US3148101A - Process for making non-woven batt - Google Patents

Process for making non-woven batt Download PDF

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US3148101A
US3148101A US744844A US74484458A US3148101A US 3148101 A US3148101 A US 3148101A US 744844 A US744844 A US 744844A US 74484458 A US74484458 A US 74484458A US 3148101 A US3148101 A US 3148101A
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Prior art keywords
filaments
batt
form
process
filters
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US744844A
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Jr William T Allman
Claude E Layman
James F Carothers
Jr Ralph G Higgins
Charles R Haley
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Celanese Corp
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Celanese Corp
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Priority to US744844A priority Critical patent/US3148101A/en
Priority to CH68260A priority patent/CH363602A/en
Priority to DEC20676A priority patent/DE1272794B/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B01PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES OR APPARATUS IN GENERAL
    • B01DSEPARATION
    • B01D39/00Filtering material for liquid or gaseous fluids
    • B01D39/14Other self-supporting filtering material ; Other filtering material
    • B01D39/16Other self-supporting filtering material ; Other filtering material of organic material, e.g. synthetic fibres
    • B01D39/18Other self-supporting filtering material ; Other filtering material of organic material, e.g. synthetic fibres the material being cellulose or derivatives thereof
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24DCIGARS; CIGARETTES; TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS; MOUTHPIECES FOR CIGARS OR CIGARETTES; MANUFACTURE OF TOBACCO SMOKE FILTERS OR MOUTHPIECES
    • A24D3/00Tobacco smoke filters, e.g. filter-tips, filtering inserts; Mouthpieces for cigars or cigarettes
    • A24D3/02Manufacture of tobacco smoke filters
    • A24D3/0229Filter rod forming processes
    • A24D3/0237Filter rod forming processes by extrusion
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D5/00Formation of filaments, threads, or the like
    • D01D5/04Dry spinning methods
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H3/08Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating
    • D04H3/16Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating with bonds between thermoplastic filaments produced in association with filament formation, e.g. immediately following extrusion

Description

Sept. 8, 1964 w. T. ALLMAN, JR., ETAL 3,148,101

PROCESS FOR MAKING NON-WOVEN BATT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 26, 1958 Sept; 8, 1964 w. T. ALLMAN, JR., ET AL 3,148,101

PRocEss Foa MAKING NoNwovEN BATT Filed June 26, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG.4. FIG.5.

United States Patent Ofi lice 3,l458,ll Patented Sept. 8, 1964 PROCESS FR The present invention relates to novel filters particularly suited for filtration of tobacco smoke, intermediates therefor, and processes of making such filters and i11- termediates.

Most cigarette filters of point the filaments may, and preferably do, deviate from the general longitudinal direction, i.e. the filaments are crimped. In production of filters from such materials, prior to wrapping with paper, it is necessary to form the bundle or tow of filaments, to crimp the bundle, and then to store the crimped filaments because the linear speed of subsequent processing differs from these earlier steps. It is then necessary to work or open the bundle or tow to separate the individual filaments so that their crimps will be de-registered in order not to provide channels through which smoke will pass without being filtered, and to plasticize the opened tow to assist cohesion of the filaments into a firm body. Following wrapping with paper the filters must be cured to cause the lament to adhere at points of contact and to stiften the filters.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel non-woven batt which can be manufactured easily and inexpensively, and which is suited for use in making filters for tobacco smoke.

Another object of the invention is to produce novel non-woven batts using the same filament extrusion equipment generally used in spinning yarns.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a cigarette filter of improved efiiciency, of reduced weight, and of high whiteness even without added pigment.

A further object of the invention is to provide novel procedures for producing cigarette filters which perform as Well as or better than existing filters.

Still :another object of the invention is to provide novel lter materials free of plasticizer and/or adhesives, composed exclusively of filamentary material.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following detailed description and claims.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention filament forming material in liquid phase, e.g. in solution, is extruded through a plurality of orifices in the form of substantially parallel filaments and the individual filaments are caused to be moved about relative to one another so as to contact each other while still plastic and to coalesce or fuse at randomly spaced points, thereby forming a random non-woven batt. The batt is drawn away from the point of extrusion at a linear speed considerably slower than the linear speed at which the filament forming material is extruded through the orifices so that the weight of the batt per unit length will be considerably greater than if the filaments were withdrawn at the same linear speed at which they were extruded. The exact rate of withdrawal will depend upon the number of orifices, the speed of extrusion and the desired denier of the batt, i.e. the desired weight in grams of 9000 meters of the batt. This denier will depend upon the end use contemplated for the batt; when it is intended to be used for manufacturing filters for cigarettes of conventional size, e.g. about 25 mm. in circumference,

the denier of the whole batt generally ranges from about 40,000 to 500,000 and preferably 55,000 to 100,000. Generally, the speed of extrusion of the filaments will be at least about times, and preferably at least about 400 times, the rate of withdrawal of the batt, although as noted the exact ratio may be varied widely depending on the other conditions of operation.

The preferred batts generally have a thickness of at least about 5 mm., e.g., 10 mm. to 50 mm., and a width of at least about 25 mm., e.g. about 50 mm. to 300 mm. The apparent density of the batt as measured with a substantially uncompressed sample is generally less than 2 pounds per cubic foot and preferably less than l pound per cubic foot.

The dried batt can be rolled up or it can be given a small twist so as to form a rope of approximately cylindrical configuration. In either of these instances, or preferably directly as withdrawn in the form of a non-woven batt of randomly directed filaments, the mass is passed through a trumpet which reduces it to a cross section corresponding in size and shape to the cigarettes into which filters are to be incorporated. The continuously moving, approximately cylindrical rope is then processed into cigarette filters in generally the same manner that a conventional opened and plasticized tow is processed, e.g. it may be continuously wrapped in paper, cut into predetermined lengths and either packaged for subsequent incorporation into cigarettes as the lter elements thereof or directly incorporated into cigarettes, except that curing is not necessary.

The characteristics of the non-woven batt and the performance of cigarette filters produced therefrom will be largely dependent upon the conditions of extrusion. For example, the filaments when they contact each other should still be sufficiently plastic to coalesce; on the other hand, it not sufficiently dry when they contact each other and are deposited on the support, they will mat down and form a thin relatively dense batt which is less suited for cigarette filter production although it may have other uses.

Examples of filament forming materials are organic derivatives of cellulose such as ethers and/ or esters thereof, e,g. ethyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, cellulose propionate, cellulose butyrate, cellulose acetate formate, cellulose acetate propionate, cellulose acetate butyrate, etc., which esters may be ripened so as to modify their solubility characteristics or may be unripened, i.e. containing fewer than about 0.29 free hydroxyl groups per anhydroglucose unit, such as cellulose triacetate. While other filament forming materials such a polyamides, e.g. nylon 6 or 66, linear polyesters such as polyethylene terephthalate, acrylonitrile polymers and copolymers, oleiinic polymers suc has polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, polyvinyl acetate, polyvinyl chloridevinyl acetate, polyvinylidene chloride, and the like, can be employed, organic acid esters of cellulose, such as cellulose acetate, are preferred and these are advantageously extruded as a solution into a heated evaporative atmosphere.

The invention will be more fully described with reference to the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG, 1 is a schematic perspective View of an apparatus for forming cigarette filters in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a portion of a cigarette,

with the papers shown in section, having incorporated therein the filter of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view on an enlarged scale of the batt 24 formed in FIG. 1; and

FIGS. 4, 5, 6, and 7 are photomicrographs of lengths of individual filaments of the batt of FIG. 3.

Referring now more particularly to the drawing, in

FIG. l there is shown a closed cabinet 11 (with the front removed so that the inside is visible) housing an endless highly porous member such as a wire screen 12 trained about shafts 13, 14, at least one of which is rotated, at relatively low speed, so that the top of screen 12 moves to the right. Hot air is admitted to the cabinet 11 at 15 and vapors leave through pipe 16.

A solution of a filament forming material dissolved in a volatile solvent is supplied by a conduit 1'7 to a multiorificed spinnerette or jet 18 through which it is extruded under pressure, in the same manner as when spinning yarn, as a plurality of substantially parallel filaments 19 directed toward moving screen 12. inclined pipes 20 and 21 are positioned in front of and behind the plane of the filaments 19, i.e. to the right and left of said plane, and direct jets of fluid, e.g. compressed air, fore and aft at the filaments 19 before they reach screen 12 and cause the filaments to be drawn, i.e. to be reduced in denier, and to swirl about in a turbulent zone, each filament whipping about and forming entanglements with itself and with other filaments. The solvent in filaments 19 starts evaporating upon contact with the hot air in cabinet 11 but the filaments 19 are still sufficiently Wet and plastic when acted upon by the air blasts from pipes 2f), 21 so that they occasionally fuse where they come in contact and are distorted into varied geometrical configurations which are set by the rapid drying as a result of the air blast. A pair of lateral baffles 22, 23 (the latter being shown partly broken away) are positioned above screen 12 and determine the Width of the batt 24 which forms as the entangled filaments 19 drop to the screen. These baffles also serve to prevent formation of a batt having lateral edges of lesser thickness or height than the middle, i.e. they aid in producing a uniform batt.

As noted, the blasts of air through pipes 20, 21 also serve to dry the filaments 19 so that the batt 24 is almost fully dry after moving only a short distance toward end wall 2S of cabinet 11. The batt 24 accordingly does not mat down but rather is lofty and of low density. The batt is carried along by screen 12 and leaves cabinet 11 through an elongated slit 26 in end Wall 25.

Batt 24 then enters the wide end of a trumpet 27 and is compacted laterally therein and changed in cross section from a wide rectangle to an approximately cylindrical rope 28 of the approximate cross-sectional shape and size of a cigarette. Rope 23 enters a paper wrapping apparatus 29 along with paper 30 and an endless belt 31, the paper 30 being wrapped about rope 28 and glued in apparatus 29 in conventional manner.` The wrapped rope 32 issuing from apparatus Z9 is then cut by knife 33 into filter plugs 34 of predetermined length.

The plugs 34 are incorporated as the filters in cigarettes in conventional manner. As shown in FIG. 2, the plug 34 comprising a portion of rope 28 and paper 3ft is wrapped together with cigarette tobacco 3S in an outer paper 36 to form a filter-tipped cigarette 3'7.

As can be seen in FIG. 3 the batt 24 is an entangled mass of substantially continuous substantially randomly directed filaments 19 which are adhered to each other at spaced points so as not to be capable of being individually pulled out, although the individual filament identity is apparent over short distances. The edges of the batt 24, are of substantially the same thickness as the middle of the batt. The agitation and turbulence produced by the air blasts produce the random structure as well as many small neps or clusters 38 which appear to be composed of tight coils, knots, or entanglements of one or more filaments. It has been observed that filters made from batts having such neps exhibit greater filtration efiiciences.

The batt and filters produced therefrom are characterized by extreme uniformity, individual filters produced from different portions along the length of a given batt having substantially the same weights per unit length, the same filtration efiiciences, porosity, etc. The filters compare extremely favorably, in both cost and performance,

with conventional filters. While a plasticizer may be used, it is not necessary, and the plugs are of satisfactory firmness and resilience. They are also of excellent Whiteness, although no pigment has been incorporated. The Weight of the novel filter, per unit length, is less than that of conventional filters of equal filtration efficiency.

In place of an elongated spinnerette as shown, a conventional spinnerette with orifices arranged in a circular pattern may be employed; several spinnerettes may be lined up transversely of the cabinet 11 to form a nonwoven batt of greater width (the baffles 22 and 23, if present, being spaced further apart) or they may be lined up in longitudinal direction of the cabinet to form a laminated batt of greater height or thickness. If desired, subdivided absorbents such as silica gel, fiber fioc, or the like can be deposited on the batt 24 in cabinet 11 shortly after its formation and thus may be embedded in the batt; if introduced before the batt is dry such additives may even be held adhesively within the batt. In addition to use in making cigarette filters, the batt can be used in spread condition for making fiat filters or other articles generally prepared from non-wovens.

The number and disposition of the air blasts can be varied as desired to modify the physical properties of the resulting batt.

Depending upon the temperature of the air in the cabinet and the conditions of extrusion, it is possible t0 practice the invention without moving the screen 12, i.e. the batt immediately upon dropping to the screen will be sufficiently coherent to be moved over the stationary screen without being disrupted. In place of a screen as support for the batt, a plurality of parallel spaced filaments or yarns from a metier or a supply package can move beneath the spinnerette and can be joined to the batt as a reinforcement. If the entangled mass is sufficiently coherent as formed a support can be entirely omitted.

In the event that the denier of the batt 24 is greater than that desired in the filters, the denier may -be reduced by speeding up the support or by drafting prior to condensing the batt in trumpet 27, eg. |by passing the batt between a plurality of pairs of rolls successively moving at greater peripheral speed. The resulting denier of the batt will be the product of the original denier and the peripheral speed of the first pair of rolls divided by the peripheral speed of the last pair of rolls.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention, it has been found that more coherent batts and superior filters are produced when the filaments are extruded under extremely high pressures. Desirably the extrusion pressure exceeds 600 p.s.i.g., which can be attained by employing small orifices, eg. round orifices about .040 mm. or less in diameter with linear rates of extrusion of 700 or more meters per minute. Under such conditions the solvent appears to flash off and produces filaments having surface characteristics different from those generally resulting from dry spinning a solution through round orifices. Specifically, as shown in FIG. 4, a length of an individual filament 39 is twisted about itself to form a loop 40. On a more highly magnified scale as shown in FIG. 5, the filament 39 has a ribbon-like rugose surface with helical striations 41. FIG. 6 shows another filament 42 having a longitudinal fold 43 and substantially parallel circumferential striations 44. These are shown on a less highly magnified scale in FIG. 7. The folds 43 differ in height and their Width varies from about one-tenth to one-third of the fiber width. Their surfaces are slightly indented. Some bifurcate into two divergent folds. The folds may be well separated or almost touch; in some areas they are very irregular and appear crumpled. lf any one fiber is examined through a small part of its length, all or only some of these features may be observed.

As would be expected from the elevational views of the filaments, in cross section they are irregular and have many lobes and deep indentations. In general, the filaments 19 have a rough crenulated surface which resembles the =bark of a tree. As a result of the sfriations and the knots there is more surface for a given weight of filament. The pits and irregularities increase the entrapment of smoke particles when used as a filter and the irregularities produce a locking action which resists relative displacement of the filaments so that a stronger more firm filter plug is produced.

Example Using the apparatus shown in the drawing, a 26.8% by weight solution of cellulose acetate, acetyl value of 55%, in acetone is extruded through a jet having 30 circular holes, each .034 mm. in diameter, at a linear speed of about 1850 meters per minute (ie. at a total volume of 50 ml. of solution per minute). The extrusion pressure is 1500 p.s.i.g. The temperature of the solution is 88 C. Air is withdrawn at a temperature of 75 C. after being admitted to the cabinet at a temperature of 80 C. The screen 12 is positioned 20 cm. below the spinneret-te and advances at a speed of 1.75 meters per minute. The lower ends of baffles 22, 23 are spaced 4.5 inches apart. Pipes 20 and 21. terminate in wing tips which direct sheets of air at 20 p.s.i.g. and 25 C. at approximately 45 angles with the vertical, the pipes being positioned so that the air blasts impinge upon the filaments and produce a turbulent zone about 15 cm. below the face of the spinnerette. The resulting bat is about 1 cm. thick and has a denier of 57,000. As formed, it is fed into a filter making apparatus and converted into paper wrapped filter plugs 15 mm. long and 25 mm. in circumference. The cellulose acetate in each plug weighs 102 milligrams. It is tested on conventional filter testing equipment to determine the amount of suction needed to draw a predetermined volume of air therethrough under fixed conditions and to determine the percentage of solids removed from the smoke produced by smoking cigarette tobacco. Fore ease of comparison the results are tabulated below along with those for plugs of two of the most effective filter cigarettes commercially available:

From this tabulation it can be seen that the novel plugs have a pressure drop intermediate the controls, indicating a lack of parallelism in the filter so that there is no channeling. The filtration efficiency of the novel filter is about 20% greater than that of the better of the controls and 50% greater `than the other control; its weight is less than 85% than that of the shorter plug (of lower efficiency) and less than 60% than that of the more eflicient plug.

The individual filaments vary in denier, averaging between about 2.6 and 3.2. Their cross sections are extremely irregular `due to their pits and crenulations, and the cross section of a given filament varies considerably at different longitudinal locations along the filament. In general the average maximum width of each of these filaments is about 30 microns while the average minimum width is about l microns.

It is to be understood that the foregoing detailed description is given merely by way of illustration and that many variations may be made therein without departing from the spirit of our invention.

Having described our invention what we desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. The process which comprises extrudng a filament forming material in liquid phase through a plurality of orices to form substantially parallel filaments, agitating through a plurality said filaments while still in plastic and mutually adhesive condition whereby the filaments contact one another randomly and are coalesced at randomly spaced points in the absence of any externally applied binder, and collecting said coalesced filaments in the form of a non-woven batt.

2. The process set forth in claim 1, wherein said filament forming material comprises cellulose acetate.

3. The process set forth in claim 1, including the further step of withdrawing said batt from where formed at a linear speed sufficient to product a batt of at least about 40,000 denier.

4. The process set forth in claim 3, wherein the filament forming material is extruded under a pressure in excess of 600 p.s.i.g.

5. The process which comprises extrudng a filament forming material in liquid phase through a plurality of orifices to form substantially parallel filaments, directing a jet of a gas against said filament while still in plastic and mutually adhesive condition whereby the filaments contact one another randomly and are coalesced at randomly spaced points in the absence of any externally applied binder, and collecting said coalesced filaments in the form of a non-woven batt.

6. The process set forth in claim 5, including the step of laterally confining said jet of a gas and said batt to produce a batt of predetermined width.

7. The process which comprises extrudng a solution of a filament forming material in a Volatile solvent through a plurality of orifices into an evaporative atmosphere to form substantially parallel filaments, directing a jet of a gas against said filaments while still in plastic and mutually adhesive condition whereby the filaments contact one another randomly and are coalesced at randomly spaced points in the absence of any externally applied binder, and collecting said coalesced filaments in the form of a non-woven batt.

8. The process set forth in claim 7, wherein said solution comprises cellulose acetate dissolved in acetone.

9. The process set forth in claim 7 wherein said nonwoven batt is collected on a porous support, and moving said support at a linear speed sufiicient to produce a batt of at least about 40,000 denier.

l0. The process which comprises extrudng a solution of a filament forming material in a volatile solvent of orifices into a chamber to form substantially parallel filaments, continuously supplying air to said chamber and withdrawing air and solvent vapors therefrom, directing a jet of air against said filaments while still in plastic and mutually adhesive condition whereby the filaments contact one another randomly and are coalesced at randomly spaced points in the absence of any externally applied binder, collecting said coalesced filaments in the form of a non-woven batt, and continuously withdrawing said non-woven batt from said chamber at a linear speed less than that at which the solution was extruded through said orifices.

l1. The process which comprises extrudng under a pressure in excess of 600 p.s.i.g. a solution of cellulose acetate in a volatile solvent through a plurality of orifices into a chamber to form substantially parallel filaments, continuously supplying air to said chamber and withdrawing air and solvent vapors therefrom, directing a jet of air against said filaments while still in plastic and mutually adhesive condition whereby the filaments contact one another randomly and are coalesced at randomly spaced points in the absence of any externally applied binder, collecting said coalesced filaments on a porous support in the form of' a non-woven batt of predetermined width, and moving said support at a linear speed sufficient to produce a batt of at least about 40,000 denier.

12. The process which comprises extrudng a filament forming material in liquid phase through a plurality of orifices to form filaments, agitating said filaments while still in plastic and mutually adhesive condition whereby the filaments contact one another randomly and are coalesced at randomly spaced points in the absence of any externally applied binder, collecting said coalesced filaments in the form of a non-Woven batt, comprising said batt into a rope of the approximate size and crosssectional shape of a cigarette, and forming said rope into iilters for cigarettes.

13. The process which comprises extruding a solution of a lament forming material in a volatile solvent through a plurality of orifices into an evaporative atmosphere to form ilaments, directing a iet of Huid against said filaments while still in plastic and mutually adhesive condition whereby the iiiaments contact one another randomly and are coalesced at randomly spaced points in the absence of any externally applied binder, collecting said coalesced larnents in the form of a non-woven batt having a denier of at least about 40,000, compressing said batt into a rope of the approximate size and crosssectional shape of a cigarette, and forming said rope into iilters for cigarettes.

14, The process which comprises extruding under a pressure in excess of 600 p,s.i.g. a solution of cellulose acetate in a volatile solvent through a plurality of orifices into a chamber to form filaments, continuously supplying air to said chamber and withdrawing air and solvent vapors therefrom, directing a jet of air against said lilaments while still in plastic and mutually adhesive condition whereby the filaments contact one another randomly and are coalesced at randomly spaced points in the absence of any externally applied binder, collecting said coalesced ilaments on a porous support in the form of a non-woven batt of predetermined width, moving said support at a linear speed suicient to produce a batt of at least about 55,000 denier, compressing said batt into a rope of the approximate size and cross-sectional shape of a cigarette, and forming said rope into lters for cigarettes.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,242,988 Averns May 20, 1941 2,483,406 Francis Oct. 4, 1949 2,688,380 MacHenry Sept. 7, 1954 2,707,308 Taylor et al. May 3, 1955 2,794,480 Crawford et al June 4, 1957 2,795,290 Butsch et al, June 11, 1957 2,813,051 MacHenry Nov. 12, 1957 2,828,752 Jackson Apr. 1, 1958 2,884,681 Labino May 5, 1959 2,931,422 Long Apr. 5, 1960 2,988,469 Watson `Tune 13, 1961 3,080,611 Jarrett et al Mar. l2, 1963

Claims (1)

  1. 5. THE PROCESS WHICH COMPRISES EXTRUDING A FILAMENT FORMING MATERIAL IN LIQUID PHASE THROUGH A PLURALITY OF ORIFICES TO FORM SUBSTANTIALLY PARALLEL FILAMENTS, DIRECTING A JET OF A GAS AGAINST SAID FILAMENT WHILE STILL IN PLASTIC AND MUTUALLY ADHESIVE CONDITION WHEREBY THE FILAMENTS CONTACT ONE ANOTHER RANDOMLY AND ARE COALESCED AT RANDOMLY SPACED POINTS IN THE ABSENCE OF ANY EXTERNALLY APPLIED BINDER, AND COLLECTING SAID COALESCED FILAMENTS IN THE FORM OF A NON-WOVEN BATT.
US744844A 1958-06-26 1958-06-26 Process for making non-woven batt Expired - Lifetime US3148101A (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US744844A US3148101A (en) 1958-06-26 1958-06-26 Process for making non-woven batt
CH68260A CH363602A (en) 1958-06-26 1960-01-22 filamentous mass capable of filtering gases, manufacturing process of this mass of filaments and apparatus for the implementation of this method
DEC20676A DE1272794B (en) 1958-06-26 1960-01-30 Method and apparatus for producing nonwoven fabrics

Applications Claiming Priority (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US744844A US3148101A (en) 1958-06-26 1958-06-26 Process for making non-woven batt
FR798211A FR1227864A (en) 1958-06-26 1959-06-22 fiber products, particularly for the manufacture of cigarette filter tips
GB2166959A GB915353A (en) 1958-06-26 1959-06-24 Fibrous batt
DEC19273A DE1230702B (en) 1958-06-26 1959-06-25 Method and apparatus for manufacturing filters for tobacco smoke or other gases
CH68260A CH363602A (en) 1958-06-26 1960-01-22 filamentous mass capable of filtering gases, manufacturing process of this mass of filaments and apparatus for the implementation of this method
GB278060A GB922698A (en) 1958-06-26 1960-01-26 Novel fibrous products
DEC20676A DE1272794B (en) 1958-06-26 1960-01-30 Method and apparatus for producing nonwoven fabrics
FR817724A FR78153E (en) 1958-06-26 1960-02-05 fiber products, particularly for the manufacture of cigarette filter tips

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US3148101A true US3148101A (en) 1964-09-08

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US (1) US3148101A (en)
CH (1) CH363602A (en)
DE (2) DE1230702B (en)
FR (2) FR1227864A (en)
GB (2) GB915353A (en)

Cited By (33)

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US3255508A (en) * 1959-06-02 1966-06-14 Du Pont Apparatus for crimping textile yarn
US3276944A (en) * 1962-08-30 1966-10-04 Du Pont Non-woven sheet of synthetic organic polymeric filaments and method of preparing same
US3304220A (en) * 1962-05-07 1967-02-14 Ici Ltd Production of non-woven webs from synthetic fibers
US3314840A (en) * 1961-08-01 1967-04-18 Celanese Corp Process and apparatus for producing a non-woven fabric
US3323961A (en) * 1963-10-10 1967-06-06 Eastman Kodak Co Method and apparatus for forming rodshaped fibrous elements
US3352778A (en) * 1965-08-17 1967-11-14 Monsanto Co Shaped fibers
US3413185A (en) * 1964-09-30 1968-11-26 Du Pont Yarn package in the form of a rod-shaped batt
US3431159A (en) * 1964-06-17 1969-03-04 David Gordon Manufacture of mouldings from acrylonitrile copolymers
US3444863A (en) * 1966-09-21 1969-05-20 Celanese Corp Tobacco smoke filter
US3477445A (en) * 1962-05-15 1969-11-11 Celanese Corp Non-woven cigarette filter rod
US3500991A (en) * 1967-07-13 1970-03-17 Clarence W Vogt Pressure differential material handling device
US3512230A (en) * 1965-07-29 1970-05-19 Snia Viscosa Method and apparatus for the production of nonwoven fabrics
US3595245A (en) * 1968-08-14 1971-07-27 Exxon Research Engineering Co Cigarette filter from polypropylene fibers
US3608564A (en) * 1968-05-15 1971-09-28 Mitsubishi Rayon Co Cigarette filter
DE2314287A1 (en) * 1972-03-24 1973-10-04 Celanese Corp Self-bonded nonwoven verbundkoerper and process for their manufacture
US3775213A (en) * 1970-05-28 1973-11-27 Celanese Corp Production of lightweight polybenzimidazole insulative material
US3852009A (en) * 1972-02-07 1974-12-03 Celanese Corp Filter making apparatus
US3852007A (en) * 1970-05-13 1974-12-03 Celanese Corp Apparatus for making filters
US3856612A (en) * 1971-08-02 1974-12-24 Celanese Corp Non-woven structures
US3923942A (en) * 1973-01-16 1975-12-02 Toray Industries Filler material and method of manufacturing same
US3923587A (en) * 1972-01-04 1975-12-02 Rhone Poulenc Textile Apparatus for the manufacture of continuous filament nonwoven web
US4032688A (en) * 1973-08-31 1977-06-28 Pall Corporation Seamless tubular nonwoven webs and filters thereof
US4189511A (en) * 1975-10-31 1980-02-19 Celanese Corporation Filter
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US6684468B1 (en) * 2002-10-07 2004-02-03 Lujan Dardo Bonaparte Microfiber structure
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US3552400A (en) * 1967-06-08 1971-01-05 American Filtrona Corp Filter plug of staple fiber filter elements and the like
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US5669900A (en) * 1993-11-03 1997-09-23 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Spunbond loop material for hook and loop fastening systems
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US3255508A (en) * 1959-06-02 1966-06-14 Du Pont Apparatus for crimping textile yarn
US3314840A (en) * 1961-08-01 1967-04-18 Celanese Corp Process and apparatus for producing a non-woven fabric
US3304220A (en) * 1962-05-07 1967-02-14 Ici Ltd Production of non-woven webs from synthetic fibers
US3477445A (en) * 1962-05-15 1969-11-11 Celanese Corp Non-woven cigarette filter rod
US3276944A (en) * 1962-08-30 1966-10-04 Du Pont Non-woven sheet of synthetic organic polymeric filaments and method of preparing same
US3323961A (en) * 1963-10-10 1967-06-06 Eastman Kodak Co Method and apparatus for forming rodshaped fibrous elements
US3431159A (en) * 1964-06-17 1969-03-04 David Gordon Manufacture of mouldings from acrylonitrile copolymers
US3413185A (en) * 1964-09-30 1968-11-26 Du Pont Yarn package in the form of a rod-shaped batt
US3512230A (en) * 1965-07-29 1970-05-19 Snia Viscosa Method and apparatus for the production of nonwoven fabrics
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US3500991A (en) * 1967-07-13 1970-03-17 Clarence W Vogt Pressure differential material handling device
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US3595245A (en) * 1968-08-14 1971-07-27 Exxon Research Engineering Co Cigarette filter from polypropylene fibers
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US3775213A (en) * 1970-05-28 1973-11-27 Celanese Corp Production of lightweight polybenzimidazole insulative material
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US3923587A (en) * 1972-01-04 1975-12-02 Rhone Poulenc Textile Apparatus for the manufacture of continuous filament nonwoven web
US3852009A (en) * 1972-02-07 1974-12-03 Celanese Corp Filter making apparatus
DE2314287A1 (en) * 1972-03-24 1973-10-04 Celanese Corp Self-bonded nonwoven verbundkoerper and process for their manufacture
US3923942A (en) * 1973-01-16 1975-12-02 Toray Industries Filler material and method of manufacturing same
US4032688A (en) * 1973-08-31 1977-06-28 Pall Corporation Seamless tubular nonwoven webs and filters thereof
US4189511A (en) * 1975-10-31 1980-02-19 Celanese Corporation Filter
US4292984A (en) * 1978-04-22 1981-10-06 Daicel Ltd. Filter for cigarette smoke
US4267002A (en) * 1979-03-05 1981-05-12 Eastman Kodak Company Melt blowing process
US5053066A (en) * 1990-05-04 1991-10-01 Hassenboehler Charles B Nonwoven filter and method of manufacture
US5244723A (en) * 1992-01-03 1993-09-14 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Filaments, tow, and webs formed by hydraulic spinning
US5667814A (en) * 1994-08-09 1997-09-16 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Apparatus for making and collecting continuous fibers in the form of a rod-shaped batt
US5591335A (en) * 1995-05-02 1997-01-07 Memtec America Corporation Filter cartridges having nonwoven melt blown filtration media with integral co-located support and filtration
US5681469A (en) * 1995-05-02 1997-10-28 Memtec America Corporation Melt-blown filtration media having integrally co-located support and filtration fibers
US5733581A (en) * 1995-05-02 1998-03-31 Memtec America Corporation Apparatus for making melt-blown filtration media having integrally co-located support and filtration fibers
US6013347A (en) * 1997-07-16 2000-01-11 3M Innovative Properties Company Method of continuous tone imaging to provide an imaged high loft mat product
US6684468B1 (en) * 2002-10-07 2004-02-03 Lujan Dardo Bonaparte Microfiber structure
US7730684B1 (en) * 2003-07-21 2010-06-08 Keene Building Products Co., Inc. Weep venting system for masonry walls

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
DE1272794B (en) 1968-07-11
CH363602A (en) 1962-07-31
FR1227864A (en) 1960-08-24
FR78153E (en) 1962-06-15
DE1230702B (en) 1966-12-15
GB922698A (en) 1963-04-03
GB915353A (en) 1963-01-09

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