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Fountain displays

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US3165966A
US3165966A US9142161A US3165966A US 3165966 A US3165966 A US 3165966A US 9142161 A US9142161 A US 9142161A US 3165966 A US3165966 A US 3165966A
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John P Pribyl
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John P Pribyl
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63JDEVICES FOR THEATRES, CIRCUSES, OR THE LIKE; CONJURING APPLIANCES OR THE LIKE
    • A63J17/00Apparatus for performing colour-music

Description

Jan. 19, 1965 J. P. PRIBYL. 3,165,966

FOUNTAIN DISPLAYS Filed Feb. 24, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet l du @ma m M Jan. 19, 1.965 J. P. PRIBYL.

FOUNTAIN DISPLAYS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 24, 1961 whs UnitedStates Patent 3,165,966 FOUNTAIN DSPLAYS l Jehu P. Pribyl, 402 Harriet, Arlington, Tex. Filed Feb. 24, 1961, Ser. No. 91,421 Claims. (Cl. Sb-464) This invention relates'to fountain displays, and more particularlyto a control system for varying the amplitudes of the fountain sprays in accordance with the occurrence of particular frequency components of predetermined values in an'audio control signal and for varying the intensities of colored illuminating lights for the sprays in accordance with the amplitudes of the particular frequency components.

' An object of this inveniton is to provide a new and improved water fountain display with varying water spray Iand illumination patterns.

Another object is to provide a water display whereiny a plurality of different frequency band pass channels are energized by a controllingsound source to provide varying patterns of water spray amplitudes and illumination therefor. f Y

Still Ianother object Vis to provide a fountain display system of Water sprays and illuminating lights wherein light colors corresponding to various sound frequency bands are varied in intensity as a function of the amplitudes of the particular bands of frequency components in an audio control signal.

' lA still further object is to provide Ian. electromechanical control system for a fountain display comprising a plurality of liquid spray systems and light-source systems for illuminating the sprays in patterns of color wherein an audio control signal is separated into a plurality of sound-frequency bands, a particular color illuminating system and a particular solenoid valve for controlling the supply of liquid and the amplitude of sprays in a liquid spray system being associated with each such band of sound-frequencies, whereby the amplitudes of the respective bands of sound frequency components control the intensities of the light colors in the associated illuminating systems .and :the occurrence of the particular frequency components control the operation of the solenoid valves so as to vary the visual effect of the display in accordance with thel characteristics of the audiocontrol signal.

' Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the reading of the following description of a device constructed in accordance with the invention, and with reference to the accompanying drawings thereof, wherein:

FIGURE l is a simplified schematic view of the electro-mechanical control system of a preferred embodiment of the invention; i l

FIGURE 2 is a plan View of the fountain display showing the arrangement of spray nozzles and colored lights for illuminating the water sprays; Y

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3 in FIGURE 2; and,

FIGURE 4 is a circuit diagram of the electrical system l for controlling the intensities of the various colored lights and the action of the solenoid valves for regulating the rate of fiow of water to the'various spr'ayfnozzles.

Referring to the drawings, anaudio input signal from an audio-frequency'source, such as a radio, recording, microphone, or the like, is delivered to a preamplifier 10 for raising the voltage level of the input signal. The pre-amplifier output signal is transmitted to a pair of conventional amplifiers and 16. The output of the amplifier 15 may bevused to power a loudspeaker or loudspeakers 18 and the output of amplifier 16 is transmitted to a group of frequency'selective channels which separate 3,165,966 Patented Jan. 19, V19`65 ICC whose amplitude varies in accordance with the amplitude of the audio input signal. The direct current voltage is then transmitted -to each of a pair of direct current am plifiers 23 and 24, the amplifier 23 controlling the operation of a particular illuminating system 25 and the'ampliiier 24 controlling the operation of a particular solenoid valve 26. Y

The output of the amplifier 23 which is representative of the controlling sound in channel I, both in amplitude and in frequency, is transmitted through a powercontrol magnetic amplifier 27 and a switch device 28 which transmits current to the particular lighting system 25 which varies in accordance with the direct current output of amplifier 23. Thus, any change in output current of the amplifier 23 is accompanied by a change inl intensity of the light emitted by the particular light system associated therewith. Similarly, the direct current output ofthe amplifier 24 is delivered through an electromagnetic relay 29 to control the operation of a switch device 30'which varies thesupply level of current to the solenoid valve 26. The valve 26 isl disposed in a conduit for supplying liquid under pressure from a pump 0r pressure source 31 to the Ispray nozzles 32. The operation of the valve as controlled by the channel output current is such that the size of the valve opening is increased to a size corresponding to an all-on condition when the occurrence of a signal in the frequency selective channel operates they relay to increase the current output of the switch vice 30.

The spray nozzles are preferably arranged in a pattern to produce a particular visual effect, usually with orifices pointing in av generally upward direction. After being ejected from the spray nozzles, the liquid may be collected 'in a tank or accumulator 33 where it is picked up and re-pressurized by the pump if a recirculating systern is used. A drain 34 may be provided for the aceumulator if no recirculating is desired. However, if it is not desired to collect the falling liquid from the sprays, the accumulator may be eliminated and the pump connected to some other liquid supply means.

lt ,is thus apparent that the size of the valve opening or orince is varied in accordancewith the current supplied from the switching device 3% as determined by theoccurg rence of particular frequency components in the audio control signal to vary the height of the water spray. Similarly, the intensity of the light-color in the illuminating system is varied in accordance with the current supplied from the switching device 28. In this manner, when a number of channels are provided to control a number of spray nozzles and a number of lighting systems, a varying spray and light pattern is produced to provide an overall visual effect which changesy in accordance with the frequencyiand amplitude characteristics of a controlling audio signal.

Referring to FIGURES 2 and 3, a suitable arrangement of water spray and illuminating systems includes a spray nozzle 39, and water spray systems 40 and 41 comprisingv concentric circular arrangements of spray nozzlesand afvariable resistance'or potentiometer 76.

' electric discharge devices of the other channels.

cathode 81 ofthe electric discharge device `is connected.

alsace-e of the outlet conduits with the manifold conduit, controls the` rate ot flow of, liquid to all of the spray systems i simultaneously. A manually operated valve d and solenoid valves 57', 53, and 5L connected in the outlet conduits 49 to 52, respectively, also'control the rates of iiow ot liquid to their individual associated spray systems.

I The solenoid valves 57, 5? and 59 are controlled by a-frequency selective network, schematically illustrated in FIGURE l, having low frequency, middle frequency, and highfrequency band pass channels, respectively. The solenoid lvalve S51, however, is not frequency selective in that it is connecte-dto a signal channel which does not include a band-pass filter. The valve will operate to allow greater iiow of liquid whenever the amplitude of any frequency in the audioy input signal is above apredetermined value.

Intheembodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG- URES 2 and 3, four lighting systems are included. Onel lighting system` includes blue lights (il and 62 controlled by the output of a low frequency band-pass channel. A.

system of green lights d3 andV v6ftV is controlled by a middle frequency band-pass channel, a system of red lights' 65 and 66 is controlled by a high frequency bandpass channel, and a system of white lights 67 and d isJ controlled'by output of the compositek channel CC `which is ,also adapted tol control the operation of the solenoid valve 55. It is apparent, of course, that any number of Alighting systems and water spray systems may electrical control'system, the audio input'signal or volt-` age is applied across the input terminals "itl andi'l of a pair of conductors 72 and 73, theconductorf'Z-being connected to ground. The input signal orvoltage is irnpres'sed across a coupling capacitor 74, conductor 75, One terminal of the variable resistance is connected to the conductor 72 by a conductor 77. The slide "Contact 7S of thevariable resistance is connected to one side of each of the respective channels, the other side of each of the channels being connected to ground, so that the potentiometer 76 controls the range of the input voltage applied Vacross the channels and thus the sensitivity of all channels simultaneously. 4

Channel I, illustrated in detail in FIGURE 4,'passes a band of low frequency components of the audio input signal and channels Il and III are designed to pass bands Y of middle and high audio frequencies, respectively. Since they channels are substantially identical, differing'only in the;band-pass:characteristics of each channel, a description of channel I will suliice to describe all of the channels. i

iilt'er resistor dit and conductors @and 89a. The other side 89h of the direct current supply circuit is connected to ground. n

A iiltcr network 9@ is connected across the anodecathode circuit'iof the amplifier electric discharge device l and the bias resistor 82 through the conductor 93,

The output of the filter .network 9i? is connected across the control grid lltlZ and the cathode lil?) of an amplilier The Yconductor ltl con-` A capacitor 12S is connected across the rectifiersby the The potentiometer contact 7? is connected 4to the control grid 79 of an amplifier electric discharge-device @il inchannel I and to the grids of corresponding amplifier to ground through a bias resistor S2 and its anode d3 The is connected to one side 8d of a direct current supply i a coupling capacitor 94 and the conductor 9S. The lilter network includes a resistance 9e, one of whose s1des is connected to the coupling capacitor 91d through the conductor 95 and a pair of capacitors $7 and 9S having one pair kof sides connected to opposite side of resistance n and their other sides connected to the conductor 95'.

electric discharge device itl/i. nects the grid l to the common junction or connection file of the capacitor 9d and the resistance 96 of the tilte network, and to the conductor 72. through the resist-ik ance lili.

It" will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the conductivityofthe electric discharge device Sti varies in accordance with the audiorinput voltage across the' input terminals "itl Vand 7l, the filter network 9u. will transmit a voltage of prt-:selecte frequencyconiponents only across the control grid 102 and cathode 163 ofthe amplier electricldischarge means Ille; The electric ydischarge means Mid also includes an anode Il?, connected to the side 8d ofthe direct current supply circuit through the resistanceV 113, the conductor. 87, conductor S9 the resistance 88 and 'the conductor 89a. charge device lil/i and the electric discharge device 8i) may be in the same envelope and are preferably of the high vacuum type. work lS is connected across the anode-cathode circuit of the electric discharge device lit through a conductor lle connected to the common connection or junction il? of the resistance H3, and the anode 112 of the electric discharge device, the conductor 72, the conductor 16S and the resistance 1&9.. v

The rectifierl and voltage doubling network includes a pair of diodes or semiconductor type rectitiers 122 and 23. The conductor l2@ is connected to the common junction or connectiony IE6 of the rectitiers T122 and 123.

conductors 2.29, i3d, 131 and '72. A variable resistance i3d connected across the capacitor 12.8. by the .conduc. tors 134, 72, and 130, controls the rate ofvdis'oharge` ot the capacitor 128. It will be apparent to thoseV skilled in the art that when the filtered and amplified audio'input voltage is fed to the input of the rectifier and voltage doubler circuit, the capacitor 12d is charged totwice the peak voltageof audio inputrvoltage as the rectifier 122 and 1213 alternately conduct positive and negative half cycles of the input voltage. Y

The rectilied output voltage of the rectifier-.and voltage doubler' circuit is impressed across thelcontrol grid 1% and the cathode 137 of an amplilier electric discharge device l'by means of the conductor .139, a variablev sistors M3 and $.44 connectedin series to the conductor 72. The electric discharge device includes an anode connected to the positive side 84v of the` direct current voltage supply through conductors 1415 Yand 89a. A suppressor grid 15d is connected to "the cathode'and is disposed between the anode and a screen grid of the device. The screen grid is connected tothe side VSrl-foi the direct'current supply Vthrough a voltage dropping resistor lite, the conductors S6 and S7', yiilter resistor 33,

and conductors 89 and'a. A-pairfof capacitors 157 and ISS having sides connecte'dto opposite sides of the The electric dis-y A rectifier and voltage doubling netf resistor 88. and their other sides connected to ground,

constitute with the resistor S8 a resistance-capacitance filter for the direct current voltage supply.

The control winding 16de of a magnetic amplifier 15) is connected across the resistance 144 by means of the conductors 72 and 72a. The magnetic amplifier may be of any suitable type such as the commercially available amplifier manufactured by Magnetics, lne., Butler, Pa. under the designation Type-4536-l. it will be apparent that the output voltage across the resistor 14d varies in accordance with the conductivity of the electric discharge means 13S which in turn varies in accordance with the voltage applied across the grid and cathode of the electric discharge means 13S. The current in lthe control winding thus varies in accordance with the conductivity of the electric discharge means 138.

The magnetic amplifier 16@ is adapted to regulate the action of a switching circuit 165 for controlling the supply of power from a suitable A.C. power supply 17) to a particular illuminating system for the fountain installation. The switching circuit includes a pair of switching'means 171 and 172, such as silicon controlled rectiiiers, which are connected reversely in parallel relative to one anotherand in series with the lamps L constituting the load connected across the main conductors 173 and 17d which are connected to the alternating current input terminals 175 and 176. The anode 177 of the rectifier 171 is connected to the main conductor 173 by the conductor 17S while its cathode 179 is connected through conductors 1g@ and 1&1 to `one side of the load L. The other side of load Lis connected to the other main conductor 174. The anode 183 of the rectifier 172 is connected to one side of the load through the conductors 1841 and 181, and its cathode 185 is connected to the main conductor 173 by the conductor 136.

lt will be apparent that since the rectiiiers 171 and 172 are connected reversely in parallel relative to each other and in series with the load L, they will transmit alternate half cycles of the alternating current to 4the load when they are rendered alternately conductive by appropriate control potentials.

The point in the half cycle during which the rectifier 171 is rendered conductive is controlled by the potential applied across 'the gate or control member 13? and the cathode 179. The gate is connected to one side of the secondary winding 19nd of a transformer 191 having a primary winding 19% and a core 192, through a conductor 193, a semi-conductive device or half wave rectier 194 and the conductor 195. The cathode 179 is connected to the common junction 1% of the primary and secondary windings through the conductors 18u and 1597. The junction 1% is of course connected tothe main conductor 17d through the conductors 197 and 155i and the load L. The other side of the primary winding 19% of the transformer is connected to the main conductor 173 through the conductor 2.96, the winding 199 of the magnetic amplifier 160 and the semi-conductive device or half wave rectifier 201'.

' During the half cycle or" the alternating current input across ythe main conductors 173 and 174i in which a posi'- tive potential is applied to the anode 177 of the rectifier 171, a positive pulse of current will iiow through the semiconductive device 2.@1, the winding-199 of the magnetic amplifier 160 and the primary winding 19% of the transformer inducing a potential in the secondary winding 1900. The' magnitude of the potential applied across the gate and cathode of the rectifier 171 during the half cycle in which a positive potential is applied to the anode 177, hereinafter referred to as the positive half cycle, of the rectifier 171 varies not only in accordance with the voltage across the mainV conductors but also in accordance with the impedance `of the winding 199 of the magnetic amplifier 16) which in turn varies in accordance with the current flowing inthe control winding letta. The windings ltia and 199'are so arranged that the impedance of the winding 199 to the current now being transmitted by the half wave rectifier is higher when the value of the current owing through the control winding 16de is high and is lower when the Value of the current flowing through the winding letta is low. Since the rectifier becomes conductive at the time or phase of the positive halt cycle at which ythe potential across the gate and cathode attains a predetermined value during such positive half cycle and since this predetermined value is attained at different times or phases of the positive half cycle depending upon the impedance of the winding 199, the amount of current transmitted by the rectifier 171 during a half cycle will vary directly in accordance with the value` of the current flowing in the control winding 16de of the magnetic amplifier during such positive half cycle. For example, if the value of the current in the winding e is relatively high during a positive half cycle, the impedance of the winding 1% is relatively high so that the potential across the gate and the cathodeof the transistor attains the predetermined value at a later time or phase of the positive half'H cycle and the rectifier is rendered conductive at a later time during the positive half cycle. lf the'value of the current in the winding 16de is low, the impedance of the winding 199 is low and the potential applied across the gate and cathode of the rectier attains the predetermined value ats an earlier time of the positive half cycle so that the amount of current during such positive half cycle transmitted by the rectifier 171, which is in effect switched on at an earlier time in the positive half cycle, will be greater. Of course, the impedance of the winding 199 may be so high that the predetermined value is never attained and the rectifier will not be rendered conductive during a particular half cycle.

The rectifier 172 is similarly rendered conductive during the negative half cycles of the alternating current impressed across the main conductors 173 and 174 in accordance with the variations in the current in the winding 160e since its gate or control member 2de is connected to one side of the secondary winding 267 or" the transformer 191 through a conductor 2h91, a semi-conductor device or halt wave rectifier 21@ and a conductor 1211. The cathode 135 is connected to the common junction 212 of the secondary winding 2W and the primary winding 213 of the transformer 191 by the conductor 214. One side of the primary winding 213 is connected tothe main conductor 173 by the conductors 214- and 136 and its other side is connected to the main conductor 17d by the conductor 215, the winding 216 of the magnetic amplifier, the conductor 217, the semi-conductive device or half wave rectifier 218, the conductor 181 and the load L. It will be apparent that the amount of current transmitted by the rectifier 172 during each negative half cycle of the alterhating current impressed across the conductors 173 and 174 will vary in accordance with the value of the current in the control winding 16de of the magnetic amplifier since the voltage induced in the transformer secondary Winding 267 by the current in the primary winding 213 varies in accordance with the impedance of the winding 216 of the magnetic amplifier. When the audio input signal having the frequency components which are transmitted by the filter network @d is applied across the input terminals 7i) and 71, the potential applied to the grid 136 becomes more negative, the electric discharge device is rendered less conductive causing less current to flow through the control winding 16de, the impedances of the windings 199 and 216 decrease and the rectifiers 171 and 172 transmit current `to the load alternately during alternate half cycles of the alternating current applied across the input terminals 175 and 176. The conductivity of the electric discharge means 138 varies, of course, with the amplitude of such frequency components.

When the audio inputsignal applied 'across the input d Winding leila to be relatively-high and, since, the impedances of the windings l@ and Zlio are thus relatively high, the rectifiers 171 and 72 do not transmit any current to the load L. lt will thus be seen that the intensity of the light emitted by the lamps controlled b y a particular channel will vary inaccordance with the amplitude of the y selected frequency component band which is transmitted by its associated filter, the intensity or the amount of light emitted by the lamps increasing as the amplitude of the selected band of frequency components increases and decreasing as this amplitude decreases.

The audio input signal which is received hy a particular channel also controls the operation or a solenoid valve which regulates the iiow of liquid to a particular one of the water spray systems. For this purpose, the one side n of the output of the rectier and voltage doubler circuit llli is connected to the control grid 22 of an electric discharge device 2 26, having a cathode 227, by means of the conductor 13u; the variable resistance or potentiometer 22S, and the conductors 29 and 72. The slile.` Contact 23? of the variable resistancey is connected to the control grid oi the electric discharge device 226 so that the potentiometer controls the input voltage applied to the grid and thus the sensitivity of the electric discharge device. The cathode 227 is connected to the other side ot the output ofthe rectifier and voltage doubler circuit lilS through the conductors 72 and 223i, and the bias resistor 235.'. The screen grid 242 interposed between the convtrol grid 225 and the anode 237 of the device is connected to thevside Sf-i of the direct current supply voltage through a voltage'dropping resistor 21th,' conductors do and S7,

. resistor tl, and conductors 89 and 89a.

` by means of conductors 261 and 262, the voltage dropping resistor 263, and the conductors 265,89 and S961. When an audio input signal which does not have the preselected frequency components is applied across the input termina-ls '70 and 71, the'movablercontact 257 of the relay is held in engagement with the iixed contact 2.55 by the current transmitted to the relay winding 251 by the electric discharge device 2226 which is now fully conductive.

.When an audio input signal having the preselected frcquency components of predetermined amplitude is'received by channel the potential applied across the grid 225 and cathode 226 becomes-more negative and thus causes the current transmitted through the anode-cathode circuit of the electric discharge device 227, lthe conductor 250,V and the relay winding to decrease permitting the movable contact 257 to move from engagement with the fixed contact 2.55 and into engagement with the stationary Contact 256, thus energizing the light.

The movable contact 257, when in engagement with the stationary contact 255, connects the control winding '300 of the magnetic amplifier 301 across the resistance 302 o fthe voltage divider `bridge 363 by means of the conductors 304, 305, '365, '72 Yand 270. The voltage divider bridge comprises thevrr'esistances 302 and 309 connected in series across the input circuit 84 and 8% through the conductors 89a, 89, 31.2, 313, 3% and 72 and ground.

YIt will thus be seen that whenever the movable relay contact 257'y engages the stationary contact 255, the control winding 3h0 is energized with direct' current of a value predetermined by the values of the resistances of 'the voltage divider bridge and the voltage of the input circuit. v

@l e The magnetic amplifier Stil is part of a switching circuit or controlling theV supply of current to a particular `solenoid valve V. The switching circuit lita is substantially identical in all respects to the switching circuit i65- associated with the magnetic ampliiier i6@ and components of this Yswitching circuit have been provided with the same reference characters, to which the character a has been added, as areV used to designate corresponding components of the switching circuit controlled by the magnetic amplifier 16@ Y The switching circuit 165er includes a pair of silicon controlled rectiers i710. and 172e which are connected reversely in parallel relative to one another and in series with the winding of the solenoid valve'V constituting the load connected across the power supply conductors i173 and il. The anode 177e: of the rectiiier 171s is connected to the main conductor 173 by the conductor 178a while its cathode T7941 is connected through the conductors ltltla and ldlc to one side ot the load V. The other side of the load V is connected to the power conductor li. The anode la of'the rectiier i725: is connected to one side of the load through conductors i845: and idle, and its cathode lta is connected to the power conductor 173 by the conductor lSoa. Lilie the rectifiers l7l and'i'Z, the rectiiiers'17ia and 172-11 trans-Y mit alternate half cycles of the alternating current to ,the load 'when they are rendered alternately conductive by appropriate control potentials applied across their respective-gates and cathodes.

The-gate lta of the rectifier 17in is connected to one side of the secondary winding of a transformer lda through a conductor 193m a half-wave rectifier wetland the conductor ll'a. The cathode lt79a is connected to the common junction .ia of the primary and secondary windings through conductors luft and 197:1. The junction won is, of course, connected to the main conductor 174 through the conductors 19761, ltla, and the load V. The other side ot the transformerprimary winding is connected to the main conductor 173 through conductor Zda, winding lh/ia of magnetic amplilier Still and the halfwave rectifier Zilla. lt will thus be seen, that as in the switching circuit E65, the potential across the gate and cathode of the rectitier lla varies in accordance with the impedance of the winding 199m of the magnetic ampliiier 3M, which, in turn, is dependent upon the magnitude ot current in the magnetic amplifier control winding.

Whereas the rectifier llla is adapted to be rendered conductive only duringv positive half cycles of the alterhating supply voltage, the rectilier lZn is adaptedto be rendered conductive only during the negative half cycles. rifhe gate Ztla is connected Vto one side of the secondaryv fier, conductor Zlia, half-wave rectifier Zigiz, conductor 181i; and the load V.

The admission of the channel of an audio signal of theY required frequency components decreases the current iiowV through the electric discharge device 226 so that `the deenergization of the relay winding permitsy the movable contact 257pto move from engagement with the contact 255 and into engagement with contact 256 stopping iiow of direct current through the control winding 300. The

impedances of the windings 19% and 216g vary directly as the current iow in the control windinghl and phaseshift the voltages or tiring pulse supplied to the control elements of the silicon controlled rectiiiers relative to the supply voltage, thereby. allowing the lflow lof current through the rectiiiers to the solenoid valve V. The

alcance switching circuitV -is adapted to renderthe rectifiers conductive whenever an audio input signal of predetermined magnitude is received by the channelY and the current flow through the rectifiers whenever they are conductive is suliicient to open the solenoid valve to its position allowing maximum liquid flow. When no audio input signal is received by the channel, the current in the control winding of the magnetic amplifier 301 prevents the switching circuit 165:1 from supplying current to the particular valve controlled by the channel, the valve being in normally closed position or in a position allowing a minimum liquid flow therepast.

It will thus be seen that whereas the energization of the illuminating system as controlled by the switching circuit 16S Varies in accordance with the magnitude of current in the magnetic amplifier control winding 16th:, the valve is energized to either afully open position or a position allowing minirnumliquidkl flow.

It will also be seen that the amplitudes of the sprays in the spray systems is determined by the occurrence of particular'frequency components in the audio input signal. When the signalincludes frequencies which are acceptable by any particular channel, the solenoid valve associated with the channel is opened tof increase the liquid flow from the spray nozzles and the amplitudes of the sprays controllable by the valve. in addition, the intensities of the lights in the particular illuminating system associated with the channel are varied in accordance with the amplitudes of the frequency components in the channel.y

It Will also be seen that the sensitivityvof the switching means in any channel for supplying current to a solenoid valve and illuminating system is controllable by the potentiometer 76. Additional sensitivity controls for the illumination and spray systems are provided by the potentiometers 140 and 228, respectively.

The additional channels `for filtering the audio input signal and transmitting other preselected bands'of frequency components, similarly control the other'illuminating-systems and solenoid valves. All of the channels are connected in parallel whereby the audio input signal which is applied across the grid and cathode of the amplifier electric discharge device 8i) in channel l is also applied across the grid and cathode of the corresponding amplifiers in the additional channels. The grid of each ofthese amplifiers is connected to the slide contact 78 of the' potentiometer '76 by the conductor C and their cathodes connected to ground through their bias resistors so that all the channels are adapted to receive the input signal. `The frequency selectivity of each of the channels, of course, is determined by the characteristics of the filter included therein, althoughy the channel which controls the solenoid 55 should be designed to transmit'all of the audio frequencies.v Forpurposes of illustration, a different type of filter 96a is shown in channel II than is employed in channel I, however, any suitable' lter may be used. g

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory only, and changes in the details of the construction illustrated may be made by those skilled in the art, within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. A device for controlling a plurality of water spray fountains and a plurality of illuminating systems therefor, comprising: rst means for providing an input potential having audio frequency components of varying amplitudes; a plurality of filtering means for filtering said potential connected to said first means, each said filtering lil a particular one of said filtering means for varying the intensity of illumination of a particular one of said illuminating systems in accordance with the varying amplitude of the potential components transmitted by said particular filtering meansyfountain control means operatively associated with each said filtering means for increasing the water flow of a particular one of said fountains when the amplitude of the components transmitted by the filtering means exceeds a predetermined value and means responsive to said input potential for increasing the water liow of all'said spray fountains upon the occurrence in said potential of an audio frequency component of a predetermined amplitude.

2. A device for controlling a plurality of water spray fountains and a plurality of illuminating systems therefor, comprising: first means for providing an input potential having audio frequency components of varying amplitudes; a plurality of filtering means for filtering said potential connected'to said first means, each said filtering means comprising a frequency band-pass circuit adapted to transmit aparticular frequency range of said components; illumination control means operatively associated with each said filtering means, each of said control means responsive to theV components transmitted by a particular one of said filtering means for var-ying the intensity of illumination of a particular one of said illuminating systems in accordance with a varying amplitude characteristic of the components transmitted by said particular filtering means; a plurality of spray control means, each operatively associated with a particular one of said filtering means for varying the water flow o-f a particular one of said fountains upon the occurrence in said potential of a component of a predetermined amplitude and frequency adapted to be transmitted by its particular associated filtering means; and spray control means operatively associated with all said spray fountains and said rst means for varying the water flow of all said fountains upon the occurrence in said potential of any audio frey quency component of a predetermined amplitude.

3. A fountain spray system including: a plurality of y individual spray nozzles for ejecting sprays of liquid;

meansk connected to said nozzles for supplying liquid under pressure to said nozzles; .means for individually controlling the flow of liquid to each said spray nozzle from said supply means, said controlling means comprising a separate valve means associated with each of said spray nozzles for controlling the flow of l-iquid from said supply means to each of said nozzles; andmea'ns responsive to voltage signals of predetermined audio frequencies for operating the valve means when the amplitude of said vol-tage signals exceeds a predetermined value. Y

4. A fountain spray system including: a plurality of individual spray nozzles for ejecting sprays of liquid; means connected to said nozzles for supplying liquid under pressure to said nozzles; means for individually controlling the fiow of liquid to each said spray nozzle from said supply means, said controlling means comprising a separate valve means associated with each of said spray nozzles for controlling the flow of liquid from said supply means to each of said nozzles; and a plurality of valve control means, each responsive to a particular `audio frequency electrical signal for operating a particular valve means whenever the amplitude of the signal exceeds a predetermined value.

5. A fountain installation comprising: a plurality of individual spray nozzles for ejecting sprays of liquid,

` means connected to said nozzles comprising a pump for means comprising a frequency band-passcircuit adapted supplying liquid under pressure to said nozzles; separate valve means associated with each of said spray nozzles for controlling the flow of liquid pumped from said pump to each of thenozzles; illuminating means mounted adjacent said spray nozzles for illuminating the sprays; means connected to said illuminating means for varying the intensity of illumination from said illuminating means aisance in accordance with the amplitude of an audio frequency sound; and means connected to said valve means for opening said valve means to increase the amplitude of the sprays Whenever the amplitude of said audio frequency soundr exceeds a predetermined value.

6. A fountain installation comprising: a plurality of individual spray nozzles for ejecting sprays of liquid; means connected to said nozzles comprising a pump for supplying liquid under pressure to said nozzles; separate Valve means associated with each of said spray nozzles for controlling the flow of liquid pumped -from said pump to each of the nozzles; separate control means for each of said valve means, said control means each being responsive to a different audio `frequency voltage signal for controlling the operation of the valve means; a plurality of illumina-ting means for illuminating the sprays; and separate illuminating control means operatively associated With each said illuminating means, each said illuminating control means being responsive to a voltage signal or" a different audio frequency for controlling the illuminating intensity of its associated illuminating means in accordance with the amplitude of the voltage signal.

7. A fountain spray system including: a plurality of individual lspray nozzles for ejecting sprays `et liquid; means connected to said nozzles for supplying liquid under pressure to said nozzles, saidsupply means comprising a pump; a valve means lassociated with said spray nozzles for controlling the oW of liquid pumped by said pump to each of the nozzles; means for providing electric current having audio frequency components; means connected yto said last mentioned means for 'rectifying said current for deriving uni-directional control currentstherefrom; and means responsive to said uni-directional cur-v rents for operating said valve means to increase the ilow of liquid to each of said nozzles whenever the amplitude of any of said audio frequency current components exceeds a predetermined value` Y 8. A fountain spray system including: a plurality of ,individual spray nozzles for ejecting ksprays of liquid;

, quency components; means for rectifying said current for deriving uni-directional control currents therefrom; means responsive to said uni-directional currents for controlling the energization of said illuminatingmeans in accordance with the magnitude of said audio lfrequency components; and means responsive to `said uni-directional currents for operating said valve means to increase the flow of liquid Y to each of said nozzles whenever the amplitude of any of 6e lie said audio frequency components exceeds a predetermined value.

9. A fountain vspray system including: a plurality of individual spray nozzles for ejecting sprays of liquid; means connected to said nozzles for supplying Vliquid under pressure to said nozzles, said supply means kcomprising a pump; separate valve means associated with each of said spray nozzles for controlling the ow of liquidV pumped by said pump to each of the nozzles; means for providing a potential having audio frequency components of varying amplitudes; a plurality of lter means for said potential connected to said last mentioned means,

- each said iilter means adapted to-transmit a control potential consisting of a different band of said components; and separate control means associated with each valve means, each control means being'responsive to the control potential from a different one of said lter means for opening its associated valve means Whenever the control is of a predetermined magnitude.

l0. A fountain spray system including: aplurality of 'individual spray Vnozzles for ejecting sprays of liquid;

means connected to'said spray nozzles for supplying liquidy under pressure -to said nozzles, saidl supply means com` ferent one 'of said filter means for opening its associated valve means Whenever the control potential is of a predetermined magnitude; a pluralityof illuminating means for illuminating the sprays; and separate control means associated with each illuminating means, each said illuminating control means beingresponsive to vary the energization of itsassociated illuminating means in accordance with the varying amplitude of the control potential from a particularV one of said filter means.

Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 634,569 Brainard Oct. 10, 1899A 1,837,732 Stabler Dec. 22, 1931 1,977,997 Patterson ,Oct. 23, 1934 2,131,934 Burchfield Oct. 4, 1938" 2,591,100 Y Rause Apr. 1, 1952 2,868,055 Simos ian.' i3, 1959 2,922,582 vPrzystawik Jan. ,26, 1960 3,618,583 Way Ian. 30, -1962 potential

Claims (1)

1. A DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING A PLURALITY OF WATER SPRAY FOUNTAINS AND A PLURALITY OF ILLUMINATING SYSTEMS THEREFOR, COMPRISING: FIRST MEANS FOR PROVIDING AN INPUT POTENTIAL HAVING AUDIO FREQUENCY COMPONENTS OF VARYING AMPLITUDES; A PLURALITY OF FILTERING MEANS FOR FILTERING SAID POTENTIAL CONNECTED TO SAID FIRST MEANS, EACH SAID FILTERING MEANS COMPRISING A FREQUENCY BAND-PASS CIRCUIT ADAPTED TO TRANSMIT A PRATICULAR FREQUENCY RANGE OF SAID COMPONENTS; ILLUMINATION CONTROL MEANS OPERATIVELY ASSOCIATED WITH EACH SAID FILTERING MEANS, EACH OF SAID CONTROL MEANS RESPONSIVE TO THE POTENTIAL COMPONENTS TRANSMITTED BY A PARTICULAR ONE OF SAID FILTERING MEANS FOR VARYING THE INTENSITY OF ILLUMINATION OF A PARTICULAR ONE OF SAID ILLUMINATING SYSTEMS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE VARYING AMPLITUDE OF THE POTENTIAL COMPONENTS TRANSMITTED BY SAID PARTICULAR FILTERING MEANS; FOUNTAIN CONTROL MEANS OPERATIVELY ASSOCIATED WITH EACH SAID FILTERING MEANS FOR INCREASING THE WATER FLOW OF A PARTICULAR ONE OF SAID FOUNTAINS WHEN THE AMPLITUDE OF THE COMPONENTS TRANSMITTED BY THE FILTERING MEANS EXCEEDS A PREDETERMINED VALUE AND MEANS RESPONSIVE TO SAID INPUT POTENTIAL FOR INCREASING THE WATER FLOW OF ALL SAID SPRAY FOUNTAINS UPON THE OCCURRENCE IN SAID POTENTIAL OF SAID AUDIO FREQUENCY COMPONENT OF A PREDETERMINED AMPLITUDE.
US3165966A 1961-02-24 1961-02-24 Fountain displays Expired - Lifetime US3165966A (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3292861A (en) * 1964-11-17 1966-12-20 Kawamura Koreichi Control device of dynamic operation and colored illumination of water fountains in synchronism with music
US3294322A (en) * 1963-11-18 1966-12-27 Kawamura Koreichi Device for automatically controlling water jets of artificial fountains in synchronism with musical sounds
US3595478A (en) * 1969-09-08 1971-07-27 Don W Power Splash-inhibiting fountain unit
DE1500567B1 (en) * 1966-04-12 1972-12-21 Koreichi Kawamura Selbsttaetige control device which generates musikabhaengige water games and their lighting
US4376404A (en) * 1980-10-23 1983-03-15 Agricultural Aviation Engineering Co. Apparatus for translating sound into a visual display
US4817312A (en) * 1987-02-18 1989-04-04 Wet Enterprises, Inc. User activated fountain display
US5439170A (en) * 1993-07-23 1995-08-08 Dach; Samuel Illuminated water fountain
US5491617A (en) * 1993-05-12 1996-02-13 Currie; Joseph E. Illuminated fluid tap
US6276612B1 (en) * 2000-05-05 2001-08-21 Scott Hall Synchronized fountain and method
US20060101570A1 (en) * 2004-11-16 2006-05-18 Richard Kunkel Pressure controlled multi-state fountain for spas
EP2981006A1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-02-03 George Ayer Systems and methods for underwater wireless radio-frequency communications

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US634569A (en) * 1899-01-25 1899-10-10 Edwin D Brainard Fountain.
US1837732A (en) * 1929-06-27 1931-12-22 Stabler Robinson Ryland Illuminated fountain
US1977997A (en) * 1931-04-25 1934-10-23 Rca Corp Control system
US2131934A (en) * 1936-03-09 1938-10-04 Robert D Burchfield Visual interpretation of electrical currents
US2591100A (en) * 1950-09-02 1952-04-01 Claude C Rouse Cooling basin for air conditioning units
US2868055A (en) * 1955-06-03 1959-01-13 Simos Anthony Audio frequency controlled fountain
US2922582A (en) * 1960-01-26 Fountain installation
US3018683A (en) * 1960-03-07 1962-01-30 Mobilcolor Inc Audio signal-responsive device

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2922582A (en) * 1960-01-26 Fountain installation
US634569A (en) * 1899-01-25 1899-10-10 Edwin D Brainard Fountain.
US1837732A (en) * 1929-06-27 1931-12-22 Stabler Robinson Ryland Illuminated fountain
US1977997A (en) * 1931-04-25 1934-10-23 Rca Corp Control system
US2131934A (en) * 1936-03-09 1938-10-04 Robert D Burchfield Visual interpretation of electrical currents
US2591100A (en) * 1950-09-02 1952-04-01 Claude C Rouse Cooling basin for air conditioning units
US2868055A (en) * 1955-06-03 1959-01-13 Simos Anthony Audio frequency controlled fountain
US3018683A (en) * 1960-03-07 1962-01-30 Mobilcolor Inc Audio signal-responsive device

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3294322A (en) * 1963-11-18 1966-12-27 Kawamura Koreichi Device for automatically controlling water jets of artificial fountains in synchronism with musical sounds
US3292861A (en) * 1964-11-17 1966-12-20 Kawamura Koreichi Control device of dynamic operation and colored illumination of water fountains in synchronism with music
DE1500567B1 (en) * 1966-04-12 1972-12-21 Koreichi Kawamura Selbsttaetige control device which generates musikabhaengige water games and their lighting
US3595478A (en) * 1969-09-08 1971-07-27 Don W Power Splash-inhibiting fountain unit
US4376404A (en) * 1980-10-23 1983-03-15 Agricultural Aviation Engineering Co. Apparatus for translating sound into a visual display
US4817312A (en) * 1987-02-18 1989-04-04 Wet Enterprises, Inc. User activated fountain display
US5491617A (en) * 1993-05-12 1996-02-13 Currie; Joseph E. Illuminated fluid tap
US5439170A (en) * 1993-07-23 1995-08-08 Dach; Samuel Illuminated water fountain
US6276612B1 (en) * 2000-05-05 2001-08-21 Scott Hall Synchronized fountain and method
US20060101570A1 (en) * 2004-11-16 2006-05-18 Richard Kunkel Pressure controlled multi-state fountain for spas
WO2006055247A3 (en) * 2004-11-16 2007-03-15 Watkins Mfg Corp Pressure controlled multi-state fountain for spas
EP2981006A1 (en) * 2014-08-01 2016-02-03 George Ayer Systems and methods for underwater wireless radio-frequency communications
US9662674B2 (en) 2014-08-01 2017-05-30 Crystal Fountains Holdings Inc. Systems and methods for underwater wireless radio-frequency communications

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