US3119540A - Container - Google Patents

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US3119540A
US3119540A US26750A US2675060A US3119540A US 3119540 A US3119540 A US 3119540A US 26750 A US26750 A US 26750A US 2675060 A US2675060 A US 2675060A US 3119540 A US3119540 A US 3119540A
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United States
Prior art keywords
container
structural
contour
sections
paneling
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US26750A
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Richard F Schenk
Eli A Zackheim
William R Heffernan
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Johnson and Johnson
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Johnson and Johnson
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Priority to US26750A priority Critical patent/US3119540A/en
Priority claimed from US17173362 external-priority patent/US3154617A/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/04Hollow or tubular parts of organs, e.g. bladders, tracheae, bronchi or bile ducts
    • A61F2/06Blood vessels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C45/00Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C45/14Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor incorporating preformed parts or layers, e.g. injection moulding around inserts or for coating articles
    • B29C45/14467Joining articles or parts of a single article
    • B29C45/14475Joining juxtaposed parts of a single article, e.g. edges of a folded container blank
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C70/00Shaping composites, i.e. plastics material comprising reinforcements, fillers or preformed parts, e.g. inserts
    • B29C70/68Shaping composites, i.e. plastics material comprising reinforcements, fillers or preformed parts, e.g. inserts by incorporating or moulding on preformed parts, e.g. inserts or layers, e.g. foam blocks
    • B29C70/74Moulding material on a relatively small portion of the preformed part, e.g. outsert moulding
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D15/00Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, sections made of different materials
    • B65D15/22Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, sections made of different materials of polygonal cross-section
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/20Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper by folding-up portions connected to a central panel from all sides to form a container body, e.g. of tray-like form
    • B65D5/209Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper by folding-up portions connected to a central panel from all sides to form a container body, e.g. of tray-like form the adjacent edges of folded-up portions being joined by moulding seams in situ
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/4279Joints, seams, leakproof joints or corners, special connections between panels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/44Integral, inserted or attached portions forming internal or external fittings
    • B65D5/441Reinforcements
    • B65D5/445Reinforcements formed separately from the container
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06FLAUNDERING, DRYING, IRONING, PRESSING OR FOLDING TEXTILE ARTICLES
    • D06F33/00Control of operations performed in washing machines or washer-dryers 
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31BMAKING CONTAINERS OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31B50/00Making rigid or semi-rigid containers, e.g. boxes or cartons
    • B31B50/26Folding sheets, blanks or webs
    • B31B50/44Folding sheets, blanks or webs by plungers moving through folding dies
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31BMAKING CONTAINERS OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31B50/00Making rigid or semi-rigid containers, e.g. boxes or cartons
    • B31B50/60Uniting opposed surfaces or edges; Taping
    • B31B50/61Uniting opposed edges by injecting thermoplastic material
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06FLAUNDERING, DRYING, IRONING, PRESSING OR FOLDING TEXTILE ARTICLES
    • D06F2204/00Output, e.g. controlled quantity
    • D06F2204/04Heating

Description

R. F. scHENK ETAL 3,119,540,v

CONTAINER Jan. 28, 1964 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 FHL m /6 Filed May 4,v 1960 l llammlm'/ BY ATTORNEY Jan. 28, 1964 R. F. scHENK ETAL 3,119,540

CONTAINER Filed May 4, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 BY A'I TORNEY Jan. 28, 1964` R. F. scHENK ETAL 3,119,540

Y 'CONTAINER Filed May 4, 1960 e sheets-sheet :s

TETTE.

@wif EY Jan. 28, 1964 R. F. scHENK ETAL v 3,119,540

CONTAINER Filed May 4, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 j /4//44 /fmf/ A2 #free-@VAN ATTORNEY Jan- 28, 1964 R. F. scHl-:NK ETAL 3,119,540

CONTAINER Filed May 4, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Tmil. TE'LL 57 55 55 Jan- 28, 1964 R. F. scHENK r-:TAL 3,119,540

CONTAINER 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed May 4, 1960 K M im@ 255% EZ mi@ M2M @i A f. La QW dof] ATTORN Y United States Patent O 3,119,540 CN'IAINER Richard F. Schenk, New Market, Eli A. Zackheim, South Platin-leid, and Wiliiam Hadamar-i, Westfield, Nd.,

assignors to Johnson Se Johnson, a corporation of N ew Filed May 4, .19ct?, Ser. No. 26,75@ 8 Claims. (El. 229-25) The present invention relates to a container formed of a composite of plastic and of ilexible sheet material, and to a method of making it.

According to the present invention, a container of substantially fixed volume and form which is made from relatively cheap and preferably ilexible sheet material such as paper, cardboard, foil, sheet metal and the like, has substantial strength impart-ed to it by plastic structural members molded in place to hold the container together and preserve its contour. The improved container may have panel members, such as sides and bottom, joined together by the molded structural members. IIn the molding process, plastic material may be caused to till up the space between the edges of the panels, and to adhere to the surfaces of the panels adjacent their edges or to interlock with the panels as by entering such interstices as may be present in the panel members near the edges thereof or by the edges of the panel members entering grooves in the structural members. In this way, the molded structural members cooperate to preserve the contour of the panels and the panel members cooperate to maintain the location of the molded structural elements that hold them together. By appropriately shaping the mold cavities in the vicinity of those parts of the container that are to be strengthened or joined together by the structural elements, desired rigidity and contour in the container may be obtained.

While the improved container may partake of many forms and participate in many uses, two types thereof have been selected for illustration. One type of container is suitable for surgical Sponges and the like. It requires suilcient strength and rigidity to maintain its integrity and facilitate stacking it o-ne upon another. When sealed and sterilized it must be impervious to the entrance of bacteria or other harmful organisms that otherwise would contaminate the sterile products sealed therein, and it preferably must be relatively low in cost economically to permit discarding after opening and removal of the sterile contents.

The second type of container selected for illustration is one which heretofore has usually been made of sheet metal and with substantial depth as compared to its length and width and with a hinged cover. A tobacco tin is an example of this type of container. While sheet metal may be used in the manufacture of a container in accordance vtdth the invention, a lighter and cheaper material such as cardboard or even heavy paper also may be economically used. The panels of such a container may be suitably formed and inserted in an appropriate die having mold cavities in the vicinity of its top edges, its side seams and its botto-m edges. By iniection molding a plastic material into the mold cavities of such a die when the panel elements are in place, not only are the panel elements held together but the container is suitably reinforced and appropriate shape and contour given to it.

A better understanding of the invention may be had from the following description read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates a flat blank from which a container is formed;

FIG. 2 is a partial top view of the blank after it has been folded into the form of a container but prior to molding the corners;

FIGS. 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 illustrate diiferent steps which may be used in making a container from the blank of FIG. l;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a finished container looking at the top;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a portion of a finished container looking at the bottom;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken on line itl- 10 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken on line 11-11 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 12 is a perspective View of the container looking at the top and showing the container equipped with a sealed cover partially removed to show the contents and an underlying adhesive seal.

FIG. 13 is a top plan View of the female die used in forming the container and in molding the structural members therein;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged sectional perspective View of a portion of `one corner of the die of FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a sectional view taken on line 15"-15 of FIG. 13;

FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional View taken across one corner of the container ange during molding of the corners.

FIG. 17 illustrates a ilat blank from which another type of container may be formed;

FiG. 18 is a perspective view of the blank after folding but prior to insertion in the forming die;

FIG. 19 is a perspective View of the 4structural framework formed to support and impart contour to the container panels, the panels being partly broken away to show the interior of the casing;

FlG. 20 is a vertical ysectional view of line 2li-2% of FIG. 19;

FIG. 21 is a front elevation of the finished container;

IFIG. 22 is a side elevation of the container shown in FIG. 21;

FIG. 23 is a vertical sectional view on line 23-23 of FiG. 21;

FIG. 24 is a horizontal sectional view on line 24-24 of FlG. 21;

FIGS. 25 and 26 are horizontal sectional views showing two diierent types of panel connecting structural members;

FIG. 27 is a vertical section View through a molding mechanism suitable Afor making the type of package illustrated in FlGS. 17 to 24 and showing the mold open;

FiG. 28 is ya vertical sectional View of part of the mechanism shown in FlG. 27 but with the mold closed;

FIG. 29` is a horizontal sectional view taken through the mold cavity and iabout midway between the top and the bottom of the container alter the mold has been closed but before plastic injection;

FIG. 30 is a partial horizontal sectional view similar to FIG. 29 but taken tat a somewhat lower level.

A container suitable :for sungical Sponges and the method of making it tare illustrated .in FIGS. 1 to 16. A blank 1t? is first formed ont of a hat sheet lof paper or similar material (FIGS. 1 and 2). Blank lil includes a rectangular bottom portion 11, and marginal edge portions 12, extending outwardly from the bottom portion one at each o-f its edges. In forming a container from this blank, these extending edge portions are bent along fold lines 13 where they join the `bottom portion 11, upwardly to form container sides 14, and then along fold lines 15 outwardly to form a `container rim 16 to which -a tleXible cover 17 is secured to close the container (FIG. 12).

In the particular embodiment shown, it will be noted that in the blank 1li the angle between the ends of adjacent edge portions i2, in that part thereof which ultimately become adjacent sides 1d, is somewhat less than a right angle. This gives an outward ilare to the sides, after the container is formed, making the container somewhat larger at its mouth than at the bottom to provide for easier removal of sponges or other contents which may be packaged therein.

The panel elements constituting the container are held together in their proper relationship by a plastic structuml member 18 formed one each at the corners of the container. Each stuuctural member includes an upright portion 19 extending from the bottom to the top of the container. The plastic enters into and iills up any space that exists between the adjacent edges of the side panels 14, and it extends from the corner edge alo-ng the side panels to which it ladheres, in both directions for a distance suiiicient to give some strength and contour to the container corners. The structural corner member l?, further includes la flan-ge portion Ztl at the top which likewise enters into and fills up any spia that exists between the adjacent edges of intersecting rim members 16 and which likewise extends along such r-im members, to which it adheres, a distance sufficient to impart strength to the rim members. This llange member 2li also serves to maintain a fixed angular relation-ship betwen those upright portions i9 of the structural member which radiate outwardly from the corner along the side elements M. A flange 21 formed integral with the structural upright portions 19 at its lower end also helps maintain the angular relationship between the same radiating portion or legs of the structural members and, `of course, it completely seals the container at this point by adhesion to the bottom.

Since the structural members `are `injection molded they can, without difficulty, be made in any shape ias demanded by the desired contour of the container, and to any degree of flexibility or rigidity merely by appropriately varying the dimension of the structural member and the thermoplastic material used in making it.

Formation of the container is best illustrated by reference to FIGURES 3 through 7. In forming the container, a pair iof co-acting male and female die members 22 and 23 respectively 'are used. The :female `die member 23, as best illustrated in HGS. 13 yand 14, is formed with a die cavity 2.4 which is generally the shape of the container to be formed. The die cavity -is provided at its corners with mold cavities 25 into which |a plastic resin mass is injected after the two die members 22 `and 23 are brought together Iwith the panel material of the container in between. The mold cavity 25 has the shape .of the structural member to be molded. A channel 26 communicates with yand forms part of each of the mold cavities 2S, the channels in 'turn being connected to inlets 27 which are in turn placed in communication with an injection molding apparatus of `any conventional design for forcing plastic into the mold cavities 25.

The upper male die member 22 is provided with a vacuum chamber Z8 and passages 29 extending from the Vacuum chamber 23 ito the exterior surface of the die through which a vacuum may be established for holiding a container or the blank from which it is formed, in position on the die member.

The blank il) is placed over 4the female vdie member 23 with its base panel M .in registry with the base of the cavi-ty 24 in the female die member as illustrated in FIGURE 3. The male die member 22 is lowered as shown in FIGURE 4 to push the yblank lil down into the die cavity 24. As the blank is moved into the die, the margirial edge portions l2 `are folded upwardly along fold lines i3 and outwardly along fold lines l5 to form the sides 14 and `the flange or rim i6 of the container. In this illustrated form fof the container, the blank itil is so formed that `adjacent edges at the ends of the side members do not overlap, `as best illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 10. This insures that the top surface of the rim section 16 lall around the iinished container is flush as will be evidenced hereinafter. After the die members 22 and 23 have been brought together and the blank 10 appropriatly :folded thereby, a plastic molding material s injected under pressure by conventional injection molding techniques, through pas'satgeways 27 and into- -the mold cavities Z5 at each corner of the container, completely to lill the same. Except for spaces between the walls and the rim sections of the container at the corners, at which region the mold cavity is closed by the surfaces of the male die, the mold cavity is otherwise closed by the sheet material of which the panel members are made.

The plastic material is injected into the mold cavities under substantial pressure, generally in excessof about 1G00 pounds per square inch. Asa result, the plastic material is forced into every available space completely to lill the mold cavities and form the molded plastic structural corner members 18. As the pressure under which the plastic is molded causes very intimate contact between it and the other container material and since the plastic material .is selected to have substantial adhesive compatibility with such container material, a strong bond between the structural member and the other container material is obtained. Also, because of the manner of forming the container, the upper surface of the ilange portion 2d at the top of the plastic structural member where it projects between the edges of the rim elements and the corresponding surface o-f the upright portion of the plastic structural member where it projects between the edges of the wall elements, are flush with the top surface of the container and with the inner surface of the Wall members, respectively, las best illustrated in FIG. 10. A flexible cover 2S secured to the container flange or rim i6, las illustrated in FIG. 12, will have uniform Contact throughout the top surface o-f the ilange and thus the container will be quite `devoid of any channel to the interior of the container that might permit leakage after the cover has been sealed lto the container rim.

After the plastic rhas set either by cooling if it is a thermoplastic material or by appropriate curing if it is a heat set or a catalyzed resin material, a suction is established in the `die member I22. to hold lthe formed container in intimate contact with it. Die member Z2 is then raised with the completed container adhering thereto, as illustrated in FG. 6. After the container is removed from the die member 23, suction in the die member 22 is disestablished thereby releasing the finished container to permit its separation therefrom.

The finished container without cover comprises the bottom 11, lsides 14- yand rim 16, formed from blank 10, which, if paper, has little strength and might readily be deformed in the use for which the package is normally intended. The molded plastic structural members 1S, however, not only completely seal any channels that might otherwise exist between adjacent end edges of the side and rim members, but also extends from the end edges along the sides and rim members for a portion of their length, thereby to impart a iixed contour to such members in the vicinity of the structural members not only peripheral wise but also in a Idirection from top to bottom. It should also be noted that the rigidity of the corner structural members cooperate with `the side panels and rims of the container so as in effect to make a structural form of these latter members, ie., an angle extending all around the container and this in addition lends structural strength to what otherwise might be a fragile container.

In FIG. l2 a nished container is illustrated which has been filled with flat surgical sponges 29. After iilling, the container is sealed by a paper cover, which may be cemented yas by an adhesive 3ft to the rim 16. The cover 28 may extend beyond the rim of lthe container on ati least one side thereof .to provide a tab that can be grasped for ready removal of the cover. After the coverl has been cemented to the rim, the container with contents' may then be sterilized by conventional steam or chemical sterilization.

Any of the conventional plastics yused for injection molding may be employed as long as they' have suiciently high softening point if temperatures of stenilization must be withstood. Excellent containers are obtained, for example, by using papers of about 35 to 60 pound weight and by injection molding ythe corners from linear polyethylene.

Although containers made in the manner herein described yare particularly useful for packaging sterile articles, they may be used for inexpensively packaging any item to protect it from contamination. The improved container may be completely sealed to the entry of air, as in an air or gas tight package, by forming lche container and cover from a material substantially air impermeable. Such a material, vfor example, could be a metal foil or a resin impregnated paper. Since the improved containers are devoid of air channels at the meeting edges, a container and cover made of air impervious material is, when sealed closed, essentially air or gas tight. Such containers are particularly useful for the packaging of food or any other product where it is desirable that the container be sealed against the entry of air.

In FIGS. 17 Ito 30 inclusive there is illustrated a different type of container together with its method of manufacture. The container is of tall type with hinged cover quite similar in shape to those often used for pipe tobacco. Such a container is substantially rectangular in horizontal section with its width from side to side greater than its depth from front to back, and its height from top to bottom greater than its width `from side to side. The improved container may be formed in part fro-m sheet material such as cardboard, chip board or even tin plate. Indeed, the invention will have substantial utility in connection with the use of any material which in the absence of some reinforcement and in the service for which it is intended would suffer risk of being deformed. In this embodiment of the invention, a blank 4@ of sheet material is died out to form two substantially rectangular sections 4l and 42 ultimately 4to comprise the front, rear and side paneling of the container and an intermediate section 43 of somewhat less width connected to the rectangular panels along parallel fold lines 4d and d5 and ultimately to form the base paneling of the container. The members 41 and 42 comprising the front and rear panels of the container are bent upwardly along the fold lines 4dand d5 where they interconnect with the base panel. The front panel 41 is then bent rearwardly and the rear panel 4Z forwardly along fold lines do near and substantially parallel to the lateral edges of said front and rear panels to present opposed marginal portions 47 in fore and 'aft alignment at opposite sides of the blank and which, in part, will form the sides of the container. When the front and rear panels di, d2 are bent upwardly into substantial parallelism, the opposed edges of the marginal portions may have some intermediate spacing d8 for a purpose later made clear (FIG. 24).

The various panel members 41, d2, 53, f2.7 are held in location and are strengthened against deformation by a framework d? which is molded in place (FIG. 19 and FIGS. 21 to 24). in this particular embodiment the framework includes a rim S@ of plastic material at the top of the container, a rim 51 of plastic material at the bottom of the container, and two interconnecting vertical upright strips SZ located at opposite sides of the container and which are molded integrally with the rim both at the top and at the bottom. In the finished product, the front and the side wall panels telescope for a short distance into the rim members which thus will overlap along their adjacent marginal edges (FIGS. 19 and 24). The parts are bonded rmly together along these overlapping portions during the formation of the container. The strength imparting structural strips 52 at the sides extend into and fill up the space d between the opposed edges of the marginal portions 47 of the blank, constituting the side walls of the container, and these structural members are also formed so as to overlap marginal portions of the side panels at the front and at the rear edges of these upright structural strips. With this construction, the front and rear panels are held against any substantial deformation not only by their bonded connection with the relatively stiff rim members but also by those portions of the upright members at the sides which project into and lill up the space between the opposed edges of the side panels at the front and at the rear of the upright members.

As shown at FIG. 24, increased strength or rigidity against deformation may be imparted to the lower rim member 5l by molding to it an integral flange 53 which extends inwardly from the inner surface of the rim member for a distance sufiicient for the purpose. This flange may be Located just below the bottom 43 and during the process of forming the container, the plastic material will flow up into any spaces S4 that exist where the bottom of lthe container meets the walls so that the container is completely closed all around the bottom. It should be noted that in the container illustrated in FIGS. 17 to 24 inclusive, the front and rear wall members are bowed outwardly on a relatively large radius and this also imparts strength to the container. Thus, absent the bowed contour, if the front and rear walls of the container are pressed inwardly toward each other somewhere near the top rim, a direct force in tension is exerted tending to break the seal between the front and rear panels and their adjacent rim sections. With the bowed construction similar `forces pressing the front and rear panels tend to flatten them out and thus a force in shear as well as one in tension is required to destroy the bond at this point. This, however, is not to imply that a fiat wall construction in accordance with the invention is not a desirable one but merely that the versatility in design is almost unlimited and that some constructions for some purposes may be better than others. If greater strength or rigidity against deformation is desired lower down in the vicinity of the rim, the reinforcing flange 53 to which reference has been made may be replaced by a full molded bottom which could serve either to supplement the cardboard bottom or used in lieu of a cardboard bottom in which case separate blanks for the front and rear walls of the container would be used. Provision is made for the bowed frame and rear wall panels, by having those portions of the blank which present such panels flare outwardly with the lines of fold defining the marginal portions located parallel with the lateral edges of the blank.

In this embodiment of the invention, the container is provided with a hinged lid 55 molded integrally with the upper rim member 5) and, if the hinge 56 is molded thin enough and of a material such as polypropylene, numerous exings may be accomplished in the opening and closing of the container without rupture of the hinge. The hinged lid portion shown open in FIGS. 19 and 20 and closed in FiG. 23, has a top closing portion 57, an outwardly extending peripheral ange 5E which rests against the upper edge of the top rim member 5b when the container is closed, and a depending peripheral flange 59 extending downwardly and which is arranged to telescope within the upper rim member when the container is closed. When closed, the depending flange on the lid cooperates with the rim at the top of the container to resist lateral forces tending to deform the container and since the tendency of these elements to resist deformation is substantially augmented by the ange 59 which is bowed or arched correspondingly to the rim 5@ and by the relatively rigid top plastic section 57 of the lid, the forces tending to resist deformation in the improved container are very substantial indeed.

It should be understood, of course, that while the plastic framework has a substantial amount of rigidity tending to resist deformation in the container to a substantial degree, it also has flexibility so that were the framework molded without the panel members, substantially less force would be required to displace or twist the members of the framework with respect to each other. The panel members when molded in place, however, serve by their tensility and rigidity, if present, to maintain the relative locations of the structural members of the framework, while the framework in turn preserves the contour of the panels.

A mold device designed to facilitate the manufacture of a container similar to that shown in FIGS. 17 to 24 is illustrated in FIGS. 27 to 30, comprises a fixed machine bed plate 69 and an overlying mold supporting plate 61 iioating above the bed plate on vertically arranged springs 62 which seat at their lower ends in holes 63 provided for the purpose in the bed plate and at their upper ends in recesses 64 formed in the bottom of the mold supporting plate. The mold supporting plate 61 is guided for a limited movement in a vertical direction by vertical guide studs 65 fixed in the bed plate and which pass through appropriately disposed guide holes 66 in the mold supporting plate.

The mold supporting plate 61 carries a female die 67 arranged in two parts for sliding movement in a lateral direction toward and away from each other. Cooperating tongue and groove connections 68 in the bottom of the die parts and at the top of the mold supporting plate 6i guide the die sections in their lateral movement which, as will be observed, is limited in a direction away from each other by stops 69 fixed in the die supporting plate. The die parts are biased outwardly by tension springs 7i) suitably anchored in a fixed part of the machine.

The female die 67 in the closed position of the part presents a mold cavity 71 which conforms to the contour of the container to be molded and this cavity, around its top and around its bottom as well as vertically along its sides, is recessed further to present molding cavities 72 for the rim sections at the top and at the bottom of the container and for the intermediate vertical structural members at the sides. The right-hand female die section is further equipped at the top with a mold cavity 73 having the outer shape of the container lid with a portion 74 for the flexible hinge.

As stated, the sections of the female die are normally retracted to full open position, but at the start of the casting cycle these sections are moved toward each other by hydraulic means (not shown) which act through connecting rods 75 pivoted at diametrically opposed regions on the sections. The female die sections are arrested in their inward movement with approximately h@ of an inch clearance between them, this for the purpose of avoiding risk of scuffing the sheet material of the blank as it is inserted into the die.

A container blank 40 appropriately folded as indicated in FIG. 18 is placed upon a male die member 76 which overlies the mold cavity 71 in Vertical alignment with the center line thereof. The blank may be held in position on the die member '76 by suitable vacuum means which, for clarity, have not been shown. The male die member 76 is recessed into the bottom surface in a horizontal male die supporting member 77 of a molding machine which member is arranged for movement in a vertical direction to effect closure and permit opening of the mold. During a molding cycle the horizontal die supporting member 77 descends until the lower face thereof engages the top face of the female die sections 67 and during this movement, vertical guide holes 78 disposed therein receive the guide studs 65 to insure that the container blank 4b is appropriately received in the molding cavity.

The male die carrying member 76 is equipped at opposite sides with depending fingers 79 pivotally supported in slots 86 therein, each on a pin 81 extending in a fore and aft direction and biased by tension of spring 82 to swing outwardly into a substantially vertical position. Such position is determined by engagement of the outer edges of the fingers 79 with the adjacent walls of the slots in which they are respectively supported.

As the male die supporting member 76 descends, the fingers 79 pass first through holes 83 in the female die .supporting plate 61, provided merely for the sake of clearance, and when engagement of such member with the female die sections have been eected these ngers stand :above and in registry with a pair of underlying recesses y54 in the machine bed plate. Continued descent of the male die supporting member is accomplished against the compression of the springs 62 supporting the female [die supporting plate until the latter plate is arrested by engagement with the fixed bed plate 60. In such position, a recess 85 in the bottom surface of the female die supporting plate cooperates with the top surface of the bed plate 60 to establish a horizontal passageway communicating with a vertically disposed inlet gate 85a 'leading to the casting cavities of the mold. Also as the male die supporting member completes its downward stroke, the vertical lingers 79 engage at their lower ends with inwardly sloping surfaces 86 that act to swing the :said fingers inwardly and by the reaction of protrusions 87 on their inner edges against adjacent outer surface portions of the female mold sections, cause the latter to complete their inward movement fully to close the mold 71 (FIG. 25).

When the mold has been closed a nozzle 88 of a molding machine is connected with the passageway leading to the mold cavity 35 and thermoplastic material injected into the mold to fill up all of the mold cavities therein including, as will be recalled, that portion 73 of the cavity at the top of the female die which forms the lid of the container. Pressures in the neighborhood of 15,000 p.s.i. may be encountered but such pressures may be more or less depending upon different factors as those skilled in the art well known.

In connection with opening the mold after the molding operation, note that there is a stripping pin 89 that passes vertically through that portion of the fmale die 76 that cooperates in forming the lid of the container. This pin is arranged for limited sliding movement in a vertical direction and is appropriately connected at its upper end by pin and slot connection with a horizontally disposed lever 99 about midway between its ends. This lever is disposed in a slot 91 in the male die supporting member and at one end s pivoted near the center line of the machine and at its opposite end pressed by an overlying spring 92 for a limited distance downwardly or to a point where the stripping pin projects just below the tface of the male die section. Beneath the lever at the location of the overlying spring 92, there is located a pin 93 arranged for vertical movement and provided with a head 94 at its upper end disposed in an enlarged portion of a hole 95 which accommodates the shank of the pin. The head, by enga-gement with the base of such hole 95, limits movement of the pin 93 in a downward direction. In the normal position of the parts, the pin S9 extends down below the-bottom face of the male die supporting member which, as it moves downward to engage the top face of the female die, causes the pin 93 likewise to engage said surface to swing lever upwardly against the reaction of the overlying spring 92 until the stripping pin at its lower end is flush with the molding surface of the male die. When the male die carrying member ascends at the completion of the casting cycle, the lever 9tl by the reaction of the spring 92 against its upper edge, forces the stripping pin 89 downwardly to strip the container lid off the male portion of the die and thereby prevent the lid of the container from being pulled away from that portion of the molded container normally remaining in the female section of the die.

Also, upon inauguration of upward movement of the male die carrying member 76, the fingers which previously had been effective in squeezing the female mold members 67 closed are lifted from the underlying cam surfaces 86 which effected their inward movement whereupon the female mold members `67 separate under the reaction of the tension springs to which reference has heretofore been made.

The female die supporting plate 6l ascends to its uppermost position as permitted bythe movement of the overlying male die supporting member 76, under the iniiuence of the compression springs 62 which support it. During this movement of the `female die supporting plate, hardened plastic material present in the gate 85a and in the passageway 85 leading to the gate is broken off from the molded container and left between the machine base plate 60 and the female die supporting plate 6l from which it may readily be removed.

if all members of the structural framework of the container are interconnected, as is the case inthe embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 17 to 24, one gate only to the mold cavity will suffice. If .the design of the container is such that the structural members of the container are not all interconnected then more than one gate to the mold cavity will be desirable, as is well understood.

As shown in FlG. 29, the upright structural members 52 of the container are cast in cavities 72 at opposite ends of the mold and here it will be observed that portions of the cavities are overlapped by paneling whose edges are in spaced relation. The thermoplastic material will flow into the spaces between the opposed edges of the paneling as well as outside of the paneling where the .thermoplastic material adheres to marginal portions to the paneling adjacent Kthe edges thereof.

lt may sometimes be desirable to use the invention in connection with molding a container whose paneling material has little adhesive afiinity for the particular type of plastic material used. rlfhen, for example as in FlG. 25, it may be desirable to augment the adhesive bonding between the plastic structural members 96 and the paneling 97 by mechanical bonding. Here marginal portions of the paneling adjacent the opposed edges of the paneling are provided longitudinally therealong with spaced holes 98 through which plastic material will fiow as the container is molded so as to key the paneling into the structural member.

Again by way of example, structural members and paneling may be tongued and grooved together as by molding portions of the structural member 99, both on the inside and on the outside of the paneling ltiil along its marginal edges (FIG. 26). Then, of course, a part of the mold cavity will -be recessed into the male member of the container forming die and the container paneling will overlap portions of the cavities in `all die sections.

The diderent designs that may be used in molding containers in accordance with the invention are substantially without limit. The spatial configuration of the plastic structural members may be utilized to give an artistic embossed effect and the paneling itself may be given various contours for the same purpose. Complementary telescoping formations may be used at .the top and at the bottom of containers so as to facilitate shelf stacking of similar products of the same brand name. Selected panels, as for instance the bottom or the sides or both, may be cast all in plastic material either for strength or artistic effect, and the top and a wall panel for instance may be made without an intermediate structural member, and a hinged fold in the panel material itself may be used, all without departing from the spirit of the invention. The advantages possessed of cardboard, paper, sheet metal and the like insofar as printing and decorating are concerned, will reside in the improved container since the panels can be made of any of these materials as desired.

The improved container possesses an economic advantage since its cost of production is far less than containers of the type it is intended to replace.

The invention is susceptible o-f many modifications within its spirit and accordingly is to be limited only by' the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A composite container of given form and of substantially fixed volume and which includes a wall and bottom contour-defining structure extending from the bottom of the container upwardly toward the top thereof for a substantial portion of its height, said contour-defining structure comprising a plurality of rigid plastic structural member sections injection molded in fixed spatial disposition in the container `and of `a form determinative of the contour of the container wlall throughout the upward extent of said wall contour-defining structure, panel area defined by said structural member sections, and paneling of iiexible sheet material spanning said panel area and interconnecting said structural member sections, said paneling presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding with said rigid structural meinber sections and having a contour as determined by the configuration of said lstructural member sections, said structural member sections forming part of [the container wall adjacent the edges of said paneling and by their form and relative rigidity acting to retain the contour of said paneling and said paneling by its bonded edge connections ith said structural member sections acting to retain the spatial disposition of said structural member sections, whereby to preserve said substantially fixed volume and form of the container.

2. A composite container of given form and of substantially fixed volume and which includes a wall and bottom contour-defining structure extending `from the bottom of the container upwardly toward the top thereof for a substantial portion of its height, said contour-defining structure comprising lower rigid plastic structural member means determinative of the contour of the container wall at the bottom of said wall contour-defining structure and upper rigid plastic structural member means determinative of the contour of the container wall at the top of said wall contourefining structure, with said structural member means being injection molded in fixed spatial disposition in said container, panel `areas defined by said structural member means, and paneling of exible sheet material spanning said panel aeras, ysaid paneling presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding with said rigid structural member means and having a contour as determined by the configuration of said structural member means, said structural member means forming part of the container wall adjacent the edges of said paneling and by ltheir form and rigidity act ing to retain the contour of said paneling and said paneling by its bonded edge connections with sm'd structural member means acting to retain the spatial disposition of said structural member means, whereby to preserve said substantially fixed volume and form of the container.

3. A composite container of given form and of substantially fixed volume `and which includes a wall and bottom contour-defining structure extending from the bottom of the container upwardly toward the top thereof for a substantial portion of its height, said contour-defining structure comprising lower rigid plastic structural member' means determinative of the contour of the container Wall at the bottom of said W-all contour-defining structure, upper rigid plastic structural member means determinative of the contour of said container wall at the top of said wall contour-defining structure, and intermediate rigid plastic structural member means connecting the lower and the upper structural member means, with all of said structural member means being injection molded in fixed spatial disposition in said container, a plurality of spaced panel areas defined by said structural member means, and a unitary blanlt of flexible sheet material having a plurality of panel sections corresponding to said plurality of spaced panel areas, said panel sections presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding with the lower, upper, and intermediate rigid structural member means and having a contour as determined by the configuration of said structural member means, said structural member means forming part of the container wall at the edge of said paneling and by their form and rigidity acting to retain the contour of said paneling and said paneling by its integral bonding with said structural member means acting to retain the spatial disposition of said structural member means, whereby to preserve said substantially fixed volume and form of the container.

4. A composite container of given form and of substantially fixed volume and which includes a wall and bottom contour-defining structure extending from the bottom of the container upwardly toward the top thereof for a substantial portion of its height, said contour-defining structure comprising lower rigid plastic structural member means determinative of the contour of the container wall at the bottom of said wall contour-defining structure, upper rigid plastic structural member means determinative of the contour of said container wall at the top of said wall contour-defining structure, and intermediate rigid plastic structural member means connecting the lower and the upper structural member means, with all of said structural member means being injection molded in fixed spatial disposition in said container, a plurality of spaced panel areas, defined by said structural member means, a unitary blank of flexible sheet material having a plurality of panel sections corresponding to said plurality of spaced panel areas, said panel sections presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding with said upper, lower, and intermediate rigid structural member means, and having a contour as determined by the configuration of said structural member means, and another panel section of relatively iiexible sheet material presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding to said lower rigid structural member means and constituting the bottom of the container, said structural member means forming part of the container wall at the edge of said paneling and by their form and rigidity acting to retain the contour of said paneling and said paneling by its integral bonding with said structural member means acting to retain the spatial disposition of said structural member means, whereby to preserve said substantially fixed volume and form of the container.

5. A composite container of given form and of substantially xed volume and which includes ya wall and bottom contour-defining structure extending from the bottom of the container upwardly toward the top thereof for a substantial portion of its height, said contour-defining structure comprising lower rigid plastic structural member means determinative of the contour of the container wall at the bottom of said wall contour-defining structure, upper rigid plastic structural member means determinative of the contour of said container wall at the top of said wall contour defining structure, and intermediate rigid piastic structural member means connecting the lower andthe upper structural member means, with all of said structural member means being injection molded in fixed spatial disposition in said container, -a plurality of spaced panel areas, defined by said structural member means, and a unitary blank of iiexible sheet material having a plurality of panel sections corresponding to said plurality of spaced panel `areas and a panel section corresponding to the bottom of the container, said blank being folded to locate said panel sections in the positions they occupy in the container and said panel sections presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding with the rigid structural member means that define the areas occupied by said panel section to impart to said panel sections a contour as determined by the configuration of said structural member means, and said structural member means lling completely the spaces between adjacent edges of said panel sections and by their form and rigidity acting to retainV the contour of said paneling and said paneling by its integral bonding with said structural member means `acting to retain the spatial disposition of said structural member means, whereby to preserve said substantially fixed volume and form of the container.

6. A composite container of given form and of substantially fixed volume and which includes a wall and bottom contour-dening structure extending from the bottom of the container upwardly toward the top thereof for a substantial portion of its height, said contourdefining structure comprising a pluralily of rigid plastic structural member means having each a lower section, an upper section, and an intermediate section connecting the lower and the upper section, and being injection molded in fixed spatial disposition in the container and deiin-ing a plurality of spaced panel areas, a stifiening rim joining said rigid structural member means at the top of said wall contour-defining structure and a unitary blank of flexible sheet material having a plurality of panel sections corresponding to said plurality of spaced panel areas and a panel section corresponding to the bottom of the container, said blank being folded to locate said panel sections in the positions they occupy in the container and said panel sections presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding with the rigid structural member means that dene the areas occupied by said panel sections to impart to said panel sections a contour as determined by the configuration of said structure member means, and said structural member means filling completely the spaces between adjacent edges of said panel sections and by their form and rigidity acting to retain the contour of said paneling and said paneling by its integral bonding with said structural member means acting to retain the spatial disposition of said structural member means, whereby to preserve said substantially fixed volume and form of the container.

7. A composite container of given 'form and of substantially iixed volume and which includes a wall and bottom contoursdefining structure extending from the bottom of the container upwardly toward the top thereof for a substantial portion of its height, said contour-defining structure comprising a unitary frame of interconnecting rigid plastic structural member means, with said member means being injection molded in fixed spatial disposition in the container and defining a plurality of spaced panel areas, a lower one of said member means having a molded configuration determinative of the contour of the container wall near the bottom of the wall contour-defining structure and an upper one of said member means having a molded configuration determinative of the contour of the container wall at the top of the wall contour-defining structure, a unitary blank of relatively ilexible sheet material having a plurality of panel sections corresponding to said plurality of spaced panel areas, said blank being folded to locate said panel sect-ions in the position they occupy in the container and said panel sections presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding with the rigid structural member means that dene the areas occupied by said panel sections to impart to said panel sections a contour as determined by the coniiguration of said structural member means, said rigid plastic structural member means by their form and rigidity acting to retain the contour of said paneling and said paneling by its integral bonding with said structural member means acting to retain the spatial disposition of said structural member means, whereby to preserve said substantially fixed volume and form of the container.

8` A composite container of given form and of substantially fixed volume and which includes a wall and bottom contour-defining structure extending from the bottom of the container upwardly toward the top thereof for a substantial portion of its height, said contour dening structure comprising a unitary frame of interconnecting rigid plastic structural member means, with said member means being injection molded in iixed spatial disposition in the container and defining a plurality of spaced panel areas, a lower one of said member means having a molded configuration determinative of the contour of the container wall near the bottom of the wall contour-defining structure and an upper one of said member means having a molded configuration determinatve of the contour of the container wall at the top of the wall contour-defining structure, a unitary blank of relatively exible sheet material having a plurality of panel sections corresponding to said plurality of spaced panel areas, including a panel section corresponding to the bottom of the container, said blank being folded to locate said panel sections in the position they occupy in the container and said panel sections presenting marginal edge portions integrally bonded by said injection molding with the rigid structural member means that define the areas occupied by said panel sections to impart to said panel sections a contour as determined by the configuration of said structural member means, said rigid plastic structural member means filling completely the spaces between adjacent edges of said panel sections and by their form and rigidity acting to retain the contour of said paneling and said paneling by its integral bonding with said structural member means acting to retain the spatial disposition of said structural member means, whereby to preserve said substantially fixed volume and form ofl the container.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 22,885 Press May 27, 1947 1,297,994 Boyer Mar. 25, 1919 1,520,996 Bastain Deo. 30, 1924 1,754,496 Barker Apr. 15, 1930 2,009,511 Nydegger July 30, 1935 2,097,690 Ferngren Nov. 2, 1937 2,212,433 Brossette Aug. 20, 1940 2,299,194 Ungemach Oct. 20, 1942 2,388,267 Junkin Nov. 6, 1945 2,389,601 DeWitt Nov. 27, 1945 2,392,734 Haberstump Jan. 8, 1946 2,506,056 Bergstein May 2, 1950 2,687,157 Cowan Aug. 24, 1954'r 2,732,995 Geisler Jan. 3l, 1956 2,757,851 Moore Aug. 7, 1956

Claims (1)

1. A COMPOSITE CONTAINER OF GIVEN FORM AND OF SUBSTANTIALLY FIXED VOLUME AND WHICH INCLUDES A WALL AND BOTTOM CONTOUR-DEFINING STRUCTURE EXTENDING FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE CONTAINER UPWARDLY TOWARD THE TOP THEREOF FOR A SUBSTANTIAL PORTION OF ITS HEIGHT, SAID CONTOUR-DEFINING STRUCTURE COMPRISING A PLURALITY OF RIGID PLASTIC STRUCTURAL MEMBER SECTIONS INJECTION MOLDED IN FIXED SPATIAL DISPOSITION IN THE CONTAINER AND OF A FORM DETERMINATIVE OF THE CONTOUR OF THE CONTAINER WALL THROUGHOUT THE UPWARD EXTENT OF SAID WALL CONTOUR-DEFINING STRUCTURE, PANEL AREA DEFINED BY SAID STRUCTURAL MEMBER SECTIONS, AND PANELING OF FLEXIBLE SHEET MATERIAL SPANNING SAID PANEL AREA AND INTERCONNECTING SAID STRUCTURAL MEMBER SECTIONS, SAID PANELING PRESENTING MARGINAL EDGE PORTIONS INTEGRALLY BONDED BY SAID INJECTION MOLDING WITH SAID RIGID STRUCTURAL MEMBER SECTIONS AND HAVING A CONTOUR AS DETERMINED BY THE CONFIGURATION OF SAID STRUCTURAL MEMBER SECTIONS, SAID STRUCTURAL MEMBER SECTIONS FORMING PART OF THE CONTAINER WALL ADJACENT THE EDGES OF SAID PANELING AND BY THEIR FORM AND RELATIVE RIGIDITY ACTING TO RETAIN THE CONTOUR OF SAID PANELING AND SAID PANELING BY ITS BONDED EDGE CONNECTIONS WITH SAID STRUCTURAL MEMBER SECTIONS ACTING TO RETAIN THE SPATIAL DISPOSITION OF SAID STRUCTURAL MEMBER SECTIONS, WHEREBY TO PRESERVE SAID SUBSTANTIALLY FIXED VOLUME AND FORM OF THE CONTAINER.
US26750A 1960-05-04 1960-05-04 Container Expired - Lifetime US3119540A (en)

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US26750A US3119540A (en) 1960-05-04 1960-05-04 Container
DE19611529970 DE1529970B2 (en) 1960-05-04 1961-04-28 A method for producing a floor and on seitenwaende facing the container
CH512561A CH394034A (en) 1960-05-04 1961-05-02 Containers and methods for its preparation
SE4666/61A SE310834B (en) 1960-05-04 1961-05-03
DK183261AA DK103038C (en) 1960-05-04 1961-05-04 Container which is composed of several parts, and to methods for their preparation.
GB16279/61A GB976635A (en) 1960-05-04 1961-05-04 Container and method of making it
US17173362 US3154617A (en) 1960-05-04 1962-02-07 Method of making composite container
BE659185D BE659185A (en) 1960-05-04 1965-02-02

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JPS572493B2 (en) * 1971-12-13 1982-01-16
JPS4865078A (en) * 1971-12-14 1973-09-07
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JPS547034B2 (en) * 1974-05-28 1979-04-03
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JPS5414983B2 (en) * 1974-05-31 1979-06-11
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US9850020B2 (en) 2006-03-10 2017-12-26 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Injection-molded composite construct
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US9517600B2 (en) * 2007-12-28 2016-12-13 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Method for forming a container having an injection-molded feature
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US20130249142A1 (en) * 2007-12-28 2013-09-26 Graphic Packaging International, Inc. Injection-Molded Composite Construct And Tool For Forming Construct
US10105884B2 (en) 2007-12-28 2018-10-23 Graphic Packaging International, Llc Tool for forming an injection molded composite construct
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JP2011530432A (en) * 2008-08-12 2011-12-22 ストラ エンソ オーワイジェイ Mold system for forming partitions in cardboard containers
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ITMI20130031A1 (en) * 2013-01-11 2014-07-12 Toshio Toyota Reinforcement for cellulosic or plastic packaging from transport in the form of a rectangular parallelepiped
US10687662B2 (en) 2015-12-30 2020-06-23 Graphic Packaging International, Llc Susceptor on a fiber reinforced film for extended functionality
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Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
GB976635A (en) 1964-12-02
DE1529970A1 (en) 1969-10-30
DE1529970B2 (en) 1971-07-15
SE310834B (en) 1969-05-12
CH394034A (en) 1965-06-15
DK103038C (en) 1965-11-08
BE659185A (en) 1965-05-28

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