US3169559A - Wire tying tool - Google Patents

Wire tying tool Download PDF

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US3169559A
US3169559A US92823A US9282361A US3169559A US 3169559 A US3169559 A US 3169559A US 92823 A US92823 A US 92823A US 9282361 A US9282361 A US 9282361A US 3169559 A US3169559 A US 3169559A
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tie
wire
means
legs
element
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Jr Loren F Working
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Jr Loren F Working
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G21/00Preparing, conveying, or working-up building materials or building elements in situ; Other devices or measures for constructional work
    • E04G21/12Mounting of reinforcing inserts; Prestressing
    • E04G21/122Machines for joining reinforcing bars
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G21/00Preparing, conveying, or working-up building materials or building elements in situ; Other devices or measures for constructional work
    • E04G21/12Mounting of reinforcing inserts; Prestressing
    • E04G21/122Machines for joining reinforcing bars
    • E04G21/123Wire twisting tools

Description

L. F. WORKING, JR

Feb. 16 1965 WIRE TYING TOOL 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 2. 1961 Feb. 16, 1965 1.. F. WORKING, JR 3,159,559

WIRE TYING TOOL Filed March 2, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Til/Illa vb Feb. 16, 1965 1.. F. WORKING, JR

WIRE TYING TOOL.

5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 2. 1961 IIIIII\ INVENTOR. [anew/9' oznA/az/k W Q 4 Feb. 16, 1965 1.. F. WORKING, JR

WIRE TYING TOOL 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 2. 1961 a 5 m y N m qrm WW W// 5 L. F. WORKING, JR

Feb. 16, 1965 WIRE 'ITYING TOOL 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed March 2 I961 INVENTOR. [OIL-NA- l llez/lvaa'e.

United States Patent 3,169,559 wmn TYING T001.

Loren F. Working, IL, 10423 Irondale Ave., Chatsworth, Calif. Filed Mar. 2, 1961, Ser; No. 92,823 25 Claims. (Cl. 140-1119) This application is a continuation-in-part of my appli: cation Serial No. 736,249 filed May 19, 1958, for Wire Tying Tool, now abandoned. v s

This invention relates to devices for fastening structural elements together, and more particularly, to unique apparatus with which to secure reinforcing rods in a latticework together.

A major expense in erecting a reinforcing gridstructure is the cost of labor required to tie the skeleton structure of reinforcing bars together. The skeleton structure is generally comprised of an open lattice work or grid formed of steel bars or rods. These rods, which are of the order of to 1 /2" in width or diameter, are quite heavy. It is necessary to secure them firmly together so that when wooden or metal forms are built up around them, and concrete is poured into the enclosure, the rods will not sag under the weight of the concrete.

For reinforcing rods of such size and weight, it is the usual practice to secure each rod to each and every other rod that crosses it along its length. At each such intersection, a short length of wire is wrapped around both rods and has its ends tightly twisted to secure the rods in place. As will be apparent, a large number of such tying operations must be performed, for even small reinforced concrete structures, and may run into millions in bridges, ofice buildings, and other major construction projects.

Heretofore, it has been necessary to perform wire tying operations by hand, and highly paid construction workers are employed for this purpose. In very large construction projects, the tirne needed for the tying operations is a major fraction of the time required to erect the reinforcing steel structure. Such delays, and the accompanying tie-up of costly machinery, materially increase the overall cost of building such structures.

, It is common practice for a worker to cut each wire tie from a roll of wire. As he moves from place to place in performing the tying operations, he carries the roll of wire with him. Even a small roll of wire is unduly heavy, and the burden of lifting it causes the worker to tire frequently. Still further, as the, worker proceeds, his fingers, get tired so that he is unable to twist the wire suficiently tight. As a result, when concrete is poured into forms built, up around the steel structure, and 'concrete is flowing, the force on the rods occasionally causes ties to give way, whereby the resulting concrete structure has scctionsthat are not as strongly reinforced as others. e

It is an object of this invention to provide unique wire tying apparatus that eliminates the above and other disadvantages associated with manual wire twisting opera tions. 7

It is another object of my invention to provide wire tying apparatus with which to twist wire ties around reinforcing'rods with uniform tightness, and more tightly than is possible by hand. g

A still further object of my invention is to provide a unique wire. tie form and package with which to facilitate wire twisting operations to secure reinforcing rods together.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a unique wire tying tool and-wire ties therefor, for automatically locating, ejecting, and twisting wire ties around a pair of rods. a 1

showing the ejector blade extended and a tie in the The above and other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the acompanying drawings of illustrative embodiments thereof, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a wire tying tool in accordance with the invention, showing it in an operative position for ejecting a wire tie to straddle a pair of crossed rods, and showing a wire tie in position preparatory to twisting the ends thereof for securing the rods together;

FIGURE 2 is a front elevation view of a single wire tie used in the tool of FIGURE 1; a

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of a row of wire ties of the type shown in FIGURE 2 adhered together for quick loading in the magazine of the-tool in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a longitudinal section view of the tool of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of FIGURE 4, showing the S-shaped configuration of a twisting element for twisting the ends of a wire tie together;

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIGURE 4, showing the ejector blade in position preparatory to ejecting a wire tie;

FIGURE 7 is a sectional view, similar to FIGURE 6, ejected position;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view of a modified form of wire tying tool of my inven tion, showing an ejectorblade incorporated inrack and inion arrangement operable from the motor shaft;

FIGURE 9 is a sectional view taken along the line -9-9 of FIGURE 8, showing the ejector blade thereo in position preparatory to ejecting a wire tie;

the detent arrangement for releasably interlocking the shaft and the driven gear thereon;

FIGURE 14 is a sectional view similar to FIGURE 13, showing the detent depressed when the shaft is stationary and the driven gear continues to rotate;

FIGURE 15 is a fragmentary side elevation view, partly in section, of a further modification of a wire tying tool of my invention, showing an ejector blade that is operable by friction wheels;

FIGURE 16 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 16 -316 of FIGURE 15, showing the gearing for operating the shaft on which the friction wheels are mounted, and showing the friction wheels in engagement with the ejector blade;

FIGURE 17 is a perspective view of the ejector blade of the tool shown in FIGURE 15;

FIGURE 18 is a perspective view of a pneumatic wire twisting device of my invention, showing a wire tie ejected to straddle a pair of rods where they cross, the ends of the tie extending into a chuck assembly adapted to hold and twist the ends of the tie together;

FIG. 19 is a longitudinal sectional View of the wire twisting device of FIGURE 18, showing the arrangement of the control mechanism for sequentially ejecting and twisting a wire tie; V

FIGURE 20 is an end elevation view of the device of FIGURE 18, as seen from the rear surface of the twister mechanism, showing the arrangement of the locating structure for automatically positioning the device so as to cause an ejected tie to straddle the crossed rods;

FIGURE 21 is a sectional view taken along the line 2121 of FIGURE 19, showing the guide channel and a tie therein preparatory to ejection;

FIGURE 22 is a sectional view taken along the bare 2222 of FIGURE 19, showing the internal construction of the magazine for supporting a row of wire ties so as to keep them aligned with the guide channel;

FIGURE 23 is a perspective view of the unique form of wire tie used in the wire twisting device of FIGURE 18;

FIGURE 24 is a sectional view taken along the line 24-24, of FIGURE 19, showingthe arrangement of parts to effect rotation of the twisting apparatus; and

FIGURES 2528 are fragmentary sectional views of the twisting apparatus, showing successively how the parts grasp the legsof an ejected tie, hold them during twisting until the tie conforms to the surface contour of the rods, and release them after the tie is completed.

Referring to FIGURE 1, there is shown a portion of a latticework of steel rods of the type to be used in a reenforced concrete structure, and a wire tying tool 19 before use in tying the rods together. The rods are shown in conventional arrangement, wherein spaced parallel rods 11, 12 extending in one direction are abutted by parallel rods 13, 14 extending at right angles thereto. a

The wire tying tool is adapted to secure the rods together, by ejecting tie elements to straddle the crossed rods 11-14, 1214, 1213, and 1143, and twisting the legs of the ties together as indicatedrat 15.

The wire tying tool 10 is shown in a position wherein it has ejected a tie 15 so as to straddle the rods 11, 13 where they cross, and preparatory to twisting the ends of the tie together. Such ejection, as in stapler tools, is

effected from a magazine 16, but in such a way that the, legs of the ejected tie 15 straddle a rotary twister or tying element 17. Rotation of the twister element 17 causes the legs of the tie 15 to be twisted about each other, whereby to secure the rods together in the desired relation.

As shown in FIGURE 1, the magazine 16 is an integral portion of a housing 13 that includes a hand grip section 20, and a trigger 21 is carried by the hand grip 20 in a position .to permit its actuation by the operator when he grasps the hand grip 20.

The trigger 21 is actuated to initiate a cycle in which a tie 15 is ejected from the magazine 16 to straddle the rods 11, 13 and effect operation of the twister element 17 for twisting the legs of the tie together To thisrend, a motor housing 22 is located at the forward end of the hand grip member 20, for supporting power means, e.g. an electric motor or air motor. As shown in FIGURE 4, an electric motor 23 is shown in the motor housing 22, and is adapted to be selectively connected to a power source, as through circuit leads 24 extending from the rear of the hand grip 20, upon actuating the trigger 21. The motor 23 operates through the front housing section 25, and through a gearbox 26, to establish rotation of the twister element 17. Referring to FIGURE 4 along with FIGURE 1, the motor housing 22 is adapted to be releasably secured to the housing 18 so that in the assembly of the tool, and prior to securing the housing 22 in place, the motor 23 may be positioned in the upper end of the housing section 25, with its shaft 32 extending through the housing section 25.

The lower end of the shaft 32 extends to the lower end of the housing section 25, which terminates in a threaded tubular portion. Thergear' box 26 has a threaded tubular projection 33 to be threaded into the lower end of the housing section 25. Within the projection 33 is a short stub shaft 34 that is adapted in its upper end to be engaged by the lower end of the motor shaft 32. In this connec tion, the confronting ends of the shafts 32, 34 are adapted to be matingly engaged, so that the stub shaft 34 can be adjusted longitudinally on the end of the shaft 32, but the shafts 32, 34 cannot rotate relative to each other, i.e., the shaft 34 rotates in unison with the shaft 32.

The shaft 34 is adapted to rotate the twister element 17. To this end, the shaft 34 is journaled at its lower end in the gear box 26, as indicated at 35. Adjacent its lower end, the shaft 34 carries a gear 36 that is in engagement with a larger gear 37 mounted on a stub shaft 38 that is journaled at-its lower end in the gear box 26, as indicated at 39. The upperend of the stub shaft 38 extends to the exterior of the gear box 26, and carries a circular plate 40 on which the twister element 17 is mounted.

To establish operation of the motor 23 for rotating the twister element 17,'a switch 42 is located in the hand grip 29, such switch 42 having a plunger 43 disposed in the 'path of the trigger 21. The trigger 21 is normally spring biased, as by a spring 44 located between the housing of the switch 42 and the trigger 21, to an outer position in which it is out of engagement with the plunger 43..

The plunger 43 is normally spring biased so as to be urged to an outer position, and in this position the switch 42 is open, so that the leads 24 are disconnected from the windings of the motor. 23. When the plunger 43 is depressed, the switch 42 is closed so that power is supplied through the leads 24 to the motor windings. To effect'such closure of the switch 42, the trigger 21 is adapted when forced inwardly to move about a pin 45 supported in the hand grip 20, and to engage the plunger 43 and force it inwardly. Releasing the trigger 21 allows the spring 44 to force it outwardly about the pin 45, thereby to permit the plunger 43 to move outwardly and cause the switch 42 to open.

In the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG- URE 4, actuation of the trigger 21 also causes a wire tie 15 to be ejected from the magazine 16. For such ejection, a solenoid 50 is provided that is mounted in front of a partition 49 at the forward end of the magazine 16, such solenoid 50 having a spring biased plunger 51 that is normally biased to an outer position. When the solenoid 50 is energized, it operates in a conventional manner to retract the plunger 51.

An ejector blade 52 for the wire ties is adapted for movement with the plunger 51 of the solenoid 50. For this purpose, the blade 52 at its upper end is connected to the plunger 51 by a suitable rigid mechanical connection 53. As shown in FIGURE 4, the ejector blade 52 is positioned for sliding movement against the rear surface of the partition 49 at the forward end of the magazine 16.

In order that the ejector blade 52 may eject a wire tie, the magazine 16 is adapted to accommodate a row of ties 15, and to continuously urge the row forwardly so that the tie at the front end of the row is in abutment with the rear surface of the partition 49. Centered in the bottom wall of the magazine 16, immediately adjacent the rear surface of the partition 49 is a slot 55. Thus, when the ejector blade 52 is thrust downwardly on retraction of the plunger 51, the wire tie in its path will be forced downwardly to pass through the slot 55.

Thecooperative arrangement of the parts for ejecting a tie will be better understood with reference to FIG- URES 6 and 7 along with FIGURE 4. In FIGURE 6, the ejector blade 52 is supported for sliding movement between guide walls 56, 57, i.e.,. side walls of the housing 18. Also as shown'in FIGURE 6, the ejector blade 52 in its upper position has its lower end position adjacent the top of the wire tie 15 that is located in its path. In this connection, the upper position of the blade 52, and hence of the plunger 51, is fixed by means of stops in the path of the upper portions of the blade 52, e.g., by interfering shoulder portion of the blade 52 and the side walls 56, 57, as indicated generally at 58, 59. When the solenoid Si) is energized, the plunger 51 carries the ejector blade to its lower position (see FIGURE 7),

thereby moving the adjacent tie out of the magazine 16; FIGURE 2 shows a preferred form of a wire tie 15,

and in FIGURE 3, the numeral 66 indicates a row of ties that are stuck together, e.g.,. as by a frangible ma- .terial, to form a channel-like clip or charge of ties to be loaded in the magazine 16. As shown, the portion of a tie connecting the upper ends of its parallel legs includes an intermediate nose portion 61 which dips below the upper ends of the legs.

The sectional view of FIGURE 4 reveals a row 69 of ties 15 loaded in the magazine 15 and urged in the direction of the partition 49. Any suitable means for resiliently urging the row of ties toward ejection position adjacent the partition 49 may be employed. in thepresent example, the row of ties is fed toward the ejection position by a feeder bar 62 which is urged forwardly in the magazine chamber by several inches of coiled feeder spring 63. The spring 63 extends from the feeder bar 62, around a pulley 64 that is mountedon the end of a rod 65 extending from the rear plate as of the magazine, and back to the rear plate 66.

The cover of the magazine 16 is'hinged on a pin 67 at its forward end, and the upper end of'the rear plate 65 is secured to the housing, as by a retaining screw 63. The magazine may be removed by loosening the screw 68 and withdrawing the pin 67, or, if the space between the magazine and the'twister element 17 is sufficiently great, the magazine may be swung open for reloading in the manner that a conventional stapling machine is reloaded.

The advantage of the form of wire tie shown in FIG- URES 2 and 3 may be better understood with reference to FIGURE 7. As shown, the nose 61 of the tie 15 first strikes the adjacent rod. Since the nose 61 is lower than the upper ends of the legs of the tie, and since the lower end of the ejector blade 52 engages the upper ends of the legs, the ejector is effectively cushioned, upon initial impact of the tie against the adjacent'rod, so as to minimize damage to the working parts of the tool.

Referring to Fi-GURES 4 and 5, the twister element 17 is generally S-shaped, and is centered for rotation on a line through the center of the slot 55. As will be apparent in this arrangement, the legs of an ejected tie will pass along the opposite surfaces of the twister element.

in the twisting operation, the legsof the tie naturally shorten. When the twisting is completed, the legs of the twisted tie have shortened suificiently to ride clear of the upper edge of the twister element 17. In this manner, the tool is easily moved away from the tied rods after the tying operation.

FIGURES 8-14 illustrate the construction and operation of a wire tying tool of my invention that employs a difierent mechanism for ejecting wire ties and effecting rotation of the twister element. In this embodiment, an ejector it? is employed that comprises a blade element To eifectdownward movement of the'blade 71, the pinions 74, 75 are rotated clockwise so as to force the racks 72, 73, and hence the blade 71 on which they are supported, downwardly to the ejection position shown in FIGURE 19. To accomplish such .rotation of the .pinions 74, 75, a gear 84 is provided on the shaft 76 intermediate the pinions 74, 75, and such gear 84 is in meshing engagement with a gear 85 that is fixed to the shaft 32' of the motor 30. Through such gearing, rotation of the shaft 32' in a predetermined direction causes the pinions 74, 75 to rotate in the direction required to move the blade 71 downwardly to the ejection position;

Rotation of the shaft 32" also establishes rotation of the twister element 17. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGURE 8, rotation of the twister elemeut'17 is effected through a gear box 26' that operates in the same manner as the gear box 26 shown in FIGURE 4. The

The sleeve 87 and the upper end of the shaft 34' are p in mating engagement, and their engaging portions are noncircular in cross section so as to permit the shaft 34' to be adjusted longitudinally, but to prevent relative rotation between the sleeve 87 and the shaft 34.

71 that on one surface is, provided with parallel gear racks 72, 73. (See FIGURE 12.) The racks 72, 73 are portions of rack and pinion assemblies in which a pair of pinions 74, 75 mesh with the teeth of the racks. The pinions 74, 75 are mounted on a shaft 76 that is journaled at its ends for rotation in the guide walls 56,

.57. The upper end of the blade 71 extends above the its lower endpoised immediately adjacent the upper ends of the wire tie 15 that is located directly in its path.

When the ejector 7:9 is moved downwardly, the racks 72, 73 ride in grooves 38 provided in the partition 4-9.

at the forward end of the magazine 15. Preferably,

when the blade 71 reaches the ejection position, the lower ends of the racks 72 do not strike the bottoms of the grooves 33, but are slightly spaced therefrom; The lowermostposition of the blade 71 is established by shoulder portions on the blade 71 coming into contact with interfering projections in its-path that extend from the sidewalls 56', 57'.

When the blade 71 reaches the ejection position, it is' necessary that the shaft 32' continue to rotate the twister element 17 through the gear box 26, the racks 72, 73' may be arranged so that when the blade 71 reaches the ejection position, thepinions 74, '75 ride against the upper ends of the racks. In such case, the twister element 17 continues to rotate while,

the ejector maintains the ejected tie in tying position. When the motor 23 ceases to operate, the shaft 32' is freely rotatable in its bearings, so that the springs 79 are free to force the ejector 79 to its uppermost'posL tion. In this connection, the racks 72, 73 effect reverse rotation of the pinions 74, 75, and hence, through the reverse rotation of the gear 84 and the gear 85, cause the shaft 32' and the twister element 17 to rotate in the reverse direction. 7

An alternative mode of operation of the rack. and pinion assembly is one in which the pinions 74, 75 remain in meshing engagement with the racks 72, 73 when the blade 71 is'i'n the ejection position. To permit the motor to continue to operate without damage to meshing parts, the gear 84 is adapted to slip on the shaft 76. Referring to FEGURES l3 and 14, along, with FIGURE 8, the shaft 76 is provided with a depression in which is located a spring 5% and a detent element 91, and the gear 3% at its inner periphery is provided with a notch 92. The notch 2 is contoured to matingly'receive the outer portion of the detent element 91, as shown in FIGURE 13.

a The spring 91' exerts suilicient thrust on the detent 'element9i to keep it located in the notch 92 under all conditions except when the ejector 7% is in the ejection position and the motor is still operating in the same direction. When this condition obtains, the pin-ions 74, 75 and their shaft 76 stop rotating, and continued rotation of the gear 84 causes it to earn the detent element 91 inwardly against the spring 9%, thereby to permit the gear 84 to slip on the shaft 76, a nd thereby permit con- To this end,

tinued rotation of the twister element 17 without damage to the meshing teeth of the pinions 74, 75. and the racks 72, 73.

Referring again to FIGURE 8, the tool is also shown with means to provide an additional safeguard during theejection operation, by latching the ejector blade 71 in the ejection position. To this end,'the trigger 21' is also adapted to operate as a lever, and is provided with an inner extension 93 to which the upper end of a link element 94 is connected. The lower end of the link 94 is secured to the end of one leg 95 of an L-shaped latch element 96 that is pivoted on a pin-97 in the housing 18'. As shown in FIGURE 8, the leg 95 is horizontally disposed in the undepressed position of the trigger 21', and in this situation the other leg 98 of the latch 96 is vertically disposed.

When the trigger 21 is actuated, and the ejector 70 moves to the ejection position, the lower end of the leg 93 is adapted to engage the upper portion of the ledge 78. As will be apparent, if the leg 98 is disposed in the path of the ledge 78 when the ejector reaches the ejection position, it is also disposed on the path of the ledge 78 as the ejector moves to the ejection position. To permit the ledge 78 to move .past the leg 98 in its path, the leg 95 is made of thin spring metal. Thus, when the ledge 78 engages the leg 98 in its downward passage, the leg 95 yields to permit the leg 98 to give way and permit the ledge to continue its downward movement.

As soon as the ledge 78 passes the lower end of the leg 98, the spring effect of the leg 95 operates to cause the leg 98 to move against the upper edge of the ledge 78, and to latch the ledge in position so that it cannot be pulled upwardly by the spring 79. To aid in this operation, the lower end of the leg 98 is provided with a cam surface portion, indicated at 99. The cam surface portion 99 is smoothly curved so as to aid movement of the leg 98 to the latching position.

When the trigger 21 is released, the above described lever, link and latch arrangement operates in the reverse direction to release the ejector 70 and permit the spring 79 to return it to its uppermost position. In such operation, by virtue of the contour of the cam surface portion 99 on the leg 98, and of the force of the spring 44 in returning the trigger 21' to its undepressed position, the leg 98 undergoes a smooth wiping action to move off the ledge 78, and thereby clear the ledge and free the ejector for the return movement.

' FIGURES -17 illustrate a modification of the tool structure shown in FIGURE 8. In this embodiment, the racks 72, 73 are eliminated, and the pinions 74, 75 are replaced with friction wheels 74, '75. The friction wheels 74', 75', which are made of rubber or other suitable plastic material having frictional qualities, bear directly on the adjacent smooth surface of theblade 71. When the motor operates, the friction wheels 74, 75 force the blade 71 downwardly to the ejection position. When the blade 71 reaches the ejection position, the wheels 74, 75' slip against the surface of the blade 71 while the motor continues to operate for the remainder 'of the twisting operation. When the motor is de-energized, the blade 71 is retracted by the spring 79 as in the manner previously explained. In this embodiment, as in the embodiment shown in FIGURE8, the latching mechanism may be employed if desired as an additional aid in holding the ejector in the ejection position while the twisting operation proceeds.

FIGURES 18-28 illustrate the construction and operation of a unique pneumatic wire-tying tool, and wire tie therefor, in accordance with my invention. Referring to FIGURE 18, there is shown a tool 100 having an air motor 101, and a housing 102. that supports the motor 101 and provides means for conducting high pressure air to the motor, as through an air inlet hose 103 connected to the housing 102.

Secured to the housing 102 adjacent the motor 101 is a magazine 104 for accommodating a row of preformed ties. Also secured to the housing 102, and spaced from the magazine 104, is a gear box 105 that houses chuck assembly 106. The chuck assembly 105 is disposed in the path of an ejected tie, indicated at 107, so as to receive and hold the ends of the legs of the tie 107 while twisting them together. The housing 102 is I provided with a valve control trigger 108' which, when actuated, permits air from the line 103 to effect ejection of the tie 107 and operation of the motor 101 so that the chuck assembly 106 operates to twist the ends of the legs of the tie 107 together.

In FIGURE 18, the tool 100 is in position wherein it has ejected a tie 107 to straddle a pair of crossed rods 110, 111 that form part of a latticework of reenforcing rods. When the tie 107 is thus ejected, the ends of its legs extend into the chuck assembly, and operation of the motor 101 then operates the chuck assembly 106 to wrap the legs of the tie about themselves sufiiciently to tie the rods 110, 111 securely together.

FIGURE 19 illustrates the cooperative arrangement of the parts of the unique pneumatic wire-tying tool of my invention. As shown, the connection from the air line 103 to the interior of the housing 102 is effected through a pistol grip section 114, through an input connection,

shown as a tubular element 115, to a valve 116. The trigger 108 is pivoted on a supporting pin 117 in the housing, and normally rests against the outer end of a springbiased plunger 118. The plunger 118 is normally biased to an outer position, and when depressed by actuating the trigger 108, the plunger 118 effects fluid communication between the input connection and an output connection 120. As shown, the output conection 120 is a tubular element connected between the Valve housing 116 and the rear end of a cylinder 121.

Slidably' disposed in the cylinder 121 is a piston 122, which is normally biased to a position at the rear of the cylinder 121. To effect such biasing, the piston 122 carries an elongated pin 123, and an elongated compression spring 124 surrounding the pin 123 extends from the piston 122, past the end of the pin 123, and through the housing 102 to a remote wall 125.

The piston 122 also supports one end of an ejector blade 126 for ejecting wire ties from the magazine 104. The outer end of the ejector blade 126 is located adjacent a partition 127 at the forward end of the magazine 104, and is adapted so that when the piston 122 is thrust forwardly, the blade 126 slides along the partition 127. The outer end of the blade 12:: engages the wire tie 107 in its path and moves it through a slot 128 to the exterior of the magazine 104. As shown in FIGURE 21, the partition 127 has a guide channel 127' in its outer face. The depth of the guide chanel 127' is at least equal to the thickness of the blade 125, and its Width is equal to the width of the blade. In FIGURE 21, a wire tie 107 is shown in the guide channel 127', with its legs adjacent the side walls of the channel.

The piston 122 is driven forward by high pressure air entering the rear of cylinder 121 when the trigger 108 is actuated. The rear end of the piston 122 normally abuts a plug 130 that closes the rear end of the cylinder 121. The plug 130 is chamfered, as at 131, where the connection 120 leads into the cylinder 121. The chamfer 131 is provided so that, when the valve 116 is opened, air impinges against a sufficient area of the rear surface of the piston 122 to cause the piston to move forwardly.

Immediately upon the piston 122 being separated from the plug 130, the high pressure air is applied against the entire rear surface of the piston, thereby to continue its forward movement.

1 During the major portion of the ejection stroke of the piston 122, the motor 101 is inoperative. The motor 101 does not operate until the legs of an ejected tie are engaged by the chuck assembly 105. When this has been accomplished, air is supplied to the motor 101 to efiect rotation of the chuck assembly 106 for the purpose of twisting the legs of the tie together. This operation of the motor 101, following the ejection stroke of the piston 122 is effected through a short tubular connection 132 between the air inlet of the motor and the cylinder .121. As shown, the tubular element 132 is connected to the cylinder 121 at a point spaced a short distance from the forward end of the cylinder. To permit airto enter the tubular element 132 for operating the motor 161, the piston 122 must move to the position forward of the tubular element 132, i.e., as indicated in phantom lines. When the piston 122 has reached the position shown in phantom, the air pressure holds the piston in that position while the motor 131 is operating.

The return stroke of the piston 122 is effected by releasing the trigger 1%. Such release cuts off the air supply to the cylinder 121, and the valve 116 functions to permit air behind the piston to be bled E through the valve. The spring 124 thus is'free to move the piston back against the plug 134).

To effect the desired twisting operation, I provide unique chuck and wire tie constructions. Referring to FIGURES 19 and 24, the chuck assembly comprises 'a plug 135 that is mounted for sliding movement on a pin 136 secured in the bottom of the gear box 1115, and a compression spring 137 surrounds the pin 136 for biasing the plug 135 to an outer position. As shown in FIG URE 25, the plug 135 is provided with an outer opening of greater diameter than that through which the pin 136 extends, and the pin 135 is provided with an enlarged head 139 in the opening 138, w-hereby to capture the plug 135 and prevent it from slipping off the pin 136.

The plug 135 is surrounded by a short cylindrical element 149 having an inner surface that is fluted, as indicated at 141 in FIGURE 24, and which at its outer end has a fluted-inwardly tapering portion 14-2 (FIG- URE 19). As indicated, the ridges forming the transitions in the fluting are aligned. Furthermore, the inner ends of the ridges within the cylinder 14! terminate a short distance from the inner end of the cylinder 14% whereby to provide a short, straight cylindrical section 143 of the inner wall of the cylinder. 5

Referring to FIGURES 19 and 24, the fluted cylinder 14% is adapted for rotation by the output shaft 145 of the motor 101. In this connection, the inner end of the cylinder 141i is press-fit into a-ring gear 146 that is in meshing engagement with a gear 147 carried on the motor shaft 145.

. When a wire tie 1%7 is ejected from the magazine 1% as above described, its legs are thrust into the cylinder 141) and captured between the plug 135 and opposed depressions in the inner wall of the cylinder 14%. To aid in their entry, the ends of the legs of the tie 157 are sharply tapered as at 159 (see FIGURE 25) at their outermost portions. Thus, when the ends of the legs of the tie reach the cylinder 14! the tapered ends thereof are guided by the tapered fluted portion 142 into the interior of the cylinder 14%. In this connection, it should be noted that the distance between flute edges and the plug 135 is less than the diameter of the tie legs.

FIGURES 25-28 illustrate the manner in which twisting of the wire tie 107 proceeds.

FIGURE 25 shows a tie 197 in the ejected position, wherein the legs of the tie are captured in the'chuck assembly 196 preparatory to the twisting operation. As soon as the cylinder starts to rotate, both legsof the tie are bent and locked between the plug and the contacting flute edge.

FIGURE 26 illustrates the positions of the parts during the first portion of the twisting operation, i.e., after the cylinder 149.1138 begun rotating, through the action of the gears 147, 146. As shown, the gear 146 has moved longitudinally of the gear 147, andthe cylinder 14% has moved upwardly'with the gear 146. A fixed bushing v14 8 surrounds the upper end of the cylinder 140. Such movement of the cylinder 140 and gear 146, which may continue until the gear 146 engagesthe bushing 148, is eifected through the shortening of the legs of the tie 107 when they start to undergo twisting; Since the legs are captured between the plug 135 and the cylinder 14%) as above described, this shortening of the legs exerts an upward pull on the cylinder 14%, whereby the cylinder 140 is carried along the plug 135.

The ever-shortening legs of the tie 1ii7 continue to force the cylinder 14! and hence the gear 145, upwardly until the legs of the tie can clear the chuck assembly. Just before this condition is reached, the plug 135 is forced downwardly along the pin' 136 so as to bottom against the lower wall of the gear box 105. This situation is shown in FIGURE 27, and is brought about by virtue of the fact that as the twisting proceeds through a number of turns, the shortening legs, while carrying the cylinder 14% outwardly, also engage the upper pontion 0f the plug 135. The force with which the legs are brought to .bear against the upper'po'rtion of the plug 135 is sufficient to force it downwardly to the position shown in FIGURE 27.

FIGURE 28 shows the twisting of the tie completed, and the cylinder 14% and the plug 135 returned to their initial positions. T he return to these positions from those shown in FiGURE 27 is efiected when the cylinder 14%) has moved out to a position wherein the clearance between the plug-135 and the adiacent portions of-the cylinder 140 is greater than the diameters of the legs of the tie. With the ends of the legs of the tie no longer wedged or captured, they no longer exert a suiiicient axial pull on the cylinder 149 to prevent its return to its initial position. Simultaneously, of course, the plug 135 is free to be urged back to its initial position.

Movement of the plug 135 to its initial position has the added advantage that it forces the adjacent ends of v the chuck assembly is easily disengaged from the twisted tie, and the tool thereby freed for movement to another position. In this connection, the upper portion of the plug may, as shown, be made frusto-conical. This shape will further insure easy disengagement of the tool from a completed tie.

It will be noted that in the operation of the chuck assembly 1%, the legs of a wire :tie will not undergo perfectly symmetrical deformation while they are being twisted. This means that the ends of thelegs of a tie will tend not to be released simultaneously. To avoid the possibility that one leg would remain captured, the plug 135 is adapted for slight lateral movement. For this purpose, the opening in the plug 135 that surrounds the pin 135 is slightly greater in diameter than the pin. Such clearance between the confronting portions of the pin 136 and the opening in the plug 135 is sufficient so that, upon release of one leg of the twisted tie, the remaining captured leg immediately exerm a lateral thrust on the plug 135. The plug thereupon is urged in the direction of the thrust, whereby to provide clearance to permit the remaining leg to move out of the space between the plug and the interior of the cylinder 1 1i midportion to the parallel legs.

The lengths'of the midportion 155 and the connecting portions 156, and the angles which the connecting por- V tions make with the midportion and the legs, are such of the wire tie.

that the legs of a tie are'spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the diagonal between opposite angles formed by the crossed rods. For convenience, a single size of tie is made wherein the distance between the legs is greater than the diagonals formed with the rods of different diameters. In one example, a tie 107 is formed with the legs 1% in. apart, the connecting portions 156 making angles of 45 with the midportion 155 and 135 with the legs, such midportion being 0.5 in. long. The transitions preferably are rounded as shown, rather than sharp, so the tie will deform easier while the legs are being twisted together. The overall length of the tie is designed so that the ends of the legs will be captured by the chuck assembly 166 before the midportion 155 reaches the adjacent rod, i.e., when the magazine 104 abuts the adjacent rod.

The wire ties 107 are made of soft metal, so as to be readily deformable. When a tie is ejected so that its legs extend along opposite angles formed by the crossing rods, and the ends of the legs are captured in the chuck assembly 166, the midportion 155 of the crown is spaced from the adjacent rod (see FIGURE 25). During the first portion of the twisting operation, the midportion 155 of the crown is brought against the adjacent rod, and continued pull on the legs forces the entire crown to deform and follow the contours of the surface portions of the rods straddled thereby (see FIGURE 26). Simultaneously, the twisting of the legs forces the upper portions thereof to deform to follow the contours of the 'rods. In this manner, the rods are tied securely together, with a minimum of slack.

Since my tie 107 is of soft, easily deformable material, it is necessary during ejection to prevent the crown thereof from deforming when the legs strike the upper 'fluted portion 142 of the cylinder 14%). To this end, the ejector blade 126 has its outer, end contoured to matingly engage the midportion 155 and the connecting portions 156 of the tie. Thus, and as shown in FIGURE 25 the end of the blade 126 has a (trapezoidal-shaped notch having a midportion 155 and side portions 156' conforming to the midportion 155 and connecting portions 156 ofa tie. Thus, the blade 126 snugly engages the crown substantially along its entire length. In tlds manner, I eliminate the possibility that any portion of the crown might be deformed during ejection of a tie, e.g., as where the end of one leg of the tie being ejected strikes the cylinder 140 before the other leg does.

Referring to FIGURES l8, 19 and 22, the magazine 104 is in the form of a housing having a cross section conformed to the shape of the wire ties 167. To aid in preventing the ties from getting cooked in position within the magazine, there is provided a guide plug 158 (see FIGURE 22), which has a plurality of surface portions that are spaced from the inner wall of the magazine housing a sufiicient distance to permit the ties to move longitudinally through the housing, but to prevent undesired lateral motion of the ties. For example, as shown in FIGURE 22, the guide plug 158 has a U-shaped portion 159 and a foot portion 160 that is secured to the housing of the magazine. As shown, the U-shaped portion 159 and the foot portion 160 are provided with ribs or fins at different points that are spaced from the inner wall of the housing a distance only slightly greater than the diameter As will be apparent, such a guide plug can be provided that is of extremely light weight.

For biasing a row of wire ties forwardly in the magazine 104, my unique tool employs a pusher plate 161 (see FIGURE 19) which has substantially the same di- 'mensions as'the wire ties, so as to be slidable within the magazine housing in the same manner as the ties; The pusher element 161 is supported for sliding movement along a pusher bar or rod162, and to this end a bracket member 163 is secured, as at 164, to the flat crown portion of the pusher element 161, and thebracket 163 is slidably disposed on the rod 162.

As shown, the bracket 163 is located between the side walls of the channel 159, and the rod 162 extends through the channel. Further, and referring to FIGURE 18 along with FIGURE 19, the rod 163 is a generally U-shaped element, having an external portion that extends out of the magazine 164 and along the outer surface thereof. The outer end of the rod 163 is formed as a hook that is releasably attached to the magazine, as at 165.v

To bias the pusher element 161 forwardly in the magazine, I provide an elongated compression spring 167 around the rod 162, which extends between the bracket 163 and a fixed collar 163 on the outer portion of the rod.

Removal of the pusher element 161 from the magazine is effected by forcing the rod 162 upwardly until the outer end thereof is unhooked from the magazine. Thereafter, the rod is moved rearwardly to slide the pusher element 161 out of the magazine. After loading a row of wire ties in the magazine, the pusher element is reinserted, and the rod is forced inwardly a sutficient distance to permit the outer end thereof to be hooked to the magazine. With the magazine thus loaded, the pusher element 161 abuts the outer wire tie of the row, so that when the rod is hooked to the magazine, the inner end of the rod moves forwardly through the bracket 163. The spring 167 is thus compressed, so that the pusher element 161 exerts a firm thrust against the rear wire tie in the row.

As the ejection and twisting operations proceed, the spring 167 forces the bracket 163, and hence the pusher element 151, forwardly to keep the remaining portion of the row biased so that a wire tie is always in abutment with the partition 127 at the forward end of the magzine. The innermost position of the pusher element 161 is that at which the bracket 163 reaches the end of the rod 162. The inner end of the rod has an enlarged head 162, which constitutes a stop for the forward motion of the bracket 163.

My inventionalso includes unique means for automatically locating the wire-tying tool in position so that the axis of the chuck assembly 106 passes through the center of the intersection of the crossed rods, whereby to assure that the legs of an ejected tie will straddle both rods without interference. Referring to FIGURES 18-20, the portion of the housing through which the motor shaft 145 extends is fitted with indexing apparatus in the form of a pair of guide plates 170, 171 that are oriented along lines that intersect at an angle equal to that ofthe intersecting or crossing rods 11!), 111. As shown in FIGURES 18 and 20, wherein the rods 110, 111 are right angles t o each other, the plates 17%, 171 are likewise at right angles to each other. Furthermore, the guide plates 1719, 171 are so dimensioned that they will not only'abut the rods 110, 111 firmly, but the axis of the chuck assembly 106 is centered with respect to the rods 110, 111.

With the above-described automatic locating means, the operator needs only to manipulate the tool so as to position the gear box on the opposite side of the latticework from'which he is working, bring the guide plates 170, 171 into abutment with both of the rods 110, 111, and then squeeze the trigger 108. Since the guide plates 170, 171 automatically center the tool as above described, there is no possibility that the legs of an ejected tie will strike the rods. i

In view of the various embodiments of wire-tying tools and wire ties illustrated and described herein, it will be apparent that various modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention. For

example, it will be apparent that electrically powered .W-ire tying tools, such as that illustrated in FIGURE 4,

may also be made to operate in a sequential manner as the pneumatic tool above described, i.e., by first ejecting a tie and then operating the mechanism for twisting the legs together. For this purpose, an additional switch may be located in the input-line to the motor, such switch l3 being normally open and disposed in the path of the solenoid plunger. When the plunger reaches its lower position, wherein a tie has been ejected, it closes this additional switch to cause power to be supplied to the motor for the twisting operation.

My invention also embraces other variations and means for selectively and sequentially operating the ejecting and twisting means. By way of example, electrical power may be employed for ejecting wire ties, and pneumatic power used for the twist-ing operation, or vice versa. Nor is my invention limited to portable hand tools, as it is apparent that ejecting and twisting mechanisms of. considerably larger dimensions may be supported in fixed space relation, as on carriages of machinery adapted for heavy duty work, in which case theejecting and twisting mechanisms may be moved to different positions by hydraulic operation of the carriagesl The foregoing amply demonstrates that my invention embraces a variety of modifications of the wire-tying tools and wire ties shown and described herein. Accordingly, I do not intend that my invention be limited, except as by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. Wire tying apparatus comprising: a stapler-like device having a housing for a row of substantially U-shaped wire ties; ejection means in said device for moving a tie at one end transversely of the row to the exterior of said housing; rotary twister means to engage the legs of an ejected tie, said twister means'being spaced from said housing and in the path of the ends of the legs of an ejected tie, said twister means being operable when turned to turn the engaged legs of an ejected tie therewith; means for operating said ejection means to eject a tie; and means cooperable with said operating means for automatically rotating said twister means upon ejection of a tie.

,2. A wire tying tool comprising: an elongated housing for a row of wire ties; means at one end of said housing for ejecting wire ties from said housing to straddle an object; means for feeding'a row of ties in said housing toward said one end thereof; rotary means having a twister mechanism in fixed spaced relation to said housing, said mechanism having a portion disposed to be'straddled by the ends of the legs of an ejected tie; means for operating said ejection means to eject a tie; and means cooperable with said operating means for rotating said rotary means automatically when a tie is ejected to cause said twister 'mechanism to twist the le sof an ejected tie about each other.

' 3. A portable wire tying tool comprising: a rotary wire twister device; a housing having a hand'grip member; an elongated magazine in'said housing for supporting a row of generally U-shaped wire tie elements, said magazine being spaced from said wire twister device and having one end in a plane that includesj the ofsaid wire twister device; a panel in said housing disposed across said one end of said magazine;bias means in said magazine for urging a row of tieelements therein toward said panel, thereby to cause the tie element at said one end to abut said panel; an ejector element slidable along said panel to move the tie element abutting said panel to a position outside said magazine where its legs are in the path of said Wire twister device; control means for automatically operating said ejector means and said wire twister device for successively ejecting a tie element and turning its legs about said axis to twist them together; and trigger means supported by said hand grip-member'for selectively operating said control means.

4. A wire tying tool as defined in claim 3, wherein:

said control means includes an electric motor having an connecting and disconnecting said motor to a power 5. A wire tying tool as defined in claim 4, wherein:

said control means also includes a solenoid fixed in said housing, said solenoid having a plunger movable on an axis parallel to said ejector element, said ejector element fixed to said plunger; and electrical connections between said switch and said solenoid.

6. A wire tying tool as defined in claim 4, wherein: said ejector element includes rack elements; spring means normally holding said ejector element inwardly of said magazine; pinions engaging said rack elements, said pinions being fixed on a common shaft supported in said housing; a gear on said common shaftyand a gear on said motor shaft in meshing engagement with said gear on said common shaft, said motor shaft operating throughsaid gears when the motor is energized to rotate said pinions for moving said ejector element to eject a tie element.

7. A wire tying tool as defined in claim 4, wherein: the gear on said common shaft is adapted to slip on such shaft in the event said pinions stop rotating while said motor is energized. V

8. wire tying tool as defined in claim 4, including: spring means normally holding said ejector element inwardly of said magazine; a pair of friction wheels fixed on a common shaft supported in said housing, said friction wheels frictionally engaging said ejector element; a gear on said common shaft; and a gear on said motor shaft in meshing engagement with the gear on said common shaft, said motor shaft operating through said gears when the motor is energized to rotate said friction wheels in a direction to move said ejector element to eject a tie element.

' 9. A wire tying tool as defined in claim 3, wherein: said control means includes an air motor having an output shaft; gear means coupling said output shaft and said rotatable device; and a valve in said hand grip member operable by said trigger means for coupling and decoupling said air motor to a source of air under pressure.

10. A wire tying tool as defined in claim 9, further including: a cylinder having'a closed end coupled to said valve; a piston in said cylinder; means normally biasing said piston toward said closed end; a connection between said air motor and the interior of said cylinder at a point axially spaced from said closed end, whereby said piston moves from said closed end past said point before the air motor is connected to said valve; and means effecting movement of said ejector element with said piston.

11. A wire tying tool as defined in claim 10, wherein: said ejector element extends into said cylinder and is fixed to said piston.

12. In a Wire tying tool having a magazine for support-.

ing generallyU-shaped tie elements, and ejector means for moving a tie element to the exterior of the magazine, twisting apparatus for engaging the legs of the ejected tie element and wrapping them together, comprising: a generally S-shaped rigid element; and a circular supporting plate for said element, said element being secured to said plate so the center thereof passes through the'axis of said plate.

13. In a wire tying tool having a magazine for supportmg generally U-shaped tie elements, and ejector means for moving a tie element to the exterior of the magazine, twisting apparatus for engaging the legs of the ejected tie element and wrapping them together, comprising: a tubular element; and a solid cylindrical element Within said tubular element, the confronting walls of said elements being spaced sufiiciently to permit the legs of an ejected tie to be forced therebetween at diametrically opposed points; means supporting said tubular element for rotation; and means supporting said cylindrical element against fluted wall flares outwardly at the leg-receiving end there- I.

16. Apparatus as defined in claim 14, wherein: said cylindrical element is adapted to undergo slight lateral movement relative to said tubular element; and means normally biasing said cylindrical element to a position where it partly extends beyond the leg-receiving end of said tubular element.

17. In a wire tying tool for tying crossed rods of a latticework together, the combination of: a housing having spaced portions adjacent one end for supporting respective ejector and rotary wire tying elements, wherein the ejector element is slidable in a plane toward and away from the wire tying element, and the axis'of the wire tying element passes through the center of such plane, said spaced portions being secured in fixed spaced relation by an interconnecting portion at said one end; and a locator device secured to said interconnecting portion on the side thereof opposite said axis, said locator device having a pair of legs on lines that intersect at a pretermined angle, said predetermined angle being the angle at which the rodsto be tied cross each other.

18. A tool fora tie of soft metal that has a crown of predetermined contour comprising: a blade element having a tie engaging end, said tie engaging end being shaped to matingly fit the predetermined contour of the crown of the tie. r

19. A portable wire tying tool which includes? a housing provided with a handle; a magazine in said housing for containing a row of generally U-shaped wire ties; a resilient spring means associated with said magazine for feeding a row of wire ties therein toward an ejection position in a plane at one end .of said magazine; a tubular sleeve projecting from said housing along a line parallel to said plane. and longitudinally adjustable with respect to said housing; a twisting rotor means mounted at the V projecting end of said tubular sleeve and including a rotor disposed with its axis in said plane, said rotor being spaced from said magazine; a motor in said housing having a shaft extending through said tubular sleeve and adapted to drive said twisting rotor means; an ejector means reciprocably mounted in said housing in said plane; resilient spring means for holding said ejector means retracted into said housing from said ejection position; driving mechanism associated with said shaft for driving said ejector means from said retracted position into ejection position to eject a Wire tie from said ejection position to straddle an object and engage said rotor at its ends; trigger means mounted in said handle for operating said motor; and latch means associated with said trigger means for engaging said ejector and holding it in ejection position during operation of said trigger means. 20. A Wire tying tool as described in claim 19 in which said tubular sleeve is releasably held in said housing and adjustable with respect thereto. 21. A wire tying tool as described in claim 19 in which 'i 53 said tubular sleeve and said shaft are telescopically adjustable with respect to said housing.

22. A wire tying tool as described in claim 19 in which said ejector driving mechanism includes: rack means extending longitudinally on said ejector means; pinion means engaging said rack means; and gear means driven by said shaft for driving said pinion means.

23. A wire tying tool as described in claim 19 in which said ejector driving mechanism includes: a drive wheel means rotatably mounted in said housing with its axis transverse to the direction of travel of said ejector means and adapted to frictionally engage the surface of said ejector means and drive it into ejection position; and gear means associated with said shaft for driving said drive wheel means when said trigger means is operated.

.24. In combination: a stapler-like mechanism having a housing for a row of U-shaped elements and including means for selectively ejecting individual elements from the row; a twister device spaced from said housing; a member extending between said housing and said twister device for holding said twister device for rotation in a position wherein said twister device is engageable by the ends of the legs of an ejected element; and means operable through said member and cooperable with the-ejecting means to rotate said twister means so as to elfect rotation of the legs of the ejected element about the axis of said twister element.

25. In combination: spaced staple moving means and twister means adapted to be positioned on opposite sides of an object, said staple moving means being operative to move a substantially U-shaped staple element of soft metal to a position astride such an object, said twister means being operative to engage the legs of the element when placed astride an object and to twist the legs toether; and operating control means for effecting operations of said staple moving means and said twister means in synchronism so that said twister means, immediately upon the element being positioned astride an object, engages the legs of the element and twists them together.

CHARLES W. LANE-1AM, Primary Examiner. RICHARD A. WAHL, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. WIRE TYPE APPARATUS COMPRISING: A STAPLER-LIKE DEVICE HAVING A HOUSING FOR A ROW OF SUBSTANTIALLY U-SHAPED WIRE TIES; EJECTION MEANS IN SAID DEVICE FOR MOVING A TIE AT ONE END TRANSVERSELY OF THE ROW TO THE EXTERIOR OF SAID HOUSING; ROTARY TWISTER MEANS TO ENGAGE THE LEGS OF AN EJECTED TIE, SAID TWISTER MEANS BEING SPACED FROM SAID HOUSING AN IN THE PATH OF THE ENDS OF THE LEGS OF AN EJECTED TIE, SAID TWISTER MEANS BEING OPERABLE WHEN TURNED TO TURN THE ENGAGED LEGS OF AN EJECTED TIE THEREWITH; MEANS FOR OPERATING SAID EJECTION MEANS TO EJECT A TIE; AND MEANS COOPERABLE WITH SAID OPERATING MEANS FOR AUTOMATICALLY ROTATING SAID TWISTER MEANS UPON EJECTION OF A TIE.
US92823A 1961-03-02 1961-03-02 Wire tying tool Expired - Lifetime US3169559A (en)

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US3211187A (en) * 1962-08-22 1965-10-12 Bosch Gmbh Robert Wire tying machine
US3273605A (en) * 1963-07-08 1966-09-20 Ferrarn Ind Staple twister
US3388725A (en) * 1966-10-19 1968-06-18 Randel E. Richardson Wire winding device
US3494385A (en) * 1968-03-07 1970-02-10 Thomas J Hanigan Tieing or wire twisting tool
US3524481A (en) * 1968-03-04 1970-08-18 Nicholas E Griffin Wire tying apparatus
US3590885A (en) * 1969-07-31 1971-07-06 James E Ward Tool for tying wire
US3665978A (en) * 1970-11-12 1972-05-30 Marlow H Pardike Tieing tool
US3695311A (en) * 1970-11-10 1972-10-03 Thomas J Hanigan Wire tieing tool
US3786841A (en) * 1972-10-13 1974-01-22 Novelty Tool Co Inc Wire-tie forming and twisting tool
US3867968A (en) * 1972-06-27 1975-02-25 Evg Entwicklung Verwert Ges Apparatus for binding mesh mats in stacks
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US4449660A (en) * 1981-04-30 1984-05-22 Black & Decker Inc. Fastener tool
EP0122883A2 (en) * 1983-04-15 1984-10-24 MRK Marketing and Management Techniques (UK) Limited Method of mechanically connecting the rods of a rod network, and apparatus for mechanically connecting the rods of a rod network
FR2552364A1 (en) * 1983-09-23 1985-03-29 Lafon Guy Tying device, particularly using metal wire
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WO1986007618A1 (en) * 1985-06-17 1986-12-31 Guido Cianciullo An automatic apparatus for strapping elongated superposed bodies
WO1987001753A1 (en) * 1985-09-24 1987-03-26 Styner & Bienz Ag Process and device for connecting at least two rods
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US5178195A (en) * 1989-04-07 1993-01-12 Styner & Bienz Ag Apparatus for connecting at least two rods
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US5431196A (en) * 1994-01-03 1995-07-11 Belcan Specialty Equipment Engineering Division Of Belcan Engineering Groups, Inc. Power rebar tying tool
US5913341A (en) * 1992-12-14 1999-06-22 Ironbar Pty Ltd. Apparatus and method for tying at least two bars
WO2001029347A1 (en) 1999-10-18 2001-04-26 Peter James Hitchin Rod clip and apparatus
US20020083994A1 (en) * 2000-12-29 2002-07-04 Tien-I Chen Pneumatic steel bar binding machine mechanism
US7143563B1 (en) 2003-05-20 2006-12-05 Palmer Douglas A Tie and tie method for binding together adjacent support elements
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US3211187A (en) * 1962-08-22 1965-10-12 Bosch Gmbh Robert Wire tying machine
US3273605A (en) * 1963-07-08 1966-09-20 Ferrarn Ind Staple twister
US3388725A (en) * 1966-10-19 1968-06-18 Randel E. Richardson Wire winding device
US3524481A (en) * 1968-03-04 1970-08-18 Nicholas E Griffin Wire tying apparatus
US3494385A (en) * 1968-03-07 1970-02-10 Thomas J Hanigan Tieing or wire twisting tool
US3590885A (en) * 1969-07-31 1971-07-06 James E Ward Tool for tying wire
US3695311A (en) * 1970-11-10 1972-10-03 Thomas J Hanigan Wire tieing tool
US3665978A (en) * 1970-11-12 1972-05-30 Marlow H Pardike Tieing tool
US3867968A (en) * 1972-06-27 1975-02-25 Evg Entwicklung Verwert Ges Apparatus for binding mesh mats in stacks
US3786841A (en) * 1972-10-13 1974-01-22 Novelty Tool Co Inc Wire-tie forming and twisting tool
US4583600A (en) * 1981-04-30 1986-04-22 Black & Decker Inc. Impact tool
US4449660A (en) * 1981-04-30 1984-05-22 Black & Decker Inc. Fastener tool
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US9597724B2 (en) 2010-09-02 2017-03-21 Jon R. Kodi Wire twisting tools and methods
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