US3146903A - Straddle truck with a guided lifting frame for handling containers - Google Patents

Straddle truck with a guided lifting frame for handling containers Download PDF

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US3146903A
US3146903A US3432760A US3146903A US 3146903 A US3146903 A US 3146903A US 3432760 A US3432760 A US 3432760A US 3146903 A US3146903 A US 3146903A
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lifting
means
frame
arch
vehicle
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Elmer G Bjorklund
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Clark Equipment Co
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Clark Equipment Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C19/00Cranes comprising trolleys or crabs running on fixed or movable bridges or gantries
    • B66C19/007Cranes comprising trolleys or crabs running on fixed or movable bridges or gantries for containers

Description

Sept 1f 1964 E'r G. BJORKLULND 3,145,903'

STRADDLE TRUCK wmf A GUIDED LIETING: EMME, Foa HANDLING CONTAINERS Fileddune: 19e@ 4 sheet-sheet 1 ELMER G. BJORKLUND ATTORNEY Sept. l, 1964 Filed, June 6. 1960 FIG. 2 w

E. G. BJORKLUND STRADDLE TRUCK WITH A GUIDED LIF'TING FRAME FOR HANDLING CONTAINERS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

ELMER G. BJORKLUND ATTORNEY E. STRADDLE TRUCK WITH A GUIDED LIFTING FRAME FOR HANDLING CONTAINERS G. BJORKLUND Sept. l, 1964 Filled June 6. 1960 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR.

ELMER G. BJORKLUND ATTORNEY Sept l, 1964 E. G. BJORKLUND 3,146,903

STRADDLE TRUCK WITH A GUIDED LIFTING FRAME F'OR HANDLING CONTAINERS Filed June. 6. 1960 4 Sheets-Sheetfl FIG. 4

INVENTOR.

EL MER G. BJORKLUND BY/WMDDI ATTOR NEY United States Patent O 3,146,903 STRADDLE TRUCK WI'IH A GUIDED LIFTING FRAME FOR HANDLING CNTAINERS Elmer G. Bjorklund, Battle Creek, Mich., assignor to Clark Equipment Company, a corporation of Michigan Filed .lune 6, 1960, Ser. No. 34,327 17 Claims. (Cl. 214-394) This invention relates to a straddle carrier type material handling vehicle, and more patricularly to such a vehicle having a vertically open bay in which large vans, containers and the like can be elevated to a substantial height.

With the advent of large van and container handling system concepts, sometimes referred to as containerization in the industry, came the need for specialized vehicles adapted to eiciently handle and transport van sized containers between major freight transport facilities such as railroads, overland trucks, cargo airplanes, and marine freighters. An important invention relating to one such system concept is disclosed in co-pending application Serial No. 577,118, iled April 9, 1956, now Patent No. 3,014,604, in the name of Jack E. Loomis (common assignee).

The present invention concerns such a specialized vehicle for use in containerization systems which is capable of straddling a van sized container, aligning a lifting frame with a container and engaging same at the upper surface thereof, and then lifting the container to an elevation at which it can be deposited on the top of another such container which may be located on a railroad flatcar, for example. The vehicle of the present invention is capable of, for example, engaging, lifting and transporting such a container from any car in a train of railroad flatcars supporting such containers in a single tier by driving the vehicle in straddling relation to the train until the vehicle is located over a selected one of such containers, and then engaging and lifting the container until it can be transported by the vehicle back over the tops of the other containers in the train. The invention provides actuating means associated with a container lifting frame both for lifting the frame from minimum to maximum elevation in a plane continuously parallel to the supporting surface of the Vehicle and for moving the lifting frame variously sideways or in a yawing motion to minimize the problem of aligning the lifting frame with por-tions of a container which is engageable thereby.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a generally improved material handling vehicle for use in transporting van containers and the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide in vehicles of the type specified improved means for actuating vertically a lifting frame in a horizontal plane.

It is another object of the invention to provide a lifting frame construction in vehicles of the type specified which is selectively movable in a horizontal plane both in yaw and sideways in order to align the frame with objects to be engaged.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved straddle type carrier vehicle capable of stacking van containers upon platforms and the like in double tiers, and having a lifting frame construction engageable with the upper portion of such van containers for transporting same Within the bay of the carrier.

3,146,9@3 Patented Sept. l., 1964 lCe Now, in order to acquaint those skilled in the art with the manner of constructing and using material handling vehicles in accordance with the principles of my present invention, I shall describe in connection with the accompanying drawings a preferred embodiment of my present invention.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a View in perspective of the vehicle of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is an end view of the vehicle of FIGURE 1 which illustrates an operation wherein the vehicle is in engagement with a second tier container;

FIGURE 3 illustrates somewhat schematically a plan View of the vehicle;

FIGURE 4 is a partial view in section taken intermediate the lifting arches and the lifting frame of the vehicle and showing the lifting frame in plan view;

FIGURE 5 is a schematized view in perspective illustrating the lifting chain and sprocket assembly as associated with the lifting frame at one end of the Vehicle; and

FIGURE 6 is a detail view in sectional perspective taken through one of the lifting upright members and illustrating a portion of one of the four lifting uprights which are mounted in the bay of the vehicle.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, a van carrier is illustrated generally at numeral 10 having an open bay formed between a pair of longitudinally extending parallel side frame constructions 12 and 14 secured together at the rearward ends by a transverse frame construction 16 from which is suitably supported a rearwardly extending platform 18 having support rods 2t) connecting each side thereof .to side frame constructions 12 and 14. An operators station 22 and engine and transmission compartment 24 islocated upon the platform, the power train components being drivably connected to a differential drive mechanism 26 which is suitably connected to a pair of steering-driving wheels 28 by shaft members 30 and chain and sprocket mechanism connecting the shaft members with wheels 28 and having cover guards 32 associated therewith. Additional pairs of dirigible wheels 34 and 36 are resiliently mounted upon opposite side frame constructions 12 and 14 in close tandem relationship. The steering radius of the carrier vehicle is relatively small inasmuch as all six wheels thereof are made simultaneously steerable; however, since the steering mechanisrn does not comprise a part of the present invention, it has not been illustrated in the drawings.

Mounted in opposite end portions of the side frame constructions 12 and 14 are pairs of elongated cylinder and piston hydraulic motor assemblies 38 and 40 which extend downwardly into openings formed in the respective side frame constructions and include pairs of piston rods 42 and 44, respectively, which are connected to the opposite ends of a pair of transversely extending and longitudinally spaced lifting arch members 46 and 48. Each arch member comprises a pair of longitudinally spaced opposed channel beams 50 and 52 connected to the respective piston rod ends by pin members 54 and supported for elevating movement with the hoist motors 38 or 40 by a pair of upright I-shaped beam members 56 or 58 nested transversely inwardly adjacent the respective pairs of hoist motors. Pairs of I-beams 56 and 58 are located in opposed and facing pairs of channel members 60 and 62 which are secured at the web portions thereof to pairs of inwardly facing channel sections 64 and 66 formed in the inner sides of side frame constructions 12 and 14, as illustrated. A plurality of vertically spaced pairs of rollers 68 and 70 are connected inwardly of pairs of channel members 60 and 62, respectively, for engaging and guiding the pairs of vertically movable I-beam members 56 and 58. The I-beam members are maintained in proper position transverse of the vehicle by means of ange portions 72 of each channel portion 64 and 66, said flange portions engaging in sliding relation a pair of end members '74 which extend lengthwise of each I-beam (FIGURE 6).

A lifting frame is shown generally at numeral 80; it is nested within the open bay of the vehicle and supported at opposite end portions by motion equalizing chain and sprocket mechanism, to be described below, for vertical movement with the lifting arches 46 and 48 at a 2:1 movement ratio and in a plane substantially parallel at all times to the supporting surface of the vehicle. The lifting frame comprises a pair of laterally spaced longitudinally extending members 82 secured together at the opposite ends by transverse members 84 and having transverse and diagonally extending strengthening members 36 and 88 associated with opposite end portions, and a pair of laterally spaced channel members 90 connecting the center portions of members 84 and 86 at each end of the lifting frame. Members 82 and 90 have aligned rectangular openings 92 and 94 formed therein at each end portion of the lifting frame for receiving guide members 96 which extends transversely through each end portion of the lifting frame, opposite ends of the guide members 96 being supported by pairs of rollers 98 for guided movement in inwardly facing channel portions of pairs of I-beams 56 and 58.

In each corner portion of the lifting frame 80 is located a coupler latch housing 100. A downwardly extending coupler latch assembly 102 is pivotably mounted in each housing and includes an anchor shaped lifting dog 104 which is pivotable with the latch assembly in a direction transverse of the lifting frame to engage in locking relation recessed top corner castings 105 of a van container 107 (FIGURE 2) for lifting the container by means of the lifting frame within the open bay of the carrier vehicle when the motor assemblies 38 and 40 are extended. The coupler latch and housing assembly per se is not a part of the present invention. It is manufactured and sold by National Malleable and Steel Castings Co., Cleveland, Ohio7 Part Nos. 41358 and 41937.

Lifting frame 80 is suspended from lifting arches 46 and 4S by means of a pair of chains 106 and 108 extending transversely of the open bay at each opposite end portion thereof. A pair of transversely spaced double sprocket members 110 are supported for rotation between each pair of channel members comprising the lifting arches 46 and 48 by pin members 112, and a pair of transversely spaced single sprocket members 114 and 115 are supported for rotation between the channel members of the lifting arches by pin members 116 transversely inwardly of the adjacent double sprockets 110. The single sprockets of each lifting arch are also located in longitudinally spaced relation in transverse alignment with opposite single sprocket portions of the double sprockets 110, as best shown in FIGURES 3 and 5. A pair of single sprockets 120 is located by brackets on the upper surface of each lifting frame member 82 in the vertical plane of the single sprocket 114 or 115 which is immediately above it. Each chain 106 is secured by an anchor member 124 to the outer surface of the web portion of one of fixed upright channel members 60 and 62 in the side frame 14, from which each chain 106 extends up and over the forwardly located element of the nearest double sprocket 110, thence downwardly around the nearest lifting frame sprocket 120, over single sprocket 114 and the forwardly located element of the other double sprocket 110, and finally downwardly to be secured at the opposite end to anchor member 126 which is secured to the outer surface of the web portion of each of the other pair of fixed upright channel members 60 and 62. Chains 108 are secured at their one ends to anchor members 126 from which they extend over the rearwardly located elements of the nearest double sprockets 110, thence downwardly around the nearest lifting frame sprockets 120 and up and over single sprockets 115 and the rearwardly located elements of the other pair of double sprockets 110, and finally downwardly to be secured to anchor members 124.

Each lifting arch 46 and 43 and the end portion of the lifting frame connected ytherewith by means of chains 106 and 108 is elevatable in a plane continuously parallel to the normally horizontal plane of the vehicle supporting surface by means of one of the pairs of hoist motors 38 or 40 as a result of the sprocket, chain and hoist motor construction which insures the same rate of vertical movement as between the pair of piston rods 42 and as between the pair of piston rods 44. The lifting chains 106 and 106 of each lifting arch are keyed together by double sprockets such that tension in one chain caused by a raising of the arch must necessarily produce an equal tension in the other chain at all times so that the opposite sides 82 of the lifting frame S0 to which each lifting arch 46 is operatively connected must elevate always at the same rate.

A pair of longitudinally extending torque tubes 128 and 130 extend between the end portions of lifting arches 46 and 48 and have splined ends which engage splined openings in double sprockets 110 such that vertical movements of the arches 46 and 48 are effectively keyed together as the pairs of hoist motors 33 and 40 extend or retract. The torque tubes function to maintain the lifting arches always at the same elevation relative to the vehicle supporting surface so that the opposite end portions of the lifting frame will be elevated and lowered always at the same rate and in a horizontal plane, assuming that the vehicle supporting surface is horizontal, which is normally the case. This phase of the operation will be described hereinbelow in greater detail.

Thus, the lifting frame 80 and lifting arches 46 and 48 will always move together in planes parallel to the supporting floor or surface, normally horizontal, and with the lifting frame being actuated at a 2:1 movement ratio relative to the lifting arches as will be apparent. Vertical movement of both the lifting frame and arches is effected with minimum frictional resistance in view of the utilization of roller mountings as between the upright I-beams of the lifting arches relative to the fixed channel portions 60 and 62 of the side frame constructions, and the transverse guide members 96 of the lifting frame.

Normally the lifting frame is symmetrically located within the open bay of the carrier, as illustrated in solid lines in FIGURES 3 and 4, in which position it may be lowered by the lifting arches to a position of locking engagement by means of dogs 104 with the upper corner portions of a container 106 when the open bay of the carrier is symmetrically aligned with the container to be engaged. However, it frequently occurs that the carrier is not properly aligned in respect of the van container for engagement therewith, and my lifting frame construction provides hydraulic double-acting cylinder-piston actuators 134 and 136 extending transversely of one side in each end portion of the lifting frame and having the cylinder bases pivotally secured to the respective transverse guide members 96 and the piston rods thereof secured to longitudinal members 90. Cylinder motors 134 and 136 are adapted yto be independently or simultaneously actuated in either direction by control valve means, not shown, located in the operators compartment 22 and suitably connected to a junction block 135 on frame 14 from which a plurality of hose members 137 extend over sheaves 139 on tube 130 and thence extend to connectors, not shown, on each of cylinder motors 134 and 136. Thus, the lifting frame Si) may be actuated in a horizontal plane by the cylinder motors 134 and 136 in either direction transverse of the vehicle, as when the cylinder motors are extended or retracted simultaneously; actuated sideways from one end only, las when cylinder motor 134 is actuated in either direction and cylinder motor 136 is not actuated; and swung in a yawing motion from opposite ends of the lifting frame, as when cylinder motors 134 and 136 are actuated simultaneously in opposite directions. The latter motion is illustrated by the chained line location of the lifting fname illustrated in FIGURE 4. Openings 92 and 94 in the longitudinal members of the lifting frame are sufficiently large to permit such movements of the frame relative to the transverse guide members 96.

In addition, pairs of springs 13S and 14% extend longitudinally and centrally of the lifting frame between the channel members comprising frame members 90, said springs being in compression and extending between opposite sides of center elements 142, which are secured to transverse guide members 96, and transverse plate members 144 of frame members 90. Pairs of springs 138 and 14%) are adapted to provide a cushioning of the lifting frame and load in a direction longitudinal of the vehicle during maneuvering, starting and braking operations. The springs therefore function to minimize longitudinal movement of the lifting frame 30 relative to transverse guide members 96 in order to minimize or eliminate collisions between the lifting frame and transverse guide members during operation of the vehicle,

In operation, the operator may drive the vehicle forwardly toward a container to be engaged with the lifting frame 8) elevated in the lifting arches so as to clear the upper surface of the container. The invention as illustrated in the disclosed embodiment is capable of engaging at ground level by means of lifting frame 80 a van container of predetermined dimensions by means of locking dogs 104, elevating the container to carrying position within the open bay of the vehicle, and transporting same to a desired location for deposit either at ground level or on top of a loading dock, railroad atcar or flatbed trailer, or on top of a first tier van container which may be located upon the ground, a loading dock, a flatcar or flatbed trailer or other transporting means.

As indicated above, position control cylinder motors 134 and 136 are actuatable to align the lifting frame relative to the open bay of the vehicle in any one of a plurality of directions for permitting locking engagement between dog assemblies 104 and registrable adaptor means located adjacent the upper four corners of the van container. As also discussed above, the chain and sprocket mechanism associated with each lifting arch 46 and 48 insures that respective pairs of hoists 38 and 40 will actuate each arch in elevation in a plane which is continuously parallel to the supporting surface of the vehicle, thereby also insuring like actuation of opposite end portions of the lifting frame with which the lifting arches are associated. During such lifting movement torque tubes 128 and 130 insure equal concurrent vertical: movement of the lifting arches 46 and 4S whereby to coordinate the motors 38 with the motors 40. If, for example, a container is more heavily loaded at the forward end of the lifting frame, motors 38 will carry more than one-half the load, which will tend to cause motors d@ to actuate lifting arch 48 and the rear end of the lifting frame ahead of lifting arch 46 and the forward end of the lifting frame. However, such tendency is compensated by the transmission of power in excess of that required to actuate motors 40 at the same rate as motors 38 through torque tubes 128 and 130 which actuate the sprockets and chains of lifting arch 46 to compensate for the load carried by motors 38 in excess of one-half the load of the van container. Thus, irrespective of unequal loading of the container either at one side thereof, at one end thereof, or both, the entire container will be lifted in the open bay of the vehicle by the lifting frame in a plane parallel to the Vehicle supporting surface.

It will be understood by persons skilled in the art that the embodiment disclosed is representative of but a single construction and arrangement of parts within the scope of the invention. For instance, the effective length of lifting frame may be made adjustable for handling van containers of varying lengths merely by making the locking dog constructions 194 slidably adjustable along side members S2 of the frame. The vehicle itself may, of course, be dimensioned as desired to handle containers of various basic sizes, and the chain and sprocket lifting mechanism may be readily arranged, for example, to provide a 3:1 lifting ratio between the lifting frame and lifting arches in lieu of the 2:1 lifting ratio therebetween disclosed in detail herein. Various equivalent components and elements of the structure may be readily substituted for those of the exemplary embodiment disclosed, including rearrangements and modifications which will appear to persons skilled in the art, without departing from the scope of my invention, as dened in the claims appended.

l claim:

1. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, a pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof, lifting arch means connecting the motors of each such pair of hoist motor means above the U-shaped frame, a longitudinally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions to said pairs of hoist motor means, said operative connection including pulley means connected to each lifting arch means and to the lifting frame at opposite side portions thereof and a pair of longitudinally spaced flexible lifting members supporting each end of the lifting frame from each respective lifting arch, said flexible members reeving about said pulley means and anchored at the opposite ends thereof in such a manner that upward movement of each pair of hoist motor means progresses at the same rate irrespective of unequal loading on the lifting frame.

2. A Wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, transversely extending lifting arch means mounted for vertical movement in opposite end portions of the U-shaped frame, means for actuating the lifting arch means in a vertical direction, and longitudinally extending lifting frame means embraced by the U-shaped frame suspended below the lifting arch means, pulley means connected to each lifting arch means and to the lifting frame, a pair of flexible members reeving said pulley means for suspending opposite end portions of the lifting frame from the lifting arch means, and longitudinally extending torque tube means having a connection with longitudinally spaced pulley means of the pair of lifting arch means for causing said pair of lifting arch means to be elevated at substantially the same rate irrespective of eccentric loading on the lifting frame.

3. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, lifting arch means extending transversely of the frame and mounted in opposite leg portions thereof `for vertical movement relative thereto, hoist motor means connected to the lifting arch means for actuating same vertically of the vehicle, load lifting means located below the lifting arch means and embraced by said frame, and reeving me-ans connecting the load lifting means to the lifting arch means for vertical movement therewith, said reeving means comprising first and second transversely spaced double wheel means connected to the lifting arch, rst and 7 second transversely spaced single wheel means connected to the lifting arch, first and second transversely spaced single wheel means connected to the load engaging means below said lifting arch wheel means, and first and second longitudinally spaced flexible load support members secured at the opposite ends thereof relative to the U- shaped frame, said first flexible member reeving about one wheel element of said first double wheel means and then the remote ones of said single wheel means of the lifting arch and load engaging means, respectively, and one wheel element of the other double wheel means, said other flexible member reeving about the other wheel element of the first double wheel means and then about the adjacent single wheel means of the load engaging means and lifting arch means, respectively, and the other wheel element of the remote other double wheel means.

4. Load engaging and hoisting means comprising a pair of transversely spaced upright assemblies, a lifting arch connecting said upright assemblies, hoist motor means connected to the lifting arch for elevating same in the upright assemblies, load lifting means located between the upright assemblies and operatively connected thereto and to the lifting arch for elevation therewith, said operative connection comprising anchor means on each of the upright assemblies, double and single transversely spaced wheel means connected to each end portion of the lifting arch, transversely spaced wheel means connected to the load lifting means, a first flexible member secured to one anchor means and receiving about one wheel element of the adjacent double wheel means, about the load lifting wheel means, the adjacent single wheel means and one wheel element of the remote double wheel means in that order and secured to the other anchor means, and a second flexible member secured to said one anchor means `and spaced longitudinally of the first flexible member and reeving about the other wheel element of the adjacent double wheel means, the remote single wheel means of the lifting arch, the remote single wheel means of the load lifting means and the other wheel element of the remote double wheel means in that order and secured to said other anchor means.

5. A load engaging and lifting construction comprising a pair of longitudinally spaced and horizontally extending inverted U-shaped lifting arch means, hoist motor means connected to the lifting arch means for elevating same, and a lifting frame extending between the upright members of said lifting arch means and operatively connected thereto for elevating movement therein upon actuation of the motor means, each lifting arch means being connected to the lifting frame by plural reeving wheels and flexible members, the reeving wheels associated with each lifting arch comprising a pair of transversely spaced double wheels, a pair of transversely spaced single wheels located transversely inwardly of the double wheels and a pair of single wheels connected to the one end of the lifting frame beneath the lifting arch means, said flexible members comprising first and second longitudinally spaced flexible members secured at opposite ends to fixed portions of each lifting arch means, said first flexible member reeving `about adjacent double and single wheel means and the remote double wheel means, and said second flexible member reeving about the adjacent double wheel means and the remote single and double wheel means.

6. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, a pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the frame in each end portion thereof, lifting arch means connecting the motors of each such pair of hoist motor means above the frame for elevation therewith, each arch means including a pair of transversely spaced telescoping upright assemblies located adjacent a pair of said hoist motor means, a longitudinally extending lifting 'frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said lifting arch means for elevating movement within and above the U-shaped frame and relative to the lifting arch means, said lifting frame being adapted to engage a van container on the top side thereof and elevate Same within the lifting arch means for deposit atop another such van container, the operative connection between the lifting arch means and the lifting frame comprising plural reeving Wheel means connected to the lifting means and to the lifting frame at opposite side portions thereof and flexible lifting members reeving about said plural wheel means so as to support each end of the lifting frame from each respective lifting arch means.

7. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, a pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof, lifting arch means connecting the motors of each such pair of hoist motor means above the U-shaped frame for elevation with said motor means, and a longitudinally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said pairs of hoist motor means, said operative connection including plural pulley means connected to each lifting arch means and to the lifting frame at opposite side portions thereof and flexible lifting means supporting each end of the lifting frame from each respective lifting arch by reeving about said plural pulley means such that actuation of the lifting arches by the hoist motor means causes the lifting frame to be actuated vertically at a rate greater than the rate of vertical movement of the lifting arch means, said plural pulley means including single and double transversely spaced pulley means mounted in each end portion of each lifting arch means and pulley means mounted on each side portion of the lifting frame below each such single and double pulley means, and said flexible means including a pair of longitudinally spaced flexible members associated with each lifting arch means and secured at opposite ends thereof relative to the U-shaped frame and reeving about said single and double pulley means and said lifting frame pulley means such that the elements of each such pair of flexible means are effectively keyed together so as to insure substantially equal rates of movement of opposite end portion of each lifting arch means during elevation by the hoist motor means.

8. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, a pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof, lifting arch means connecting the motors of each such pair of hoist motor means above the U-shaped frame for elevation therewith, a longitudinally and horizontally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said lifting arch means for elevation therewith and with said hoist motor means, pairs of load lifting means depending downwardly from opposite end portions of the lifting frame, said lifting frame being movable downwardly with the lifting arch into a position atop a container to be engaged wherein said lifting means are registrable in locking relation with upper corner portions of the container so that the container may be elevated within the U-shaped frame, and motor means operatively connected to opposite end portions of the lifting frame for actuating the lifting frame a limited distance in a horizontal plane transverse of the vehicle.

9. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, a pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof, lifting arch means connecting the motors of each such pair of hoist motor means above the U-shaped frame for elevation therewith, a longitudinally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said hoist motor means for elevation therewith, load lifting means depending from portions of the lifting frame, said lifting frame being movable downwardly with the lifting arch into a position atop a container to be engaged wherein said lifting means are registrable in locking relation with upper portions of the container so that the container may be elevated within the U-shaped frame, transverse guide means connected to the lifting frame, upright guide means associated with the U-shaped frame for guiding vertical movements of the said transverse guide means, and motor means operatively connected between the transverse guide means and the lifting frame for actuating the lifting frame in a transverse plane sideways of the vehicle for aligning said lifting means with a container to be engaged thereby.

10. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, a pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof, lifting arch means connecting the motors of each such pair of hoist motor means above the U-shaped frame for elevation therewith, a longitudinally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said lifting arch means for elevation therewith and with said hoist motor means, load lifting means depending from opposite end portions of the lifting frame, said lifting frame being movable downwardly with the lifting arch into a position atop a container to be engaged wherein said lifting means are registerable in locking relation with upper portions of the container so that the container may be elevated within the U-shaped frame, transverse guide means connected to the lifting frame, upright guide means associated with the U-shaped frame for guiding vertical movements of the said transverse guide means, and longitudinally extending yielding means operatively connected between the lifting frame and each transverse guide means for resisting movement of the lifting frame longitudinally of the vehicle.

l1. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, a pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof, transverse lifting arch means connecting the motors of one such pair of hoist motor means above the U- shaped frame for elevation therewith, a pair of transversely spaced upright guide means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in one end portion thereof adjacent said one pair of hoist motor means and connected to the lifting arch means, a longitudinally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and suspended from said lifting arch means for vertical movement with the lifting arch and hoist motor means at a rate greater than the rate of vertical movement of the latter means, each said guide means including an upright telescoping member connected to the lifting arm means and elevatable therewith and vertical channel means associated with each telescoping guide means and with the adjacent leg of the U-shaped frame, and transversely extending guide means connecting the lifting frame at said one end portion thereof with said transversely spaced pair of telescoping upright members.

l2. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame forming an open bay for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, a pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the frame in each end portion thereof, lifting arch means connecting the motors of each such pair of hoist motor means above the frame for elevation therewith, each arch means including a pair of transversely spaced telescoping upright assemblies located adjacent a pair of said hoist motor means, a longitudinally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said lifting arch means for elevating movement within and above the U-shaped frame and relative to the lifting arch means, said lifting frame being adapted to engage a van container on the top side thereof and elevate same within the lifting arch means for deposit atop another such van container, the operative connection between the lifting arch means and the lifting frame comprising pulley means connected to the lifting arch means and to the lifting frame at opposite side portions thereof and flexible lifting members reeving about said pulley means so as to support each end of the lifting frame from each respective lifting arch means, each said upright assembly including vertically extending channel means formed inwardly of on leg member of the U-shaped frame and an upright telescoping beam supported in said channel and connected to one end of the transverse member of the lifting arch means associated therewith, and guide means operatively connected to the lifting frame and to said beam of each upright assembly for guiding the lifting frame in elevation relative to said upright assemblies.

13. A wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame supported above the vehicle wheels and forming an open longitudinal bay having an unobstructed vertical pocket for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, each side of said frame extending vertically a substantial distance above the wheels, a pair of transversely spaced and vertically extensible hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof and extensible a substantial distance above the frame, bridge members connecting the extensible members of each such pair of transversely spaced hoist motor means above the U-shaped frame for elevation therewith, a longitudinally and horizontally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said bridge members and said pairs of hoist motor means for elevation therewith at a rate greater than the rate of elevation of said motor means and bridge members, load engaging means depending downwardly from portions of the lifting frame, said lifting frame being movable downwardly by the pairs of hoist motor means into a position atop a container to be engaged wherein said load engaging means are registrable in locking relation with portions of the container so that the container may be elevated within and at least partially above the top of the U-shaped frame, and motor means operatively connected to the lifting frame for actuating the lifting frame a limited distance in a horizontal plane transverse of the vehicle.

14. A motorized wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame supported above the vehicle wheels and forming an open longitudinal bay having an unobstructed vertical pocket for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, each side of said frame extending vertically a substantial distance above the wheels, a pair of transversely spaced and vertically extensible hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof and extensible a substantial distance above the frame, bridge means connecting the extensible members of said pair of hoist motor means located adjacent the open end portion of the U-shaped frame and extending transversely of and above the U-shaped frame for elevation with said eX- tensible members, a longitudinally and horizontally extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said pairs of hoist motor means for elevation therewith at a rate greater than the rate of elevation of said motor means and bridge means, load engaging means depending from portions of the lifting frame, said lifting frame being movable downwardly by the pairs of hoist motor means into a position atop a container to be engaged wherein said load engaging means are connectible in locking relation with portions of the container so that the container may be elevated within and at least partially above the top of the U-shaped frame, an elevated platform extending outwardly of one end of the U-shaped frame, an operator's control station located on said platform, and prime mover means operatively connected to a pair of the vehicle wheels for driving said wheels to propel the vehicle.

15. A motorized wheeled vehicle comprising a horizontally extending U-shaped frame supported above the vehicle wheels and forming an open longitudinal bay having an unobstructed vertical pocket for embracing a load to be transported by the vehicle, each side of said frame extending vertically a substantial distance above the wheels, a pair of transversely spaced and vertically extensible hoist motor means mounted upon opposite legs of the U-shaped frame in each end portion thereof and extensible a substantial distance above the frame, bridge means connecting the extensible members of said pair of hoist motor means located adjacent the open end portion of the U-shaped frame and extending transversely of and above the U-shaped frame for elevation with said extensible members, a longitudinally and horizontaly extending lifting frame embraced by the U-shaped frame and operatively connected at opposite end portions thereof to said pairs of hoist motor means for elevation therewith at a rate greater than the rate of elevation of said motor means and bridge means, load engaging means depending from portions of the lifting frame, said lifting frame being movable downwardly by the pairs of hoist motor means into a position atop a container to be engaged wherein 12 said load engaging means are connectiblein locking relation with portions of the container so that the container may be elevated within and at least partially above the top of the U-shaped frame, and transverse guide means connected to the lifting frame and connected at its opposite ends for guided movement in the opposite sides of the 'kJ-shaped frame, said lifting frame being thereby prevented from excessive movement in a horizontal plane.

16. A vehicle as claimed in claim l5 wherein motor means is connected to said lifting frame for actuating the latter in a yawing motion relative to the transverse guide means.

17. A vehicle as claimed in claim 15 wherein longitudinally extending yielding means is operatively connected between the lifting frame and the transverse guide means for resisting movement of the lifting frame longitudinally of the vehicle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,598,273 Fitch Aug. 3l, 1926 2,603,369 Soderstrom July 15, 1952 2,747,689 Abbe May 29, 1956 2,849,139 Drain et al. Aug. 26, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,183,686 France July 10, 1959 OTHER REFERENCES Circular on the Travelift, published by Travelift and Engineering, Inc., Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, U.S.A., received Sept. 23, 1959, 6 pages.

UNITED STATES vPATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,146,903 September 1, 4i964 Elmer G Bjorklund A Y It is hereby Certified that errer appear-e inthe above numbered patg ent reqlirng correction and that the Said Letters Patent should read aS correctedbelow.

Column 7, line 29, for "receiving" ead reeving cOlumn .8 line 9 after "lifting" insert arch Column l0 line 16, for "On" read one sighed and sealed this 24th day .ef-August 1965 (SEAL) Attest:

VERNEST W. SWIDER I v i EDWARD J. BRENNER -Ailcsting Officer Commissioner of Patents i

Claims (1)

  1. 2. A WHEELED VEHICLE COMPRISING A HORIZONTALLY EXTENDING U-SHAPED FRAME FORMING AN OPEN BAY FOR EMBRACING A LOAD TO BE TRANSPORTED BY THE VEHICLE, TRANSVERSELY EXTENDING LIFTING ARCH MEANS MOUNTED FOR VERTICAL MOVEMENT IN OPPOSITE END PORTIONS OF THE U-SHAPED FRAME, MEANS FOR ACTUATING THE LIFTING ARCH MEANS IN A VERTICAL DIRECTION, AND LONGITUDINALLY EXTENDING LIFTING FRAME MEANS EMBRACED BY THE U-SHAPED FRAME SUSPENDED BELOW THE LIFTING ARCH MEANS, PULLEY MEANS CONNECTED TO EACH LIFTING ARCH MEANS AND TO THE LIFTING FRAME, A PAIR OF FLEXIBLE MEMBERS REEVING SAID PULLEY MEANS FOR SUSPENDING OPPOSITE END PORTIONS OF THE LIFTING FRAME FROM THE LIFTING ARCH MEANS, AND LONGITUDINALLY EXTENDING TORQUE TUBE MEANS HAVING A CONNECTION WITH LONGITUDINALLY SPACED PULLEY MEANS OF THE PAIR OF LIFTING ARCH MEANS FOR CAUSING SAID PAIR OF LIFTING ARCH MEANS TO BE ELEVATED
US3146903A 1960-06-06 1960-06-06 Straddle truck with a guided lifting frame for handling containers Expired - Lifetime US3146903A (en)

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US3146903A US3146903A (en) 1960-06-06 1960-06-06 Straddle truck with a guided lifting frame for handling containers

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US3146903A US3146903A (en) 1960-06-06 1960-06-06 Straddle truck with a guided lifting frame for handling containers
DE1961C0024200 DE1292577B (en) 1960-06-06 1961-05-25 Portal loader with lifting beam
BE604374A BE604374A (en) 1960-06-06 1961-05-30 Vehicle for material handling

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US3387726A (en) * 1965-12-22 1968-06-11 Clark Equipment Co High lift straddle carrier
US3396861A (en) * 1965-12-10 1968-08-13 British Straddle Carrier Compa Straddle carrier vehicles
DE1278347B (en) * 1966-10-15 1968-09-19 Kocks Gmbh Friedrich Straddle carrier for transporting containers
US3448878A (en) * 1967-07-24 1969-06-10 William Schindler Low bed trailer
US3474924A (en) * 1966-05-27 1969-10-28 Alexander & Sons Ltd Stephen Carrier device
US3482720A (en) * 1967-12-21 1969-12-09 Hans Tax Vehicle for handling large containers
US3494491A (en) * 1966-10-29 1970-02-10 Mitsubishi Heavy Ind Ltd Materials handling vehicle
US3499563A (en) * 1967-12-21 1970-03-10 Towmotor Corp Container lift frame
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US3513999A (en) * 1968-03-27 1970-05-26 William H Schwartz Lifting and carrying vehicle
US3552557A (en) * 1967-09-04 1971-01-05 Lancer Boss Ltd Lifting apparatus
US3570695A (en) * 1969-01-21 1971-03-16 William H Schwartz Vehicle for carrying and stacking containers
US3655081A (en) * 1970-02-06 1972-04-11 John Thomas Monk Straddle carriers
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US4256230A (en) * 1979-05-31 1981-03-17 Clark Clinton B Jun Cantilever straddle carrier
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US4502569A (en) * 1982-04-21 1985-03-05 G & L Corporation Transportable heavy-lift apparatus
WO1986003186A1 (en) * 1984-11-19 1986-06-05 Hadar Jansson Combination truck
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JPS6227235A (en) * 1985-07-29 1987-02-05 Toshiba Butsuriyuu Kk Hoisting and conveying device
US4747745A (en) * 1985-11-21 1988-05-31 Marathon Letourneau Company Selective beam gantry crane
US5715958A (en) * 1995-01-24 1998-02-10 Marine Travelift, Inc. Stabilizer for a gantry crane lift frame
US5810183A (en) * 1995-05-26 1998-09-22 Marine Travelift, Inc. Gantry crane with elevating operator cab

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Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3344940A (en) * 1964-12-28 1967-10-03 Clark Equipment Co Synchronizing means for hydraulic cylinders
US3396861A (en) * 1965-12-10 1968-08-13 British Straddle Carrier Compa Straddle carrier vehicles
US3387726A (en) * 1965-12-22 1968-06-11 Clark Equipment Co High lift straddle carrier
US3507512A (en) * 1965-12-22 1970-04-21 Clark Equipment Co Bogie means for vehicles
US3474924A (en) * 1966-05-27 1969-10-28 Alexander & Sons Ltd Stephen Carrier device
DE1278347B (en) * 1966-10-15 1968-09-19 Kocks Gmbh Friedrich Straddle carrier for transporting containers
US3494491A (en) * 1966-10-29 1970-02-10 Mitsubishi Heavy Ind Ltd Materials handling vehicle
US3448878A (en) * 1967-07-24 1969-06-10 William Schindler Low bed trailer
US3552557A (en) * 1967-09-04 1971-01-05 Lancer Boss Ltd Lifting apparatus
US3514002A (en) * 1967-10-16 1970-05-26 Theodore H Allegri Antiracking container lift frame
US3482720A (en) * 1967-12-21 1969-12-09 Hans Tax Vehicle for handling large containers
US3499563A (en) * 1967-12-21 1970-03-10 Towmotor Corp Container lift frame
US3513999A (en) * 1968-03-27 1970-05-26 William H Schwartz Lifting and carrying vehicle
US3570695A (en) * 1969-01-21 1971-03-16 William H Schwartz Vehicle for carrying and stacking containers
US3655081A (en) * 1970-02-06 1972-04-11 John Thomas Monk Straddle carriers
US3805967A (en) * 1972-09-05 1974-04-23 Renner Mfg Co Dual hook hoist apparatus
US4015733A (en) * 1974-02-01 1977-04-05 Mpb Metall- And Parksystem-Bau Gmbh Device for storage of motor vehicles
US3982644A (en) * 1975-05-19 1976-09-28 Clark Equipment Company Side shift and skewing device for van carrier
FR2366142A1 (en) * 1976-10-04 1978-04-28 Case Co J I Container Transporters
US4127204A (en) * 1976-10-04 1978-11-28 J. I. Case Company Centering means for spreader supported on beams
US4256230A (en) * 1979-05-31 1981-03-17 Clark Clinton B Jun Cantilever straddle carrier
US4266904A (en) * 1979-05-31 1981-05-12 Raygo, Inc. Adjustable load lifting spreader frame
FR2513980A1 (en) * 1981-10-01 1983-04-08 Inge Trans Sa Handling gear for containers vehicle - has support for frame with spaced slings and hydraulic actuators for lifting
US4502569A (en) * 1982-04-21 1985-03-05 G & L Corporation Transportable heavy-lift apparatus
WO1986003186A1 (en) * 1984-11-19 1986-06-05 Hadar Jansson Combination truck
US4599030A (en) * 1985-04-01 1986-07-08 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Marginal terrain straddle-lift container handler
JPS6227235A (en) * 1985-07-29 1987-02-05 Toshiba Butsuriyuu Kk Hoisting and conveying device
JPH066449B2 (en) 1985-07-29 1994-01-26 東芝物流株式会社 Lifting transport equipment
US4747745A (en) * 1985-11-21 1988-05-31 Marathon Letourneau Company Selective beam gantry crane
US5715958A (en) * 1995-01-24 1998-02-10 Marine Travelift, Inc. Stabilizer for a gantry crane lift frame
US5810183A (en) * 1995-05-26 1998-09-22 Marine Travelift, Inc. Gantry crane with elevating operator cab
US7070060B1 (en) 1995-05-26 2006-07-04 Mi-Jack Products, Inc. Gantry crane with elevating operator cab

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BE604374A (en) 1961-09-18 grant
DE1292577B (en) 1969-04-10 application
BE604374A1 (en) grant

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