New! View global litigation for patent families

US3111125A - Drainage device - Google Patents

Drainage device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3111125A
US3111125A US15027261A US3111125A US 3111125 A US3111125 A US 3111125A US 15027261 A US15027261 A US 15027261A US 3111125 A US3111125 A US 3111125A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
diaphragm
inlet
port
tube
chamber
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Rudolf R Schulte
Original Assignee
Rudolf R Schulte
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M27/00Drainage appliances for wounds or the like, i.e. wound drains, implanted drains
    • A61M27/002Implant devices for drainage of body fluids from one part of the body to another
    • A61M27/006Cerebrospinal drainage; Accessories therefor, e.g. valves
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/7722Line condition change responsive valves
    • Y10T137/7837Direct response valves [i.e., check valve type]
    • Y10T137/7879Resilient material valve
    • Y10T137/788Having expansible port
    • Y10T137/7882Having exit lip
    • Y10T137/7884Side vent

Description

Nov. 19, 1963 R. R. scHULTE DRAINAGE DEVICE Filed Nov. 6, 1961 United States Patent O 3,111,125 DRAFLNAGE DEJECE Rudolf R. Schutte, 16 Wade Court, Santa Barbara, Calif.

Filed Nov. n, 1962i, Ser. No. 156,272 18 Claims. (Ci. 12S-350) This invention relates to a diaphragm-type pump, and to conduit means which can be associated therewith to form shunt connections with various parts of the human body to relieve one of said parts of undesirable accumulations of uids.

`in the medical iield, there is a standing requirement for small and reliable diaphragm pumps which can be installed in body cavities, and be used for ilushing purposes. As a single example, the ailment known as hydrocephalus involves the complication that fluids which ought to drain away accumulate within the skull where they exert excruciating pressure and sku'll-deforming forces. Draining these iluids by means such as the device shown in United States Patent No. 2,969,066- issued lanuary 24, 1961, relieves the symptoms and frees the individual from the terrible consequences of the iluid accumulation by draining away the i'luid. However, conventional methods of treatment of hydrocephalus by drainage have often utilized components which tended to become obstructed by particulate matter entering the drainage system, or by the backward diffusion of blood into the system.

The difficulties inherent in conventional drainage devices can be cured by providing a flushing pump which is capable of overcoming both the tendencies -to clog and to diiiuse backwardly. Conventional diaphragm pumps are not suitable for this type of pump, because it has been found that sometimes when the diaphragm is pressed down, it will adhere to the wall of the pump cavity and will not spring back. Then the pump itself clogs the drain, and adds to the malfunction which it is provided to obviate. Furthermore, since the pump is not external to the body, but rather is installed under the skin, in order to repair or manipulate it to reopen the same, it is necessary to undergo extensive and careful surgical procedures which ought to be avoided. Furthermore, conventional diaphragm pumps ordinarily utilize ytwo check valves, thereby increasing the complexity of the device.

This invention has as its objective the provision of a diaphragm-type pump which requires only one check valve, which check valve is the one provided on the drain pump anyway, and the sole moving part of which, a diaphragm, is so disposed, arranged and designed that it cannot possibly freeze in any position at all, including the position corresponding to adhesion with the pump cavity wall.

A further object of this invention is to provide a pump together with a cheek tube, which in combination provides means for draining and positively discharging, in unidirectional iiow, accumulated undesired fluids from body cavities.

A diaphragm pump according to this invention includes a body which has a wall defining an internal cavity. A diaphragm extends across this cavity and divides it into a iirst and second chamber. An inlet port extends through the wall and opens into the first chamber, while an outlet port extends through the wall and opens into the second chamber. There is an imperforate area on the diaphragm which is so disposed and arranged as `to be contactible with the inlet port to close it in one of the diaphragm positions and to move away from it to leave the inlet port open in another of the diaphragm positions.

The diaphragm is provided with an open passage therethrough `which is disposed outside the imperforate area and which places the two chambers in constant fluid ICC communication. The wall of the body has a flexible portion in at least one part of the wall which bounds the second chamber so that force can be exerted in the second chamber for moving the imperforate area of the diaphragm to close the inlet port and to pump iiuid out or" both chambers by the force exerted. Fluid from the first chamber passes through the passage in the diaphragm to get into the second chamber, and thence tiows through the outlet por-t.

According to a preferred but optional feature of the invention, a crown surrounds the inlet port inside the first chamber and extends into it in order to prevent the imperforate areas making contact with the wall immediately adjacent to the inlet port where it might occasionally occur that a reverse pressure, combined with surface adhesion properties, could tend to hold the diaphragm firmly and permanently against the wall, thereby requiring the removal and replacement of the pump.

According to another preferred but optional feature of the invention, a check tube is connected to the outlet port of the diaphragm pump to provide for a uid conduit system for accomplishing the objectives of the invention.

IWhile the device of the invention may be made of any one of a number of conventional materials, it is preferably made of silicon rubber. Such a material provides the necessary transparency and flexibility of the structure, while being a material which is essentially inert to the body iiuids.

The invention may be more readily understood by referring to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE l is a pictorial representation of a small child, illustrating the placement of the apparatus according to the invention;

FIGURE 2 is an exploded perspective view of a diaphragm pump of the present invention;

`FIGURE 3 is a sectional View of the device of FIG. 2 as disposed in use;

FEGURE 4 is a sectional view of the diaphragm pump of this invention in use and being flushed by an attendant; and

FIGURE 5 is a partial sectional view of the check tube termination of the apparatus illustrating the disposition of the outlet slits.

Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a small child lil having a head and a heart, between which is disposed a ventrculo-atrial shunt apparatus 11. The ventrculoatrial shunt apparatus .11 includes an inlet tube 12 shown in dotted lines, extending from a pump 13I into the cranial cavity of the head, and an outlet tube 14 (sometimes herein called a check tube) extending between the valve 13 and the atrium portion of the heart, through the childs jugular vein 15. rhe pump 13 is held in place in a small burr hole (not shown) in the skull of the child by means of a tlap of skin sho-wn as sewn in place by stitches.

In FIG. 2 the pump 13 is seen to consist of an upper member 16 and a lower member 17, within which is disposed a perforate diaphragm 1S having apertures 19' extending therethrough. A tube or conduit forms an outlet port Zd and fits between a irst recess 21 in the lower member and a second recess 21 in the upper member. The lower member 17 has an inlet conduit 22 extending thereinto about the opening of which is formed a shoulder 23.

The central portions of the lower surface of uppermember 16 and of the upper surface of lower member 17 form a wall defining a cavity therein. The diaphragm divides the cavity into a iirst and a second chamber. The first chamber is formed between the diaphragm and that portion of the wall formed by lower member 17. The second chamber is formed between the diaphragm and that portion of the wal'l formed by upper member 16.

animas At least a portion of one of these walls is exible, and in the embodiment illustrated, a portion of the wall bounding the second chamber is more ilexible than that bounding the iirst chamber. Inlet port 24 (sometimes called inlet conduit opening) opens into the rst chamber at a central location. Apertures 19 (sometimes herein called passages) are laterally placed relative to the inlet port so that they do not overlay it. This leaves a central imperforate diaphragm area which can move down to close the inlet port.

Referring now to FIG. 3, there is shown the pump 1.3 in place in the human body. The upper and lower members 16 and 17 may be held together by Iany conventional adhesive means so as to fonm the capsular enclosure therebetween. The pump has been inserted in a burr hole, indicated generally at Sil, which has been cut through the skull bone 31 of the child. A flap of skin 32 overlies the apparatus.

As shown, the members 16 and 17 are curved in configuration so as to form a hollow enclosure within which the diaphragm `1S is disposed. It will be noted that the diaphragm 18 is held in position by -means of an inner projecting ring 35 formed in the lower member 17. O-f course, if desired, the ring 35 can be formed in the upper member 16. The pump 13 has an outer peripheral ilange portion 36 formed by both the upper and lower members 16 and 17, which assists in holding the device in position by providing la portion through which ligatures may be threaded and sewn into the surrounding ilesh.

The burr hole 36 is filled with body fluid 3,8, which is not the uid of interest in the treatment of hydrocephalus.

VThe cerebral spinal Ifluid (not shown) is drained from the cranial cavity, enters the inlet tube 12 (see FIG. 1), and passes through the inlet conduit -22 into the portion of the pump 13 beneath the diaphragm 18 as shown by the arrows. Due to the slight pressure dilferential existing between the cranial cavity and heart, the fluid then passes through the apertures I19 in the perforate diaphragm 18 and into the upper portion of the enclosure. The Huid may then pass through the outlet port 2t) and into the check tube .1 through a connector 39, to which the conduit iil and check tube '15 are tied by ligatures 40, for example. The conduit 22 is similarly connected to the tube 12.

In FIG. 4, the device of FIG. 3 is shown while being hushed. Flushing is accomplished by pressure, as by a linger 41, upon the upper portion of the enclosure 13. Since ythe pump 13 is filled with lluid, this pressure forces the diaphragm 1-8 against the raised shoulder 23 (sometimes called a crown) surrounding the inlet conduit 22 so as to close the inlet conduit opening 24. This increased pressure is applied therefore only to the fluid already within the enclosure Iand in the outlet tube. This fluid is then forced through the outlet tube and out of the openings therein so as to clean out any particulate material or blood which may be in the outlet tube causing blockage.

In FIG. 5 the termination `and slit valve of the check tube 1'4 lare shown. It lwill be seen that the termination consists of a solid tapered portion yl5 and the slit valve of a plurality of slits 46 (three being shown in FIG. 5). These slits are preferably about one-sixteenth inch in length, and four of them are formed in the tubing in the preferred embodiment by cutting the slits in the tubing `without removing any material therefrom. The use of such a multiple slit valve in the outlet tube permits cerebral spinal fluid to llow `freely when the pressure in the tube exceeds six to ten centimeters of water, while remaining closed at a lower pressure. This structure also reduces t-he tendency of blood to diifuse into the outlet end and cause its obstruction. The operation of the outlet slit valve structure is readily checked by filling the outlet tube with sterile physiological saline solution, while holding the tube in vertical position. In a period of from thirty to sixty seconds, the height of iiuid in the l outlet tube should diminish to six to ten centimeters from the top of the slit valve.

The tubing itself is conventional tubing of preferably one-sixteenth inch in diameter and one-sixtyafourth inch wall thickness. The capsular enclosure is comparatively small so as to iit in a burr hole of sixteen to eighteen millimeters diameter, the iiange extending out over the edges of the hole so as to overlie the surrounding skull. The enclosure may have a Wall thickness, for example, of one-thirty-second of an inch. The diaphragm at its central portion is preferably from three to ve thousandths of an inch in thickness in order to provide the requisite flexibility. The silicon rubber is comparatively flexible so as to permit 'facile ilushing of the device, as has been previously described.

The surgical technique for utilization of the apparatus will now be described. Two incisions are required; a small scalp flap in the posterior temporal region and a diagonal incision crossing the anterior edge of the sternomastoid muscle lat the angle of the jaw. The posterior temporal burr hole is located in a manner Ithat allows the tube to curve gently without kinking as it emerges from the lateral `ventricle and passes subcautaneously into the neck.

A standard trephine opening, sixteen to eighteen millimeters in diameter, is made. The dura is incised in a cruci-ate manner. A ventricular cannula is passed into the lateral ventricle and immediately withdrawn so that only a minimal amount of cerebrospinal fluid escapes. The ventricular component of the shunt is then immediately inserted into the cannula tract and directed into the lateral ventricle. At least five centimeters to eight centimeters of the tube should lie within the lateral ventricle. A small amount of cerebrospinal fluid is permitted to escape from the tube. This maneuver assures the operator that the fluid is clear and colorless, and that the tube is unobstructed by brain fragments. This tube is then occlvuded with a small bulldog clamp, applied just beyond the point of emergence ffrom the dura. Every effort should be made to prevent the loss of centricular lluid so that when the ends of the shunt are joined it will be set in operation by a satisfactory pressure. The dura is closed tightly 4around the tube with non-absorbable sutures.

The incision in the neck is made at the point overlying the entrance of the common facial vein into the internal jugular vein. This vein enters the jugular vein on its mesial aspect at the level of the hyoid bone. Even in young infants this vessel is sufciently large to permit passage of the cardiac end of the shunt. The common facial vein is preferred, but when its use is not practical, a similar vein or even the internal jugular vein may be used. 'After dissecting the vein free of the surrounding tissue, two 3 0 silk ligatures are placed beneath it. At this point, the cardiac segment of the shunt is prepared for insertion. The distance from the suprasternal notch up to the point at which the tube will enter the jugular vein is added to the pre-operative measurement from the suprasternal notch to the fifth and sixth dorsal vertebral interspace. This distance is marked on the tube by tying a ligature around it, care being taken not to occlude the lumen of the tube. The tube is then filled With physiological saline leaving the syringe attached to it. The common yfacial vein is then stretched between the two ligatures and incised with the iris scissors. While the slit is held open with fine mouse-tooth forceps held by the surgeon and his assistant, the tapered end of the tube containing the valve is passed into the lumen and directed down the internal jugular vein into the right atrium. The tip of the tube should be located in the right atrium `at the level of the fifth or sixth dorsal 'vertebral bodies. The ligature on the common `facial vein proximal to the jugular vein is relaxed as the tube passes this point. Since this tube completely iills the lumen of the vessel, there is no danger of air embolism. Two

milliliters of contrast medium (Renografin, Hypaque) are then injected into the tube, and an X-ray is made. Adjustments in the position of the valve in the right atrium can now be made, depending on the indication of the X-ray film. When properly located, the ligature surrounding the common facial Vein containing the shunt is tied snugly but not so tightly as to occlude the tube. The other ligature on the common facial vein is tied tightly and the vessel is divided. The contrast medium is then flushed from the tube with physiological saline.

The final step is the attachment of the ventricular and cardiac tube to the diaphragm pump. Care should be taken not to puncture the capsule while placing securing ligatures through the flange. These ligatures are used to fasten the flange to either the skull or pericranium. The operation of the fiushing device should be checked before closing the wounds.

The invention claimed is:

`1. A diaphragm pump for use in draining fiuid from one portion of a human body and transferring it to another portion of the body comprising a capsular enclosure, at least the upper portion of which is iiexible, an outlet conduit formed in the upper portion of the enclosure and opening thereinto, an inlet conduit formed in the lower portion of the enclosure and opening thereinto, a raised shoulder formed on the inner surface of the lower portion about the inlet opening, a iiexible diaphragm disposed within the enclosure, and means holding the diaphragm within the enclosure so as to separate the upper portion from the lower portion thereof, said diaphragm having an aperture extending therethrough, said aperture being disposed so as to be out of alignment with the inlet opening.

2. Fluid-conducting shunt apparatus comprising an inlet tube, an outlet tube, a capsular enclosure of fiexible material, a diaphragm disposed within the capsular enclosure and held therewithin, an outlet conduit extending through the enclosure and opening onto one side of the diaphragm, an inlet conduit extending through the enclosure and opening onto the other side of the diaphragm, a raised shoulder formed on the inner surface of the enclosure about the inlet conduit opening, said diaphragm having an aperture extending therethrough and disposed so as to be out of alignment with the inlet conduit opening, an imperforate region on said diaphragm in alignment with the inlet conduit opening adapted to close said opening in one position of the diaphragm, means connecting the outlet conduit to the outlet tube so as to form a fluid conduit therethrough, and means connecting `the inlet conduit to the inlet tube so as to form a iiuid conduit therethrough.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2 in which the outlet tube termination remote from the enclosure is a solid tapered end and has a plurality of longitudinally disposed outlet slits formed therein adjacent the solid end.

4. Apparatus according to claim 3 in which the enclosure and diaphragm are made of silicone rubber,

5. A diaphragm pump comprising: a body having a wall defining an internal cavity; a diaphragm extending across the cavity and dividing it into a rst and a second chamber; an iniet port through the wall opening into the first chamber; an outlet portion through the wall opening into the second chamber; an imperforate area on the diaphragm so disposed and arranged as to be contactable with the inlet port to close it in one diaphragm position, and to move away from it to leave the inlet port open in another diaphragm position, the diaphragm also having an open passage therethrough disposed outside the imperforate area and placing the two chambers in constant fluid communication; and a iiexible portion in at least part of the wall which bounds the second chamber, whereby force applied externally to the flexible portion moves the imperforate area to close the inlet port and applies pressure to expel fluid through lthe outlet port, fluid from the first chamber flowing into the second chamber through the passage, `and from the second chamber into the outlet port, release of the flexible wall portion enabling the diaphragm to move away from the inlet port, the diaphragm pump then permitting substantially unimpeded passage of Huid from inlet port to outlet port through the passage in the diaphragm.

6. A diaphragm pump according to claim 5 in which the wall of one of the chambers is less liexible than the wall of the other chamber.

7. A diaphragm pump according to claim 5 in which a crown surrounds the inlet port inside the first chamber and extends into the first chamber to prevent the imperforate areas making contact fwith the wall immediately adjacent to the inlet port.

8. A diaphragm pump according to claim 7 in which the pump in plan view is generally symmetrical around an axis, with the inlet port, imperforate area, and flexible wall portion centered on said axis, and with the outlet port at one side thereof.

9. A diaphragm pump according to claim 8 in lwhich a peripheral installation flange is attached to the body.

10. A diaplnagm pump comprising: a body having a wall defining an internal cavity; an internal flange extending peripherally around `the wall; a diaphragm retained by the internal flange and extending across the cavity to divide it into a first and a second chamber, a flexible, imperforate diaphragm area at a medial region of the diaphragm, and a heavier-sectioned reinforcing bead portion `surrounding said iiexible area and joining to the wall at the internal flange, said diaphragm also having an open passage therethrough which places the two chambers in constant fluid communication; an inlet p-ort through the wall opening into the first chamber; an outlet port opening through the wall into the second chamber, at least a part of the imperforate diaphragm area being so disposed and arranged as to be contactible with the inlet port to close it in one diaphragm position, and to move away from it to leave the inlet port open in another diaphragm position, the passage lying outside the imperforate diaphragm area; and a flexible portion in at least part of the wall which bounds the second chamber, whereby force applied externally to the flexible portion moves the imperforate area to close the inlet port and applies pressure to expel fluid through the outlet port, fluid owing from the first chamber into the second chamber through 'the passage, and from the second chamber into the outlet port, release of the flexible rwall portion enabling the diaphragm to move away from the inlet port, the diaphragm pump `then permitting substantially unimpeded passage of fluid from inlet port to outlet port through the passage in the diaphragm.

11. A diaphragm pump according to claim 10 in which the wall of one of the chambers is less flexible than the wall of the other chamber.

l2. A diaphragm pump according to claim 11 in which the less flexible wall is that of the first chamber.

13. A diaphragm pump according to claim 10 in which a crown surrrounds the inlet port inside the first chamber and extends into the first chamber to prevent the imperforate areas making contact with the wall immediately adjacent to the inlet port.

14. A diaphragm pump according to claim 13 in which the pump in plan View is generally symmetrical around an axis, with `the inlet port, imperforate area, and fiexible wall portion centered on said axis, and with the outlet port at one side thereof.

15. A diaphragm pump according to claim 14 in which a peripheral installation fiange is attached to the body.

16. In combination: a drain tube having openings to admit fluid thereto; a check tube having unidirectional liow check means for permitting flow only in a first direction; a diaphragm pump comprising: a body having a wall defining an internal cavity; a diaphragm extending across the cavity and dividing it into a first and second chamber; an inlet port through the wall opening into the irst chamber; an outlet port through the wall opening into the second chamber; an imperforate area on the diaphragm so disposed and arranged as to be contactible with the inlet port to close it in one diaphragm position, and to move away from it to leave the inlet port lopen in another diaphragm position, the diaphragm also having an open passage therethrough disposed outside the imperforate area and placing the two chambers in constant fluid communication; and a iiexible portion in at least part of `the wall which bounds the second chamber, whereby force applied externally to the flexible portion moves the imperforate area to close the inlet port and applies pressure to expel fluid through the outlet port, fluid flowing from the rst chamber into the second charmber through the passage, and from the second chamber into the outlet port, release of the flexible wall portion enabling the diaphragm to morve away from the inlet port, the diaphragm permitting substantially unimpeded passage of fluid from inlet port to outlet port through the passage; said drain tube being connected to the inlet port, and the check tube being connected to the outlet port with said iirst ow direction being away from the outlet port, whereby steady drainage from the drain tube through the pump and out the check tube is possible through the diaphragm passage, and pumped flow in the same direction is causable by exerting force on the llexible wall portion.

17. A combination according to claim 16 in which a crown surrounds the inlet port inside the first chamber and extends into the -rst chamber to prevent the imperforate areas making contact with the wall immediately adjacent to the inlet port.

18. A combination according to claim 16 in which the wall of the `first chamber is less iiexible than the wall of the second chamber.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,758,609 Dickert et a1 Aug. 14, 1956 20 2,867,213 Thomas Jan. 6, 1959 2,969,066 Holter et al Ian. 24, 1961

Claims (1)

1. A DIAPHRAGM PUMP FOR USE IN DRAINING FLUID FROM ONE PORTION OF A HUMAN BODY AND TRANSFERRING IT TO ANOTHER PORTION OF THE BODY COMPRISING A CAPSULAR ENCLOSURE, AT LEAST THE UPPER PORTION OF WHICH IS FLEXIBLE, AN OUTLET CONDUIT FORMED IN THE UPPER PORTION OF THE ENCLOSURE AND OPENING THEREINTO, AN INLET CONDUIT FORMED IN THE LOWER PORTION OF THE ENCLOSURE AND OPENING THEREINTO, A RAISED SHOULDER FORMED ON THE INNER SURFACE OF THE LOWER PORTION ABOUT THE INLET OPENING, A FLEXIBLE DIAPHRAGM DISPOSED WITHIN THE ENCLOSURE, AND MEANS HOLDING THE DIAPHRAGM WITHIN THE ENCLOSURE SO AS TO SEPARATE THE UPPER PORTION FROM THE LOWER PORTION THEREOF, SAID DIAPHRAGM HAVING AN APERTURE EXTENDING THERETHROUGH, SAID APERTURE BEING DISPOSED SO AS TO BE OUT OF ALIGNMENT WITH THE INLET OPENING.
US3111125A 1961-11-06 1961-11-06 Drainage device Expired - Lifetime US3111125A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3111125A US3111125A (en) 1961-11-06 1961-11-06 Drainage device

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3111125A US3111125A (en) 1961-11-06 1961-11-06 Drainage device
DE1961SC030440 DE1887409U (en) 1961-11-06 1961-11-23 Drainage device for dissipation of fluessigkeit from an area of ​​the human body to another.
DE1961SC030600 DE1151350B (en) 1961-11-06 1961-11-23 Drainage device for draining liquid from a region of the human body to another

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3111125A true US3111125A (en) 1963-11-19

Family

ID=22533789

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3111125A Expired - Lifetime US3111125A (en) 1961-11-06 1961-11-06 Drainage device

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US3111125A (en)
DE (2) DE1887409U (en)

Cited By (73)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3233610A (en) * 1962-05-28 1966-02-08 Wade Stanley Charles Hydrocephalus shunt pump
US3234943A (en) * 1963-03-25 1966-02-15 Baxter Laboratories Inc Parenteral equipment valve and pump
US3310051A (en) * 1963-12-10 1967-03-21 Rudolf R Schulte Surgical reservoir for implantation beneath the skin
US3333588A (en) * 1964-07-06 1967-08-01 Rudolf R Schulte Brain ventricle cannula
US3334631A (en) * 1964-09-11 1967-08-08 Dow Corning Tracheal tube assembly
US3447161A (en) * 1966-08-01 1969-06-03 Avco Corp Disinfectant dispensing percutaneous connector
US3452757A (en) * 1966-09-14 1969-07-01 Dow Corning Two-way flushing device for treatment of hydrocephalus
US3492996A (en) * 1966-02-09 1970-02-03 Dow Corning Ventriculo-atrial shunt
US3503402A (en) * 1966-03-23 1970-03-31 Rudolf R Schulte Shunt device
US3505999A (en) * 1967-08-25 1970-04-14 Old Westport Medical Ass Inc Earplug
US3583387A (en) * 1968-12-20 1971-06-08 John T Garner Pressure absorbing appliance for treating hydrocephalus
US3595240A (en) * 1968-08-07 1971-07-27 Alan J Mishler Hydrocephalus shunt with two-way flushing means
US3601128A (en) * 1968-12-26 1971-08-24 Salomon Hakim Ventriculoatrial shunt accumulator
US3625199A (en) * 1969-11-06 1971-12-07 Fairchild Hiller Corp Implantable pressure indicator
FR2165934A1 (en) * 1971-12-09 1973-08-10 Sherwood Medical Ind Inc
US3756243A (en) * 1971-09-23 1973-09-04 R Schulte Flow control system for physiological drainage
US3769982A (en) * 1971-09-24 1973-11-06 R Schulte Physiological drainage system with closure means responsive to downstream suction
US3827439A (en) * 1972-10-30 1974-08-06 Heyer Schulte Corp Plug valve for physiological shunt systems
US3877137A (en) * 1974-05-30 1975-04-15 Hakim Co Ltd Method of making implantable pressure sensor
US3888249A (en) * 1973-11-02 1975-06-10 David L Spencer Arterial infusion catheter
US3946735A (en) * 1974-05-13 1976-03-30 Dewall Richard A Medical drainage device
US3958562A (en) * 1974-05-30 1976-05-25 Hakim Company Limited Implantable pressure sensor
US4141361A (en) * 1970-02-09 1979-02-27 Snyder Manufacturing Co., Incorporated Evacuator
US4267835A (en) * 1979-04-24 1981-05-19 American Hospital Supply Corporation Medical flushing valve
US4364395A (en) * 1981-06-30 1982-12-21 American Heyer-Schulte Corporation Low profile shunt system
US4377166A (en) * 1970-07-22 1983-03-22 Wilder Joseph R Surgical evacuator
WO1983001387A1 (en) * 1981-10-26 1983-04-28 Leveen, Harry, H. Non-clogging valved drainage system for body fluids
US4381591A (en) * 1979-04-24 1983-05-03 American Hospital Supply Corporation Method of assembling medical flushing valve
US4464168A (en) * 1981-06-30 1984-08-07 American Hospital Supply Corporation Low profile shunt system
US4552553A (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-11-12 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corp. Flow control valve
US4560375A (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-12-24 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corp. Flow control valve
US4636194A (en) * 1983-06-30 1987-01-13 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corp. Burr-hole flow control valve
EP0250891A1 (en) * 1986-07-02 1988-01-07 Becton Dickinson and Company Catheter assembly
US4787887A (en) * 1984-08-16 1988-11-29 Biomedica Mexicana, S.A. Ventricular by-pass valve for draining the cephalorachidian liquid in the hydrocephalus
US4795437A (en) * 1987-01-29 1989-01-03 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corporation Siphon control device
US4867741A (en) * 1983-11-04 1989-09-19 Portnoy Harold D Physiological draining system with differential pressure and compensating valves
US4885002A (en) * 1986-11-04 1989-12-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Nihon M.D.M. Brain ventricle shunt system
US4946448A (en) * 1989-10-23 1990-08-07 Kendall Mcgaw Laboratories, Inc. Check valve for use with intravenous pump
US4995856A (en) * 1989-06-14 1991-02-26 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corporation Ventriculostomy reservoir
FR2654937A1 (en) * 1989-11-28 1991-05-31 Hechard Patrick Device for continuous drainage of an effusion in the human or animal body
US5030210A (en) * 1988-02-08 1991-07-09 Becton, Dickinson And Company Catheter valve assembly
US5147332A (en) * 1991-05-17 1992-09-15 C.R. Bard, Inc. Multi-valve catheter for improved reliability
US5160325A (en) * 1986-10-06 1992-11-03 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter with novel lumens shapes
US5169393A (en) * 1990-09-04 1992-12-08 Robert Moorehead Two-way outdwelling slit valving of medical liquid flow through a cannula and methods
US5201722A (en) * 1990-09-04 1993-04-13 Moorehead Robert H Two-way outdwelling slit valving of medical liquid flow through a cannula and methods
US5205834A (en) * 1990-09-04 1993-04-27 Moorehead H Robert Two-way outdwelling slit valving of medical liquid flow through a cannula and methods
WO1993020862A1 (en) * 1992-04-17 1993-10-28 Science Incorporated Liquid delivery apparatus
US5405316A (en) * 1993-11-17 1995-04-11 Magram; Gary Cerebrospinal fluid shunt
US5472325A (en) * 1991-01-18 1995-12-05 Uno Plast A/S Suction pump for draining body fluids from body cavities
FR2721216A1 (en) * 1994-06-21 1995-12-22 Bruno Chene Drainage implant for treating hydrocephalus
US5662600A (en) * 1995-09-29 1997-09-02 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corporation Burr-hole flow control device
US5769093A (en) * 1994-12-09 1998-06-23 Xomed Surgical Products, Inc. Method of relieving synovial fluid pressure
US5928203A (en) * 1997-10-01 1999-07-27 Boston Scientific Corporation Medical fluid infusion and aspiration
US6251098B1 (en) 1992-01-24 2001-06-26 I-Flow, Corp. Fluid container for use with platen pump
US6358239B1 (en) 1992-01-24 2002-03-19 I-Flow Corporation Platen pump
US20040068221A1 (en) * 1998-11-10 2004-04-08 Eunoe, Inc. Methods for the treatment of a normal pressure hydrocephalus
US20040122348A1 (en) * 2002-12-24 2004-06-24 Hokanson Charles P. Gravitational pressure regulating mechanism
US20050043703A1 (en) * 2003-08-21 2005-02-24 Greg Nordgren Slit valves for catheter tips and methods
US6875192B1 (en) 1998-11-10 2005-04-05 Eunoe, Inc. Devices and methods for removing cerebrospinal fluids from a patient's CSF space
US20050182432A1 (en) * 2004-02-18 2005-08-18 Fanton Gary S. Apparatus and methods for clearing obstructions from surgical cutting instruments
US20060111688A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2006-05-25 Kraus Robert G Ventriculostomy reservoir
US20060189898A1 (en) * 2005-02-22 2006-08-24 Yaacov Nitzan Implantable sensor
US20080215029A1 (en) * 1993-01-22 2008-09-04 I-Flow Corporation Platen pump
US20100282394A1 (en) * 2001-03-01 2010-11-11 Watson David A Process for creating an ingrowth preventing indwelling catheter assembly
US20100296953A1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2010-11-25 Deka Products Limited Partnership Pump chamber configured to contain a residual fluid volume for inhibiting the pumping of a gas
US8863772B2 (en) 2008-08-27 2014-10-21 Deka Products Limited Partnership Occluder for a medical infusion system
US9028440B2 (en) 2008-01-23 2015-05-12 Deka Products Limited Partnership Fluid flow occluder and methods of use for medical treatment systems
US9364655B2 (en) 2012-05-24 2016-06-14 Deka Products Limited Partnership Flexible tubing occlusion assembly
US9364647B1 (en) * 2014-07-30 2016-06-14 University Of South Florida Shunt catheter system
US9433764B2 (en) 2014-04-18 2016-09-06 Alcyone Lifesciences, Inc. Systems and methods for shunting fluid
US9447892B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2016-09-20 Angiodynamics, Inc. Pressure activated valve for high flow rate and pressure venous access applications
US9603985B2 (en) 2007-02-27 2017-03-28 Deka Products Limited Partnership Blood treatment systems and methods
US9629987B2 (en) 2013-01-22 2017-04-25 Alcoyne Lifesciences, Inc. Systems and methods for shunting fluid

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1282858B (en) * 1964-01-18 1968-11-14 Dr Eduard Alther Apparatus for deriving the Liquors
US3910283A (en) * 1973-10-09 1975-10-07 Harry H Leveen Process for treatment of ascites and device to accomplish same
US4413985A (en) * 1981-09-02 1983-11-08 The United States Of America As Represented By The Dept. Of Health & Human Services Hydrocephalic antenatal vent for intrauterine treatment (HAVIT)

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2758609A (en) * 1953-05-06 1956-08-14 Henry Flow Control Company Check valve
US2867213A (en) * 1957-06-12 1959-01-06 Jr Paul A Thomas Flutter valve for drainage of the pleural cavity
US2969066A (en) * 1956-10-02 1961-01-24 Holter Company Device for draining ventricular fluid in cases of hydrocephalus

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2758609A (en) * 1953-05-06 1956-08-14 Henry Flow Control Company Check valve
US2969066A (en) * 1956-10-02 1961-01-24 Holter Company Device for draining ventricular fluid in cases of hydrocephalus
US2867213A (en) * 1957-06-12 1959-01-06 Jr Paul A Thomas Flutter valve for drainage of the pleural cavity

Cited By (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3233610A (en) * 1962-05-28 1966-02-08 Wade Stanley Charles Hydrocephalus shunt pump
US3234943A (en) * 1963-03-25 1966-02-15 Baxter Laboratories Inc Parenteral equipment valve and pump
US3310051A (en) * 1963-12-10 1967-03-21 Rudolf R Schulte Surgical reservoir for implantation beneath the skin
US3333588A (en) * 1964-07-06 1967-08-01 Rudolf R Schulte Brain ventricle cannula
US3334631A (en) * 1964-09-11 1967-08-08 Dow Corning Tracheal tube assembly
US3492996A (en) * 1966-02-09 1970-02-03 Dow Corning Ventriculo-atrial shunt
US3503402A (en) * 1966-03-23 1970-03-31 Rudolf R Schulte Shunt device
US3447161A (en) * 1966-08-01 1969-06-03 Avco Corp Disinfectant dispensing percutaneous connector
US3452757A (en) * 1966-09-14 1969-07-01 Dow Corning Two-way flushing device for treatment of hydrocephalus
DE1566591B1 (en) * 1966-09-14 1971-02-25 Dow Corning An implantable device for connecting and Durchspuelen two catheters, particularly for the treatment of Hydrocephalus
US3505999A (en) * 1967-08-25 1970-04-14 Old Westport Medical Ass Inc Earplug
US3595240A (en) * 1968-08-07 1971-07-27 Alan J Mishler Hydrocephalus shunt with two-way flushing means
US3583387A (en) * 1968-12-20 1971-06-08 John T Garner Pressure absorbing appliance for treating hydrocephalus
US3601128A (en) * 1968-12-26 1971-08-24 Salomon Hakim Ventriculoatrial shunt accumulator
US3625199A (en) * 1969-11-06 1971-12-07 Fairchild Hiller Corp Implantable pressure indicator
US4141361A (en) * 1970-02-09 1979-02-27 Snyder Manufacturing Co., Incorporated Evacuator
US4377166A (en) * 1970-07-22 1983-03-22 Wilder Joseph R Surgical evacuator
US3756243A (en) * 1971-09-23 1973-09-04 R Schulte Flow control system for physiological drainage
US3769982A (en) * 1971-09-24 1973-11-06 R Schulte Physiological drainage system with closure means responsive to downstream suction
FR2165934A1 (en) * 1971-12-09 1973-08-10 Sherwood Medical Ind Inc
US3809086A (en) * 1971-12-09 1974-05-07 Sherwood Medical Ind Inc Wound drainage device
US3827439A (en) * 1972-10-30 1974-08-06 Heyer Schulte Corp Plug valve for physiological shunt systems
US3888249A (en) * 1973-11-02 1975-06-10 David L Spencer Arterial infusion catheter
US3946735A (en) * 1974-05-13 1976-03-30 Dewall Richard A Medical drainage device
US3877137A (en) * 1974-05-30 1975-04-15 Hakim Co Ltd Method of making implantable pressure sensor
US3958562A (en) * 1974-05-30 1976-05-25 Hakim Company Limited Implantable pressure sensor
US4381591A (en) * 1979-04-24 1983-05-03 American Hospital Supply Corporation Method of assembling medical flushing valve
US4267835A (en) * 1979-04-24 1981-05-19 American Hospital Supply Corporation Medical flushing valve
US4364395A (en) * 1981-06-30 1982-12-21 American Heyer-Schulte Corporation Low profile shunt system
US4464168A (en) * 1981-06-30 1984-08-07 American Hospital Supply Corporation Low profile shunt system
WO1983001387A1 (en) * 1981-10-26 1983-04-28 Leveen, Harry, H. Non-clogging valved drainage system for body fluids
US4552553A (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-11-12 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corp. Flow control valve
US4560375A (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-12-24 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corp. Flow control valve
US4636194A (en) * 1983-06-30 1987-01-13 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corp. Burr-hole flow control valve
US4867741A (en) * 1983-11-04 1989-09-19 Portnoy Harold D Physiological draining system with differential pressure and compensating valves
US4787887A (en) * 1984-08-16 1988-11-29 Biomedica Mexicana, S.A. Ventricular by-pass valve for draining the cephalorachidian liquid in the hydrocephalus
EP0250891A1 (en) * 1986-07-02 1988-01-07 Becton Dickinson and Company Catheter assembly
US4737152A (en) * 1986-07-02 1988-04-12 Becton, Dickinson And Company Catheter assembly
US5160325A (en) * 1986-10-06 1992-11-03 C. R. Bard, Inc. Catheter with novel lumens shapes
US4885002A (en) * 1986-11-04 1989-12-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Nihon M.D.M. Brain ventricle shunt system
US4795437A (en) * 1987-01-29 1989-01-03 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corporation Siphon control device
US5030210A (en) * 1988-02-08 1991-07-09 Becton, Dickinson And Company Catheter valve assembly
US4995856A (en) * 1989-06-14 1991-02-26 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corporation Ventriculostomy reservoir
US4946448A (en) * 1989-10-23 1990-08-07 Kendall Mcgaw Laboratories, Inc. Check valve for use with intravenous pump
FR2654937A1 (en) * 1989-11-28 1991-05-31 Hechard Patrick Device for continuous drainage of an effusion in the human or animal body
US5169393A (en) * 1990-09-04 1992-12-08 Robert Moorehead Two-way outdwelling slit valving of medical liquid flow through a cannula and methods
US5201722A (en) * 1990-09-04 1993-04-13 Moorehead Robert H Two-way outdwelling slit valving of medical liquid flow through a cannula and methods
US5205834A (en) * 1990-09-04 1993-04-27 Moorehead H Robert Two-way outdwelling slit valving of medical liquid flow through a cannula and methods
US5472325A (en) * 1991-01-18 1995-12-05 Uno Plast A/S Suction pump for draining body fluids from body cavities
US5147332A (en) * 1991-05-17 1992-09-15 C.R. Bard, Inc. Multi-valve catheter for improved reliability
US6251098B1 (en) 1992-01-24 2001-06-26 I-Flow, Corp. Fluid container for use with platen pump
US6358239B1 (en) 1992-01-24 2002-03-19 I-Flow Corporation Platen pump
US7083068B2 (en) 1992-01-24 2006-08-01 I-Flow Corporation Platen pump
US20050211725A1 (en) * 1992-01-24 2005-09-29 Rake Kenneth W Platen pump
US6871759B2 (en) 1992-01-24 2005-03-29 I-Flow Corporation Platen pump
US20040108333A1 (en) * 1992-01-24 2004-06-10 Rake Kenneth W. Platen pump
US7337922B2 (en) 1992-01-24 2008-03-04 I-Flow Corporation Platen pump
WO1993020862A1 (en) * 1992-04-17 1993-10-28 Science Incorporated Liquid delivery apparatus
US20080215029A1 (en) * 1993-01-22 2008-09-04 I-Flow Corporation Platen pump
US5405316A (en) * 1993-11-17 1995-04-11 Magram; Gary Cerebrospinal fluid shunt
FR2721216A1 (en) * 1994-06-21 1995-12-22 Bruno Chene Drainage implant for treating hydrocephalus
US5807303A (en) * 1994-12-09 1998-09-15 Xomed Surgical Products, Inc. Valve assembly and device for relieving synovial fluid pressure
US5769093A (en) * 1994-12-09 1998-06-23 Xomed Surgical Products, Inc. Method of relieving synovial fluid pressure
US5800376A (en) * 1995-09-29 1998-09-01 Medtronic, Inc. Burr-hole flow control device
US5662600A (en) * 1995-09-29 1997-09-02 Pudenz-Schulte Medical Research Corporation Burr-hole flow control device
US6120483A (en) * 1997-10-01 2000-09-19 Boston Scientific Corporation Medical fluid infusion and aspiration
US6436077B1 (en) 1997-10-01 2002-08-20 Boston Scientific Corporation Medical fluid infusion and aspiration
US5928203A (en) * 1997-10-01 1999-07-27 Boston Scientific Corporation Medical fluid infusion and aspiration
US6723075B2 (en) 1997-10-01 2004-04-20 Christopher T. Davey Medical fluid infusion and aspiration
US20040068221A1 (en) * 1998-11-10 2004-04-08 Eunoe, Inc. Methods for the treatment of a normal pressure hydrocephalus
US6875192B1 (en) 1998-11-10 2005-04-05 Eunoe, Inc. Devices and methods for removing cerebrospinal fluids from a patient's CSF space
US7189221B2 (en) 1998-11-10 2007-03-13 Integra Life Sciences Corporation Methods for the treatment of a normal pressure hydrocephalus
US9488167B2 (en) 1999-07-20 2016-11-08 Deka Products Limited Partnership System, method, and apparatus for utilizing a pumping cassette
US9039395B2 (en) 1999-07-20 2015-05-26 Deka Products Limited Partnership System, method, and apparatus for utilizing a pumping cassette
US9593678B2 (en) 1999-07-20 2017-03-14 Deka Products Limited Partnership System, method, and apparatus for utilizing a pumping cassette
US9494151B2 (en) 1999-07-20 2016-11-15 Deka Products Limited Partnership System, method, and apparatus for utilizing a pumping cassette
US9494150B2 (en) 1999-07-20 2016-11-15 Deka Products Limited Partnership Pump chamber configured to contain a residual fluid volume for inhibiting the pumping of a gas
US8556225B2 (en) * 1999-07-20 2013-10-15 Deka Products Limited Partnership Pump chamber configured to contain a residual fluid volume for inhibiting the pumping of a gas
US20100296953A1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2010-11-25 Deka Products Limited Partnership Pump chamber configured to contain a residual fluid volume for inhibiting the pumping of a gas
US20100282394A1 (en) * 2001-03-01 2010-11-11 Watson David A Process for creating an ingrowth preventing indwelling catheter assembly
US20040122348A1 (en) * 2002-12-24 2004-06-24 Hokanson Charles P. Gravitational pressure regulating mechanism
US7282040B2 (en) 2002-12-24 2007-10-16 Vygon Us, Llc Gravitational pressure regulating mechanism
US20050043703A1 (en) * 2003-08-21 2005-02-24 Greg Nordgren Slit valves for catheter tips and methods
US20050182432A1 (en) * 2004-02-18 2005-08-18 Fanton Gary S. Apparatus and methods for clearing obstructions from surgical cutting instruments
US20060111688A1 (en) * 2004-11-22 2006-05-25 Kraus Robert G Ventriculostomy reservoir
US20060189898A1 (en) * 2005-02-22 2006-08-24 Yaacov Nitzan Implantable sensor
US7756579B2 (en) * 2005-02-22 2010-07-13 Depuy International Ltd. Implantable sensor
US9603985B2 (en) 2007-02-27 2017-03-28 Deka Products Limited Partnership Blood treatment systems and methods
US9358332B2 (en) 2008-01-23 2016-06-07 Deka Products Limited Partnership Pump cassette and methods for use in medical treatment system using a plurality of fluid lines
US9028440B2 (en) 2008-01-23 2015-05-12 Deka Products Limited Partnership Fluid flow occluder and methods of use for medical treatment systems
US9839776B2 (en) 2008-01-23 2017-12-12 Deka Products Limited Partnership Fluid flow occluder and methods of use for medical treatment systems
US9447892B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2016-09-20 Angiodynamics, Inc. Pressure activated valve for high flow rate and pressure venous access applications
US8863772B2 (en) 2008-08-27 2014-10-21 Deka Products Limited Partnership Occluder for a medical infusion system
US9364655B2 (en) 2012-05-24 2016-06-14 Deka Products Limited Partnership Flexible tubing occlusion assembly
US9700711B2 (en) 2012-05-24 2017-07-11 Deka Products Limited Partnership Flexible tubing occlusion assembly
US9629987B2 (en) 2013-01-22 2017-04-25 Alcoyne Lifesciences, Inc. Systems and methods for shunting fluid
US9433764B2 (en) 2014-04-18 2016-09-06 Alcyone Lifesciences, Inc. Systems and methods for shunting fluid
US9744338B2 (en) 2014-04-18 2017-08-29 Alcyone Lifesciences, Inc. Systems and methods for shunting fluid
US9364647B1 (en) * 2014-07-30 2016-06-14 University Of South Florida Shunt catheter system

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
DE1151350B (en) 1963-07-11 application
DE1887409U (en) 1964-02-13 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3411506A (en) Method and apparatus for hemostasis
US3402710A (en) Self-closing valve device for implantation in the human body
US3527226A (en) Ventricular catheter with valve and pump flushing means
US3566875A (en) Device for draining cerebrospinal fluid
US3540451A (en) Drainage cannula with tissue connecting assemblies on both ends
US3516410A (en) Cerebro-ventricular catheter
US3492996A (en) Ventriculo-atrial shunt
US3601128A (en) Ventriculoatrial shunt accumulator
US5423751A (en) Contrast media dispensing apparatus
US4181132A (en) Method and apparatus for effecting hyperthermic treatment
US5520632A (en) Ascites valve
US5755780A (en) Implantable vascular device
US7322953B2 (en) Catheter device
EP0427852B1 (en) Balloon-carrying instrument for use in continuously injecting medical fluid
US5342394A (en) Apparatus for blocking a vein branch and method of blocking a vein branch
US6942633B2 (en) System for treating tissue swelling
US4175563A (en) Biological drainage shunt
US6796972B1 (en) Catheter anchoring balloon structure with irrigation
US3109429A (en) Ventriculo-venous shunt device for treatment of hydrocephalus
US6648873B2 (en) Aural catheter system including anchor balloon and balloon inflation device
US5527276A (en) Flexible inflow/outflow cannula
US7252652B2 (en) Valved catheters including high flow rate catheters
US4445897A (en) Catheter for postsurgical drainage
US5358494A (en) Irrigation dressing
US3730186A (en) Adjustable implantable artery-constricting device