be swung upwardly about the center of the hinge as an axis into an out-of-the-Way position against said side wall, said hinge comprising a forked bracket fixed to the car, with a hinge pin extending between and journaled by its ends for rotation in the two arms of the forks, the bracket occupying a position centered With respect to the end of one of the slats, said end of the slat overhanging a side stringer of the rack, the span of the arms of the bracket being less than the width of the slat, and a hinge butt fixed to said side stringer of the rack in a position underlying said overhanging end of the slat and centered relative to the Width of the slat and formed to provide a hook-shaped projection which has a saddlling fit over the pin in the interstice between said fork arms and is clamped thereto, the concerned slat being mutilated by having said inclined legs of its two channels cut back in the degree necessary to produce a covered pocket of a depth sufiicient to accommodate said butt and the portion of the bracket which receives the ends of the hinge pin.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,169,307 1/1916 Van Dorn -375 1,828,842 10/1931 Loucks 189-34 1,867,433 7/1932 Young 189-34 2,274,998 3/1942 Webster 105-375 2,275,037 3/1942 Watter 189-34 2,382,761 8/1945 Wilks 189-34 2,471,459 5/1949 Stich 248-235 2,603,169 7/1952 Jahn 105-375 2,907,417 10/1959 Doerr 105-422 3,070,337 12/1962 Gates 248-235 MILTON BUCHLER, Primary Examiner.

LEO QUACKENBUSH, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A REFRIGERATION CHAMBER WHICH COMPRISES THE INTERIOR OF A RAILWAY CAR, A PLURALITY OF ALL-METAL RACKS COLLECTIVELY COVERING THE FLOOR OF SAID CHAMBER AND EACH COMPRISED OF PARALLELING SPACED-APART STRINGERS BEARING UPON THE FLOOR WITH CLOSELY SPACED SLATS DISPOSED IN OVERLYING CROSS-ANGULAR RELATION TO THE STRINGERS AND SECURED RIGIDLY THERETO, THE INDIVIDUAL SLATS, SECTIONALLY CONSIDERED, HAVING THE SHAPE OF TWO DOWNWARDLY FACING TOUCHING CHANNELS, THE SIDE EDGE OF SAID RACK WHICH LIES PROXIMAL TO A SIDE WALL OF THE CHAMBER BEING HINGED TO THE CAR SO THAT THE RACK MAY BE SWUNG UPWARDLY ABOUT THE CENTER OF THE HINGE AS AN AXIS INTO AN OUTE-OF-THE-WAY POSITION AGAINST SAID SIDE WALL, SAID HINGE COMPRISING A FORKED BRACKET FIXED TO THE CAR, WITH A HINGE PIN EXTENDING BETWEEN AND JOURNALED BY ITS ENDS FOR ROTATION IN THE TWO ARMS OF THE FORK, THE BRACKET OCCUPYING A POSITION CENTERED WITH RESPECT TO THE END OF ONE OF THE SLATS, SAID END OF THE SLAT OVERHANING A SIDE STRINGER OF THE RACK, THE SPAN OF THE BRACKET BEING LESS THAN THE WIDTH OF THE SLAT, AND A HINGE BUTT FIXED TO SIDE STRINGER OF THE RACK IN A POSITION UNDERLYING SAID OVERHANGING END OF THE SLAT AND CENTERED RELATIVE TO THE WIDTH OF SAID SLAT AND FORMED TO PROVIDE A HOOK-SHAPED PROJECTION WHICH HAS A SADDLING FIT OVER THE PIN IN THE INTERSTICE BETWEEN SID FORK ARMS AND IS CLAMPED THERETO, THE CONCERNED SLAT BEING MULTILATED BY HAVING THE LEGS OF ITS TWO CHANNELS WHICH LIES AT THE CENTER OF THE SLAT CUT BACK IN THE DEGREES NECESSARY TO PRODUCE A COVERED POCKET OF A DEPTH SUFFICIENT TO ACCOMMODATE SAID BUTT AND THE PORTION OF THE BRACKET WHICH RECEIVES THE ENDS OF THE HINGE PIN.
US224089A 1962-09-17 1962-09-17 Metal floor rack for refrigerator cars Expired - Lifetime US3221670A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US224089A US3221670A (en) 1962-09-17 1962-09-17 Metal floor rack for refrigerator cars

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US224089A US3221670A (en) 1962-09-17 1962-09-17 Metal floor rack for refrigerator cars

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3221670A true US3221670A (en) 1965-12-07

Family

ID=22839238

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US224089A Expired - Lifetime US3221670A (en) 1962-09-17 1962-09-17 Metal floor rack for refrigerator cars

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3221670A (en)

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1169307A (en) * 1915-04-16 1916-01-25 William T Van Dorn Loose flooring and means for storing the same in railway-cars.
US1828842A (en) * 1926-10-18 1931-10-27 Detroit Steel Products Co Building construction
US1867433A (en) * 1932-04-30 1932-07-12 Robertson Co H H Building construction
US2275037A (en) * 1939-07-19 1942-03-03 Budd Edward G Mfg Co Panel section
US2274998A (en) * 1941-08-08 1942-03-03 Deane C Webster Floor rack for refrigerator cars
US2382761A (en) * 1942-02-12 1945-08-14 American Rolling Mill Co Bridge decking and the like
US2471459A (en) * 1946-02-14 1949-05-31 George E Stich Scaffolding bracket
US2603169A (en) * 1950-01-24 1952-07-15 Union Railway Equipment Compan Floor rack
US2907417A (en) * 1957-01-30 1959-10-06 Kaiser Aluminium Chem Corp Floor construction
US3070337A (en) * 1959-12-01 1962-12-25 Gates & Sons Scaffold support bracket

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1169307A (en) * 1915-04-16 1916-01-25 William T Van Dorn Loose flooring and means for storing the same in railway-cars.
US1828842A (en) * 1926-10-18 1931-10-27 Detroit Steel Products Co Building construction
US1867433A (en) * 1932-04-30 1932-07-12 Robertson Co H H Building construction
US2275037A (en) * 1939-07-19 1942-03-03 Budd Edward G Mfg Co Panel section
US2274998A (en) * 1941-08-08 1942-03-03 Deane C Webster Floor rack for refrigerator cars
US2382761A (en) * 1942-02-12 1945-08-14 American Rolling Mill Co Bridge decking and the like
US2471459A (en) * 1946-02-14 1949-05-31 George E Stich Scaffolding bracket
US2603169A (en) * 1950-01-24 1952-07-15 Union Railway Equipment Compan Floor rack
US2907417A (en) * 1957-01-30 1959-10-06 Kaiser Aluminium Chem Corp Floor construction
US3070337A (en) * 1959-12-01 1962-12-25 Gates & Sons Scaffold support bracket

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3572513A (en) Trollye crane apparatus
US3516706A (en) Freight vehicles
US2457842A (en) Freight container
US2963310A (en) Vertical container couplers
US2691450A (en) Transportation unit carrier
CA2123726C (en) Intermediate deck structures for vehicles
US3159110A (en) Motorized staging suspending and adjusting carrier
US4152020A (en) Pickup truck rack with means for facilitating loading
US4911318A (en) Air transportable container adjunct
US3357371A (en) Container well car
US3909059A (en) Floor and frame construction for flat trailers
US3370552A (en) Railway carrier for automotive vehicles
US4232884A (en) Lightweight trailer bed construction
US4624619A (en) Retractable ramp assembly for pick-up truck
US3240168A (en) Railway car
US3801177A (en) Frameless shipping container
US3807581A (en) Pallet with adjustable height legs
US4281870A (en) Vehicle convertible double deck system
US2021503A (en) Container carrying vehicle
US2223275A (en) Demountable truck body for railroad transportation
US4456413A (en) Low level freight car for carrying trailers
GB951095A (en) Railway flat cars
US4240571A (en) Car top carrier
US5279230A (en) Railroad well car body
US2783718A (en) Railway car underframe cross-bearer assembly