US3120006A - Toilet bowl and bathroom ventilating system - Google Patents

Toilet bowl and bathroom ventilating system Download PDF

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US3120006A
US3120006A US46748A US4674860A US3120006A US 3120006 A US3120006 A US 3120006A US 46748 A US46748 A US 46748A US 4674860 A US4674860 A US 4674860A US 3120006 A US3120006 A US 3120006A
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fan
assembly
bowl
cover
air
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Knappe Siegfried
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Knappe Siegfried
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D11/00Other component parts of water-closets, e.g. noise-reducing means in the flushing system, flushing pipes mounted in the bowl, seals for the bowl outlet, devices preventing overflow of the bowl contents; devices forming a water seal in the bowl after flushing, devices eliminating obstructions in the bowl outlet or preventing backflow of water and excrements from the waterpipe
    • E03D11/02Water-closet bowls ; Bowls with a double odour seal optionally with provisions for a good siphonic action; siphons as part of the bowl
    • E03D11/06Bowls with downwardly-extending flanges for the sake of flushing
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E03WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE
    • E03DWATER-CLOSETS OR URINALS WITH FLUSHING DEVICES; FLUSHING VALVES THEREFOR
    • E03D9/00Sanitary or other accessories for lavatories ; Devices for cleaning or disinfecting the toilet room or the toilet bowl; Devices for eliminating smells
    • E03D9/04Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices
    • E03D9/05Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices ventilating the bowl
    • E03D9/052Special arrangement or operation of ventilating devices ventilating the bowl using incorporated fans

Description

Feb. 4, 1964 s, KNAPPE TOILET BOWL. AND BATHROOM VENTILATING SYSTEM Filed Aug. 1, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. SIEGFRIED KNAPPE ATTORNEYS Feb. 4, 1964 s. KNAPPE TOILET BOWL AND BATHROOM VENTILATING SYSTEM Filed Aug. 1, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 SIEGFRIED INVENTOR. KNAPPE WM mw ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,120,006 TOILET BOWL AND BATHROOM VENTILATING SYSTEM Siegfried Knappe, 940 Whitestone Road, Xenia, Ohio Filed Aug. 1, 1960, Ser. No. 46,748 3 Claims. (Cl. 4-413) This invention relates to a ventilating system for toilet bowls and bathrooms.

The invention has special relation to a system adapted to be installed in already existing toilet bowls, or built into a bowl designed in accordance with the present disclosure. Elimination of noxious odors which are frequently present in bathrooms may be accomplished in a manner well known in the art by providing a relatively large fan and valve assembly which is effective to draw the odors into the waste duct through which the Waste materials flow. Many of the devices of the prior art are adapted to operate only during the immediate use of the toilet, thereby preventing the effective elimination of odors which may be present in lavatories for some time after use thereof, and require a substantial amount of power to accomplish such effective odor elimination.

Another manner of removing odors from lavatories involves the use of a ceiling or wall fan, which often proves inadequate for efiectively removing such annoying odors as are present. Even more important, installation of such a system involves considerable expense due to the requirement of structural ducting necessary to conduct the odors out of the building. Besides, a fan of this type often runs unintentially for a long time after use of the toilet, because the user forgets to come back and switch it off when the bathroom is ventilated thoroughly.

According to the present invention, such structural ducting and the relatively high powered fans employed therein are eliminated by provision of a compact, low wattage, high air capacity fan, which when operated in conjunction with a power operated valve, eliminates the odors in an eflicient manner while maintaining power consumption at a minimum because it catches most of the odors right at the source before they can enter the bathroom atmosphere. Since the fan and valve assembly are conveniently located within a single casing, easy access is provided, as opposed to some of the arrangements heretofore employed wherein the valve unit is spaced a considerable distance from the fan assembly.

In addition to the provision of an apparatus designed to eliminate the presence of offensive odors, the present invention provides a system for effectively preventing the back flow of these odors through the waste duct by the provision of a novel fan and valve arrangement.

Thus it is a principal object of this invention to provide a compact apparatus, which may be attached to a conventional toilet bowl or built into a correspondingly designed bowl, which automatically removes the obnoxious odors in a bathroom area thereby maintaining such areas odorless and well ventilated without the need of additional plumbing and installation.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a compact motor driven fan housed together with a solenoid controlled valve operating automatically with the fan to prevent back flow of sewer gases during the time that the fan is inoperative and enabling, in conjunction with the operation of the fan, a complete cirice culation of air, thereby maintaining the bathroom or the like odor-free.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a clock-work mechanism for maintaining the fan operative for a specified period of time, subsequent to the energization thereof, for completely ventilating the area of the bathroom, thereby eliminating any noxious odors which may be present during and after use of the toilet.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, the accompanying drawings, and the appended claims.

In the drawings- FIG. 1 is a sectional view of a toilet assembly incorporating the novel ventilating apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a view partly in section and partly in elevation taken generally along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of the motor and fan assembly showing the relative location of the various parts;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of the motor and fan assembly of FIG. 1 showing the movement of air from the area of the bowl into the air duct;

FIG. 5 is a view of the fan and valve control unit with parts in section and parts in elevation exposing the interior working parts thereof;

FIG. 6 is an exploded view of the coupling assembly and the timer actuating mechanism; and

FIG. 7 illustrates a modified form of the present invention adapted to be installed in already existing toilets.

Referring to the drawings, which illustrate the preferred embodiments of the present invention, FIGS. 1 and 2 show a toilet bowl 10 having a cylindrical chamber 12 for receiving the fan and valve unit generally designated 15. Connecting the cylindrical chamber 12 to the waste duct 16 is an air duct 18, the chamber 12 being eccentrically positioned to provide space for the flushing water duct 20 which delivers flushing water 22 maintained within tank 24 into the annular water passage 265 which extends circumferentially around the inner periphery of the bowl 10 and proximate the upper edge thereof. The usual siphon duct 28 is provided for drawing the liquid and waste in the bowl into the waste duct 16 during the flushing cycle.

The fan-valve unit 15 includes a housing 30 and a cover plate 32 adapted to fit into a flat-shaped recess in the bowl body, and having a porcelain-like finish which blends into the exterior of the bowl top. Between the cover plate 32, which protrudes into the rear section of the bowl edge and terminates flush with the bowl oval, is an air intake duct 34 which leads into the intake opening 36 of the fan-valve housing 30. The cover plate 32 is held in place by a pair of hinge assemblies 40 and 42 having bolts 48 and 49, and nuts 52 and 54, respectively, which extend through the plate 32.

Referring especially to FIGS. 3 to 5, it can be seen that a gasket 56 is interposed between the cover plate 32 and the bowl member 10 to provide an air tight assembly of the fan and valve unit to the bowl member. The gasket 56 extends along the top and side walls of the fan valve housing 39 thereby preventing passage of sewer gases around the housing during times when the fan assembly is not being employed. The motor assembly 60 which is contained Within the housing 30 includes a motor 62 and a motor winding 64, both of these units being contained within a motor housing 66 to shield these units from the sewer gases. Extending through the motor housing 66 and driven by the motor 62 is a fan assembly generally designated 68 which includes a plurality of radially disposed vanes 70 adapted to rotate as the motor shaft 72 rotates.

The motor winding 64 acts as a solenoid for controlling the valve assembly positioned within the casing 30. This valve assembly includes a flap blade 74 positioned such that it is able to obstruct the air passage 18 at such time as the flap blade is closed as shown in the full lines in FIG. 4. The flap valve blade 74 is fixed at one end to an intermediate linkage 76 and supported by a peripheral baffle 78 which separates the fan assembly from the motor assembly. The movement of the flap valve 74 is accomplished by solenoid action attracting a pair of levers 80 which are pivotally attached at 81 to the housing 30 as the motor 62 is energized. Each lever 80 works against the tension of spring 82. which tends to maintain the flap valve blade 74 in the closed position. Approximately at the same time that the motor 62 is energized, the lever 80 is attracted towards solenoid 64 causing opening of the valve by movement of the flap valve blade 74 to the position shown in dotted lines in FIG. 4.

Operation of the motor and valve assembly can be understood with reference to FIG. wherein the same reference numerals have been employed to identify similar parts. Located within the fixed portion 84 of hinge assembly 40 is a clock-work mechanism generally designated 85 operative in conjunction with the electrical mechanism to maintain the fan operative for a specific period of time and maintaining the fan-valve assembly open during operation of the fan. Positioned in the cross-connection 86 which interconnects the cover hinge members 88 and 90 is a spring member 92 which is afiixed at each end to a spring pin 94 and spring pin 96, spring pin 94 being journaled into the fixed portion 98 of hinge assembly 42. Thus, as the cover is rotated in an upward direction moving hinges 38, 9t) and the intermediate connection 86, the spring is wound up due to the fact that one end of the spring is attached to spring pin 94 which does not rotate and the other end is afiixed to spring pin 96 which does rotate, as described below.

Hinge assemblies 40 and 42 each include seat hinges 100 and 102 respectively, which are capable of being rotated independently of the cover hinges 88 and 90. Journaled into seat hinge 104) is a switch wheel 104 having a button 106 located thereon for controlling the operation of normally closed switch 108. interconnecting the clock-work mechanism 35 and spring pin 96 is a coupling assembly 110 which provides initiation for movement of the clock-work mechanism at such time as the cover assembly is moved from a downward to an upward position.

Details of the coupling assembly 110 may be understood with reference to FIG. 6 wherein continuity of reference numerals has been maintained. A Z-shaped spring member 112 is affixed to the side of cover hinge 88 which faces the clock-work 85 and resiliently urges the coupling assembly 110 into engagement with the ratchet wheel 114 of the clock-work. The shaft of spring pin 96 passes through the aperture 116 of the spring member 112 and is fitted into coupling pick-up member 118 of the coupling assembly 110. A shaft 119 interconnects member 118 with a contact wheel 126, the latter being provided with a notched portion 122 along the outer periphery thereof resulting in rotation of the coupling assembly 110 as a unit.

One arm of the spring 112 is provided with a deformed portion 124 at the end thereof which is adapted to ride in the recess 126 provided in the surface of pickup member 118 facing the hinge 88. With the seat 4 cover in the down position, the parts occupy the relative positions as shown in the exploded view of FIG. 6 and the electrical switch 130 is opened due to the fact that the contact arm thereof is biased into the recess 122 of contact wheel 120.

The operation of the motor actuating and timing assembly which includes the clock-work and the hinge arrangements as above described, can be understood with reference to FIGS. 4, 5 and 6. Assuming that the toilet has not been used for some time and the previous venting cycle has been completed, the toilet seat 44 and the toilet cover 46 are in the down position with electrical switch 108 closed and switch 130 opened, thereby opening the circuit to the power source 134, which may be a wall plug, or other suitable means. The line 136 from the wall plug 134 passes through a water tight plug 138 to a pair of bayonet plugs 139 and 140 and thence to the motor winding 64. As the cover 46 is raised for use of toilet, hinge members 38 and are rotated resulting in the following; spring 92 is wound up since spring pin 94 is fixed to the stationary member 98 of hinge 42. The Z-shaped spring 112 is rotated due to the fact that it is attached to hinge member 88, and as the spring 112 is turned, the deformed portion 124 engages the recess 126 of pick-up member 118 of the coupling assembly causing rotation thereof as indicated by the arrows in FIG. 6. After the cover 46 has been raised by 90 to the upmost position (and is now being turned a little farther and put back to rest against the water tank 24) the little tongue 1 41 on the Z-shaped spring 112 is moved away from member 118 through contact with a little protrusion 142 at this place on the inside of the fixed portion of the hinge assembly 40. This forces the deformed portion 124 out of recess 126, thus allowing the clock-work mechainism to start moving in the unwind direction as described below. This arrangement causes the time cycle to start in any case as soon as the cover has been raised, preventing the motor from running continuously if someone forgets to put the cover down after use of the toilet.

Thus it can be seen that with the one end of the spring 92 fixed and the other end free to rotate a twist is put on the spring. As the coupling assembly is rotated due to movement of the Z-shaped spring 112 as above described, the contact member 129 which is moved in unison with member 118 is also turned to close the switch 130 as the recessed portion 122 passes over the contact arm of the switch. Ratchet wheel 114 of the clock-work is not turned since the inter-engaging surfaces 131 and 133 of contact member 128 and ratchet wheel 114, respectively, act as a clutch member to provide interengagement of the ratchet wheel 114 and the contact member as the coupling assembly is moved in one direction, for example, the unwind direction, but allows movement of the contact wheel independently of the ratchet wheel as the coupling assembly 116 is moved in a second direction or the wind-up direction. As the cover is raised, contact member 120 slips with respect to ratchet member 114, and with the cover in the raised position, the fan and valve unit are energized since switch 108 is normally closed, and switch is closed as above described.

The clock-work has now been wound and will operate for a predetermined time in accordance with the delaying action of the escapement mechanism generally indicated as in FIG. 6. As the clock-work mechanism moves, the coupling assembly is turned in the unwind direction due to the positive clutch-like engagement between contact member 120 and ratchet wheel 114. When the clockwork winds down due to movement of the internal mechanism thereof, coupling assembly 110 is rotated in the return or home direction, allowing the normally open switch 130 to open as recess 122 is aligned therewith. The Z-shaped spring member 112 will not engage the recess 126 of member 118 as the clock-work Winds down due to the fact that the deformed portion 124 is such that it will slip into and out of recess 122 rather than be in positive engagement therewith. Rotation of member 118 in the unwind direction is caused by the tension of spring 92 which drives spring pin 96 in the unwind direction in a movement which is slowed down by the clock-work mechanism. After the complete time cycle has occurred, the valve will be closed at approximately the same time the fan is stopped.

The purpose of switch 108 is to prevent operation of the fan and valve assembly at such time as the seat is in a raised position. This is effectively accomplished by the switch wheel 104 which is journaled into seat hinge 100 for movement therewith. Thus, as the seat is raised either with the cover or separately from the cover, switch 108 is opened thereby opening the circuit to the fan and valve assembly and preventing operation of the motor. This action prevents any water or other liquid or solid matter from being drawn into the fan and valve assembly while the toilet is being cleaned or used with the seat in raised position. As soon as the seat has been lowered again the fan and valve unit will operate for the remaining part of the time cycle thus eliminating odors which might be present in the bathroom atmosphere also after use of the toilet with the seat in raised position.

It can be seen that the operation of the present mechanism of the present invention is not hindered by the fact that the cover is closed during the running cycle of the motor and fan assembly. This is due primarily to the fact that the spring member 92 is not unwound as the cover is moved to the closed position, since the shaft of spring pin 96 is engaged with the coupling mechanism 110 whose movement in the unwind direction is controlled by the clock-work mechanism 85. Downward movement of the cover allows the Z-shaped spring to ride over recess 126 without rotating member 118 in the unwind direction.

The principles of the present invention may also be incorporated into a conventional toilet bowl as shown with reference to FIG. 7. The fan and valve unit 15 is affixed to the underside of the lavatory 145 by means of a hanger 147 which is adapted to secure the fan and valve unit 15 to the bathroom wall. The interior structure of the fan and valve unit in this modification is similar to that previously described, however, it is provided with an intake tube 148 connected at one end to the suction head 150 on bowl 10 and a discharge tube 152 con nected at the other end by a saddle fitting (not shown) on the sewer side above the water trap of drain pipe 154. The odors are taken from the sewer trap through the conventional stack extending above the root level to atmosphere.

The bowl 10 which is of the conventional type has been modified to provide the hinge and actuating assemblies 44) as shown in FIG. and a suction head 150 which is clamped to the bowl as shown at 157 and 158. Wire leads 136 extend from the switching mechanism contained within hinge assembly 40 to the fan and valve unit 15.

Operation of the above modification is exactly the same as that described in connection with FIGS. 3 to 6. However, the sewer gases are now conducted into the sewer trap of the lavatory as opposed to the air passage provided in the toilet bowl.

The invention as above described offers a simple, compact and eificient unit for ventilating and removing troublesome odors from the bathroom area fully automatically and in every case no matter in what way the toilet has been used. It also assures that the fan and valve assembly is operative only during the controlled running time whether the user of the toilet leaves seat and/or cover open or closes them. The use of a fan and valve assembly which are located within the same housing and operated under a single control oifers two distinct advantages, the first requiring a minimum of power since it is not necessary to create sufficient air pressure to force the 6 valve open and secondly the fact that the two elements; are combined in a single housing facilitates repair.

The eflicient system such as heretofore described offers a method of eliminating odors without the necessity of any additional structural modifications in the bathroom and in addition maintains the power requirements at a minimum. With this ventilating system, there is no longer any problem of having to open windows, especially during the winter since the unit provides a complete change of air due to its controlled running time.

While the forms of apparatus herein described constitute preferred embodiments of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to these precise forms of apparatus, and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A ventilating system for use with a toilet bowl comprising a hinge assembly securing a seat and cover member to said toilet bowl, air conduit means providing flow of air from the area of said bowl to a sewer passage, a housing interposed in said air conduit means and con taining a fan assembly for drawing said air from the area of said bowl to said sewer gas passage, an electromagnetically controlled normally closed valve within said housing and responsive to the energization of said fan assembly for allowing flow of said air through said housing to said sewer gas passage, a timer contained within said hinge assembly for controlling the running time of said fan assembly, a pair of switches arranged in series, the one being normally closed and responsive to the movement of said seat to the vertical position for disabling operation of said fan assembly, and the other being normally opened and adapted to close upon movement of said cover to a vertical position for maintaining said fan operative and said valve open for a predetermined time as controlled by said timer.

2. A ventilating system for use with a toilet bowl and a lavatory comprising a hinge assembly securing a seat and cover member to said toilet bowl, air conduit means providing flow of air from the area of said bowl to a sewer passage provided in said lavatory, an air tight housing interposed in said air conduit means containing a fan assembly and a normally closed valve therein, said normally closed valve being responsive to the energization of said fan assembly for opening said air conduit means to said sewer passage at approximately the same time that said fan assembly is energized, a timer contained within said hinge assembly for controlling the running time of said fan assembly, said timer being responsive to the movement of said cover member for initiating a running cycle of a predetermined time interval to maintain said fan assembly operative and said valve open for a period of time as controlled by said timer, switch means responsive to the movement of said seat to the vertical position for deenergizin g said motor and fan assembly, and second switch means controlled by said timer and operative within said predetermined time interval to maintain said motor and fan assembly in operation with said seat and cover in a horizontal position.

3. A ventilating system for use with a toilet bowl comprising separately movable seat and cover members, air conduit means providing flow of air from the area of said bowl to a sewer passage, a housing interposed in said air conduit means and containing a fan assembly for drawing air from the area of said bowl to said sewer gas passage, an electromagnetically controlled normally closed valve within said housing and responsive to energization of said fan assembly for allowing flow of air through said conduit to said sewer gas passage, a first normally closed stationary switch responsive to movement of said seat to the vertical position for disabling operation of said fan assembly, a second stationary switch arranged electrically in series with said first switch and normally open with the cover in the horizontal position and adapted to close in response to movement of said cover to the vertical position, and timer means energized by movement of said cover to the vertical position and initiating a time cycle of a predetermined length of time at the termination of said vertical movement of said cover, said timer means maintaining said second switch closed during said timing cycle with said cover moved to the horizontal position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Hartwell Sept. 4, 1934 Greene Mar. 29, 1938 Henschler Feb. 13, 1940 Briscoe eta1 May 25, 1943 Sanford Sept. 14, 1943 Allen et a1 May 11, 1954

Claims (1)

1. A VENTILATING SYSTEM FOR USE WITH A TOILET BOWL COMPRISING A HINGE ASSEMBLY SECURING A SEAT AND COVER MEMBER TO SAID TOILET BOWL, AIR CONDUIT MEANS PROVIDING FLOW OF AIR FROM THE AREA OF SAID BOWL TO A SEWER PASSAGE, A HOUSING INTERPOSED IN SAID AIR CONDUIT MEANS AND CONTAINING A FAN ASSEMBLY FOR DRAWING SAID AIR FROM THE AREA OF SAID BOWL TO SAID SEWER GAS PASSAGE, AN ELECTROMAGNETICALLY CONTROLLED NORMALLY CLOSED VALVE WITHIN SAID HOUSING AND RESPONSIVE TO THE ENERGIZATION OF SAID FAN ASSEMBLY FOR ALLOWING FLOW OF SAID AIR THROUGH SAID HOUSING TO SAID SEWER GAS PASSAGE, A TIMER CONTAINED WITHIN SAID HINGE ASSEMBLY FOR CONTROLLING THE RUNNING TIME OF SAID FAN ASSEMBLY, A PAIR OF SWITCHES ARRANGED IN SERIES, THE ONE BEING NORMALLY CLOSED AND RESPONSIVE TO THE MOVEMENT OF SAID SEAT TO THE VERTICAL POSITION FOR DISABLING OPERATION OF SAID FAN ASSEMBLY, AND THE OTHER BEING NORMALLY OPENED AND ADAPTED TO CLOSE UPON MOVEMENT OF SAID COVER TO A VERTICAL POSITION FOR MAINTAINING SAID FAN OPERATIVE AND SAID VALVE OPEN FOR A PREDETERMINED TIME AS CONTROLLED BY SAID TIMER.
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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3534415A (en) * 1965-05-05 1970-10-20 Robert G Huffman Automatic ventilating system for sanitary toilets
US3599253A (en) * 1969-02-25 1971-08-17 Gaggenau Eisenwerk Toilet fitting
US3805304A (en) * 1971-07-01 1974-04-23 N Ikehata Ventilating toilet
US4318192A (en) * 1979-10-31 1982-03-09 Williams Jack D Ventilated toilet
WO1988006661A1 (en) * 1987-03-03 1988-09-07 Ratanangsu Karl S Improved ventilating toilet
US4984305A (en) * 1989-12-22 1991-01-15 Boisvert Paul J Self ventilating toilet
US4993083A (en) * 1990-06-18 1991-02-19 Lemieux Charles E Ventilated toilet
US5813060A (en) * 1996-09-12 1998-09-29 Klopocinski; Stanislaw Multifunction toilet
DE10060559A1 (en) * 2000-11-30 2002-06-13 Wolfgang Mueller Ventilation water closet has upper region of basin shape connected to fecal chamber by opening; fecal chamber has connection in highest region for extraction of fecal odors
WO2005121463A1 (en) * 2004-06-08 2005-12-22 Josef Haas Toilet bowl comprising a device for suctioning pungent smelling air
US20060085898A1 (en) * 2004-10-27 2006-04-27 Hector Rosa Toilet ventilation system
US7117548B1 (en) * 2005-02-28 2006-10-10 Horacio Reyes Toilet ventilation system
US20100327636A1 (en) * 2008-12-21 2010-12-30 W.E.T. Automotive Systems Ag Ventilation system

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1972774A (en) * 1932-06-25 1934-09-04 Hartwell Harold Edward Closet
US2112772A (en) * 1937-05-07 1938-03-29 Ellis D Greene Toilet ventilator
US2190068A (en) * 1938-05-13 1940-02-13 Henschler Ewald Lavatory device
US2320065A (en) * 1941-03-11 1943-05-25 Charles F Briscoe Toilet ventilator
US2329221A (en) * 1941-04-10 1943-09-14 Hugh W Sanford Deodorizer
US2677830A (en) * 1950-03-09 1954-05-11 Clyde H Allen Ventilating means for toilet bowls

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1972774A (en) * 1932-06-25 1934-09-04 Hartwell Harold Edward Closet
US2112772A (en) * 1937-05-07 1938-03-29 Ellis D Greene Toilet ventilator
US2190068A (en) * 1938-05-13 1940-02-13 Henschler Ewald Lavatory device
US2320065A (en) * 1941-03-11 1943-05-25 Charles F Briscoe Toilet ventilator
US2329221A (en) * 1941-04-10 1943-09-14 Hugh W Sanford Deodorizer
US2677830A (en) * 1950-03-09 1954-05-11 Clyde H Allen Ventilating means for toilet bowls

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3534415A (en) * 1965-05-05 1970-10-20 Robert G Huffman Automatic ventilating system for sanitary toilets
US3599253A (en) * 1969-02-25 1971-08-17 Gaggenau Eisenwerk Toilet fitting
US3805304A (en) * 1971-07-01 1974-04-23 N Ikehata Ventilating toilet
US4318192A (en) * 1979-10-31 1982-03-09 Williams Jack D Ventilated toilet
WO1988006661A1 (en) * 1987-03-03 1988-09-07 Ratanangsu Karl S Improved ventilating toilet
US4984305A (en) * 1989-12-22 1991-01-15 Boisvert Paul J Self ventilating toilet
US4993083A (en) * 1990-06-18 1991-02-19 Lemieux Charles E Ventilated toilet
US5813060A (en) * 1996-09-12 1998-09-29 Klopocinski; Stanislaw Multifunction toilet
DE10060559A1 (en) * 2000-11-30 2002-06-13 Wolfgang Mueller Ventilation water closet has upper region of basin shape connected to fecal chamber by opening; fecal chamber has connection in highest region for extraction of fecal odors
WO2005121463A1 (en) * 2004-06-08 2005-12-22 Josef Haas Toilet bowl comprising a device for suctioning pungent smelling air
US20060085898A1 (en) * 2004-10-27 2006-04-27 Hector Rosa Toilet ventilation system
US7117548B1 (en) * 2005-02-28 2006-10-10 Horacio Reyes Toilet ventilation system
US20100327636A1 (en) * 2008-12-21 2010-12-30 W.E.T. Automotive Systems Ag Ventilation system
US8777320B2 (en) * 2008-12-21 2014-07-15 W.E.T. Automotive Systems Ag Ventilation system
US9415712B2 (en) 2008-12-21 2016-08-16 Gentherm Gmbh Ventilation system

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