US3148646A - Zigzag sewing machines - Google Patents

Zigzag sewing machines Download PDF

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US3148646A
US3148646A US161734A US16173461A US3148646A US 3148646 A US3148646 A US 3148646A US 161734 A US161734 A US 161734A US 16173461 A US16173461 A US 16173461A US 3148646 A US3148646 A US 3148646A
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needle
thread
guide
feed
underlooper
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US161734A
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Victor J Sigoda
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MAN SEW CORP
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MAN SEW CORP
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B53/00Thread- or cord-laying mechanisms; Thread fingers
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B3/00Sewing apparatus or machines with mechanism for lateral movement of the needle or the work or both for making ornamental pattern seams, for sewing buttonholes, for reinforcing openings, or for fastening articles, e.g. buttons, by sewing
    • D05B3/02Sewing apparatus or machines with mechanism for lateral movement of the needle or the work or both for making ornamental pattern seams, for sewing buttonholes, for reinforcing openings, or for fastening articles, e.g. buttons, by sewing with mechanisms for needle-bar movement
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B57/00Loop takers, e.g. loopers
    • D05B57/02Loop takers, e.g. loopers for chain-stitch sewing machines, e.g. oscillating

Description

Sept. 15, 1964 Filed Dec. 22, 1961 V. J. SIGODA ZIGZAG SEWING MACHINES 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 74 2 1 lIllll p A III! as Em-um .g-flllll s m 8 INVENTOR.
Karo d. \SIGODH Sept. 15, 1964 v. J SIGODA ZIGZAG SEWING MACHINES 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 22, 1961 IN VENTOR. More a}. 5/600 Se t. 15, 1964 v. J. SIGODA ZIGZAG SEWING MACHINES 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Dec. 22, 1961 INVENTOR. Karo? d. SIGQO4 Sept- 15, 1964 v. J. SIGODA 3,148,646
ZIGZAG smwznc MACHINES Filed Dec. 22, 1981 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 i E IN VEN TOR.
l Illlll BY :7 nu 7.0 B6 4rrop/ve'y United States Patent York Filed Dec. 22, 1961, Ser. No. 161,734 6 Claims. (Cl. 112-158) This invention relates to sewing machines capable of high speed production of zigzag stitching. It also relates to mechanisms which may be added to existing sewing machines of either the lockstitch or two thread chainstitch types to convert such machines for the production of zigzag stitching of those types.
One feature of the invention is the provision of mechanism which may be readily attached to existing sewing machines such as typically a lockstitch machine of the Singer 451K class to produce lateral movement of the needle concurrently with the usual vertical reciprocation. Another feature is the provision of mechanism which not only guides the needle so that it enters the work perpendicularly regardless of the lateral movement of the needle but also compensates for the inherent difference in timing of the loop-taker at opposite extremes of the lateral movement of the needle.
Such mechanisms may be applied to existing sewing machines to produce either zigzag lockstitching or two thread chainstitching. New sewing machines may be designed to take advantage initially of the disclosed features, or alternately, stripped down versions of new lockstitch sewing machines may be expressly manufactured for such conversion by inclusion of these features to produce high speed zigzag sewing machines. In the latter case, in those machines having reverse feed action, new varieties of zigzag sewing machines having reverse feed action may be made available.
Since there are numerous plain lockstitch sewing machines already available, many of which are surplus for use as lockstitchers, it now becomes relatively inexpensive to produce the more desirable and more versatile zigzag type of sewing machine. This is of significant economic advantage as the owner may now recoup a dormant investment by such conversions when such machines are no longer needed for the initial purpose. It also makes possible a reduction in the capital investment in machines and lessens the storage requirements for various types of sewing machines when they may be readily converted from one stitch type to another either temporarily or permanently.
In certain aspects, this application is a continuationin-part of pending applications Serial No. 30,682, filed May 20, 1960, and Serial No. 151,680, filed November 13, 1961, now abandoned. In application Serial No. 30,682, mechanisms are disclosed for converting lockstitch sewing machines for the production of two thread chainstitching. These mechanisms provide an underlooper operating transversely to the line of feed and a novel underlooper thread presentor operating along the line of feed which cooperates with the vertically reciprocating needle to form the two thread chainstitch. In application Serial No. 151,680, mechanism is disclosed for use with a reverse feed action lockstitch machine so converted which assures poistive two thread chainstitch formation when the feed action is reversed.
When the new mechanisms disclosed herein are incorporated into a lockstitch machine converted in accordance with application Serial No. 30,682, all the advantages inherent in this new family of two thread chainstitch machines are made available in a zigzag sewing machine. These include the use of a much shorter and therefore stiffer needle, a shorter needle-bar stroke while maintaining adequate clearance between the end of the needle ice and the surface of the work, and the use of the thread presentor about whose limbs the underlooper thread triangle is formed. The use of the presentor desensitizes the timing and positioning of the underlooper in meeting the needle and makes the use of a compound motion underlooper no longer necessary. This new member also acts to control and hold the needle thread loop previously intercepted by the underlooper out of the path of theneedle as it intercepts the newly formed underlooper thread triangle. Since this combination of features makes possible positive two thread chainstitch formation at high operating speeds in the region of six thousand stitches per minute, the additional mechanisms disclosed herein make possible production of a zigzag two thread chainstitch sewing machine capable of operating at speeds exceeding five thousand stitch penetrations per minute.
The mechanism which provides for the perpendicular entry of the needle into the work contributes to this high speed performance capability as it is arranged to guide the needle ahnost down to the work. This guided perpendicular entry minimizes needle deflection, and hence possible needle breakage, which may occur when the needle is required to penetrate todays hard surfaced and tough synthetic fabrics at an angle at high velocity. Perpendicular guidance despite the lateral shifting of the needle is made possible by separating the needle-bar into two portions. One is drive portion corresponding to the conventional needle-bar and the other is a needle-carrier which is guided perpendicularly regardless of its lateral position.
The desired aspect is maintained by the use of a pair of links connecting the two portions in conjunction with a vertical guideway. The links are arranged however so that they alone are capable of holding the needle-carrier in perpendicular attitude without the assistance of the walls of the guideway. This not only minimizes wear in the Walls of the guideway but makes the desired needle entry possible even if wear in such walls does occur.
Another feature is the arrangement of the parts which provide the lateral movement to the needle and guide it, in such manner that a minimum of mass is in motion and this contributes to smooth operation at high speed.
The linkage mentioned is arranged so that it provides compensation for the difference in timing of the loop-taker at each extreme of the lateral shifting of the needle. In any sewing machine the movements of the needle and the loop-taker (the threaded underlooper for a two thread chainstitch or the hook and bobbin for a lockstitch) are coordinated so that the point of the loop-taker meets the needle in the scarf just above the eye shortly after the needle reverses direction and is ascending. This condition occurs in a zigzag machine only at the median position of the lateral throw of the needle. At either extreme thereof, the loop-taker travels either a shorter or longer distance to meet the needle, and is therefore earlier or later in meeting the needle than when the needle reciprocates on its median line.
When the range of vertical movement of the needle is held constant, the point of the loop-taker meets the needle in a different vertical position of the needle for either extreme of the lateral movement. When the needle is penetrating at the inner side of the zigzag seam it will not have reached as high a point in its ascent as it will reach when the needle is penetrating at the outer edge of the zigzag seam. In this latter instance, since the loop-taker must take longer to reach the meeting point, the eye of the needle may have risen above the point at which the loop-taker can intercept the needle thread loop.
To compensate for this inherent timing difference, the linkage connecting the two portions of the needle-bar has been arranged so that it not only provides a flexible connection between the two, but so that at one extreme of the lateral movement of the needle the stroke of the needle-bar and needle-carrier combination is in etfect lengthened so that it takes somewhat longer for the eye of the needle to reach the point in its ascent at which it is desirable that the loop-taker meet it. This is accomplished by pivoting the linkage at two spaced points, and this arrangement in conjunction with the two movements supplied to the needle-carrier changes the overall length of the combination. It is possible by suitable positioning of the pivots to arrange this change of overall length so that the combination may have a shorter stroke at one extreme of the lateral throw than at the median position of needle reciprocation, and a somewhat longer stroke at the other extreme of lateral throw than at the median position. This may afford better compensation.
Other features will in part be obvious and in part will be pointed out in the following description, it being understood that the principles of the invention may be incorporated into other sewing machines whether of the particular brand of manufacture mentioned or others, so long as the disclosed principles are compatible with their construction. It should therefore be understood that the following description and the drawings are merely illustrative and should not be construed in a limiting sense.
In the accompanying drawings:
FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of an industrial type sewing machine representative of such widely used lockstitch sewing machines as the Singer 400, 451 and 600 classes, which has been converted for zigzag stitching of the two thread chainstitch type both in accordance with this disclosure and that of application Serial No. 30,682; portions of the machine having been broken away and some shown partly in section to indicate the driving arrangements for the mechanisms which are added;
FIG. 2 is an end elevation of the head end of the converted sewing machine shown in FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a portion of the machine shown in FIG. 1, partly in section, indicating the drive mechanisms for the underlooper and the underlooper thread presentor and the mechanism which shifts the thread presentor in synchronism with the lateral movements of the needle;
FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view of another portion of the machine shown in FIG. 1, showing the linkage connecting the needle-bar and the needle-carrier and for guiding the needle for perpendicular penetration of the work; indicating in broken line the position of the linkage and other members when the needle is at the other extreme of its lateral movement; and showing in section the means for changing the central position of the needlecarrier;
FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 4; and
FIG. 6 is a detail view taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 4.
The Sewing Machine The sewing machine consists of a cloth-plate 1 from one end of which rises the standard 2 of a hollow bracketarm 3 overhanging the cloth-plate and terminating at its free end in a needle-head 4. Rotatably supported in the bracket-arm 3 is the horizontally disposed main-shaft carrying at one end belt-pulley 6. Within the bracket-arm, the main-shaft carries a peripherally grooved pulley 8 connected by a clip-belt 9 disposed within the arm-standard to a similarly grooved pulley 10 carried by one end of the usual hook and feed actuating shaft 11 which rotates oneto-one with the main-shaft and is disposed beneath the cloth-plate in substantial parallelism therewith.
Before conversion for two thread chain-stitching, shaft 11 carries an internal gear at its other end which is in mesh with a pinion 12 which is attached to a horizontally disposed hook-shaft 14, the ratio of the internal gear and pinion being such that the hook-shaft rotates twice for each rotation of the main-shaft. The hook-shaft 14 carries at its opposite end the hook which cooperates with the needle 15 in the formation of lockstitching.
The work is advanced past the stitch-forming members by feed mechanism of well known construction. Such feed mechanism produces the usual four motions of the feed-bar 16 and the feed-dog 18 carried thereby, the latter, in conjunction with the presscr-foot 19 serving to ad Vance the work to the stitch-forming elements. A type of reverse feed mechanism which may be applied to such sewing machines is shown in US. Patent No. 1,618,213 of February 22, 1927.
The stitch-forming mechanism for the lockstitch includes drive mechanism for the needle-bar 20 and for the thread take-up mechanism. The needle-bar drive mechanism includes a crank-disk carried at the end of mainshaft 5, and the crank-disk has extending therefrom a crank-pin which is connected by a link to reciprocate the needle-bar.
Other details of the basic lockstitch sewing machine may be obtained by reference to US. Patent No. 2,267,- 581 of December 23, 1941. That type of lockstitch machine as so far described is not suitable for modification for zigzag stitching because the hook operates along the line of feed without any provision for shifting it laterally, and hence it cannot intercept the needle thread at the extremes of the lateral movement given to the needle by the mechanism described herein. The manner in which this type of lockstitch sewing machine may be modified for zigzag stitching will be explained later.
However, other types of lockstitch sewing machines having hooks operating transversely to the line of feed may be modified to produce zigzag stitching, as may this type of lockstitch machine after it has been converted for two thread chainstitching in accordance with the disclosure of application Serial No. 30,682, since the latter conversion results in a machine having a looptaker operating transversely to the line of feed. The instant invention will be further described in conjunction with such a conversion.
When the basic lockstitch machine described previously is to be converted for two thread chainstitching, the hook is removed from shaft 14 and the large internal gear is removed from shaft 11 and the latter is replaced by a small spur gear 21 which is the same size as pinion 12, and thus the former hook-shaft 14 now rotates in a oneto-one relationship with mainshaft 5. Shaft 14 is then provided at its other end (see FIG. 3) with eccentricblock 22 which carries stud 24 mounted at a selected distance from center to provide a predetermined amount of rocking of the thread presentor arm 25 which is pivotally mounted on shaft 26. Arm 25 is connected by strap-link 28 with the stud on the eccentric-block 22 to produce a cycle of forward and rearward rocking of thread presentor 29 carried by arm 25 for each rotation of main-shaft 5 in time with the reciprocation of needle-bar 20.
The chainstitch underlooper is driven as follows. On the underside of cloth-plate 1 (see FIG. 3) there is a downwardly projecting box 30 which is normally sealed off by a gasketed cover plate which is replaced by a gear support casting 31 when the converting mechanism is installed. Shaft 11 projects into this box and in the conversion is fitted with spiral gear 32 as well as with spur gear 21.
Gear 32 through a train of other spiral gears 34, 35 and 36, rotates a second eccentric-block carrying stud 41 which through pitman 42 and rocker arm 44 rocks shaft 45 which supports looper carrier 46. Underlooper 48 mounted on carrier 46 is thereby oscillated transversely to the line of feed.
When the converted sewing machine has a reverse feed mechanism, provision for positive chainstitch formation may be made by installing the mechanism disclosed in application Serial No. 151,680.
Conversion for Zigzag Stitching Provision for obtaining the lateral movement for needle 15 is effected in the following manner. Main-shaft 5 (see FIG. 1) is provided with bevel gear 51. A portion of the standard 2 and of the arm 3 where they meet is machined away so that support bracket 52 may be mounted by its horizontal section 54 to the underside of arm 3 with a shaft supporting section 55 fitted within the hollow space at the junction of the arm and standard. Portion 56 of section 55 is bored to receive an anti-friction hearing 58 to provide an additional journal for main-shaft 5, and the cylindrically shaped vertical portion of section 55 is bored to provide a vertical journal for shaft 60. The upper end of shaft 60 carries bevel gear 61 in mesh with gear 51 on the main-shaft, and the lower end carries eccentric-block 62.
Block 62 has a transverse slot 64 disposed perpendicularly to the axis of shaft 60 in which T-headed stud 65 may be adjustably fixed at some selected distance from the axis of rotation of shaft 60. A pitman 66 is pivotally connected with T-stud 65 at its lower end to transmit the reciprocating motion derived from the rotation of shaft 68 to provide the lateral throw for needle 15. It will be apparent that shifting the position of stud 65 in slot 64 closer to the axis of rotation of block 62 will reduce the extent of movement of the pitman and therefore the lateral excursion of needle 15, and conversely, that moving the stud away from the axis of rotation of block 62 will increase the lateral throw of the needle. Stud 65 may be held in the desired adjusted position in slot 64 by any suitable means such as for example the manually adjustable screw passing through the head of the stud as indicated in FIG. 1.
Various mechanisms have been used in the art for providing the lateral excursion of the needle and also for adjusting the extent thereof. These are so well known that it seems unnecessary to expand further on such means other than to mention that when extremely large lateral excursions are involved, this type of eccentric drive means is not suitable. Since the lateral movements of the needle are continuous with such an arrangement, the needle may be moving laterally as it is penetrating the work which of course is objectionable. A more suitable arrangement therefore would be the use of a cam and follower to drive pitman 66 and to provide a dwell in the lateral excursions of the needle as it is penetrating the Work.
T he Perpendicular Guide Means for the Needle Support 68 (see FIGS. 2 and 4) secured to the lower end of needle head 4, has a large horizontally disposed slot 69 which receives the vertical guide member 70 for lateral reciprocation thereof. Member '70 is T-form in shape, the upper horizontal section 71 being rectangular and dimensioned to fit snugly, but freely in slot 69. Member 70 is moved transversely to the line of feed by a pivotal connection with pitman 66. Straps 72 which confine section 71 in slot 69 are held to support 68 by screws 74.
Guide member 70 has a vertical section 75 which depends downwardly toward the cloth-plate. Section 75 has a rectangular slot 76 which also extends vertically and perpendicular to the cloth-plate. Needle-carrier 78 fits snugly, but freely, in slot 76 so that the needle 15 carried thereby may reciprocate normal to the cloth-plate regardless of the lateral position of guide member 70 as it is reciprocated by pitman 66.
Needle-carrier 78 receives its vertical reciprocation by a flexible connection with needle-bar 20 which consists of a linkage which changes the vertical position of the lower end of the needle at each extreme of the lateral movement of guide member 70. Arm 80 held by clamp 81 (see FIG. 6) on the lower end of needle-bar 20, has a portion 82 which projects horizontally toward the standard 2 and on which one or more horizontally disposed pivot pins 84 are supported. Needle-carrier 78 (see FIG. 5) also has a horizontally projecting portion on which one or more horizontally disposed pins 85 are supported in parallel relation to pins 84 but offset vertically therefrom.
6 A link 86 connects each pin 84 with each pin and these provide the connection between needle-bar 20 and needlecarrier 78 to reciprocate the latter.
Only one pin 84 and one pin 85 and one link 86 pivotally connecting the pins are needed for this drive connection. The walls of slot 76 could maintain the needle-carrier in perpendicular aspect, but wear in the walls, much more likely to occur in high speed operation, would change this desired perpendicular entry into the work by the needle. The use of the second set of pins 84 and 85 equally spaced from the first set of pins as indicated in FIG. 1, and the connecting link 86 holds the needle-carrier in the desired perpendicular relationship without the guidance of walls in the slot 76. This arrangement therefore serves to lessen the strain that would be imposed on these walls by the vertical reciprocation of needle-carrier 78, and also minimizes the effect that wear in these walls would exert on proper guidance of the needle-carrier.
The main purpose of this linkage however is to effect the change in the overall length of the combination of the needle-bar, needle-carrier and needle. As shown in FIG. 4, when pitman 66 has moved guide member 70 to the extreme left, lower pin 85 on needle carrier 78 will have been shifted to the left, and this shifting shortens the vertical distance between pins 84 and 85 as link 86 pivots about both. In this position, link 86 approaches a somewhat horizontal aspect. When pitman 66 moves guide member 70 to the right (as indicated in broken line in FIG. 4), lower pin 85 will be shifted to the right, and this will increase the vertical distance between the pins as the link is pivoted about them to approach a somewhat vertical attitude. This change in distance provides the compensation necessary for the previously mentioned inherent difierence in timing between underlooper interceptions of the needle thread loop at the extremes of lateral movement of the needle.
The mechanisms so far described which provide lateral movement for the needle coupled with perpendicular entry into the work and compensation for the timing difference in the interaction of the underlooper and needle are suitable for zigzag conversion of two thread chainstitch sewing machines having compound action underloopers and for lockstitch machines which have hooks arranged so that the needle thread loop can be intercepted at both extremes of the lateral throw of the needle. Unlike the case in lockstitching, in two thread chainstitching interception of the needle thread loop by the underlooper is only part of the stitch formation. It is also necessary for the needle to intercept the underlooper thread to complete the stitch formation.
In the type of two thread chainstitching disclosed in application Serial No. 30,682 utilizing the underlooper thread presentor, in a zigzag conversion in which the needle is provided with lateral movement, the needle will not necessarily be in position to enter the underlooper thread triangle held about the limbs of the presentor when it is at extremes of its lateral movement. Since it is de sirable that the needle enter this triangle between the limbs of the presentor, some provision must be made for this lateral movement of the needle. This may be done by utilizing a presentor having widely spaced limbs, but when this construction is used, the wide spacing prevents either limb, depending upon which extreme of lateral movement is being considered, from effectively controlling the needle thread loop on the underlooper from the preceeding interception of the needle thread. This can be overcome by providing a third limb centrally disposed between the widely spaced limbs which would then be efiective to control this intercepted needle thread loop on the underlooper in the same manner as the second limb of the thread presentor described in application Serial No. 30,682.
As an alternate thereto, the thread presentor may be provided with a lateral movement matching thatof the needle, and this is the presently preferred embodiment;
Mechanism for Shifting the Thread Presenter Later-ally Alhough thread presentor 29 is pivotally mounted on shaft 26, collar 88 normally is positioned on shaft 26 so that it prevents arm from shifting laterally. In this modification, the position of collar 88 is adjusted so that enough lateral movement of arm 25 on shaft 26 may be had. This movement is produced through shifting yoke 89 which has a pair of fingers 90 either bored or slotted to fit freely on shaft 26 straddling the hub of arm 25. The lower end of the shifting yoke has a clamp portion 91 by which the yoke may be secured to a laterally shifting shaft 94 journalled in spaced bearings provided in a support casting 95 which is affixed to the lower end of the support casting 31 in place of the bottom cover plate.
Shaft 94 is shifted laterally through a connection with the vertical guide member 70 and therefore travels in unison with the lateral movement of the guide member and the needle-carrier 78 guided thereby. This connection is in effect a large bellcrank lever shown as consisting of a number of connected parts. Obviously other mechanisms could be substituted for this connection to effect the desired synchronous movement of the yoke 89 with guide member 70.
As shown, the arrangement comprises a vertical shaft support bracket 96 which is mounted within the standard 2 to provide a vertical journal for shaft 98. The lower end of shaft 98 carries an arm 99 which connects through a pair of ball joints 100 and 101 at either end of rod 102 with an arm 104 clamped on shaft 94. The upper end of shaft 98 carries arm 105 clamped thereto which is pivotally connected through a second pitman 106 with the same section of guide member 70 to which pitman 66 is attached.
This arrangement provides a fixed relationship between the throw laterally of the needle and the lateral shifting of the thread presentor 29 to maintain the desired relationship between them. Setting this relationship is effected by positioning arm 25 on shaft 26 by adjusting the lateral position of yoke 89 on the shifting shaft 94 after loosening the screws in clamp 92. This adjustment normally would be made with the lateral throw of the needle reduced to zero so that the needle moves only vertically on the median line of its lateral movement, with the needle centered in the transverse needle slot in the needle-plate and disposed centrally between the limbs of presentor 29. As mentioned, this reduction of movement is obtained by adjusting the position of T-stud 65 toward the center of rotation of eccentric-block 62.
When the parts have been so positioned, it may subsequently be desired to shift the central position of the needle slightly in either direction laterally. This is done by manipulating an eccentric in the common pivotal connection of the pitmans 66 and 106 at the end of section 71 of vertical guide 70. As may be seen in FIG. 4, this connection is effected through an eccentric-headed stud 108 which has a concentric shaft portion 109 which is freely received in the yoked end of section 71 and through the end of pitman 106 held between the arms of the yoke. The eccentric head 110 is held within the clamp 111 at the end of pitman 66, and this clamp may be loosened to permit stud 108 to be rotated manually by means of the pierced tang 112 at the lower end of the stud. It is apparent that rotation of stud 108 will change the lateral position of member 70 and since pitman 106 is connected thereto, this will automatically shift the lateral position of yoke 89 and presentor arm 25 in synchronism with the shifting of needle-carrier 78.
It was previously mentioned that in lockstitch sewing machines having a hook operating along the line of feed that some provision for laterally shifting the hook in synchronism with the shifting of the needle is necessary to convert the machines for zigzag stitching. In such machines, if the hook-shaft is modified so that it may move laterally while maintaining its rotating drive connection, then some additional connection with this hook-shaft u may be made through a shift member such as yoke 89 or some equivalent mechanism to shift the hook in unison with the lateral throw of the needle.
While various embodiments of the invention have been described and certain modifications suggested, it will be understood that changes and elaborations may be effected in the various parts without departing from the general principles disclosed herein and the scope of the invention is therefore defined by the appended claims.
What is claimed is:
1. In a two thread chainstitch sewing machine having a reciprocating needle-drive-bar, and actuating means therefor; a threaded underlooper operating transversely to the line of feed, and actuating means therefor; an underlooper thread presenting member operating along the line of feed and about whose limbs the underlooper thread triangle is formed, and actuating means therefor; said presenting member being mounted for bodily movement transversely to the line of feed as well as along the line of feed; means for producing a zigzag stitch comprising a support fixed to the machine, a member having vertical guide means thereon mounted on said support so that it can move laterally only, and actuating means to impart lateral reciprocation to the guide member; a needle-carrier, and a threaded needle supported thereby; said needle carrier being connected with said member for guided vertical reciprocation as said guide member moves laterally; means connecting the needle-drive-bar and the needlecarrier to impart vertical reciprocation to the needlecarrier simultaneously with its lateral movement with the guide member; and means connected with the guide member to shift the underlooper thread presenting member laterally in unison with the guide member.
2. A sewing machine in accordance with claim 1 in which the means for shifting the underlooper thread presenting member laterally comprises a yoke mounted for movement transversely to the line of feed, said yoke being maintained in engagement with the thread presenting member; and mechanism connecting the yoke with the guide member to shift the yoke in unison with the lateral movement of the guide member.
3. A Zigzag sewing machine having a vertically reciprocating needle-bar and a needle carried thereby; actuating means to impart reciprocation to said needle-bar; said needle-bar being mounted for movements laterally across the line of feed, and means for imparting lateral movements to the needle-bar including a shiftable support for said needle-bar and an arm connected with said support; a loop-taker operating along the line of feed, and actuating means therefor; said loop-taker being mounted for bodily movement transversely to the line of feed as well as along the line of feed; means for shifting the loop taker transversely to the line of feed; said last-named means including a second arm connected to the shiftable support; the connections for both arms with the shiftable support being common and including a manipulatable eccentric whose position in said common connections may be adjusted to fix the lateral position of the needle-bar and the loop-taker simultaneously without affecting the extent of the lateral movements of either.
4. A sewing machine according to claim 1 in which there is an arm connected with the vertical guide member and in which the means for shifting the underlooper thread presenting member laterally includes a second arm connected to the vertical guide member, the connections for both arms with the guide member being common and including a manipulatable eccentric whose position in said common connection may be adjusted to fix the initial lateral position of the needle-carrier and of the thread presenting member simultaneously without affecting the extent of lateral movement of either.
5. In a sewing machine having a reciprocating needle drive-bar and actuating means therefor; a loop-taker actuating means therefor; means for producing stitch comprising a support fixed to the ma her having vertical guide means thereon mounted on said support so that it can move laterally only, and actuating means to impart lateral reciprocation to the guide member; a needle-carrier and a threaded needle supported thereby, said needle-carrier being guided for vertical reciproeation by the guide means on the guide member as the latter moves the needle-carrier laterally; a pair of pivots spaced a predetermined distance apart laterally on the needle-drive-bar; a second pair of pivots spaced the same predetermined distance apart laterally on the needle carrier; and parallel links connecting the pivots on the needledrive-ba-r and the needle-carrier, said arrangement being efieotive to maintain the needle-drive-bar and the needle carrier in substantial axial parallelism as the guide member moves laterally and the needle-drive-bar is reciprocated vertically.
6. A sewing machine having a vertically reciprocating needle-drive-bar and actuating means therefor; a needlecarrier; a connection between said needle-drive-bar and the needle-carrier for imparting vertical reciprocation to the needle-carrier While permitting concurrent horizontal reciprocation thereof; means for reciprocating said needlecarrier horizontally as it is reciprocated vertically; and means for maintaining said needle-drive-bar and the needle-carrier in substantial axial parallelism during the concurrent needle-carrier reeiprocations, said connection and said means for maintaining axial parallelism comprising a pair of pivots spaced a predetermined distance apart laterally on the needle-drive-bar, a corresponding pair of pivots spaced the same predetermined distance apart laterally on the needle-carrier, and parallel links connecting the respective pivots on the needle-drive-bar and the needle-carrier.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 326,724 Dewey Sept. 22, 1885 929,698 Onderdonk Aug. 3, 1909 1,232,263 Finch July 3, 1917 2,029,942 Rapaport et al. Feb. 4, 1936 2,107,271 Allen et al. Feb. 8, 1938 2,324,836 Hale July 20, 1943 2,344,632 Parry Mar. 21, 1944 2,635,568 Gellman et a1 Apr. 21, 1953 3,026,831 Johnson Mar. 27, 1962 3,058,436 Goosman' Oct. 16, 1962 FOREIGN PATENTS 603,984 Germany Oct. 12, 1934

Claims (1)

1. IN A TWO THREAD CHAINSTITCH SEWING MACHINE HAVING A RECIPROCATING NEEDLE-DRIVE-BAR, AND ACTUATING MEANS THEREFOR; A THREADED UNDERLOOPER OPERATING TRANSVERSELY TO THE LINE OF FEED, AND ACTUATING MEANS THEREFOR; AN UNDERLOOPER THREAD PRESENTING MEMBER OPERATING ALONG THE LINE OF FEED AND ABOUT WHOSE LIMBS THE UNDERLOOPER THREAD TRIANGLE IS FORMED, AND ACTUATING MEANS THEREFOR; SAID PRESENTING MEMBER BEING MOUNTED FOR BODILY MOVEMENT TRANSVERSELY TO THE LINE OF FEED AS WELL AS ALONG THE LINE OF FEED; MEANS FOR PRODUCING A ZIGZAG STITCH COMPRISING A SUPPORT FIXED TO THE MACHINE, A MEMBER HAVING VERTICAL GUIDE MEANS THEREON MOUNTED ON SAID SUPPORT SO THAT IT CAN MOVE LATERALLY ONLY, AND ACTUATING MEANS TO IMPART LATERAL RECIPROCATION TO THE GUIDE MEMBER; A NEEDLE-CARRIER, AND A THREADED NEEDLE SUPPORTED THEREBY; SAID NEEDLE CARRIER BEING CONNECTED WITH SAID MEMBER FOR GUIDED VERTICAL RECIPROCATION AS SAID GUIDE MEMBER MOVES LATERALLY; MEANS CONNECTING THE NEEDLE-DRIVE-BAR AND THE NEEDLECARRIER TO IMPART VERTICAL RECIPROCATION TO THE NEEDLECARRIER SIMULTANEOUSLY WITH ITS LATERAL MOVEMENT WITH THE GUIDE MEMBER; AND MEANS CONNECTED WITH THE GUIDE MEMBER TO SHIFT THE UNDERLOOPER THREAD PRESENTING MEMBER LATERALLY IN UNISON WITH THE GUIDE MEMBER.
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Cited By (1)

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US4246855A (en) * 1979-06-18 1981-01-27 The Singer Company Compensating needle bar connecting linkage for a sewing machine

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US326724A (en) * 1885-09-22 Sewing-machine
US929698A (en) * 1899-05-13 1909-08-03 Union Special Sewing Mach Co Overseaming sewing-machine.
US1232263A (en) * 1916-05-23 1917-07-03 Singer Mfg Co Loop-taker-actuating mechanism for sewing-machines.
DE603984C (en) * 1932-02-16 1934-10-12 Kochs Adler Ag Zigzag sewing and embroidery machine
US2029942A (en) * 1931-11-30 1936-02-04 Rapaport Naham Sewing machine
US2107271A (en) * 1936-11-10 1938-02-08 Josephine W Allen Zigzag stitch-forming mechanism for sewing machines
US2324836A (en) * 1941-11-27 1943-07-20 Singer Mfg Co Needle-actuating mechanism for zigzag-stitch sewing machines
US2344632A (en) * 1942-04-25 1944-03-21 Singer Mfg Co Needle-vibrating mechanism for sewing machines
US2635568A (en) * 1949-10-08 1953-04-21 Gellman Abraham Mechanism for design stitching
US3026831A (en) * 1957-12-02 1962-03-27 Singer Mfg Co Zigzag mechanisms for sewing machines
US3058436A (en) * 1960-01-25 1962-10-16 Singer Mfg Co Needle bar mounting for zigzag sewing machines

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US326724A (en) * 1885-09-22 Sewing-machine
US929698A (en) * 1899-05-13 1909-08-03 Union Special Sewing Mach Co Overseaming sewing-machine.
US1232263A (en) * 1916-05-23 1917-07-03 Singer Mfg Co Loop-taker-actuating mechanism for sewing-machines.
US2029942A (en) * 1931-11-30 1936-02-04 Rapaport Naham Sewing machine
DE603984C (en) * 1932-02-16 1934-10-12 Kochs Adler Ag Zigzag sewing and embroidery machine
US2107271A (en) * 1936-11-10 1938-02-08 Josephine W Allen Zigzag stitch-forming mechanism for sewing machines
US2324836A (en) * 1941-11-27 1943-07-20 Singer Mfg Co Needle-actuating mechanism for zigzag-stitch sewing machines
US2344632A (en) * 1942-04-25 1944-03-21 Singer Mfg Co Needle-vibrating mechanism for sewing machines
US2635568A (en) * 1949-10-08 1953-04-21 Gellman Abraham Mechanism for design stitching
US3026831A (en) * 1957-12-02 1962-03-27 Singer Mfg Co Zigzag mechanisms for sewing machines
US3058436A (en) * 1960-01-25 1962-10-16 Singer Mfg Co Needle bar mounting for zigzag sewing machines

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4246855A (en) * 1979-06-18 1981-01-27 The Singer Company Compensating needle bar connecting linkage for a sewing machine

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