US3157966A - Concrete insert - Google Patents

Concrete insert Download PDF

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US3157966A
US3157966A US122984A US12298461A US3157966A US 3157966 A US3157966 A US 3157966A US 122984 A US122984 A US 122984A US 12298461 A US12298461 A US 12298461A US 3157966 A US3157966 A US 3157966A
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insert
nail
concrete
aperture
wood
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Philip C Sherburne
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Grinnell Corp
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Grinnell Corp
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G15/00Forms or shutterings for making openings, cavities, slits, or channels
    • E04G15/06Forms or shutterings for making openings, cavities, slits, or channels for cavities or channels in walls of floors, e.g. for making chimneys
    • E04G15/061Non-reusable forms
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/38Connections for building structures in general
    • E04B1/40Separate connecting elements
    • E04B1/41Connecting devices specially adapted for embedding in concrete
    • E04B1/4107Longitudinal elements having an open profile, with the opening parallel to the concrete or masonry surface, i.e. anchoring rails

Description

- Nov. 24, 1964 P. c. SHERBURNE 3,157,966
CONCRETE INSERT Filed July 10, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR PHILIP C. SHERBURNE ATTORNEY Nov. 24, 1964 P, c. SHERBURNE 3,157,966
CONCRETE INSERT Filed July 10, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. PH I LIP C. SHERBURNE ATTOR N EY United States Patent 3,157,966 CGNCRETE INSERT Philip C. Sherburne, Rumford, Rl, assignor to Grinnell Corporation, Providence, Rh, a corporation of Delaware Filed July 1t 1961, Ser. No. 122,984 7 Claims. (Cl. t 468) This invention relates in general to masonry anchors, and more particularly to improved means for securing such anchors to a wood form before concrete is poured therein.
Masonry anchors, more commonly referred to as concrete inserts, have long been well known and the art is abundant with diversity of design and operation. Basical- 1y, however most such anchors or inserts are intended to provide a means for supporting an object or device from an overhead concrete surface, such as a ceiling, by
serving as an anchor in the concrete for a connecting member secured at one end of the insert and at the other end to the object or device being supported. Such member is frequently termed a hanger.
The disadvantages arising from securing a concrete fastener (as distinguished from an insert) to the surface of a concrete body are readily apparent. Firstly, within the range of reasonable attaching means, a fastener has far less holding power than does an insert of comparable size which is embedded in the concrete. Secondly, it is desirable that the anchor be flush with the underside of the concrete body from the appearance standpoint; this requires that the anchor be embedded in the concrete. Finally, even if a fastener of comparable strength and holding power were used, and if it were secured to the surface, the attachment by the connecting means, usually a nail of special form, is rendered more difficult by the upward direction of the work. Even the manipulation of an automatic driving tool is rendered more cumbersome when the tool is directed upwardly. And, when working overhead, the problem further arises of temporarily restraining the fastener against falling when the nail is initially being placed in position.
One solution to the above problems is to secure the concrete insert to the wood form before any concrete is poured therein, with the result that the concrete will flow around and completely cover the insert except for its bottom surface which is resting on the wood form. The insert is thus captured in the concrete in the desired manner, and, when the concrete has fully hardened and the wood form has been removed, is ready for use as an anchor.
The problem arises, however, of securing the insert to the wood form in such a manner that the form can subsequently be torn away from the hardened concrete and the embedded insert without injury to the latter. Conventionally, therefore, the insert has been nailed to the wood form with an ordinary headed nail, either through a flange perforated or notched along an edge for this purpose and upon which the insert rests, or through the hollow, substantially channel shaped body of the insert itself. In the former case, when the wood form is torn away from the hardened concrete, the flange is bent downwardly from the concrete surface a distance sufiicient to permit the nail head to be removed from between the flange and the concrete; in the alternative, the projecting part of the nail must be snipped or otherwise cut off if the flange is perforated rather than notched. If the nail is passed through the body of the insert, there is no alternative but to snip or cut off that part of the nail which projects into the body of the insert with a nail cutter or similar tool, or to bend the projecting nail portion up out of the way, still leaving it within the insert body. The former practice, of course, requires a nail cutter which 3,1519% Patented Nov. 24, 1964 "ice will fit into the relatively narrow interior of the aforementioned hollow body; this, in the smaller size inserts, might require the fabrication of a special tool.
The undesirable results of the above practices are either that a short and usually jagged projecting stud of metal remains in the insert body even after the bulk of the nail has been snipped off by the nail cutter, with the attendant risk of injury to anyone working on the insert, or that the entire nail remains bent over in the body of the insert, frequently in position to interfere with smooth sliding movement of a supporting member or hanger when such movement is desirable. And a bent over nail is similarly a source of possible injury.
The present invention is directed toward a solution of the above problems arising from nailing a concrete insert to a wood form in the manner of the prior art. Within the scope of this invention, therefore, it is intended that the concrete insert shall be nailed to the wood form in a convenient manner, but that, upon hardening of the concrete, the entire nail shall be removable from the insert either with removal of the wood form, or subsequent thereto, without any bending or other mutilation of the insert, without any injury to the concrete immediately surrounding the insert, and without any serious mutilation or destruction of the nail.
Accordingly one embodiment of the present invention includes a concrete insert comprising a substantially channel shaped body member having a top wall, depending side walls and bottom supporting flanges, the top wall being perforated periodically in a desired pattern for the reception therethrough of nails, whereby the insert may be nailed to the form prior to pouring concrete therein. The nails used with the insert may be headed or headless, and of constant or varying diameter from one end to the other, but all have means either on or associated with the nail for frictionally contacting the edge of the perforations of the insert to secure the insert to the wood form. It is highly desirable that the force with which the insert grips the nail be no greater, and preferably at least slightly less, than the force exerted by the wood form on the nail. If this relationship of forces exists, it will be seen that the nails will pull out of the insert and be removed therefrom when the wood form is stripped from the concrete surface, and they will remain embedded in the wood form.
However, it is not always possible to adjust the many variables precisely enough to arrive at the above situation, and some nails may remain in the insert body when the wood form is removed. In this situation, it is desirable that the nails be readily removable by some easily manipulatable means. Consequently, the nails are so constructed as to be removable from the insert by grasping with a pair of pliers and pulling downwardly with a force which is reasonable and convenient in relation to the size of nails and insert involved, thereby removing the nails with no injury to the insert and with no destruction or mutilation of the nails.
It is, therefore, a primary object of the present invention to provide novel and useful improvements in anchor devices for a concrete body.
Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved concrete insert for use with an intermediate connecting member to support a device or object from i an overhead surface.
Another object of the, present invention is to provide an improved means of embedding a masonry anchor in a concrete body in such manner that when the form containing the concrete during hardening is removed, the anchor will be exposed from the undersurface of the concrete body.
Still another object of the present invention is to provide a concrete insert which is readily attachable to a wood form prior to pouring concrete thereinto, and in which the fastening means is readily removable, either with the wood form when this is removed from the hardened concrete, or by other convenient means subsequent to removal of the wood form.
Another object of the present invention is to provide a concrete insert having substantial stability against displacement when wet concrete flows therearound, and which provides a maximum bearing surface against the surrounding concrete for proper distribution of the load forces into the concrete body.
It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a concrete insert which is inexpensive to manufacture, easy to assemble and install, and which will have superior load holding ability in use.
Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the detailed description which follows. In the drawings:
FIGURE 1 is a view in perspective of a short length of concrete insert secured in position on a wood form and shown prior to pouring any concrete therearound;
FIGURE 2 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;
FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing the wood form, with the nail still embedded therein, being stripped away from the hardened concrete;
FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary view on an enlarged scale of the nail gripping area of the insert;
FIGURE 5 is an end view of the insert with a closure member secured thereon;
FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary side elevation of the insert and end closure member shown in FIG. 5
FIGURE 7 is a front elevation of the nut-like retaining element that forms part of the supporting member;
FIGURE 8 is a view on the line 88 of FIG. 7;
FIGURE 9 is a sectional view of the insert with the supporting member in place;
FIGURE 10 is a view similar to FIGURE 1 showing a staggered arrangement of the perforations;
FIGURE 11 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 1111 of FIGURE 10; and
FIGURES 12-l5 are vertical sectional views of alternative embodiments of the invention.
Referring now to the drawings wherein like parts are designated by the same reference numeral throughout the several views, the numeral 10 generally indicates a masonry anchor or concrete insert constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention. The insert comprises a hollow body member of generally trapezoidal configuration having a top wall portion, integrally formed convergent sides and an open bottom to permit the insertion therein of a supporting member or hanger. More specifically, the insert 10 comprises a relatively wide substantially flat top wall portion 12, (hereinafter called the top), which is joined along both edges thereof to a pair of downwardly curved, U-shaped reverse bends 14 and 16 respectively, each of which is joined in turn to one of a pair of relatively narrow, inwardly directed horizontal upper ledges 18 and 20 respectively. On one side of. the insert, the reverse bend 14, the upper ledge 18, and so much of the top 12 that overlies the upper ledge 18 all constitute a locking flange 22 for assisting in securing the insert into the concrete. Similarly on the other side the reverse bend 16, the upper ledge 20 and so much of the top 12 that overlies the upper ledge 20 all constitute another locking flange 24.
The insert 10 further comprises downwardly convergent side wall portions 26 and 18 (hereinafter called sides), which are joined at the upper edges thereof to the inner edges of the upper ledges 18 and 20 respectively. These sides are relatively wide in comparison to the upper ledges 18 and 20, but not as wide as the top 12, and are isogonally disposed with respect to the top 12 at such an angle that a relatively wide gap or opening 29 is defined between the lower edges of the sides 26 and 28.
4 The convergence of the sides 26 and 28 provides two distinct advantage to the insert. Firstly, the sides 26 and 28 act, in addition to the locking flanges 22 and 24, to secure the insert into the hardened concrete by providing a wedging action between the sides and the concrete surface against which they bear. Hence the forces created by the load on the hanger are distributed over a greater area of concrete than would be provided if the sides were vertical and the flanges 22 and 24 were the sole means for locking the insert in place. Secondly, the inner surfaces of the sides 26 and 28 are the bearing surfaces for a nut 68, which is fully described hereinafter, which is supported by being wedged between the two slanting sides in much the same manner as the insert itself is wedged into the concrete.
The lower edge of each side 26 and 28 is joined to one of a pair of horizontal lower ledges 39 and 32 respectively which are inwardly directed from the sides 26 and 28 and which are approximately the same width as the aforementioned upper ledges 18 and 20. These lower ledges assist in preventing the accidental dislodgement of the supporting member or hanger, as more fully set forth hereinafter.
The lower ledges 30 and 32 are joined to U-shaped reverse bends 34 and 36 respectively each of which is joined to one of a pair of fiat horizontal outwardly directed portions 38 and 40, which constitute a pair of relatively wide support flanges. These support flanges extend from the lower edge of the U-shaped bends out to approximately the outer edge of the top 12, and assist in stabilizingthe insert to help prevent it from tipping under the influence of the concrete 42 (see FIG. 3) when the concrete is being poured.
Suitable means are secured to the insert, both on the underside and at the ends thereof, to prevent any wet concrete from entering the hollow interior of the insert. If it were permitted to enter and harden therein, the concrete could cause considerable difiiculty in the operation of the device or much inconvenience in removing it. On the underside, such means consists of a length of tape 44 covered with a suitable adhesive, such as a pressure sensitive adhesive, and which is wide enough to span the gap 29 fromone support flange 38 to the other 40. The tape will prevent any concrete or even any moisture which may seep under the support flanges from entering the insert.
Each end of the insert is closed by a closure member 46 illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6. The closure member, which is formed from a blank or a liar piece of sheet metal, is seen to comprise a surface 48 which is of substantially the same overall dimensions as the cross-section of the insert so as to cover the open end of the insert. The closure also has a horizontal portion 50 which overlies the top 12 of the insert. A pair of cars 52 bent inwardly from each side of the closure blank overlie each of the sides 26 and 28. Four spot welds, designated 4 9, two on the top portion 50 and one on each of the side ears 52, suifice to secure the closure member in place on the insert to effectively prevent any moisture or wet concrete from entering the insert.
From the foregoing discussion it will be readily apparent that the insert must be suitably secured to the wood form before it is surrounded with concrete. The present invention provides a means for securing the insert to the form which positively locks the insert to the form and which is readily removable with removal of the form or after the form has been removed. Referring now to FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, it will be seen that the aforementioned means comprises, in a preferred embodiment, a nail 54 of sufficient length to extend from the top 12, through the hollow interior of the insert and into the wood form a distance sutiicient to prevent it from being readily withdrawn. The nail 54 is of a diameter at least equal to that of, or very slightly larger than, a hole 55 in the top 12 on the insert, this hole being defined by a transverse peripheral surface 56. This results in what is referred to as a press fit. It is desirable that the diameter of the nail be selected so that the holding force exerted by the insert on the nail is at least not substantially greater, and preferably a little less, than the holding force exerted by the wood form on the nail. If this relationship of forces can be obtained, the nails will remain embedded in the wood form when it is stripped away from the wooden concrete, and all the nails will come out of the insert or inserts with the form, in the manner shown in FIG. 3.
As more closely seen in FIG. 4, a portion of the top 12 immediately surrounding the hole 55 is bent or extruded inwardly or downwardly as viewed in this figure after the hole 55 is punched to form a slight repression 58 which is concentric with the hole 55. One advantageous effect of this bending of the metal immediately around the opening 55 is that the peripheral surface 56 of the metal which defines the hole 55, which would otherwise be a cylindrical section concentric with the nail 54 if no depression were formed, is now disposed at an angle to the longitudinal axis of the nail and is frustoconical with respect to this axis. As a result thereof, the intersection of the upper surface of the top 12 and the frustoconical surface 56 forms a sharp biting edge 62 which very tightly grips the nail 54 and prevents the inadvertent removal thereof from the insert.
It can readily be seen that it would be extremely dithcult to withdraw the nail from the hole in a direction opposite to that in which it was inserted. And even movement in the direction of insertion is ma e difficult by the bite of the sharp edge 62. Therefore, the insert is rigidly held in place during pouring and settling of the concrete.
Another advantage of the depression 58 resides in its function as a deterent to inadvertently driving the nail 54 completely through the top 12. Even after the nail has been driven to the point where the top of the nail is flush with the upper surface of the top 12, a small segment 64 of the nail will still remain above the sharp edge 62 so that the edge 62 will still effectively grip the nail.
The insert of the present invention may be fabricated most conveniently in one of two ways. Firstly, it may be extruded in its finished shape in any desired length and subsequently punched in a punch press to obtain the holes in the top portion. Or, it may be made from flat stock which is passed through a roll forming machine and rolled or pressed into shape in a succession of rolling steps. The roll forming machine can also be adapted to punch the holes in the top portion including the depressed recess around the hole as the insert strip emerges from the final rolling step. The insert strip is completed by the application of the sealing tape to the underside of the support flanges.
The user will cut the insert strip, which is manufactured in lengths up to several feet, to the desired length and the individual insert will be nailed to the wood form in the manner heretofore described. When the concrete has hardened, the wood form will be torn away by usual methods and the nails desirably will pull out of the insert with the removal of the wood form in the manner illustrated in FIG. 3. Any nails which do not pull out of the insert with the wood form are thereafter removed by grasping with a pair of pliers or other convenient gripping device and pulling downwardly relative to the insert. The entire nail will come out leaving no undesirable projections or bent nails in the insert interior which might otherwise interfere with the proper operation of the device.
The hanger used in conjunction with theinsert is made up of two members, the first being a specially designed nut 68 as seen in FIGS. 7-9, and the second being merely a shaft with a threaded end 70. The nut 63 is generally of rectangular configuration having a width which is slightly less than the opening 29 between the reverse bends 34 and 3d, and a length somewhat greater than the aforementioned opening 29 but still less than the width of the top 12 between the side wall portions 26 and 2 8. By so proportioning the size of the nut to the size of the insert it will be appreciated that even the slightest amount of turning of the nut will permit it to rest on the lower ledges 3t) and 32 thus helping to prevent accidental withdrawal of the nut. It will be noticed from FIG. 9 particularly that each end is tapered back toward a plane through the mid-section of the nut to form four surfaces 72, 74, 76 and 78 respectively, which surfaces bear against the inside of the sides 26 and 28 to support the nut in the hanger. The angle of taper of these four surfaces is equal to that of the two sides 26 and 28 relative to a vertical axis, and is generally in the nature of 15.
The nut 68 is also provided with a threaded opening 80 which receives the shaft 70, thus forming the completed hanger. It will be noticed from FIG. 7 that the corners 82, 84-, 3-5 and 88 have been chamfered to facilitate turning the nut within the insert body.
The operation of the device is as follows: after the nail 54 is withdrawn, the nut 68 is threaded onto the shaft '70 and is then inserted into the insert body by aligning the longitudinal axis of the nut with that of the insert and passing the nut 68 up through the opening 29. The nut is then rotated through 90 by turning the shaft 70 so that the edge surface '72 and 74, or 76 and 78 depending on how the nut is put on the shaft 7%, engage the sides 26 and 28 respectively. The nut is held in contact with the sides 26 and 28 by the application of a downward force on the shaft, while it is rotated relative to the nut until the upper end of the shaft touches the underside of the top portion 12, or is very close thereto. Thus the nut is locked in position by being wedged against the sides 26 and 28, and it cannot be removed from the insert without turning, which requires upward movement. Hence, the insert supports the nut and the shaft in the manner shown in FIG. 9. It will, of course, be recognized that the shaft 7% is shown for purposes of illustration only, and that any desired type of hanger or support may be substituted therefor.
Referring now to FIGURES 10 and 11, an insert is shown which is a substantial duplicate of that shown in FIG. 1 with the exception, however, that the holes 55 through which the nails 54 are driven are staggered from adjacent one side of the top portion to adjacent the other side thereof and aligned in two parallel rows, and positioned in such a manner that the nails 54, when driven r ight down through the body, will pass very close to, or touch, the inner edges of the lower U-shaped reverse bends 34 or 36 respectively.
An advantage of this arrangement is the lateral stability that is realized from the contact between the nails and the lower reverse bends 34- and 36. It can readily be seen that by this arrangement, it would be more difficult to accidentally dislodge the insert from its desired position by inadvertently kicking it or striking it with another object. The procedure by which this embodiment of the invention is secured to the wood form, and the manner of removing the nails from the insert when the wood form is removed, is substantially identical with that of the previous embodiment.
It will be apparent from the foregoing description and accompanying drawings that the device described and illustrated therein is by far the preferred embodiment of the invention. Other modifications, however, are deemed to be within the scope of the present invention, of which the following are illustrative. FIG. 12 is a fragmentary cross sectional view similar to FIG. 4 illustrating the use of a small headed nail such as a finishing nail 154'having a small outwardly bulged head 164 and which is inserted in an aperture 155 in the top wall portion 112 of the insert. In this embodiment, and the three embodiments described hereinafter, the shank portion of the nail (i.e., the portion between the point and the head) has a diameter which is smaller than the aperture in the insert top portion through which it must pass; nevertheless, there is means either on or associated with the nail for producing some type of retaining engagement or contact with the insert and maintaining a press fit, in this case the enlarged head 164 which has a diameter at least equal to that of the aperture 155 so as to be gripped thereby when driven thereinto. An advantage to this type of construction is that the initial placement of the nail in position for striking with a hammer is greatly facilitated since the nail will pass freely through the aperture 155 until the point rests on the wood form. Again it is desirable that the holding force of the insert on the nail be slightly less than the corresponding force of the Wood form on the nail so that the nails will pull out when the wood form is removed. Again, however, any nails which remain in the insert after removal of the Wood form can be subsequently removed by pulling the nail through with any convenient pulling device.
In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 13, a nail 25% has a shank portion with a diameter slightly smaller than the diameter of the aperture 255 in the insert 212 so as to pass freely therethrough in a manner similar to the nail of the previous embodiment. However, a portion of the nail 254 is corrugated, knurled, or otherwise roughened and has a diameter very slightly larger than the remainder of the nail, or substantially the same as that of the opening 255 as to be frictionally gripped by the inner edge of the aperture 255 to thereby secure the insert to the wood form board. This nail, of course, can be removed by the same procedure as that followed in either of the previous embodiments when the wood form is removed. It should be noted that a nail of this type will not work loose as readily as a smooth surfaced nail such as illustrated in FIG. 12.
It may, in some instances, be desirable to use an ordinary headed nail where, for example, no other type is readily available. It is necessary to the use of such a nail that the head thereof be smaller than the diameter of the aperture through which it must pass in order to permit removal of the nail from the insert in the same direction as that in which it is inserted. Referring now to FIG. 14, it will be seen that, to provide the necessary gripping force to secure the insert 312 in place, a temporary retaining washer 209 is placed over the aperture 355, the washer itself having an aperture that is smaller than the diameter of the head 364 of nail 354. The washer 300 has an outside diameter that is larger than the aperture 355, and is made from a soft and bendable metal or other suitable compressible or flexible material. Therefore it will be apparent that when the nail 354 is driven to its operative position in the insert, the head 364 thereof will bend or deform the washer 3th and force it partially into the aperture 355 to provide a wedging effect which will tend to prevent further movement of the nail head through the aperture. Thereafter the nail, acting through the washer, will retain the insert in place. With removal of the wood form after hardening of the concrete, the downward force on the nail will cause the washer 300 to deform further and collapse inwardly upon itself, thereby permitting the nail head and the washer to pass through the aperture 355 and be removed there from. One advantageous result of this type of construction is that the nail diameter is not critical in that many different size nails may be used with the same washer without losing the benefits of the invention.
Still another modification of the present invention is shown in FIG. wherein a nail 454 is employed which is of slightly smaller diameter than the diameter of the aperture 455, butwhich is driven into the wood form at an angle to the axis of the aperture in such manner that a portion 464 of the nail 4-54 overlies a portion of the top 412 of the insert and prevents movement thereof. A
serious drawback of this modification, however, is that it is considerably more diiiicult to remove the nail from the insert because of t e extent to which the nail protrudes up into the hardened concrete. Hence the nail in this embodiment will not be as easily broken away from the concrete as in the previous modifications.
It v be apparent from the foregoing description that there has been provided a concrete insert which is believed to provide a solution to the problems, and to fulfill the objectives, hereinbefore set forth. It is to be understood, however, that the above description and accompt tying drawings are to be deemed primarily as illustrative of the best modes presently contemplated of carrying out the principles of the invention, and that the dcviccs described and illustrated may be modified or altered in their form, proportions, detail of construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the spirit and so no of the invention as defined in the appended claims.
The use of terms such as top and side with regard to the insert walls is intended to define the relationship of parts with each other rather than the relationship in What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
l. A concrete forming construction comprising:
(A) a wood form for supporting concrete to be poured therein, said form including:
(1) a substantially flat surface,
(B) an elongate substantially channel shaped crossseetioned insert secured to said form surface, said insert including:
(1) two spaced side Wall portions defining a longitudinal gap adjacent said form surface,
(2) a top wall portion joining said side wall portions and spaced from said form surface a distance significantly greater than the thickness of the channel walls, said top wall portion including:
(a) an outer surface, (11) an inner surface, presented generally toward said form surface, (c) at least one aperture through said top wall portion, said aperture,
(i) being defined by a peripheral edge formed by the intersection of the sides of a hole formed through said top wall portion and said outer surface of said top wall portion, and,
(ii) being slightly depressed below said outer surface,
(C) a driven elongate fastening means extending through said aperture and into said wood form and gripped thereby, s id fastening means,
(1) being unsupported between said top wall portion and said form surface,
(2) being engaged and grippe about a portion of its periphery by a major extent of the circumference of said aperture,
(3) having a maximum cross'sectional dimension,
(a) considerably smalier than said gap defined by said side wall portions,
(4) having a portion which engages said peripheral edge of said aperture in a fit not exceeding a press fit,
whereby, said fastening means may be readily drawn through said aperture in the direction of insertion upon removal of said wood form.
2. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein said fastening means comprises a headless nail having a diameter at least equal to the diameter of said aperture.
3. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein said fastening means comprises a nail, a major portion of which has a diameter smaller than the diameter of said aperture, said nail having a small portion adjacent one end thereof which is bulged outwardly to a diameter at least equal to the diameter of said aperture.
4. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein said fastening means comprises a nail, a major portion of which has a diameter smaller than the diameter of said aperture, said nail having a small portion adjacent one end thereof which has a series of corrugations thereon, said corrugations having an outside diameter at least equal to the diameter of said aperture.
5. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein said fastening means comprises a nail having a shank portion which has .a diameter smaller than the diameter of said aperture, said nail further having a head portion of larger diameter than said shank portion but of smaller diameter than said aperture, and a Washer of bendable material having an opening therethrough, said opening having a diameter greater than the diameter of said shank portion but less than the diameter of said head portion, said washer having an outside diameter larger than the diameter of said aperture, whereby said inner peripheral edge will tightly grip said washer when said washer is depressed into said aperture between said inner peripheral edge and said head portion of said nail.
6. The combination as set forth in claim 1 wherein said fastening means comprises a headless nail having a diameter smaller than the diameter of said opening, the axis of said nail being disposed at an angle to the axis of said aperture whereby said nail will substantially fill said aperture.
7. A concrete forming construction comprising:
(A) a wood form for supporting concrete to be poured therein, said form including:
(1) a substantially flat surface,
(B) an elongate substantially channel shaped crosssectioned insert secured to said :form surface, said insert including:
(1) two spaced side Wall portions converging to ward each other toward said form surface and defining a longitudinal gap adjacent said form surface,
(2) :a top wall portion joining said side wall portions and spaced from said form surface a distance significantly greater than the thickness of the channel walls, said top wall portions including:
(a) an outer surface,
(b) :an inner sunfiace, presented generally toward said form surface,
(c) a plurality of apertures through said top wall portion aligned in two parallel rows with each row being oriented over a corre sponding edge of said gap, each of said apertures,
(i) being defined by a peripheral edge formed by the intersection of the sides or" a hole formed through said top wall portion and said outer surface of said top wall portion, and,
(ii) being slightly depressed below said outer surface,
(C) a driven elongate fastening means extending through each of said apertures and into said wood form and gripped thereby, each of said fastening means, 4
(1) being unsupported between said top wall portion and said torm surface,
(2) being engaged and gripped about .a portion of its periphery by a major extent of the circumference of its corresponding aperture,
(3) having a maximum cross-sectional dimension,
(a) considerably smaller than said gap defined by said side Wall portions,
(4) having a portion which engages said peripheral edge of its corresponding aperture in a fit not exceeding a press fit,
whereby, said fastening means may be readily drawn through said apertures in the direction of insertion upon removal of said wood form.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,052,149 Kennedy Feb. 4, 1913 1,213,649 Hunter Jan. 23, 1917 1,267,276 Ruinello May 21, 1918 1,804,246 Budd May 5, 1931 2,006,300 Kinninger June 25, 1935 2,075,262 Boettner Mar. 30, 1937 2,107,885 Caggiano Feb. 8, 1938 2,108,107 De Wees Feb. 15, 1938 2,111,110 Deniston et a1 Mar. 15, 1938 2,578,381 Tinnerman Dec. 11, 1951 2,909,054 Phillips Oct. 20, 1959 2,967,448 Hallock Jan. 10,- 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 10,814 Great Britain May 9, 1907 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No 3 ,157 ,966 November 24 1964 PhiliptCu Sherburne It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.
Column 9, line 42, for "portions" read portion Signed and sealed this 24th day of August 1965a (SEAL) Allest:
ERNEST W. SWIDER EDWARD J. BRENNER Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Claims (1)

1. A CONCRETE FORMING CONSTRUCTION COMPRISING: (A) A WOOD FORM FOR SUPPORTING CONCRETE TO BE POURED THEREIN, SAID FORM INCLUDING: (1) A SUBSTANTIALLY FLAT SURFACE, (B) AN ELONGATE SUBSTANTIALLY CHANNEL SHAPED CROSSSECTIONED INSERT SECURED TO SAID FORM SURFACE, SAID INSERT INCLUDING: (1) TWO SPACED SIDE WALL PORTIONS DEFINING A LONGITUDINAL GAP ADJACENT SAID FORM SURFACE, (2) A TOP WALL PORTION JOINING SAID SIDE WALL PORTIONS AND SPACED FROM SAID FORM SURFACE A DISTANCE SIGNIFICANTLY GREATER THAN THE THICKNESS OF THE CAHNNEL WALLS, SAID TOP WALL PORTION INCLUDING: (A) AN OUTER SURFACE, (B) AN INNER SURFACE, PRESENTED GENERALLY TOWARD SAID FORM SURFACE, (C) AT LEAST ONE APRTURE THROUGH SAID TOP WALL PORTION, SAID APERTURE, (I) BEING DEFINED BY A PERIPHERAL EDGE FORMED BY THE INTERSECTION OF THE SIDES OF A HOLE FORMED THROUGH SAID TOP WALL PORTION AND SAID OUTER SURFACE OF SAID TOP WALL PORTION, AND, (II) BEING SLIGHTLY DEPRESSED BELOW SAID OUTER SURFACE, (C) A DRIVEN ELONGATED FASTENING MEANS EXTENDING THROUGH SAID APERTURE AND INTO SAID WOOD FORM AND GRIPPED THEREBY, SAID FASTENING MEANS, (1) BEING UNSUPPORTED BETWEEN SAID TOP WALL PORTION AND SAID FORM SURFACE, (2) BEING ENGAGED AND GRIPPED ABOUT A PORTION OF ITS PERIPHERY BY A MAJOR EXTENT OF THE CIRCUMFERENCE OF SAID APERTURE, (3) HAVING A MAXIMUM CROSS-SECTIONAL DIMENSION, (A) CONSIDERABLY SMALLER THAN SAID GAP DEFINED BY SAID SIDE WALL PORTIONS, (4) HAVING A PORTION WHICH ENGAGES SAID PERIPHERAL EDGE OF SAID APERTURE IN A FIT NOT EXCEEDING A PRESS FIT, WHEREBY, SAID FASTENING MEANS MAY BE READILY DRAWN THROUGH SAID APERTURE IN THE DIRECTION OF INSERTION UPON REMOVAL OF SAID WOOD FROM.
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Cited By (28)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3319985A (en) * 1963-11-18 1967-05-16 Fry Reglet Corp Reglet
US3375623A (en) * 1964-06-23 1968-04-02 Buhler Karl Channel shaped insert for embedment in concrete
US3390500A (en) * 1966-06-13 1968-07-02 Karl J. Schumak Screed support
US3509670A (en) * 1969-03-07 1970-05-05 Richmond Screw Anchor Co Inc Structural concrete insert or anchor
US3591997A (en) * 1969-06-19 1971-07-13 James D Tennison Jr Antiracking support brace for a building wall
US3680826A (en) * 1965-01-25 1972-08-01 Ermanno Bassani Panel form with flexible cap holding access box in sealing relationship
US3754729A (en) * 1971-12-27 1973-08-28 Symons Corp Groove-forming pattern assembly for a concrete wall form structure
US3775915A (en) * 1972-11-03 1973-12-04 Textron Inc Explosion venting wall
US3793795A (en) * 1971-09-23 1974-02-26 C Annand Waterproofing receiver
US3837128A (en) * 1972-10-24 1974-09-24 Fleury T Partitioning system
US4027436A (en) * 1976-03-15 1977-06-07 Walcon Corporation Explosion venting wall structure with releasable fastener means
US4243200A (en) * 1977-12-16 1981-01-06 Beer-Zaz Building Systems, Inc. Form pan structure
US4445303A (en) * 1982-04-26 1984-05-01 Judkins Milton W Wedge-type concrete insert
EP0116476A2 (en) * 1983-02-14 1984-08-22 BICC Public Limited Company Securing device
EP0436165A2 (en) * 1990-01-05 1991-07-10 Sergio Zambelli Profiled anchor element structure for prefabricated concrete componets
EP0545086A1 (en) * 1991-12-05 1993-06-09 SCHÖCK BAUTEILE GmbH Permanent shuttering element
EP1498564A1 (en) * 2003-07-14 2005-01-19 Hawa Ag Mounting process of a rail and mounting device
US20050217197A1 (en) * 2003-11-13 2005-10-06 Peacock Bobbie D Frangible concrete insert clip
US20100162656A1 (en) * 2008-12-31 2010-07-01 Jin-Jie Lin Middle pour anchor bolt holder
WO2010090736A1 (en) * 2009-02-04 2010-08-12 Espinosa Thomas M Concrete anchor
US20110041449A1 (en) * 2009-02-04 2011-02-24 Espinosa Thomas M Concrete anchor
US8381482B2 (en) 2011-07-29 2013-02-26 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Anchor bolt locator
US8966833B2 (en) 2012-09-12 2015-03-03 Mohamed R. Ally Concrete insert
US9062452B2 (en) 2012-07-24 2015-06-23 Thomas M. Espinosa Holder for concrete anchors
US9222251B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2015-12-29 Thomas M. Espinosa Concrete anchor coupling assembly and anchor rod holder
US9303399B2 (en) 2012-08-06 2016-04-05 Thomas M. Espinosa Holder and concrete anchor assemblies
US9394706B2 (en) 2013-10-08 2016-07-19 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Concrete anchor
US20190226200A1 (en) * 2018-01-20 2019-07-25 Friedrich Wilhelm Neikes Profiled rail with plug for fastening to formwork

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US1052149A (en) * 1912-04-30 1913-02-04 Joseph Kennedy Concrete-insert.
US1213649A (en) * 1916-02-24 1917-01-23 Rowland C Hunter Metal reglet.
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US1804246A (en) * 1928-05-05 1931-05-05 Walter P Budd Roof flashing
US2006300A (en) * 1932-02-06 1935-06-25 Carl A Kinninger Anchor insert
US2075262A (en) * 1936-02-14 1937-03-30 Universal Form Clamp Co Wall tie
US2107885A (en) * 1937-09-25 1938-02-08 Gertrude M Caggiano Curtain tie-back device
US2108107A (en) * 1935-12-02 1938-02-15 Wees Russell J De Means for anchoring structural elements to concrete supporting bodies
US2111110A (en) * 1937-04-21 1938-03-15 Deniston Jr Roof construction
US2578381A (en) * 1948-03-17 1951-12-11 Tinnerman Products Inc Sheet metal snap fastener
US2909054A (en) * 1956-01-13 1959-10-20 George T Phillips Anchor for securing accessories to concrete and the like
US2967448A (en) * 1955-06-20 1961-01-10 Hallock Robert Lay Drive fastener with anchoring teeth on the tapered portion thereof

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB190710814A (en) * 1907-05-09 1907-06-20 Wilbar Mfg Company Ltd Improvements in Means for Securing Rubber Heels to Boots and Shoes and similar Wearing Apparel.
US1052149A (en) * 1912-04-30 1913-02-04 Joseph Kennedy Concrete-insert.
US1213649A (en) * 1916-02-24 1917-01-23 Rowland C Hunter Metal reglet.
US1267276A (en) * 1917-08-27 1918-05-21 Henry Ruinello Wall concrete anchor.
US1804246A (en) * 1928-05-05 1931-05-05 Walter P Budd Roof flashing
US2006300A (en) * 1932-02-06 1935-06-25 Carl A Kinninger Anchor insert
US2108107A (en) * 1935-12-02 1938-02-15 Wees Russell J De Means for anchoring structural elements to concrete supporting bodies
US2075262A (en) * 1936-02-14 1937-03-30 Universal Form Clamp Co Wall tie
US2111110A (en) * 1937-04-21 1938-03-15 Deniston Jr Roof construction
US2107885A (en) * 1937-09-25 1938-02-08 Gertrude M Caggiano Curtain tie-back device
US2578381A (en) * 1948-03-17 1951-12-11 Tinnerman Products Inc Sheet metal snap fastener
US2967448A (en) * 1955-06-20 1961-01-10 Hallock Robert Lay Drive fastener with anchoring teeth on the tapered portion thereof
US2909054A (en) * 1956-01-13 1959-10-20 George T Phillips Anchor for securing accessories to concrete and the like

Cited By (48)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3319985A (en) * 1963-11-18 1967-05-16 Fry Reglet Corp Reglet
US3375623A (en) * 1964-06-23 1968-04-02 Buhler Karl Channel shaped insert for embedment in concrete
US3680826A (en) * 1965-01-25 1972-08-01 Ermanno Bassani Panel form with flexible cap holding access box in sealing relationship
US3390500A (en) * 1966-06-13 1968-07-02 Karl J. Schumak Screed support
US3509670A (en) * 1969-03-07 1970-05-05 Richmond Screw Anchor Co Inc Structural concrete insert or anchor
US3591997A (en) * 1969-06-19 1971-07-13 James D Tennison Jr Antiracking support brace for a building wall
US3793795A (en) * 1971-09-23 1974-02-26 C Annand Waterproofing receiver
US3754729A (en) * 1971-12-27 1973-08-28 Symons Corp Groove-forming pattern assembly for a concrete wall form structure
US3837128A (en) * 1972-10-24 1974-09-24 Fleury T Partitioning system
US3775915A (en) * 1972-11-03 1973-12-04 Textron Inc Explosion venting wall
US4027436A (en) * 1976-03-15 1977-06-07 Walcon Corporation Explosion venting wall structure with releasable fastener means
US4243200A (en) * 1977-12-16 1981-01-06 Beer-Zaz Building Systems, Inc. Form pan structure
US4445303A (en) * 1982-04-26 1984-05-01 Judkins Milton W Wedge-type concrete insert
EP0116476A2 (en) * 1983-02-14 1984-08-22 BICC Public Limited Company Securing device
EP0116476A3 (en) * 1983-02-14 1985-11-27 BICC Public Limited Company Securing device
EP0436165A2 (en) * 1990-01-05 1991-07-10 Sergio Zambelli Profiled anchor element structure for prefabricated concrete componets
EP0436165A3 (en) * 1990-01-05 1991-12-04 Sergio Zambelli Profiled anchor element structure for prefabricated concrete componets
EP0545086A1 (en) * 1991-12-05 1993-06-09 SCHÖCK BAUTEILE GmbH Permanent shuttering element
EP1498564A1 (en) * 2003-07-14 2005-01-19 Hawa Ag Mounting process of a rail and mounting device
US20050217197A1 (en) * 2003-11-13 2005-10-06 Peacock Bobbie D Frangible concrete insert clip
US20100162656A1 (en) * 2008-12-31 2010-07-01 Jin-Jie Lin Middle pour anchor bolt holder
US8397464B2 (en) 2008-12-31 2013-03-19 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Middle pour anchor bolt holder
US9097001B2 (en) 2009-02-04 2015-08-04 Thomas M. Espinosa Concrete anchor
US20110041450A1 (en) * 2009-02-04 2011-02-24 Espinosa Thomas M Concrete anchor
US20110041449A1 (en) * 2009-02-04 2011-02-24 Espinosa Thomas M Concrete anchor
US10724230B2 (en) 2009-02-04 2020-07-28 Cetres Holdings, Llc Concrete anchor
WO2010090736A1 (en) * 2009-02-04 2010-08-12 Espinosa Thomas M Concrete anchor
US10036158B2 (en) 2009-02-04 2018-07-31 Cetres Holdings, Llc Concrete anchor
US8943777B2 (en) 2009-02-04 2015-02-03 Thomas M. Espinosa Concrete anchor
US9447574B2 (en) 2009-02-04 2016-09-20 Cetres Holdings, Llc Concrete anchor
CN102341552A (en) * 2009-02-04 2012-02-01 T·M·埃斯皮诺萨 Concrete anchor
US9416530B2 (en) 2009-02-04 2016-08-16 Thomas M Espinosa Concrete anchor
US9222251B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2015-12-29 Thomas M. Espinosa Concrete anchor coupling assembly and anchor rod holder
US10626596B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2020-04-21 Cetres Holdings, Llc Concrete anchor coupling assembly and anchor rod holder
US10047516B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2018-08-14 Cetres Holdings, Llc Concrete anchor coupling assembly and anchor rod holder
US10047517B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2018-08-14 Cetres Holdings, Llc Concrete anchor coupling assembly and anchor rod holder
US9702139B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2017-07-11 Cetres Holdings, Llc Concrete anchor coupling assembly and anchor rod holder
US8381482B2 (en) 2011-07-29 2013-02-26 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Anchor bolt locator
US8621816B1 (en) 2011-07-29 2014-01-07 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Anchor bolt locator
US9062452B2 (en) 2012-07-24 2015-06-23 Thomas M. Espinosa Holder for concrete anchors
US9303399B2 (en) 2012-08-06 2016-04-05 Thomas M. Espinosa Holder and concrete anchor assemblies
US10676917B2 (en) 2012-08-06 2020-06-09 Cetres Holdings, Llc Holder and concrete anchor assemblies
US10202753B2 (en) 2012-08-06 2019-02-12 Cetres Holdings, Llc Holder and concrete anchor assemblies
US8966833B2 (en) 2012-09-12 2015-03-03 Mohamed R. Ally Concrete insert
US9945115B2 (en) 2013-10-08 2018-04-17 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Concrete anchor
US9394706B2 (en) 2013-10-08 2016-07-19 Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc. Concrete anchor
US20190226200A1 (en) * 2018-01-20 2019-07-25 Friedrich Wilhelm Neikes Profiled rail with plug for fastening to formwork
US10570610B2 (en) * 2018-01-20 2020-02-25 Friedrich Wilhelm Neikes Profiled rail with plug for fastening to formwork

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