US3188658A - Ventilated water closet - Google Patents

Ventilated water closet Download PDF

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US3188658A
US3188658A US241588A US24158862A US3188658A US 3188658 A US3188658 A US 3188658A US 241588 A US241588 A US 241588A US 24158862 A US24158862 A US 24158862A US 3188658 A US3188658 A US 3188658A
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water
seal
overflow
tube
ventilator
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US241588A
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Farris E Dixon
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American Radiator and Standard Sanitary Corp
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American Radiator and Standard Sanitary Corp
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D11/00Other component parts of water-closets, e.g. noise-reducing means in the flushing system, flushing pipes mounted in the bowl, seals for the bowl outlet, devices preventing overflow of the bowl contents; devices forming a water seal in the bowl after flushing, devices eliminating obstructions in the bowl outlet or preventing backflow of water and excrements from the waterpipe
    • E03D11/02Water-closet bowls ; Bowls with a double odour seal optionally with provisions for a good siphonic action; siphons as part of the bowl
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D9/00Sanitary or other accessories for lavatories ; Devices for cleaning or disinfecting the toilet room or the toilet bowl; Devices for eliminating smells
    • E03D9/04Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices
    • E03D9/05Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices ventilating the bowl

Description

June 15, 1965 F. E. DIXON VENTILATED WATER CLOSET '7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 5, 1962 1 NVEN TOR. 157 6? ATD/ o/V ATTORNEY June 15, 1965 F. E. DIXON VENTILATED WATER CLOSET 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed D90. 5, 1962 "I'IIIIIIII H INVENTOR.
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ATTOR NE y June 15, 1965 F. DIXON 3,138,558
VENTILATED WATER CLOSET Filed Dec. 5, 1962 k '7 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. FARR/S 5. Duo/v June 15, 1965 DIXON I 3,188,658
VENTILATED WATER CLOSET Filed Dec. 5, 1962 '7 Sheets-Sheet 4 76 77 76' 24b V 0 INVENTOR. nfi ja 6 flaw/s ED/XON ATTORNEY June 15, 1965 F. E. DIXON VENTILATED WATER CLOSET 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 5, 1962 INVENTOR. flee/s E-E/XON ATTORNEY June 15, DlXQN VENTILATED WATER CLOSET Filed D80. 3, l962 '7 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR.
ATTORNE Y June 15, 1965 F. E. DIXON VENTILATED WATER CLOSET Filed Dec. 3, 1962 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 INVENTOR. fizz/r 20m ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,188,658 VENTILATED WATER CLOSET Farris E. Dixon, Louisville, Ky., assignor to American Radiator 8: Standard Sanitary Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 3, 1962, Ser. No. 241,588 7 Claims. (Cl. 4215) is substantially trouble free.
Another object is to provide a ventilating system which is adaptable for use either with a water closet having a tank or with a tankless Water closet.
Another object is to provide a ventilating system which is hydraulically operated and which requires minimum quantities of water for operation.
Another object is to provide a water closet having a ventilator wherein the water closet can be flushed without operating the ventilator.
Another object is to provide a ventilating system in which a liquid seal is established between an air discharge tube and the toilet bowl when the ventilating system is not operating.
Another object is to provide a ventilating system which will prevent passage of air from within the water closet tank to the air discharge tube.
Another object is to provide a water closet having a ventilating system in which communication between the water closet water supply conduit and the ventilator discharge tube is prevented in the event that a negative pressure occurs in the water supply conduit.
Other objects and features of the invention will appear as the description of the particular physical embodiments selected to illustrate the invention progresses.
For a better understanding of the present invention, reference should be had to the accompanying drawings, wherein like numerals of reference indicate similar parts throughout the several views and wherein:
FIGURE 1 is a schematic view of a water closet ventilating system illustrating the principles of operation of the present invention.
FIGURE 2 is a partial schematic view of a water closet illustrating the relationship between the passage in the toilet bowl housing and the ventilator tubes shown in FIGURE 1 wherein the discharge from the ventilating system is led to a location below the toilet bowl water seal.
FIGURE 3 is a partial schematic view similar to FIG- URE 2 but modified to show the discharge from the ventilating system being led to a location above the toilet I bowl water seal.
flush tank of FIGURE 5 showing the flush valve and the ventilating system installed therein.
ice
FIG. 8 is a plan view of FIGURE 7 with the flush tank cover removed.
FIGURE 9 is a partial section taken along the line 99 of FIGURE 8.
FIGURE 10 is a front view, partly in section, of the ventilating system shown in FIGURE 7.
FIGURE 11 is a sectional view taken along the line 11-I1 of FIGURE 12.
FIGURE 12 is a sectional view taken along the line 1212 of FIGURE 10.
FIGURE 13 is a partial sectional view taken along the line 13-13 of FIGURE 11.
FIGURE 14 is a partial perspective and schematic view of an embodiment similar to that of FIGURES 5-13 showing the path and location of water when the ventilator is in operation. 1
FIGURE 15 is a perspective and schematic view of an embodiment similar to that of FIGURES 5-13 showing a water seal which is used to prevent passage of air from the tank to the ventilator discharge tube.
FIGURE 16 is a schematic view of an alternate embodiment wherein the high vacuum-low volume section of the aspirator is mounted in the discharge tube.
FIGURE 17 is a plan view of the high vacuum-low volume section of the aspirator of FIGURE 16.
FIGURE 18 is an elevational view of the high vacuumlow volume section of the aspirator shown in FIGURE 17.
Referring to the drawings, FIGURE 1 illustrates schematically the principle of operation of the ventilating system of the present invention. The ventilating system of FIGURE 1 may be installed in a water closet flush tank 10, shown partially in FIGURE 2, mounted conventionally at the top rear portion of a toilet bowl 12.
The ventilation system in FIGURE 1 utilizes a flush tank overflow tube which is conventionally provided in water closet flush tanks to protect the flush tank against filling above a predetermined level. Thus as shown in FIGURE 1, the ventilating system comprises an overflow tube 14 which is in communication with a hollow passageway 15 extending around the rim of the toilet bowl 12, a ventilator discharge tube 16 in communication with the toilet bowl waste passageway 22 and a U-shaped tube 18 serving as a water seal between the two tubes 14 and 16 for sealing the discharge tube 16 from the atmosphere. 1
Thus it can be seen from FIGURES 1 and 2 that when-there is no water in the U-shaped tube or seal 18, communication is provided between the passageway 15 in the rim of the toilet bowl 1'2 and the toilet bowl waste passageway 22, so that air adjacent the openings 20 in the toilet bowl rim passageway 15 can be discharged to waste. Means are provided for filling and evacuating the seal 18 with water so that communication between the overflow tube 14 and discharge tube 16 is cut off when the ventilating system is not operating thereby sealing the discharge tube 16 from the atmosphere. This means consists of an aspirator which is used for evacuating Water from the seal 18 and which is also used for creating a reduced pressure in the discharge tube 16 to cause air to flow from the passageway 15 in the rim of the toilet bowl to the discharge tube 16 to waste as setforth heretofore.
The aspirator comprises a high vacuum-low volume section 24 for evacuating water from the seal 18 and a low vacuum-high volume section..26 for creating the reduced pressure in the discharge tube 16. The terms high and low vacuum and volume are used merely to denote the relative operating characteristics between the two aspirator sections. The aspirator is operated by utilizing the water supply line provided for flushing the aspirator, 'a conduit or tube 28 of smaller diameter than I known.
The laterally extending conduit 30 is in communication with an elevated Water seal reservoir 62 while the latter is in communication. with the lower portion of the U-shaped seal tube 18 by means of conduit 31. Thus, 10
when the aspirator is operated, the Water in the seal 18 will be drawn up into the reservoir 32 due to the suction provided by the high-vacuum section '24. ,The lwater; will remainin the reservoir 32 and will not be drawn into the aspirator since the difference between the pres sure in the lateral conduit 30 created by the high-vacuum section 24 and the pressure in the seal tube 18 created by the low vacuum section 26 (to be described hereinafter) is'not sufiicient to carry over thewater to the high pressure aspirator section 24.
As the high vacuum section 24 continues to operate,
however, it will draw up air fromthe seal 18, such withdrawn air bubbling up through the water in the reservoir 32 at illustrated in FIGUREJ.
the descharge tube 16 from the atmosphere.
so that the water flowing from the smaller diameter tube 28 of thehighvacuum section 24will flow into the larger; diameter discharge tube16 to 'create a suction in the discharge tube 16 to draw air from the laterally extending seal tube 18. a
It isbelieved apparent, therefore, that as water flows to the aspirator, the water inthe seal 18 will be drawn to the reservoir 32 while the suction created in the discharge tube 16 will cause air to be drawn front the area adjacent the toilet bowl rim to the overflow tube :14, seal 18, and dischargetubew 16, to be discharged to waste along with the water used for operating the aspirator. An overflow cap 33 having a downwardly depending flange 35 portion extending below the normal water I level. of the flush tank 10 is mounted on top of the overflow tube 14 and serves to prevent air from being drawn from within the flush tank lltlintothe ventilator system. .The ventilator is placed in operation by opening. an
' actuating-valve 34 in the water. supply line .36. A vacuwater supply line 36jinthe event that a negative pressure should develop in the water supply line 36 with the actuating valve 34 in an open position.
'A water refill tube 42 leadinggfrom the flush Waterinlet, valve, (not shown inFIGURE 1) supplies. water to 'the sealj18 when the water closet'is flushed while-adifference inelevation,- denoted by .a .in' FIGURE 1, between the inlet and outlet of'the seal 18 is" provided to direct refill water to the toilet bowl seal 44 via the over- ,flow tube 14, the rim passageway 15, and openings 20 after, the seal "18 is filled to the level indicated by b in FIGUREl.
to the embodiment of FIGURES 513.-- I H In the embodiment of ,FIGURE 2, the discharge tube 16 is shown as communicating with a separate discharge .passageway 46 provided in the toilet bowl'housing 12 wherein suchpassageway 46 is shown as communicating with the waste outlet 22 of the toilet bowl at a location below the bowl water seal 44.
As the water flow to f the aspirator is stopped and no further suction is produced thereby, the water in the reservoir 32 will flow back by'gravity to establish the seal 18 thereby sealing .4 In a modification shown in FIGURE '3 the discharge tube 16 exists into the toilet'bowl waste passage 22a at a location above the bowl water seal 44a. In certain types of toilet bowls wherethe bowls is flushed with a 5 siphoning action in the waste passageway leading from the bowl, the use of the arrangement shown in FIGURE ;2 where the mixture of air and water=in thedischarge .tube 16 communicates with the'toilet bowl waste outlet at a location below the bowl water seal 44, is prefera'ble since it would not be critical that the ventilator seal 18 be established before the siphoning action of the flushing toilet bowl occurs. Thus, in the embodiment of FIGURE3, if the'ventilator seal 18 was not established before the siphon action of the bowl occurs as it is flushed, the discharge tubeT16 would be open to atmosphere and thus tend to adversely afiect the siphoning actionof the bowl as it is flushed. T his would not happen in the embodiment of FIGURE 2 since the discharge tube 16 isin communication with thetoilet bowl waste passage 22 at alocation below the toilet bowlwater seal 'Ihe ventilator system according to the present invention may be installed in the? flush tank 10 shown in FIG- URES 2 and. 3 or alternatively, it may be used with a tankless toilet. as' shown in the modification of FIGURE 4. In that modification, since there is no flush tank, a
tankvoverllo'w tube such as the tube 14 in FIGURE 2 is not provided. However, a water supply tuibe 14a is employed which corresponds to the overflow tube 14 of FIGURE 2. 7
a The principle of operation of the ventilator system 7 of FIGURE 4 is. essentially the same as that of FIGURE 1.. Thus,.in one position (-flush position) of the flush valve handle 48, the toilet bowl 12a will be flushed by admitting Water through the flush valve 50to the rim passageway 15 0f the toilet bowl 12a, through the water supply tube 14a, At the sometime water will be admitted to' the seal tube 18 through the refill tube 42a to insure that the seal 18 is established, In another position '(ventilateposit ion) of the flush valve handle 48, I water will be admitted from the flush valve to a tube 43 for operating the aspirator whichin turn evacu'ates water fromtheseal 18 and draws the air through the openings 20 inthe. rimpassageway 15 of the toilet bowl 12a to waste as herebefore set forth. When the flush valve handle 48 is returned to its initial shut-01f position, the aspirator isshut off and the seal 18 is established 'as ,hereinbefiore set forth; The ventilating system. and flush valve'shown in FIGURE. 4 may also be used with 'thetoilet bowl 12 of FlGURE 2. i
r In the enrb'odiment of FIGURES 5 to 13 flush t-ank'10 "is; shown in FIGURE S as mounted in its conventional reanward position relative to the toilet bowl 12b. The tank 10 containsthe waterfor flushing the toilet in the conventional manner, and houses the ventilating system andthe flushingmechamism. The. flush tank ,10 is normally filledto a level as'sh-olwn in FIGURE 7 so that f "when the flush valve 52 is'lifit'ed from its seat53, the water in the tank 10 will pass to the conduit 54, to the rim 6O passageway 15b to fl ush the toilet. The flu hlglye 52 7 is mounted for'pivotal movement about the end of an upstanding arm 56 such that when theexternal operating handle :58 is turned'counter clockwise, .it will rotate an actuating; arm 60, in acounter clockwise direction. A suitable linkage such as a chain 61 is provided between the end of the actuating arm, .60 and the container 63 of the flush valve so; that counter clockwise rotation of the operating handle 58 will pivotthe flush valve 52 off ofit-s seat 53. After the water in the tank 10 flows by gravity to the toilet bowl 12b through the. unseated flush valve 52,the flush valve 52 will reseat itself and the tank 10 will be filledup with water supplied through a water supply conduit 62; A valve 64 operated by a float 65 admits and shuts off water to the tank 10 in'the conven- 7 tional manner. V
, operates essentially on the same principles as that described and shown in FIGURE 1, with some modifications. In FIGURES 513, for example, certain elements have been constructed, grouped together, and arranged in a different manner for the sake of convenience, and an overflow trap 72 (to be described hereinafter) is used instead of the cap 33 shown in FIGURE 1.
Thus in the embodiment of FIGURES 5-13 the over- .flow tube is shown at 14b, the discharge tube at 16b,
and the water seal 18b between the two is shown as comprising a U-shaped conduit having two legs 67 and 68 and a cross-over conduit 70 (FIGURE 11) having one end connected to the upper end of the discharge tube 16b and the other end to the upper portion of the legs 68 of the seal 18b. A cross-over conduit 71 is also provided for connecting the upper end of the overflow tube 14b to the upper portion of the leg 67. With this arrange ment the overflow tube 1412 may be centrally located in the flush tank with the seal 18b on one side and the discharge tube 16b and overflow Water seal 72, to be described hereinafter, on an opposite side to provide a balanced unit which will conveniently fit into the flush tank 10. Details of the overflow water seal 72 have not been shown in FIGURES 7, 8, 10 and 11 since it is shown in detail in FIGURES 14 and 15.
As can best be seen in FIGURE 11, the conduits 67, 68, 70, 71, and 72 may be formed as an integral unit for mounting on the overflow tube 14b and discharge tube 16b by means of the tube portions 73 and 74. The
water seal reservoir 32b is mounted on one side of the two cross-over conduits 70 and 71, as can best be seen .in FIGURE 13, and the conduit 31b between the resermounted on top of the cross-over tube 71) and directly over the discharge tube 161) so that the water discharging therefrom will pass directly into the low vacuum section 2612 of the aspirator.
As can best be seen in FIGURE 9, the high vacuum aspirator comprises a housing 75 having a passageway 76, therein so that water flowing through the passageway 76 from the water supply line 3612 will create a suction in the reduced diameter lateral passageway 77 for draw- ,ing air from the reservoir 32b via the conduit 36b. As
the water leaves the high vacuum section 24b of the aspirator it is sprayed into the discharge tube 16b, as best shown in FIGURE 11, thereby creating a suction in the laterally extending crossover tube 70 for drawing air from adjacent the rim or" the toilet bowl 12b as hereinbefore set forth with reference to the description pertaining to FIGURE 1. The water spraying past the high vacuum section 2412 of the aspirator down the center of the discharge tube 16b will be sufiicient to move an adequate amount of air from the rim of the toilet bowl. The mixture of water from the aspirator and the withdrawn air from adjacent the toilet bowl passes down the discharge tube 16b and externally of the flush tank 10 to the toilet bowl waste passage.
The refill tube 42b (FIGURES 7 and 8) for supplying water to the seal 18b when the flush valve 64 is open enters the leg 67 of the seal 18b by a connection 80 (FIG- URE 10) at a location below the normal water level of the flush tank It to insure that the seal 18b will fill even if the refill tube 42b is inadvertently disconnected from the seal 1817 since, in such an event, water from the tank 6 10 would then replenish the seal 18b through the opening of the connection 80.
The principle of operation of the ventilating system shown in the embodiment of FIGURES 5-13 is similar to that shown schematically in the embodiment of FIG- URE 1, so that a detailed account of the operation of the embodiment of FIGURES 5-13 is not believed necessary. FIGURE 14, however, which is a schematic representation of the embodiment of FIGURES 513, illustrates the path and location of air and water when the ventilator is in operation. Thus the path of air from the overflow tube 14b through the seal 18b and cross-over tube 74 to the discharge tube 19b can be clearly seen along with the seal water being contained in the reservoir 32]).
FIGURE 14 also illustrates the overflow trap 72, mentioned heretofore, as comprising a U-shaped conduit having two legs, one leg 81 being open at the top for communication with the interior of the flush tank 10 and another leg 82. being connected to the cross-over 71. The overflow trap 72 is preferred over the cap 33 shown in FIGURE 1 since when the trap 72 is filled with water, it will prevent passage of air from within the flush tank 19 to the discharge tube 16b as the aspirator is in operation even if the level of the water in the flush tank 10 is well below normal. This overflow trap 72 also permits normal overflow of flush tank water to the overflow tube 14b if the level of water in the flush tank 10 rises to an abnormal height.
FIGURE 15, which is a more detailed schematic representation of the overflow trap 72 shows a channel 84 extending between the leg 67 of the seal 18b and the leg 82 of the overflow trap 72. This channel 84 is at a lower elevation than the top opening or mouth of the overflow tube 1412 so as to provide the overflow trap 72 with water from the main seal 1812 after the main seal 18]) is filled by the refill conduit 42b as can be clearly seen in FIGURE 15.
With the construction and arrangement of the main seal trap 18b, the overflow trap '72, the overflow tube 14b, and the discharge tube 16b as illustrated, the ventilating system will utilize all of the refill water without wasting any down the discharge tube 1612. Thus, the sequence of events which occurs when the refill water is flowing through refill conduit 42b is as follows: refill water fills the main trap 18b, excess water then flows into the overflow trap 72 via the channel 84, excess water then flows down the overflow tube 14b to provide Water from the toilet bowl water seal 441) (FIGURE 6).
The ventilator is placed in operation by raising (rotating in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIGURE 7) the operating handle 58 which in turn opens the ventilator actuating valve 85 by meansof the lever 86 (FIGURE 8), for supplying water to the aspirator through the conduit 36b. Thus, it can be seen in FIGURE 8 that when the operating handle 58 is raised, the valve 35 will be opened and the ventilating system will be placed into operation. When the handle is lowered, the valve 85 will be closed to shut off the ventilating system while at the same time the lowering of the handle will trip the flush valve 52 by means of the lever 69 and chain 61. If it is desired to flush the toilet without ventilating, it is only necessary to move the handle downwardly, that is rotate it in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIGURE 7. Thus, the water closet can be flushed without turning the ventilator on.
In a modification of the invention, the high vacuumlow volume section of the aspirator is mounted in the discharge tube such as shown schematically in FIGURE 16. The details of such a high vacuum aspirator section 240 are shown in FIGURES 17 and 18.
The aspirator section 240 may be inserted between an upper portion 16d and a lower portion 16:: of the discharge tube. The lower end of the aspirator section 24c is shown in FIGURE 18 as having a flange 9i) mating connection therebetween.
placing the ventilating'system into operation.
secure the flanges 90'and 91'together; A sealing gasket 93 may be provided betweenthe flanges. The upper end of the aspirator section 240 may be secured to the upper portion 16d of the discharge tube by extending an end thereof into the aspirator section 24c and cementing the The aspirator section 240 comprises a v 89 and a member 94 extending therein having a water inlet passageway95 and a passageway 96 in which a suction is created in much the same manner as shown and described with reference to the embodiment of FIG- URE 7. The member 94 extends into the conduit section 89 but does not prevent communication therethrough -so that the portions 16d and 16e of'the discharge tube communicate with one another. Suitable strengthening conduit section a -with a flange 91 on theportion Me of the discharge tube while fastening means such as the screws 92 serve to Fcharge tube being on one side oflsaid overflow tube and said U Shaped ventilator water seal being on an opposite vside, a first'crossover conduit between one leg of said 7 .U-shaped ventilator water'seal and, said discharge tube,
ribs 97 and 98 may be provided in the aspirator section 7 It is believed apparent'from theabove description that :maintenance required and the potential trouble spots are at a minimum. Component parts may be combined and preformed to facilitate construction and the entire assembled unitwill conveniently fit'into a standard size flush tank without impairing the operation of the flushing mechanism while the water closet may be flushed without The vena second crossover conduit between the other leg of said U-shaped' water ventilator seal and the other leg of said overflow seal trap, said second crossover conduit being in communication with the mouth of said overflow -tube and "having conducting means at a lower elevation than the mouth of said overflow tube such that when said U-shaped water ventilator seal is filled, water will flow through said conductingimeans to fill said upright U- shaped :overflow seal trap and thereafter flow to the mouth of said overflow tube, and aspirator means communicating with said discharge tube and operable upon activation to simultaneously withdraw water from said U-shaped water ventilator sealand to produce a reduced pressure in said discharge tube to withdraw air from said bowl, and means for activating and deactivating said aspirator means whereby upon deactivation the U-shaped water ventilator "seal between the overflow tube and discharge tube is established. I
2.j In a water closet as'set forth in claim 1 wherein said first and second crossover conduits, said overflow seal trap,,and'said U-shaped ventilator water seal-are formed as an integralunit. '7 i 3. In a ventilatingsystem for a water closet, the com- I 'bination comprising, adischargeconduit in the fiush tank tilating system does not evacuate the flush tank even if refill water used in the ventilating system while provision is made to seal off the discharge tube from atmosphere even if the main seal trap water supply line is madvertently disconnected. The ventilating system may be used either in connection with a toilet bowl having a flush tank or a tankless water closet. The ventilating component parts may be constructed of relatively inexpensive materials such as plastic'and component parts may be formed as integral units to reduce the cost of construction. The ventilating system is easy to install since it may be preformed before it is installed to the water closet.
It is to be understood that the invention hereinabove described is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways. Also it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed in the specification is for the purpose of description and not of limitation. f V
.Theinvention hereinabove described may be varied in construction within the scope of the claims, forthe particular device selected to illustrate the invention is but one of many possible embodiments of the same.
What is claimed is:
1. In a water closet having a bowl, a flush tank, and an overflow tube providing communication between the .of said water closet, conduit means-providing communication between said dischargeconduit and the bowl of said water closet, water seal means in said conduit means, first laspirator means communicating with andoperable to withdraw water from said water seal means to establish communication between said water, closet bowl and said dis- .charge conduit via said conduit means, said first aspirator means comprising an aspirator and an enclosed reservoir arranged such that said aspirator when in operation produoes a reduced pressure in the enclosed reservoir so that water from the water seal means is thereby drawn into 1 and temporarily stored in the reservoinsecond aspirator means communicating with and operable to produ ce a reduced pressure in-s-aid discharge conduit to draw air from said bowl through said conduit means andvdischarge sameto said discharge conduit when said water' is withdrawn from said' water seal means and temporarily stored in said reservoir, and means controlling said aspirators whereby upon reactuation thereof water flows by gravity fromthe'reservoir to said water seal in the conduit means to establish the water-seal.
4., In a ventilating system as set forth in claim 3 wherein said first and second aspirator means are arranged in a series'relationship such that bothaspirators operate with the same flow of liquid.
5.-In combination with a ventilating system for a water closet having a'water seal between the ventilator system inlet and outlet, the combination comprising an enclosed reservoir carried at an elevation extending above the operating level of said water seal, conduit means communicatingbetween, the reservoir and the water seal, aspirator means communicating with said reservoir and operable to producea reduced pressure in said reservoir such that 7 water is drawnfinto the reservoir from said water seal via fiushtank and the bowl, the improvement comprising, a
discharge tube in said flush tank, a U-shaped ventilator water seal providing communication between said overflow tube and said discharge tube, an upright U-shaped overflow seal trap for preventing the passage of air from inside said flush tank into said'overflow tube, said overflow seal trap having one leg in communication with the interiorof said flush tank said overflow seal trap anddissaid conduitmeans and temporarily stored in the reservoir when said aspiratoris activated, said conduit means con- 7 ducting water from the reservoir to the water seal to charge conduit and said overflow conduit, operable means in communication with and operable upon activation to an overflow seal means in said flush tank preventing communication between the interior of the flush tank and the I ventilating system, said overflow seal means comprising an upright U-shaped conduit having one leg in communication with the interior of the flush tank and the other leg with said ventilator seal and with the inlet of said overflow conduit, crossover means extending between the ventilator seal and overflow seal means and having conducting means extending below the elevation of the inlet of said overflow conduit and providing a path for fluid flow from the ventilator seal to the overflow seal means, and a refill conduit communicating with and supplying water to said ventilator seal such that When the latter is filled, the fluid flows via said conducting means to fill the overflow seal means and when the latter is filled to thereafter overflow through the inlet of the overflow conduit to fill said seal trap in the water closet bowl.
7. In combination with a ventilating system as set forth in claim 6 wherein said refill conduit is connected to said ventilator seal below the normal operating water level of the flush tank thereby insuring that the ventilator seal will fill with Water from the flush tank should the refill conduit be inadvertently disconnected from the ventilator seal.
References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,058,436 10/36 Friel 4--213 2,406,507 8/46 Owens 4-215 2,443,705 6/48 Fitzgerarld 4-213 2,603,797 7/52 Baither 4-2l5 3,059,245 10/62 Bell 4-213 LEWIS J. LENNY, Primary Examiner.
EDWARD V. BENHAM, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A WATER CLOSET HAVING A BOWL, A FLUST TANK, AND AN OVERFLOW TUBE PROVIDING COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE FLUSH TANK AND THE BOWL, THE IMPROVEMENT COMPRISING, A DISCHARGE TUBE IN SAID FLUSH TANK, A U-SHAPED VENTILATOR WATER SEAL PROVIDING COMMUNICATION BETWEEN SAID OVERFLOW TUBE AND SAID DISCHARGE TUBE, AN UPRIGHT U-SHAPED OVERFLOW SEAL TRAP FOR PREVENTING THE PASSAGE OF AIR FROM INSIDE SAID FLUSH TANK INTO SAID OVERFLOW TUBE, SAID OVERFLOW SEAL TRAP HAVING ONE LEG IN COMMUNICATION WITH THE INTERIOR OF SAID FLUSH TANK SAID OVERFLOW SEAL TRAP AND DISCHARGE TUBE BEING ON ONE SIDE OF SAID OVERFLOW TUBE AND SAID U-SHAPED VENTILATOR WATER SEAL BEING ON AN OPPOSITE SIDE, A FIRST CROSSOVER CONDUIT BETWEEN ONE LEG OF SAID U-SHAPED VENTILATOR WATER SEAL AND SAID DISCHARGE TUBE, A SECOND CROSSOVER CONDUIT BETWEEN THE OTHER LEG OF SAID U-SHAPED WATER VENTILATOR SEAL AND THE OTHER LEG OF SAID OVERFLOW SEAL TRAP, SAID SECOND CROSSOVER CONDUIT BEING IN COMMUNICATION WITH THE MOUTH OF SAID OVERFLOW TUBE AND HAVING CONDUCTING MEANS AT A LOWER ELEVATION THAN THE MOUTH OF SAID OVERFLOW TUBE SUCH THAT WHEN SAID U-SHAPED WATER VENTILATOR SEAL IS FILLED, WATER WILL FLOW THROUGH SAID CONDUCTING MEANS TO FILL SAID UPRIGHT USHAPED OVERFLOW SEAL TRAP AND THEREAFTER FLOW TO THE MOUTH OF SAID OVERFLOW TUBE,AND ASPIRATOR MEANS COMMUNICATING WITH SAID DISCHARGE TUBE AND OPERABLE UPON ACTIVATION TO SIMULTANEOUSLY WITHDRAW WATER FROM SAID U-SHAPED WATER VENTILATOR SEAL AND TO PRODUCE A REDUCED PRESSURE IN SAID DISCHARGE TUBE TO WITHDRAW AIR FROM SAID BOWL, AND MEANS FOR ACTIVATING AND DEACTIVATING SAID ASPIRATOR MEANS WHEREBY UPON DEACTIVATION THE U-SHAPED WATER VENTILLATOR SEAL BETWEEN THE OVERFLOW TUBE AND DISCHARGE TUBE IS ESTABLISHED.
US241588A 1962-12-03 1962-12-03 Ventilated water closet Expired - Lifetime US3188658A (en)

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US241588A US3188658A (en) 1962-12-03 1962-12-03 Ventilated water closet

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3548424A (en) * 1968-02-29 1970-12-22 Case Mfg Co Ventilated water closet
US3691568A (en) * 1970-08-24 1972-09-19 William L Martz Ventilator for water closets
US3740771A (en) * 1971-05-12 1973-06-26 J Bond Air venting device for a toilet
US20120255110A1 (en) * 2011-04-05 2012-10-11 Chi Kao Ventilation system for toilet bowl

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2058436A (en) * 1935-12-06 1936-10-27 James A Friel Self-ventilating toilet
US2406507A (en) * 1945-02-05 1946-08-27 Fred L Owens Ventilating and deodorizing toilet
US2443705A (en) * 1945-05-28 1948-06-22 Fitzgerald Harold Ventilating device for water closets
US2603797A (en) * 1947-07-26 1952-07-22 Baither Harry Water motor-driven ventilator
US3059245A (en) * 1960-11-18 1962-10-23 Alfred D Bell Toilet ventilating apparatus

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2058436A (en) * 1935-12-06 1936-10-27 James A Friel Self-ventilating toilet
US2406507A (en) * 1945-02-05 1946-08-27 Fred L Owens Ventilating and deodorizing toilet
US2443705A (en) * 1945-05-28 1948-06-22 Fitzgerald Harold Ventilating device for water closets
US2603797A (en) * 1947-07-26 1952-07-22 Baither Harry Water motor-driven ventilator
US3059245A (en) * 1960-11-18 1962-10-23 Alfred D Bell Toilet ventilating apparatus

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3548424A (en) * 1968-02-29 1970-12-22 Case Mfg Co Ventilated water closet
US3691568A (en) * 1970-08-24 1972-09-19 William L Martz Ventilator for water closets
US3740771A (en) * 1971-05-12 1973-06-26 J Bond Air venting device for a toilet
US20120255110A1 (en) * 2011-04-05 2012-10-11 Chi Kao Ventilation system for toilet bowl

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