US3156924A - Garment shield - Google Patents

Garment shield Download PDF

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US3156924A
US3156924A US25557063A US3156924A US 3156924 A US3156924 A US 3156924A US 25557063 A US25557063 A US 25557063A US 3156924 A US3156924 A US 3156924A
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garment
shield
layer
axis
direction
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Elizabeth M Wonacott
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Elizabeth M Wonacott
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D27/00Details of garments or of their making
    • A41D27/12Shields or protectors
    • A41D27/13Under-arm shields

Description

Nov. 17, 1964 E. M. WONACOTT 3,156,924

GARMENT SHIELD Filed Feb. 1, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG 76 I4 '/IO INVENTOR. ELIZABETH M. WONACOTT ATTORNEY Nov. 17, 1964 E. M. WONACOTT 3,156,924

GARMENT SHIELD Filed Feb. 1, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

ELlZABETH M. WONACOTT ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,156,924 GARMENT SHEEN) Elizabeth M. Wonacott, 9301 Lenore Drive, Garden Grove, Calif. Filed Feb. 1, 1963, Ser. No. 255,570 19 Claims. (Q1. 2 5? This invention pertains to a garment shield and more particularly to a garment shield which is adapted to be disposed of after it has been used once. This application is a continuation-in-part of patent application Serial No. 172,155, filed Feb. 9, 1962, now abandoned, for Disposable Garment Shield, by Elizabeth M. Wonacott.

There is an essential and a decided need to prevent human perspiration from damaging clothes.

Garment shields are frequently used to shield the sources of perspiration from the garment of the wearer. Previously known garment shields are sufficiently expensive that it is impractical to dispose of the garment shield after it has been used. It is usual to launder the garment shield so that it can be re-used. Laundering is not only inconvenient out also packs the shield reducing its absorbent qualities.

The garment shield of this invention is sufficiently inexpensive that it may be packaged in packages-dor example of fifty or one hundred to be used once and thrown away. It is not only more convenient and sanitary than the non-disposable shields but also more etlective and more comfortable to wear.

Some attempts have been made create disposable garment shields. No. 2,005,232 to H. V. Marsh for a Dress the use of flesh colored crepe or tissue paper as an absorbent material covered by cheese cloth or the like. A sheet of Waxed paper is used as a moisture barrier. Such a device would be rough and irritating to the wearer, the paper would become weak after it became wet, and the shield would rustle with the movement of in the prior art to For example, Patent Shield shows the wearer.

Patent No. 1,897,952 to Du Pont for a Garment Shield and Method of Making Same also uses crepe paper, a weak and irritating material.

Patent No. 2,654,888 to Brightrnan for a Dress Shield shows a garment shield which has a coarse outer surface of preferably coarse weave material such as Fiberglas and rayon. Such an outer material would irritate the body of the wearer. Further, it is necessary in the Brightman device to provide holes in the outer wall to allow perspiration to pass into an inner filler. The filler is adapted to be disposed of but not the outer cover. The Brightman device in addition to being only semi-disposable would be substantially more expensive, less eflicient and more irritating to the body of the wearer than the device of this invention.

The garment shield contemplated by this invention is a multilayer garment shield in which the outer layers are preferably nylon gauze. Nylon gauze has the that it is very strong, non-irritating because of lack of abrasive qualities, and very porous. The preferred nylon gauze has a bias thread so that when two layers are overlapped with their bias directions opposite, a very strong pair of layers results. Alternatively two oppositely directed bias threads can be used in the same layer.

The device of this invention uses cellulose material such as cotton as a perspiration absorbing member. The cotton layer is positioned beneath, preferably, a double layer of nylon gauze.

A moisture barrier of ve y thin polyethylene or polyvinyl plastic-but preferably polyethylene-4s used to prevent perspiration from reaching the clothes. The plastic is made as thin as feature mechanically practical which 3,155324 Patented Nov. 1?, sass allows it to present a moisture barrier without having a characteristic which causes it to rustle when the wearer moves.

The side of the garment shield which is adapted to contact the garment also is preferably covered by a double layer of nylon gauze with the bias threads in opposite directions. Alternatively one layer with two oppositely directed bias threads can be used.

In its preferred shape the blank from which the dress shield is made is substantially oval in shape. The oval members are laid on top of each other in the sequence nylon gauze, nylon gauze, polyethylene or polyvinyl plastic, cellulose material, nylon gauze, nylon gauze. The cross fibre of the nylon gauze is preferably aligned parallel to the minor axis of the oval with the bias threads dis played at an angle relative to the direction of the major axis of the oval.

To fasten the multilayers of the garment shield together, it is desirable to apply heat and pressure to the periphery of the stack of blanks. This may be done in a plurality of points or about the entire periphery of the blanks.

In order better to fit the body contour of the wearer, the oval stack of blanks is folded about the minor axis of the oval stack. To contour the stack of blanks to fit the curvature of the arm, a substantially crescent shaped indention is made in the folded portion to depress the fold in its central region. The crescent shaped indention should extend for substantially two-thirds of the central portion of the fold. The indention, then, amounts to a fold in the opposite direction, along the minor axis or" the oval extending from the major axis on either side thereof for approximately two-thirds of the distance from the center of the oval to the periphery of the blank. On either side of the indented fold are a. pair of crescent shaped folds positioned to accommodate the indented told.

When a garment is worn, the side seam of the garment is usually not directly under the arm. When a garment shield is worn, usually approximately two-tsirds of it should be forward of the seam. In accordance with this invention, appropriate positioning marks are provided on the outer surface of the garment shield so that the shield may be aligned with the seam of the garment before the garment is put on.

It is also desirable in accordance with this invention to provide a plurality of adhesive surfaces on the periphery of the surface of the shield which goes next to the garment. t would be apparent that the presence of the adhesive surfaces is optional for some kinds of material-tor example cashmere sweaters ill not tolerate the use of adhesive surfaces.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a disposable garment shield.

It is more particular object of this invention to provide a disposable garment shield which is very inexpensive relative to pre-existing shields.

It is another specific object of this invention to provide a disposable garment shield which is extremely strong.

it is still another specific object of this invention to provide a disposable garment shield which has a nonrustling moisture barrier.

It is still another specific object of this invention to provide a disposable garment shield which is easily fabricated to conform to the contour of the wearer.

it is also a specific object of this invention to provide position marks on the exterior surface of a disposable garment shield.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a method for making a disposable garment shield.

Other objects will become apparent from the following a 9 description together With the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a partially broken plan view of a typical garment shield in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2.is a profile view taken at 2-2 in FIG. 1; 7

FIG. 3 is an oblique view showing the layers of the mutlilayered garment shield of this invention;

FIG. 4 is a side view of the garment shield of this in vention in its folded position;

FIG. 5 is a view, partially in section, taken at 5-5 in FIG. 4.

FIG. 1 shows the surface of the garment shield of this invention which is adapted to contact the body of the wearer. The garment shield is preferably substantially oval in shape. The garment shield blank is folded approximately along the minor axis 12 of the oval. The fold 14 is away from the side of the garment shield which is adapted to contact the body of the wearer. The fold 14 is intended at substantially symmetrically about the major axis 16. for a distance of approximately twothirds of the way from the major axis 16 to the outer periphery 18 of the shield.

The indented portion 26 of fold 14 is substantially crescent shaped and is adapted to depress the central portion of fold 14 to contour the garment shield to the body of the wearer. The center of the indention 20 has a fold 22:. The leaves 24 and 32 to form the 28 and the indention 20.

The line connecting lines 34 and 36 intersects the minor axis 12 of the garment shield 10 at a point substantially one-third of the distance across the minor axis 12 of the garment shield 10 from the major axis 16, as shown at in FIG. 4. Similarly, a line connecting position marks 38 and 40 is substantially parallel to the major axis 16 and is positioned approximately one-third of the distance across the garment shield measured on the minor axis 12 as shown at 37 in FIG. 4.

It may sometimes be desirable to attach adhesive members to the periphery of the garment shield 10 on the surface which comes into contact with the clothes. The adhesive surface may extend entirely around the periphery of the shield or may be a plurality of individual adhesive segments. The segments need not be of the same size and shape. Adhesive segments are shown by way of example at 42, 44, 46, adhesivemembers is optional for some clothing will not tolerate such use.

An especially significant feature of this invention is the material selected for the multilayered garment shield and the sequence of layers thereof.

The outer layer 54 of material on the side of the shield adapted to come into contact with the body of the wearer is preferably of nylon gauze. The nylon gauze has one second thread 68 is intera bias angle 70 relative to 48, 50 and 52. 'The use of the i a line 72 which is parallel to the major axis 16 of the garment shield. The nylon weave is very coarse and the interstices between the threads are preferably filled with a gauze material. The nylon gauze has the advantage that it is non-irritating to the body of the wearer. It is chemically inert to the perspiration and other body fluids of the wearer. It is not abrasive. It is very strong and does not ravel nor flake.

Although one layer of nylon gauze is suflicient to come within the spirit and the scope of this invention, it is preferable to underlay the outer layer 54 with a second layer 56 of nylon gauze substantially identical to the layer 54. The thread 72 of layer 56 is substantially parallel to the minor axis 12 of the garment shield, and the bias thread 74 forms a bias angle 76, with a line parallel to the major axis 16 of the garment shield, which is opposite in direction from the bias angle 70 of layer 54.

It is also within the spirit of this invention to use both bias threads 68 and '74 along with thread 66 in a single layer.

Under nylon gauze 56 is a layer of absorbent material 58. It is preferable that layer 58 be fabricated of some material such as, for example, cotton. Paper is not satisfactory because it tends to crumble, pack and flake.

Under layer 58 is a layer 60 of a polyethylene or polyvinyl plastic material. The plastic material of layer 60 is preferably polyethylene. Layer 60 is as possible while still maintaining the desired mechanical layer 60.

Layers 62 and 64 which are adapted to be positioned ad acent to the clothing of the wearer are fabricated of When heat and pressure are applied around the periphery of the garment shield the material-particularly the polyethylene or polyvinyl plastic-fuses and fastens all of the layers together. Both heat and pressure are required to fuse the material and the amount of heat and pressure depends upon the relative thickness of the layers.

The indention 20 and the fold fused it does not have the breathing and absorbing qualities which are desired in a garment shield.

garment shield, it is desirable to cut the layers in blanks of the proper shape. This shape, as explained above, is preferably an oval shape. The layers are laid in the described sequence upon a fiat plate and are fused by the application of pressure and heat. The pressure and heat, for example, may be applied by a hand for example, It may also dies which be made by a heated pair of matching dies. be made without heat by a pair of pressure are contoured to the desired shape.

The fold 14 may be made by the application of heat and To make the fold 14, the garment shield is folded about its minor axis and heat or pressure or both is applied at fold 14.

Automatic machinery may be used to fabricate the garment shield described herein. rial could be placed on a plurality of rollers and interleaved, by means well known in the art, toprovide a con- For example, the mate-' tinuous strip of multilayered material. The stacked blanks could then simultaneously be fused and cut. At the same time the periphery is fused and cut, the indention could be made. The entire cutting, fusing and indenting process could be carried out by means of a pair of matching dies. The matching dies could be stationary or could be movable with the flow of material. The individual garment shield members could then be extracted by a suction cup, or the like, which would be adapted to grasp the individual shields and fold them about their minor axis. The folds could then be pressed by a pair of pressure members and the folded or unfolded garment shield could then be packaged by known packaging techniques.

Thus, the garment shield of this invention presents a significant advance over the art in that it provides extreme convenience in a relatively inexpensive garment shield which has all the qualities of more expensive shields.

Further, the garment shield described in this invention has the decided advantage that it may be made by mass production techiques, packaged and sold as a disposable item.

The garment shield of this invention also has the unique feature of having positioning marks on the outer surface thereof which are adapted to aid the wearer in attaching the garment shield to the inner surface of the garment before the garment is worn.

The material selected for use in the garment shield of this invention has the advantage of being soft and very comfortable on the wearer.

The garment shield of this invention also has the desirable quality of being moisture proof without having a rustling characteristic when the wearer moves.

Thus, the wearer may use the garment shield of this invention without being aware that she is wearing the garment shield. Further, the disposable feature means that the garment shield need not be Washed and reused which has obvious sanitary as well as labor saving advantages.

Although the device of this invention has been described in detail above it is not intended that the invention should be limited by this description but only in accordance with the spirit and scope of the appended claims in which I claim:

1. A blank for a garment shield having multiple layers of material in sequence comprising: a first layer of nylon gauze having a bias thread in a first direction, a second layer of nylon gauze having a bias thread in a second direction, a third layer of moisture absorbing material, a fourth layer of very thin polyethylene, a fifth layer of nylon gauze having a bias thread in one direction, and a sixth layer of nylon gauze having a bias thread in a direction different than said last named layer of nylon gauze.

2. In combination: an oval shaped garment shield blank having a plurality of layers of material in sequence, a first said layer being of nylon gauze with one thread direction substantially in the direction of the minor axis of said oval and the second thread direction on a bias with the major axis of said oval forming a bias angle with a first direction, a second layer of nylon gauze having one thread direction parallel to the minor axis of said oval and second thread direction on a bias with the major axis of said oval the bias angle of said second layer being opposite in direction to that of the bias angle of said first layer, a third layer of moisture absorbing cellulose material, a fourth layer of thin polyethylene, a fifth layer of nylon gauze having one thread direction parallel to the minor axis of said oval and the second thread direction on a bias with the major axis of said oval, and a last layer of nylon gauze having one thread direction substantially parallel to the minor axis of said oval and a second thread direction on a bias with the major axis of said oval the bias angle of said last named layer being opposite in direction from that of the bias angle of said fifth layer, said layers being heat fused on the periphery thereof.

3. A garment shield blank as claimed in claim 2 and further comprising: adhesive material attached to the periphery of the exterior side of said last named layer.

4. A disposable garment shield comprising: a substantially oval shaped blank of multilayered material heatfused together on the periphery of said oval and folded substantially along the minor axis of said oval; a second fold indented into said first fold to form a substantially crescent shaped indention, said idention extending over substantially the center two-thirds of said fold to cause said fold to be depressed in the region of said indention; and positioning marks positioned on the outer surface of said blank on at least one line parallel to the major axis of said oval said last named line positioned approximately one-third of the distance across said minor axis; the layers of said blank being in sequence a first layer of nylon gauze having one thread direction substantially parallel to the minor axis of said oval and a second thread direction forming a bias angle in a first sense with the major axis of said oval, a second layer of nylon gauze having a first thread direction forming a bias angle in a sense opposite to said first sense with the major axis of said oval, a third layer of moisture absorbent fibrous material, a fourth layer of very thin polyethylene, a fifth layer of nylon gauze having one direction substantially parallel to the minor axis of said oval and a second thread direction forming a bias angle in a third sense with the major axis of said oval, a sixth layer of nylon gauze having one thread direction substantially parallel to the minor axis of said oval and a second thread direction forming a bias angle in a sense opposite to said third sense with the major axis of said oval.

5. A garment shield as recited in claim 4- and further comprising adhesive material positioned on the exterior surface of the periphery of said garment shield.

6. A blank for a garment shield having multiple layers of material in sequence comprising: a first layer of porous fabric having a bias thread in a first direction, a second layer of porous fabric having a bias thread in a second direction, a third layer of moisture absorbing material, a fourth layer of very thin polyethylene, a fifth layer of porous fabric having a bias thread in one direction, and a sixth layer of porous fabric having a bias thread in a direction different than said last named layer of porous fabric.

7. In combination: an oval shaped garment shield blank having a plurality of layers of material in sequence, a first said layer being of porous fabric with one thread direction substantially in the direction of the minor axis of said oval and the second thread direction on a bias with the major axis of said oval forming a bias angle with a first direction, a second layer of porous fabric having one thread direction parallel to the minor axis of said oval and second thread direction on a bias with the major axis of said oval the bias angle of said second layer being opposite indirection to that of the bias angle of said first layer, a third layer of moisture absorbing cellulose material, a fourth layer of thin polyethylene, a fifth layer of porous fabric having one thread direction parallel to the minor axis of said oval and the second thread direction on a bias with the major axis of said oval, and a last layer of porous fabric having one thread direction substantially parallel to the minor axis of said oval and a second thread direction on a bias with the major axis of said oval the bias angle of said last named layer being opposite in direction from that of the bias angle of said fifth layer, said layers being heat-fused on the periphery I thereof.

crescent shaped indention, said indention extending over substantially the center two-thirds of said fold to cause said fold to be depressed in the region of said indention; and positioning marks positioned on the outer surface of said blank on at least one line parallel to the major axis of said oval said last named line positioned approximately one-third of the distance across said minor axis; the layers of said blank being in sequence a first layer of porous fabric having one thread direction substantially parallel to the minor axis of said oval and" a second 10 thread direction forming a bias angle in the first sense With the major axis of said oval, a second layer of porous fabric having a first thread direction forming a bias angle in a sense opposite to said first sense With the major axis of said oval, a third layer of moisture absorbent fibrous material, a fourth layer of very thin polyethylene, a fifth layer of porous fabric having one direction substantially parallel to the minor axis of said oval and a second thread direction forming a bias angle in a third sense with the major axis of said oval, a sixth layer of porous fabric having one thread direction substantially parallel to the minor axis of said oval and a second thread direction forming a bias angle in a sense opposite to said third sense With the major axis of said oval.

8 10. A garment shield as recited in claim 9 and further comprising adhesive material positioned on the exterior surface of the periphery of said garment shield.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 374,172 12/87 Bryarly 2 56 715,353 12/02 Davis 2-58 1,340,882 5/20 Freeman 258 2,005,232 6/35 Marsh 253 2,113,469 4/38 Standley 2 56 2,344,781 3/44 Mullen 25 3 2,438,771 3/48 Topjian 2--53 2,516,800 7/50 Rand 2-58 2,562,508 7/51 Rand 253 FOREIGN PATENTS 461,404 2/ 37 Great Britain.

JORDAN FRANKLIN, Primary Examiner.

DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Examiner.

Claims (1)

1. A BLANK FOR A GARMENT SHIELD HAVING MULTIPLE LAYERS OF MATERIAL IN SEQUENCE COMPRISING: A FIRST LAYER OF NYLON GAUZE HAVING A BIAS THREAD IN A FIRST DIRECTION, A SECOND LAYER OF NYLON GAUZE HAVING A BIAS THREAD IN A SECOND DIRECTION, A THIRD LAYER OF MOISTURE ABSORBING MATERIAL, A FOURTH LAYER OF VERY THIN POLYETHYLENE, A FIFTH LAYER OF NYLON GAUZE HAVING A BIAS THREAD IN ONE DIRECTION, AND
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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3345643A (en) * 1965-03-29 1967-10-10 Mary A L Bradley Disposable dress shield
US3346878A (en) * 1965-10-12 1967-10-17 Roger A Marrs Disposable garment shield
US3673611A (en) * 1970-05-18 1972-07-04 Deering Milliken Res Corp Molded hats having improved shape retention and recoverability
US3727237A (en) * 1971-06-23 1973-04-17 L Glatt Underarm shield
FR2499832A1 (en) * 1981-02-17 1982-08-20 Hascoet Andree Disposable under-arm protection fitted inside garment - is made of absorbent material with adhesive on one side to fix under garment arm hole
FR2505622A1 (en) * 1981-05-13 1982-11-19 Monnier Josette Underarm dress shield - folded in two from central portion
FR2545335A1 (en) * 1983-05-03 1984-11-09 Seyve Bernard Absorbent and deodorising armpit napkin intended to protect the garments of people who perspire abundantly and to protect against foul-smelling odours
US4631752A (en) * 1985-04-19 1986-12-30 Eleanor Heyman Disposable garment shield
US4747162A (en) * 1986-04-01 1988-05-31 Fumie Yanagihara Disposable perspiration absorbing pad
US5042088A (en) * 1987-12-23 1991-08-27 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable clothing shield and method of manufacture
US6760920B1 (en) * 2002-08-12 2004-07-13 Jack Kadymir Disposable underarm perspiration pad
US20060015981A1 (en) * 2002-04-03 2006-01-26 Barbara Ammer Perspiration insert
US20060236439A1 (en) * 2005-04-20 2006-10-26 Michelle Bailey Dress shield
US20070218092A1 (en) * 2006-03-17 2007-09-20 Gregory Lee Deodorant patch and method for making
FR2932959A1 (en) * 2008-06-25 2010-01-01 Anne Laure Courvoisier Piece protective against the transfer of bodily secretions.
US20100180357A1 (en) * 2007-06-13 2010-07-22 Betalife Gmbh Anti-transpiration insert
US20100263102A1 (en) * 2009-04-17 2010-10-21 Gabriella Trespalacios Garment protector
CN105996246A (en) * 2016-05-06 2016-10-12 天津工业大学 An armpit sweat absorbing paste preparation method

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US374172A (en) * 1887-12-06 Dress-shield
US715353A (en) * 1902-04-09 1902-12-09 Theron Davis Process of making dress-shields.
US1340882A (en) * 1917-05-17 1920-05-25 Rufus A Freeman Method of making articles from sheet-rubber
US2005232A (en) * 1934-07-27 1935-06-18 Harry V Marsh Dress shield
GB461404A (en) * 1936-04-30 1937-02-16 Felix Pollenz A dress protector
US2113469A (en) * 1937-02-10 1938-04-05 Eleanor W Standley Dress shield
US2344781A (en) * 1940-06-27 1944-03-21 Eunice G Mullen Garment protector
US2438771A (en) * 1945-02-14 1948-03-30 Topjian Daniel Garment protector
US2516800A (en) * 1946-04-30 1950-07-25 Rand Rubber Company Dress shield construction
US2562508A (en) * 1948-07-16 1951-07-31 Rand Rubber Company Inc Dress shield

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US374172A (en) * 1887-12-06 Dress-shield
US715353A (en) * 1902-04-09 1902-12-09 Theron Davis Process of making dress-shields.
US1340882A (en) * 1917-05-17 1920-05-25 Rufus A Freeman Method of making articles from sheet-rubber
US2005232A (en) * 1934-07-27 1935-06-18 Harry V Marsh Dress shield
GB461404A (en) * 1936-04-30 1937-02-16 Felix Pollenz A dress protector
US2113469A (en) * 1937-02-10 1938-04-05 Eleanor W Standley Dress shield
US2344781A (en) * 1940-06-27 1944-03-21 Eunice G Mullen Garment protector
US2438771A (en) * 1945-02-14 1948-03-30 Topjian Daniel Garment protector
US2516800A (en) * 1946-04-30 1950-07-25 Rand Rubber Company Dress shield construction
US2562508A (en) * 1948-07-16 1951-07-31 Rand Rubber Company Inc Dress shield

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3345643A (en) * 1965-03-29 1967-10-10 Mary A L Bradley Disposable dress shield
US3346878A (en) * 1965-10-12 1967-10-17 Roger A Marrs Disposable garment shield
US3673611A (en) * 1970-05-18 1972-07-04 Deering Milliken Res Corp Molded hats having improved shape retention and recoverability
US3727237A (en) * 1971-06-23 1973-04-17 L Glatt Underarm shield
FR2499832A1 (en) * 1981-02-17 1982-08-20 Hascoet Andree Disposable under-arm protection fitted inside garment - is made of absorbent material with adhesive on one side to fix under garment arm hole
FR2505622A1 (en) * 1981-05-13 1982-11-19 Monnier Josette Underarm dress shield - folded in two from central portion
FR2545335A1 (en) * 1983-05-03 1984-11-09 Seyve Bernard Absorbent and deodorising armpit napkin intended to protect the garments of people who perspire abundantly and to protect against foul-smelling odours
US4631752A (en) * 1985-04-19 1986-12-30 Eleanor Heyman Disposable garment shield
US4747162A (en) * 1986-04-01 1988-05-31 Fumie Yanagihara Disposable perspiration absorbing pad
US5042088A (en) * 1987-12-23 1991-08-27 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Disposable clothing shield and method of manufacture
US20060015981A1 (en) * 2002-04-03 2006-01-26 Barbara Ammer Perspiration insert
US6760920B1 (en) * 2002-08-12 2004-07-13 Jack Kadymir Disposable underarm perspiration pad
US20060236439A1 (en) * 2005-04-20 2006-10-26 Michelle Bailey Dress shield
US20070218092A1 (en) * 2006-03-17 2007-09-20 Gregory Lee Deodorant patch and method for making
US8062628B2 (en) 2006-03-17 2011-11-22 Gregory Lee Deodorant patch and method for making
US20100180357A1 (en) * 2007-06-13 2010-07-22 Betalife Gmbh Anti-transpiration insert
US7954170B2 (en) * 2007-06-13 2011-06-07 Betalife Gmbh Anti-transpiration insert
FR2932959A1 (en) * 2008-06-25 2010-01-01 Anne Laure Courvoisier Piece protective against the transfer of bodily secretions.
US20110179544A1 (en) * 2008-06-25 2011-07-28 Anne-Laure Courvoisier Protective patch providing protection against the transfer of bodily secretions
WO2010004175A1 (en) * 2008-06-25 2010-01-14 Anne-Laure Courvoisier Protective piece against the transfer of bodily secretions
US20100263102A1 (en) * 2009-04-17 2010-10-21 Gabriella Trespalacios Garment protector
US8011018B2 (en) * 2009-04-17 2011-09-06 Gabriella Trespalacios Garment protector
CN105996246A (en) * 2016-05-06 2016-10-12 天津工业大学 An armpit sweat absorbing paste preparation method

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