US3185151A - Catheter placement unit - Google Patents

Catheter placement unit Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3185151A
US3185151A US20355462A US3185151A US 3185151 A US3185151 A US 3185151A US 20355462 A US20355462 A US 20355462A US 3185151 A US3185151 A US 3185151A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
catheter
needle
fitting
end
hub
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Vasil P Czorny
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Sorenson Research Co Inc
Original Assignee
Sorenson Research Co Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M25/00Catheters; Hollow probes
    • A61M25/01Introducing, guiding, advancing, emplacing or holding catheters
    • A61M25/0105Steering means as part of the catheter or advancing means; Markers for positioning
    • A61M25/0111Aseptic insertion devices

Description

y 1965 v. P. CZORNY 3,185,151

CATHETER PLACEMENT UNIT Filed June 19, 1962 INVENT OR. V4846 p OZOP/V) u; AZ!

A TTORNE YS United States Patent 3,185,151 CATHET PLACEMENT UNlT Vasil P. Qzorny, alt Lalre Qity, tail, assignor to Enronson Research (Zorn, Salt Laire City, tah, a corporation of Utah Filed .l'une 19, 1962, Ser. No. 293,554- 6 Claims. (U. 128214) This invention relates to improvements in a catheter placement unit, and more particularly to a unit for placing a catheter through a cannulated needle into the vein of a patient for an intravenous infusion, although the invention may have other uses and purposes as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

Catheter placement units as developed heretofore have proven highly objectionable because of the difficulty in manipulating the unit to properly advance the catheter through the cannulated needle and position it in the vein of the patient. In some instances, a catheter was packaged in a pliable plastic sheath, connected with a cannulated needle, either capped or in the same sheath with the catheter, and the catheter being provided with a connector for engagement with an infusion tube, plugged for the purpose of maintaining sterility. With such a device the needle had to be uncovered, inserted in a patients vein, and the catheter advanced while still in its sheath. This was extremely difficult owing to back flow of blood into the sac which lubricated the catheter and made it difficult to be gripped through the sac and pushed forwardly into the vein in a dry condition. After advancement of the catheter the sac would be removed, the connector unplugged, and attached to the infusion tube. The entire procedure was messy, highly objectionable to the operator, and if the venipuncture was faulty, the entire apparatus had to be thrown away and a new attempt made with a new apparatus.

In other instances heretofore, a relatively rigid sheath was used to house the catheter and the catheter was advanced through the cannulated needle by means of a plunger, which had to be removed, the sheath removed, a connector placed in position, and the hollow hub of the needle connected to the infusion tube. Here again a slow and tedious process was involved and the operation proved messy by back fiow of blood.

In still other instances, a cannulated needle having a longitudinal slot therein was utilized, and this was objectionable because an intralurninal plug of tissue accumulated in the slot of the needle, interferingwith the advancement of the catheter, and rendering the operation unsterile by virtue of the catheter contacting the skin of the patient. 7

All such formerly known catheter units were thus objectionable in that air and residue from sterilization could not be flushed out prior to venipuncture, giving rise to the possibility of air embolism resulting, there was loss of blood from the patient, and danger of the spread of disease from potentially infected blood. Also, the units were objectionably. difficultto manipulate, resulted in a messy operation, and some operators objected to the need of removing a catheter sheath.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide a catheter placement unit by means of which the catheter may be connected to the infusion system prior to venipuncture and nothing need be removed from the unit except a needle cap and a tube cap.

Another object of the instant invention is the provision of a catheter placement unit wherein the sheath which maintains the catheter in a sterile condition remains after positioning of the catheter as a part of the infusion system.

Still another feature of this invention resides in the provision of a catheter placement unit so constructed that the catheter may be advanced through a cannulated needle into the vein of a patent in a simple, expeditious, and clean manner without direct manipulation of the catheter itself.

Also a feature of this invention is the provision of a catheter placement unit wherein the catheter may be advanced through a cannulated needle while infusion is taking place, the advancement being aided by expansion of the vein ahead of the catheter by the infusion liquid, and the catheter is maintained properly seated in the unit with the aid of the infusion liquid pressure.

It is also an object of this invention to provide an economical catheter placement unit of simple construction, and wherein the infusion tube is connected directly to the catheter sheath which thereupon becomes a part of the infusion system, and such connection may be established prior to venipuncture.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary part vertical sectional, part elevational view illustrating a catheter unit embodying principles of the instant invention, prior to advancemerit of the catheter;

FIGURE 2 is a View similar in character to FIGURE 1 but illustrating the catheter partly advanced into the vein of the patient;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary elevational View of the unit prior to use, with the needle cap removed;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary part sectional, part elevational view illustrating a modified form of catheter unit embodying principles of the instant invention, showing the same ready for use; and

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary part sectional part elevational View showing the structure of FIGURE 4 with the catheter advanced.

As shown on the drawings:

In the first illustrated embodiment of the instant invention, seen in FIGURES 1, '2 and 3, there is, shown a catheter placement uni-t embodying the usual cannu lated needle 1 having a hollow hub 2-thereon. A resilient circumferentially corrugated tube 3 is secured at one end to the needle hub 2, and at the other end to a hollow connector 4 having a tapering nose 5 of a size to seat within the hollow hub 2 of the needle. This tube 3 may satisfactorily be made of synthetic rubber or equivalent material inert to both body and infusion liquids. Se-

cured to the outer end of the connector or bushing 4 is an elongated tube 6 which, together with the resilient tube 3 forms a sheath for the catheter. This tube 6 may be made of a suitable plastic material, preferably trans- 7 parent, a polyvinyl plastic, polyurethane plastic, or equivalent material being satisfactory. A nipple 7 or equivalent means is provided at the outer end of the tube 6 and projects therefrom to receive a cap 8, FIGURE 3, thereon, to maintain the interior of the sheath and the catheter therein in a sterile condition until the unit is put to use.

Inside the tubes 3 and 6 is a catheter 9 which is in the form or" a flexible plastic tube. While the tube 6 may also be somewhat flexible, the tube 6 is preferably less flexible than the catheter. As seen in FIGURES 1 and 2, the catheter is preferably provided with an enlargement ill on its trailing end so that it will not be advanced too far. The catheter extends through a resilient plug 11 inside the connector 4, and this plug is provided with a conical opening therethrough as indicated at 12, with the smaller end of the opening toward the needle whereanswer by the catheter is movable forwardly but rearward motion is restricted, the plug functioning as a one-way valve.

In use, the instant placement unit is extremely simple and effective. It is simply necessary to remove the cap 8 from the nipple 7 and insert the end of an infusion tube 13 leading from an infusion tank 14 as diagrammatically illustrated in FIGURE 1. Of course, there will be suitable valve means in the infusion system. The needle cap or enclosure, not shown, is removed, the infusion system turned on, and the catheter unit flushed out to remove air and whatever sterilization residue may be present. Then the venipuncture is made, as indicated in FIGURES l and 2 wherein the arm 15 of a patient is diagrammatically shown with a needle entered through the flesh of the arm into a vein 16. Infusion is begun immediately-upon establishment of the venipuncture and while infusion proceeds the catheter is advanced through the needle into the vein. This may easily be accomplished by holding the unit over the hub 2 of the needle and with the other hand holding the unit over the connector 4 and physically moving the connector forwardly toward the needle compressing the corrugated tube 3. This is in effect what may be termed a pumping operation, and the catheter is advanced a certain amount each time the tube 3 is so compressed. The plug 11 maintains the increments of advancement of the catheter, and when the catheter is fully in position, as shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 2, the conical nose of the fitting 4 is forced into the hollow hub of the needle, with the enlargement It at the trailing end of the catheter seated in the plug 11. The insertion of the nose of the fitting 4 into the needle hub somewhat compresses the plug in the connector so that the needle is firmly held and the fixed position of the needle is augmented by pressure of the infusion liquid. After the catheter is positioned, the needle may be withdrawn out of the patients body and the catheter secured to the body with adhesive tape or in any other suitable manner as is commonly done when infusion is to be continued for a relatively long period of time and the risk of injury to the patient from an inserted needle is desired to be eliminated.

It will be noted that the catheter may be very easily inserted through the needle into the vein of the patient without danger of puncturing the vein wall and with the catheter properly following the tortuous contour of the vein, since the infusion liquid maintains the vein open ahead of the advancing catheter. This overcomes the former difliculty of inserting a catheter in a patients vein when the patient was under shock and the vein collapsed. It will also be particularly noted that there can be no loss of blood from the patient, there will be no air embolism resulting, the patient will not be irritated by any sterilization residue, there is no danger of spread of disease from potentially infected blood, and the entire operation of positioning the catheter may be accomplished rapidly in a neat and clean manner with no mess. Further, there are no parts of the catheter unit to be removed following insertion of the catheter, since all parts of the unit used at the time of venipuncture remain as a part of the infusion system.

In FIGURES 4 and 5 I have illustrated a different form of the instant invention. In this instance, the same needle 1 and the same catheter 9 as above described are embodied in the unit. An elongated pliable plastic sac or enclosure sheaths the catheter, one end of the sac being secured to the needle hub 2, and the other end being secured ltO a nipple 18 having an expanded end 19 outside the sheath to receive the infusion tube 13. It will be understood that'prior to use a plug or cap will seal the exposed enlarged end 19 of the nipple 18, and there will be a cap or enclosure over the needle.

When this form of the invention is put to use, it is a simple expedient to remove the plug or cap at the outer end of the sheathing means and connect the infusion tube '13 to the unit, remove the cap from the needle, flush out the unit, make the venipuncture, and advance the catheter through the needle by squeezing the sac 17 against the catheter and pushing the catheter forwardly, the sac rumpling as indicated in FIGURE 5 very readily to accomplish this purpose. When the catheter is seated with the conical head 10 thereof resting against the bottom of the hollow in the needle hub as also seen in FIGURE 5, pressure of the infusion liquid will maintain the catheter in that position. Nothing else need be removed from the unit, since the means sheathing the catheter'then become a part of the infusion system. Here again, the advantages discussed above are present, and the needle may be withdrawn from the venipuncture and the catheter secured to the patients body in a known manner. Should it be diflicult to positively seat the catheter against the bottom of 'the hollow in the needle hub, a slight withdrawal of the needle will accomplish that, and the conical end 10 on the catheter will prevent the catheter being advanced too far through the needle.

From the foregoing it is apparent that I have provided a simple form of catheter placement unit, which is extremely simple in operation as well as rapid and efiicient and in which nothing need be removed by the operator from the catheter unit except a small end cap and a needle cap, all the rest of the unit becoming a part of the infusion system.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a catheter placement unit,

a cannulated needle,

a hollow hub on the outer end of said needle,

a tubular catheter sheath of which the outer end is connectable to an infusion tube,

a hollow fitting at the inner end of said sheath,

a oneeway valve in said fitting,

a nose on said fitting shaped to seat in said needle hub,

a circumferentially corrugated resilient tube connecting the needle hub and said fitting, and

a catheter within said sheath extending through said fitting, valve and tube, whereby said catheter may be advanced through said needle by a pumping movement of said fitting relative to said needle hub.

2. In a catheter placement unit, a cannulated needle, a hollow hub on the outer end of said needle, tubular catheter sheathing means attached to said hub and arranged for connection as a part of an infusion system, a hollow fitting in said sheating means, a nose on said fitting to seat in said hollow hub, resilient means in said fitting arranged to assist advancement of a catheter and restrict retraction thereof, and a catheter in saidrsheathing means extending through said resilient means, said sheathing means being longitudinally flexible at least in part to permit advancement of the catheter, and said nose causing compression of said resilient means when seated in said hub to hold the advanced catheter. 3. In a catheter placement unit, a cannulated needle, a hollow hub on the outer end of said needle, catheter sheating means longitudinally flexible at least in part connected at one end to said hub, connecting means at the other end of said sheating means for engagement with an infusion system to permit flow of infusion liquid through. said sheathing means as a direct part of the infusion system, and

a catheter in said sheathing means with one end extending into the cannula of said needle and the other end free of engagement with said connecting means.

4. In a catheter placement unit,

a cannulated needle,

a hollow hub on the outer end of said needle,

catheter sheathing means longitudinally flexible at least in part connected at one end to said hub,

connecting means at the other end of said sheathing means for engagement with an infusion system to permit flow of infusion liquid through said sheathing means as a direct part of the infusion system,

a catheter in said sheating means with one end extending into the cannula of said needle and the other end free of engagement with said connecting means, and

catheter advancing means in said sheath and initially around an intermediate portion of said catheter and arranged to engage and hold said other end of said catheter when the same is fully advanced.

5. In a catheter placement unit,

a cannulated needle,

hollow hub means on one end of said needle, catheter sheathing means at least partly flexible connected at one end to said hub,

a nipple secured to the other end of said sheathing means for connection to an infusion system to inporate said sheathing means as a direct part of the system with infusion liquid flowing along the inside wall of the sheathing means,

a catheter loosely disposed in said sheathing means with one end in the cannula of said needle, and

an enlargement on the other'end of said catheter to prevent complete passage of said catheter through the cannula of said needle.

6. In a catheter placement unit,

a cannulated needle,

hollow hub means on one end of said needle,

catheter sheathing means at least partly flexible connected at one end to said hub,

a nipple secured to the other end of said sheathing means for connection to an infusion system to incorporate said sheathing means as a direct part of the system with infusion liquid flowing along the inside wall of the sheathing means,

a catheter loosely disposed in said sheathing means with one end in the cannula of said needle,

a hollow fitting in said sheating means and surrounding :an intermediate portion of said catheter, and

a resilient one-way valve element in said fitting to assist advancement of said catheter and resist retraction thereof.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,937,643 5/60 Elliot 128-214 3,010,453 11/61 Doherty 128-214 3,055,361 9/ 62 Ballard 128214 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,064,445 10/52 France.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. IN A CATHETER PLACEMENT UNIT, A CANNULATED NEEDLE, A HOLLOW HUB ON THE OUTER END OF SAID NEEDLE, A TUBULAR CATHETER SHEATH OF WHICH THE OUTER END IS CONNECTABLE TO AN INFUSION TUBE, A HOLLOW FITTING AT THE INNER END OF SAID SHEATH, A ONE-WAY VALVE IN SAID FITTING, A NOSE ON SAID FITTING SHAPED TO SEAT IN SAID NEEDLE HUB, A CIRCUMFERENTIALLY CORRUGATED RESILIENT TUBE CONNECTING THE NEEDLE HUB AND SAID FITTING, AND A CATHETER WITHIN SAID SHEATH EXTENDING THROUGH SAID FITTING, VALVE AND TUBE, WHEREBY SAID CATHETER MAY BE ADVANCED THROUGH SAID NEEDLE BY A PUMPING MOVEMENT OF SAID FITTING RELATIVE TO SAID NEEDLE HUB.
US3185151A 1962-06-19 1962-06-19 Catheter placement unit Expired - Lifetime US3185151A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3185151A US3185151A (en) 1962-06-19 1962-06-19 Catheter placement unit

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3185151A US3185151A (en) 1962-06-19 1962-06-19 Catheter placement unit

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3185151A true US3185151A (en) 1965-05-25

Family

ID=22754460

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3185151A Expired - Lifetime US3185151A (en) 1962-06-19 1962-06-19 Catheter placement unit

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3185151A (en)

Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3335723A (en) * 1964-12-02 1967-08-15 Baxter Laboratories Inc Indwelling catheter unit
US3683928A (en) * 1970-03-25 1972-08-15 David H Kuntz Urethral catheter applicator
US3703174A (en) * 1970-07-14 1972-11-21 Medidyne Corp Method and apparatus for catheter injection
US3757771A (en) * 1972-01-10 1973-09-11 Biophysics Corp Int Sterile inserter apparatus
US3856010A (en) * 1971-08-09 1974-12-24 Deseret Pharma Catheter placement unit with pressure closure
US3903885A (en) * 1973-02-06 1975-09-09 Braun Melsungen Ag Device for introducing flexible catheters
US4037600A (en) * 1975-07-11 1977-07-26 Poncy Mark P Catheter placement system
US4051849A (en) * 1976-04-06 1977-10-04 Poncy Mark P Catheter feeding system
US4140119A (en) * 1977-05-12 1979-02-20 Pollack Charles N Balloon-tipped extracorporeal cannula apparatus and method for insertion of same
DE2906785A1 (en) * 1979-02-22 1980-08-28 Boehringer Sohn Ingelheim Hand operated brake preventing slipping back of catheter - has coupling to sheath partly of elastically deformable material
US4301797A (en) * 1977-05-12 1981-11-24 Pollack Charles N Balloon-tipped extracorporeal cannula apparatus and method for insertion of same
US4311139A (en) * 1980-03-28 1982-01-19 Quest Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for catheter insertion
US4515592A (en) * 1980-05-13 1985-05-07 Arrow International, Inc. Catheter shield
US4613329A (en) * 1983-09-30 1986-09-23 Sherwood Medical Company Catheter placement device
US4662870A (en) * 1985-07-15 1987-05-05 Augustine Scott D Needle penetration indicator and guide
US4850974A (en) * 1984-10-11 1989-07-25 Baxter International Inc. Dispenser and method for an elongated flexible member
US5149326A (en) * 1990-09-21 1992-09-22 Baxter International Inc. Adjustable catheter contamination shield
US20080183141A1 (en) * 2007-01-26 2008-07-31 Matthew Dickson Reavill Long catheter infusion insertion method and apparatus
EP2022279A2 (en) * 2006-05-16 2009-02-11 Flexicath Ltd. Catheter insertion apparatus and method of use thereof
US20090318867A1 (en) * 2005-11-07 2009-12-24 Flexicath Ltd. Removable Adapter for a Splittable Introducer and Method of Use Thereof
WO2010031371A1 (en) * 2008-09-04 2010-03-25 Walter Pobitschka Device and method for creating an access to a hollow organ, tool
US20110077598A1 (en) * 2009-09-25 2011-03-31 St. Jude Medical Puerto Rico Llc Vascular access to closure sheath and methods
WO2011044296A1 (en) * 2009-10-06 2011-04-14 Venetec International, Inc. Extendable extension set
US20120283775A1 (en) * 2011-05-06 2012-11-08 Edward H Cully Echogenic Sleeve
US20140005613A9 (en) * 2010-07-26 2014-01-02 Steerable Instruments Bvba Capillary tube assembly
US8932258B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2015-01-13 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter placement device and method
US9095683B2 (en) 2011-02-25 2015-08-04 C. R. Bard, Inc. Medical component insertion device including a retractable needle
US9522254B2 (en) 2013-01-30 2016-12-20 Vascular Pathways, Inc. Systems and methods for venipuncture and catheter placement
US9616201B2 (en) 2011-01-31 2017-04-11 Vascular Pathways, Inc. Intravenous catheter and insertion device with reduced blood spatter
US9675784B2 (en) 2007-04-18 2017-06-13 Vascular Pathways, Inc. Intravenous catheter insertion and blood sample devices and method of use
US9872971B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2018-01-23 C. R. Bard, Inc. Guidewire extension system for a catheter placement device
US9950139B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2018-04-24 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter placement device including guidewire and catheter control elements

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR1064445A (en) * 1952-10-15 1954-05-13 Bruneau & Cie Lab Device notably for intravenous injections
US2937643A (en) * 1957-10-11 1960-05-24 Eric C Elliot Device for fluid transference
US3010453A (en) * 1957-10-08 1961-11-28 George O Doherty Apparatus for intravenously administering fluid
US3055361A (en) * 1960-04-22 1962-09-25 Deseret Pharmaceutical Company Intravenous catheters

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR1064445A (en) * 1952-10-15 1954-05-13 Bruneau & Cie Lab Device notably for intravenous injections
US3010453A (en) * 1957-10-08 1961-11-28 George O Doherty Apparatus for intravenously administering fluid
US2937643A (en) * 1957-10-11 1960-05-24 Eric C Elliot Device for fluid transference
US3055361A (en) * 1960-04-22 1962-09-25 Deseret Pharmaceutical Company Intravenous catheters

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3335723A (en) * 1964-12-02 1967-08-15 Baxter Laboratories Inc Indwelling catheter unit
US3683928A (en) * 1970-03-25 1972-08-15 David H Kuntz Urethral catheter applicator
US3703174A (en) * 1970-07-14 1972-11-21 Medidyne Corp Method and apparatus for catheter injection
US3856010A (en) * 1971-08-09 1974-12-24 Deseret Pharma Catheter placement unit with pressure closure
US3757771A (en) * 1972-01-10 1973-09-11 Biophysics Corp Int Sterile inserter apparatus
US3903885A (en) * 1973-02-06 1975-09-09 Braun Melsungen Ag Device for introducing flexible catheters
US4037600A (en) * 1975-07-11 1977-07-26 Poncy Mark P Catheter placement system
US4051849A (en) * 1976-04-06 1977-10-04 Poncy Mark P Catheter feeding system
US4301797A (en) * 1977-05-12 1981-11-24 Pollack Charles N Balloon-tipped extracorporeal cannula apparatus and method for insertion of same
US4140119A (en) * 1977-05-12 1979-02-20 Pollack Charles N Balloon-tipped extracorporeal cannula apparatus and method for insertion of same
DE2906785A1 (en) * 1979-02-22 1980-08-28 Boehringer Sohn Ingelheim Hand operated brake preventing slipping back of catheter - has coupling to sheath partly of elastically deformable material
US4311139A (en) * 1980-03-28 1982-01-19 Quest Medical, Inc. Method and apparatus for catheter insertion
US4515592A (en) * 1980-05-13 1985-05-07 Arrow International, Inc. Catheter shield
US4613329A (en) * 1983-09-30 1986-09-23 Sherwood Medical Company Catheter placement device
US4850974A (en) * 1984-10-11 1989-07-25 Baxter International Inc. Dispenser and method for an elongated flexible member
US4662870A (en) * 1985-07-15 1987-05-05 Augustine Scott D Needle penetration indicator and guide
US5149326A (en) * 1990-09-21 1992-09-22 Baxter International Inc. Adjustable catheter contamination shield
US20090318867A1 (en) * 2005-11-07 2009-12-24 Flexicath Ltd. Removable Adapter for a Splittable Introducer and Method of Use Thereof
US8613728B2 (en) 2005-11-07 2013-12-24 Flexicath Ltd. Removable adapter for a splittable introducer and method of use thereof
EP2022279A4 (en) * 2006-05-16 2009-11-25 Flexicath Ltd Catheter insertion apparatus and method of use thereof
US20090306591A1 (en) * 2006-05-16 2009-12-10 Shai Amisar Catheter insertion apparatus and method of use thereof
EP2022279A2 (en) * 2006-05-16 2009-02-11 Flexicath Ltd. Catheter insertion apparatus and method of use thereof
US8162890B2 (en) 2006-05-16 2012-04-24 Flexicath Ltd. Catheter insertion apparatus and method of use thereof
CN101500636B (en) 2006-05-16 2012-05-30 弗莱克希凯斯有限公司 Catheter insertion apparatus and method of use thereof
US9925356B2 (en) 2007-01-26 2018-03-27 Matthew Dickson Reavill Long catheter infusion insertion method and apparatus
US20080183141A1 (en) * 2007-01-26 2008-07-31 Matthew Dickson Reavill Long catheter infusion insertion method and apparatus
US8231601B2 (en) * 2007-01-26 2012-07-31 Matthew Dickson Reavill Long catheter infusion insertion method and apparatus
US9757540B2 (en) 2007-04-18 2017-09-12 Vascular Pathways, Inc. Intravenous catheter insertion and blood sample devices and method of use
US9675784B2 (en) 2007-04-18 2017-06-13 Vascular Pathways, Inc. Intravenous catheter insertion and blood sample devices and method of use
US10086171B2 (en) 2007-05-07 2018-10-02 Vascular Pathways, Inc. Intravenous catheter insertion and blood sample devices and method of use
WO2010031371A1 (en) * 2008-09-04 2010-03-25 Walter Pobitschka Device and method for creating an access to a hollow organ, tool
US9282994B2 (en) * 2009-09-25 2016-03-15 St. Jude Medical Puerto Rico Llc Vascular access to closure sheath and methods
US20110077598A1 (en) * 2009-09-25 2011-03-31 St. Jude Medical Puerto Rico Llc Vascular access to closure sheath and methods
WO2011044296A1 (en) * 2009-10-06 2011-04-14 Venetec International, Inc. Extendable extension set
USD733289S1 (en) 2010-05-14 2015-06-30 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter placement device
USD735321S1 (en) 2010-05-14 2015-07-28 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter
US9950139B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2018-04-24 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter placement device including guidewire and catheter control elements
US8932258B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2015-01-13 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter placement device and method
US8998852B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2015-04-07 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter placement device and method
US9872971B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2018-01-23 C. R. Bard, Inc. Guidewire extension system for a catheter placement device
US8882716B2 (en) * 2010-07-26 2014-11-11 Steerable Instruments Bvba Capillary tube assembly
US20140005613A9 (en) * 2010-07-26 2014-01-02 Steerable Instruments Bvba Capillary tube assembly
US9616201B2 (en) 2011-01-31 2017-04-11 Vascular Pathways, Inc. Intravenous catheter and insertion device with reduced blood spatter
US9861792B2 (en) 2011-02-25 2018-01-09 C. R. Bard, Inc. Medical component insertion device including a retractable needle
US9095683B2 (en) 2011-02-25 2015-08-04 C. R. Bard, Inc. Medical component insertion device including a retractable needle
US20120283775A1 (en) * 2011-05-06 2012-11-08 Edward H Cully Echogenic Sleeve
US9522254B2 (en) 2013-01-30 2016-12-20 Vascular Pathways, Inc. Systems and methods for venipuncture and catheter placement

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3570485A (en) Flexible catheter and inserting apparatus
US3572334A (en) Intravenous catheter placement unit
US3547119A (en) Catheter assembly
US3595230A (en) Intravenous catheter placement unit with tubular guide sheath
US3584624A (en) Flexible intravenous catheter provided with cutting tip means
US3262449A (en) Intravenous catheter placement unit with retractable needle
US3399674A (en) Catheter placement unit
US3380448A (en) Cervical-pudendal indwelling catheter set with tissue piercing means
US3348544A (en) Polypropylene canula for continuous intravenous infusion
US3382872A (en) Venous catheter and needle
US3149186A (en) Method for making a catheter
US3469572A (en) Apparatus for taking multiple fluid samples
US3330278A (en) Hypodermic needle for a cannula placement unit
US3204634A (en) Surgical catheter
US3459183A (en) Catheter placement unit with anesthetic
US3053257A (en) Catheter
US4512766A (en) Catheter valve
US3906946A (en) Indwelling vein catheter with concentric puncture needle
US3991767A (en) Tubular unit with vessel engaging cuff structure
US5944695A (en) Multiple sheath catheter using multiple stages and method of use
US4257419A (en) Suction-assisted hemorrhoid ligator
US5836918A (en) Sleeved suction device
US5135504A (en) Needle tip guard
US4473067A (en) Introducer assembly for intra-aortic balloons and the like incorporating a sliding, blood-tight seal
US6325789B1 (en) Device and method for sealing puncture wounds