US3100961A - Clock operated electric switch and alarm buzzer control device - Google Patents

Clock operated electric switch and alarm buzzer control device Download PDF

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US3100961A
US3100961A US84663259A US3100961A US 3100961 A US3100961 A US 3100961A US 84663259 A US84663259 A US 84663259A US 3100961 A US3100961 A US 3100961A
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Prior art keywords
time
member
switch
buzzer
position
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Ronald M Bassett
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INT REGISTER CO
INTERNATIONAL REGISTER CO
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INT REGISTER CO
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04CELECTROMECHANICAL CLOCKS OR WATCHES
    • G04C21/00Producing acoustic time signals by electrical means
    • G04C21/16Producing acoustic time signals by electrical means producing the signals at adjustable fixed times
    • G04C21/28Producing acoustic time signals by electrical means producing the signals at adjustable fixed times by closing a contact to put into action electro-acoustic means, e.g. awakening by music
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/11Tripping mechanism
    • Y10T74/114Retarded
    • Y10T74/115Plural, sequential, trip actuations

Description

Aug. 20,1963 R. M. BASSETT 3, 0,

CLOCK OPERATED ELECTRIC SWITCH AND ALARM Filed Oct 15, 1959 BUZZER CONTROL DEVICE 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 v7 '74 4g f' J g //6 50 h! //7 INVENTOR. fizzaififfifiezi BY M A/M- Aug. 20, 1963 Filed Oct. 15, 1959 I R. M. BASSETT CLOCK OPERATED ELECTRIC SWITCH AND ALARM BUZZER CONTROL DEVICE 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Aug 20 1963 R. M. BASSETT 10 CLOCK OPERBATED ELECTRIC SWITCH AND ALARM 3, UZZER CONTROL DE 10 Flled Oct. 15, 1959 V E 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 v 6-:- l A? INVENTOR..

Aug 20, 1963 R. M. BASSETT 3,100,961

CLOCK OPERATED ELECTRIC SWITCH AND ALARM BUZZER CONTROL DEVICE Filed Oct 15, 1959 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

R. M. BAssET'r CLOCK OPERATED ELECTRIC SWITCH AND ALARM BUZZER CONTROL DEVICE Aug. 20, 1963 7 Sheets-She et 5 Filed Oct. 15, 1959 \l l 4 4. y/l/l ll uv/ll "/l/ll II I rll VIII/Ill,

R. M. BASSETT CLOCK OPERATED ELECTRIC SWITCH AND ALARM BUZZER CONTROL DEVICE Aug. 20, 1963 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 T Filed Oct. 15, 1959 q 0 y 3% QWSAS 1953 Y R M. BASSETT 3,100,961

CLOCK OPERATED ELECTRIC SWITCH AND ALARM BUZZER CONTROL DEVICE Filed 001;. 15, 1959 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 ctocnornna rnn ELECTRIC swrren ALARM nuzzsn CONTROL DEVICE Ronald M. Bassett, Chicago, Ill., assignor to International- Register Company Chicago, III, a corporation of Illinois Filed Oct..15, 1959, Set. No. 846,632 12 Claims. (Cl. 58- -38) The present inventionyrelates to an improvedclockv operated electric switch and alarm buzzer control device,

adapted primarily tor use with radios, but, as will hereinafter appear, the device may also be used with television sets and other appliances.

In the preferred adaptation, the device is built directly into the radio or'tele-vision set, but the device can'also be built into the form. of a separate clock operated conmy improved control device is capable of performing,

selectively, any desired one'of the following control functions or operations: 7

(f1 Turning the radio on automatically at a preselected time, and then after the lapse of a short time interval, such as or minutes, causing the alarm buzzer to automatically so nd.

(2) Turning the radio on automatically'at the preselected time, without automatically sounding the alarm buzzer.

(3) Turning the radio off automatically after a predetermined lapse of time, such as 151 to 30 minutes after going to bed; and then automatically turning the radio on again at a' preselected time, such as the next morning.

(4) Turning the radio off automatically after a predetermined lapse of time, such as to 'minutes after turning'the radio on going to bed; without automatically again the next morning;

(5) Causing the alarm buzzer to sound automatically at a preselected time, without'causing sound from the radio. I I

(6) Shutting oil? the alarm buzzer manually in such manner that it will automatically sound again after a short lapse of time, such as 5 or 6 minutes. This buzzer delayrepeat mechanism may be manually tripped several times after each sound of the buzzer so as to obtain several successive 5 minute periods for snoozing or going back to sleep; or, alternatively, two or more of the delay intervals may be totalized, if desired, by manually actuating the control lever several times at once, thereby obtaining a longer delay interval before the alarm buzzer sounds again. To avoid the complexity of a technically descriptive title for this latter mechanism, I have called it the 40-Winker mechanism.

, (7) Turning the radio on manually.

(8) Turning the radio off manually.

One of the particular objects of the invention is to provide an improved control'device of the above general description wherein the indexing position of. the index knob always indicates the true position ofthe'electric switch that controls the radio. That is tosay, the multiple position indexing knob always-goes automatically to its ON indicating position whenever'the radio goes on. Thus, a glance at this knob shows whether the radio is turned on or oif, regardless of the volume setting of the UnitedStates Pat we station has gone off the air. In theflabsence of this tenor indefinitely.

'in its OFF position, hereinafter ture it is very easy to leave the radioenergized all night Another object of the invention is to provide a simplified and improvedcontrol device capable of obtaining all ofthe above control functions.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a control device which is extremely compact in its dimensions so as to occupy the least amount of space, which is a very desirable feature when the device is to be built into arelatively small table model radio, a small tele vision set or other small appliance.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a control device which is simple and inexpensive to construct so that it can favorably compete in the highly competitive field of radio clock switches, timers, etc.

Other objects, features andadvantages of the invention will appear from the following detail description of a preferred embodiment thereof. In the accompanying drawings illustrating such embodiment:

FIGURE 1- is a front elevational yiew of my improved control device, of the form adapted to be'built directly into the radioor television set; v

FIGURE 2 is a'rear elevational View thereof; FIGURES 3' and 4 are side or edgewise elevational views, as viewed from the right and left sides respectively of FIGURE 1; p

FIGURE 5 is a transverse sectional view taken approxi-' mately on the zig-zag sectional planes 5'5: drawn in dotted lines in FIGURE 7. i

FIGURE 6 is a schematic elevational viewof the time.

driven hour hand. gear, and of the manually settable time selectinggear which is (coaxial therewith, showing in dotted lines'the coacting pairs of sloping cam humps car" ried by these gears for efiecting the axial shifting'of the time driven gear at the preselected time.

FIGURE 7 is a front sectional view taken on the plane of the lines 77 of FIGURES 3 and 4, and looking rearwardly in the direction of the arrows, this view showing the relation of the switch control and of the buzzer control when the indexing or sequence controlling knob is.

l referred to as its #1 position; Y

' FIGURE 7A' is a fragmentary transverse sectional view. taken approximately on the plane of the line 7A-7A of FIGURE 7, showing the relation of the flipper latch and latching shoulders in this position of the parts.

FIGURE 8 is a View somewhat similar to FIGURE 7, except that it is looking in the reverse direction, corresponding substantially to a section taken on the plane of the line 8--8 of FIGURE 5, this view representing the RADIO-ON or #2 position of the indexing knob, and showing the switch control in the switch closing position and the buzzer control still in the non-sounding position, such being the operational sequence when the indexing knob is rotated from its OFF 1) position to this. .RADIO-ON (#2) position;

FIGURE 8A is a transverse sectional view through RADIOIJN (#2) position otthe indexing knob, as

shown in FIGURE 8, to the RADIO-AU, radio automatic, (#3) position shown in this FIGURE 9 FIGURE 9A is a transverse sectional through FIG- URES showing the latching relation when the parts are in this RADIO-A (#3) position of FIGURE 9.

FIGURE 10' is a view similar to FIGURE 8, but showing the operating relation of the parts when theindexing Patented Aug. an, 1963 nob. occupi s the ALARM Position, this toting the other end position in the sequence of four positions through which the indexing knob is rotatable.

FIGU E; WA i a trans rse. Sectional View through FIGURE 10 showing the latching relation when the indoin knohi n h f u th Position- FIGURE 11 is a front sectional view showing the opreins re on o here-ar after he i responsive ne hai ism has. ri-rpsda e n e n knob. o h a the preselected time the indexing knob has automatically m ve a'ar v tse d ec i n t ai the M os ti n o F GURE b R -AU PQ iFlQB; Qt F GURE. 9-, n h p n o the p shown in FIGURE 11 arrived at by the automatically tripped; reverse rotation of the indexing knob, the electrio switch is closed for turning on the radio but the buzzer does not immediately sound,- such being delayed for a predetermined period of time, such as minutes sponsive mechanism, so that the now starts to sound.

" FIGURE lZA is a sectionalview showing the latching;

relation. of FIGURE 12.

FIGURE L3 is a fragmentary-elevationalview showing on a considerably magnified scale the single latching shoulder; carried by the. buzzer control; arm, and also the three latehing shoulders. carried by the switch control.

member, these four latching shoulders rotating in the three different concentric radii r1, 12 and r3, as shown; FIGURE-l4 is an. edge view on a similar magnified scale showingthe different heights to which these latching. shoulders rotating at the different radii project up weirdly, for thelpurposeof indicating the height that the flipper latch must be raised, to clear the successive latchingf shoulders;

, FIGURE 15,. is aside viewon an enlarged scale show-.

in this flipper latch. inits mountingon the time responsive lever;

FIGURE. 16 isa. rearelevational viewof the flipper latch aler s on thisenlargedv scale, and FIGURE. 1.7;is. a front sectionalview taken on the plane of the. line 17.-17- or, FIGURE 3, showing the buzzer-delay repeat. mechanism (i.e. the -Winker).

Referringfirstto FIGURE 1, the clock switch 30 comprisesaclock dial 31. having hour markings 32, relatively towhich the. hour andminute. hands 3 4;and 35 indicate theltimeof day. Rotating concentrically of the hour and minutelhands is a. sweep second-hand 36 which gives an approximate second indication and which also gives a visualindication as towhether the synchronous electricrnotcr of the clock is-running. Also mounted for rotation concentrically of the hour, minute and second hands, isthe manually settable time switch indicating hand 37 which is adapted tobemanuallyset at the time at which it is desired that the radio (orother appliance) be turned on In the typical installation atable or console type radio, the clock dial3 1 andthe four hands 64-371 are protected by a cover glass with a, surroundingjbezel, which-are net shown because they will varywith each radio manufacturers requirements. Projecting from the right and left handi edges of the clock dial, eitherlthrough orou'tside such cover glass, are rotatable settingshafts 41- and;42 onwhichrotatabie settingknobs 43 and, 44 are. mounted:, 'I hesekmbs carry indicating ribs 435 and 44 which, in conjunctionwith indicia4 7. and 48 on the face. oft he dial, indicate the rotative positions into which the 7 turn offautomatically.

. 4 setting knobs 43' and 44 can be set. The right hand knob 43 is an indexing knob which is movable into any one of four different indexing positions which are printed on the .face of the dial, and occur in the following sequence for a right hand or clockwise rotation of the knob 43; (1) OFF, (2) RADIO-ON, (3) RADIO-A and (4) ALARM." When there is no intention of having the clock switch turn on the radio or sound the buzzer at a preselected time, or having the clock switch maintain current to the radio, this right hand knob 43. is maintained in the bottom or OFF position, such being the normal position.

Referring now to the left hand setting knobv 44, this normally stands inthe position shown with the rib 44. point upwardly, the knob being rotatable therefrom through approximately 180 in a right hand or clockwisedirection. This knob 44. eflects a so-called SLEEP 'SWITCH oontrol which the user sets at night upon going to bed, for automatically turning the radio off after apredeterrnrined lapse of time, such as 20, 40, 60 utes, etc. The knob 44 can be rotated to position the rib. '44 at any point of the arcuate scale, between the upper end designated 0 down to the lower end designated, 6 0. The 0 end of the scale denotes that the SLEEP SWITCH control 4 5 is off,;and the 60 end of the scale denotes that the SLEEP SWITCH control. is set to keep.

the radio turned on for a 60 minute interval, when it will The manual setting of the hour and minute clock hands 34 and 35, and the manual setting of the automatic timer indicating hand 37, are both performed through a rear setting knob mounted on a rotatable and shit-table set-. ting shaft 511- projecting rearwardly from the back side of the clock switch assembly (FIGURE 3) One of these setting operations is performed with the knob and shaft shifted inwardly, and the other setting operation is pen.

formed with them shifted outwardly, as will be later de scribed in, detail.

Another manually operable control projects from the right hand side of the clock switch assembly, this being in the form of a vertically swinging pivoted lever 52 which is adapted; to be stroked downwardly one or more successive times'by ones linger'when, after the automatic turning on of the alarm buzzer (either following or independently of the turning on of the radio), at the preset,

time, the sleeper wishes to get more sleep, such asanother 5, 10, or 15 minutes. He can obtain any of these addi-u tional time delays in buzzeroperation by stroking the lever 5-2 downwardly either once, twice, or three times. I have commercially named this apparatus as the 40-. Winker mechanism 55 of my improved clock switch. Having brie-fly described-the function of the manual controls, I- shall, now describe the detailed construction 0 the clock switch.

The assembly comprises a front mounting plate 61 and a rear base plate 62 which are secured together in spaced relation by a plurality of spacing legs 63a, 63b and 63c (FIG. 7). These spacing legs are bent forwardly from the rear base plate 62' and pass through slotted holes 64 in the front mounting plate 61,' following which spurs 65 at the ends of the mounting legs are twisted sidewise across the front edges of the slotted openings 64 (see FIG- URE 17). A face plate 66 is securedto the frontside "in the forwardly offset top and bottom flanges ,67. of the frontmounting plate. t

' Mounted' on the back Secured to the frontend of this arbor 1 77 is the clock second hand 36. Secured to the large' gear J wheel-76 is .a pinion 78 which meshes with alarge gear wheel 79 journaled on a pivot shaft 81 having its ends 4 mounted in the fnont and rear mounting plates. Extending forwardly from the large gear wheel 79 is a relatively long pinion 82 which meshes with a large gear wheel'83 disposed concentrically of the second hand arbor 7 7.

Disposed on the front-side of the large gear wheel $3 is a smaller gearwheel 84 which is secured to a minute hand arbor or sleeve $5. This minute hand sleeve 85 surrounds the secondhand arbor 77 and carries the cloclcm-inute hand 35 on its front end. The motor driven drive from the synchronous motor unit '72 is transmitted from the large gear wheel 83 to the aligned smaller gear wheel 84 through a friction slippage clutch 86 to permit manual setting of the hour and minute hands 34- and 35 relatively to the clock dial. general type of friction slippage clutch is old and well known and need not be described in detail. a I

Meshing with the smaller gear wheel '84 is a large speed reducing gear wheel 88 which has free rotative mounting on the pivot shaft 81. Secured to this large gear wheel 88 isa pinion 91 which meshes with a large gear Wheel 92 that is mounted on the clock dial axis. This large gear wheel 92is secured to the rear end of an arbor sleeve93 which surrounds the minute hand arbor sleeve 85, such arbor sleeve being both rotatable and axially shiftable upon the minute hand arbor sleeve 85, the hour hand 34 being secured to the outer end of this. axially shiftable arbor sleeve 93. The pinion 91, with which the shiftable gear wheel 92 meshes, is relatively long so that the shiftable gear 92 will remain in'mesh with this long pinion 91 tends to hold the shiftable gear whe'el92 and amber 93 V thrust forwardly.

Mounted forwardly of'the shiftable gear wheel 92, and

' radius, whereby these two sets of humps move into contact with each other once every'twelve hours for axially displacing the shiftable hour hand gear in a rearward direction. Each hump has a gradually sloping leading end and trailing end, so that manually operated time set-j tings can be set up by either direction of rotationof the manually settable gear 95. -This particular relation of hour hand gear and time settable gear having coaoting 'pairsof axially displacing humps is old and well known, being disclosed for example, in, prior Patent, 2,816,969 issued to William P. Gallagher and Ronald M. Bassett on December 17, 1957.

It is opportune attthis point to describe the manner in which the rear setting knob 50 is operative toset up different selected time settings on the manually settable gear. 95, and is also operative to manually set the hour and minute clock hands 34 and 35. Referring to FIGURE 5, it will be seen that the setting shaft 51, on which this knob '50 is mounted extends through the rear base plate bearing against the back side of the front mounting plate 61 is a manually settable gear 95 which is secured tothe rearend of a short outer arbor 96 that surrounds the shiftable arbor 93. This outer arbor 96 extends through the fnont mounting plate 61 and mounts the time settable pointer 37 which indicates the preselected time when the clockswitch is to operate automatically. The time set table gear 95 is spaced forwardly from the axially shiftable hour hand gear 92, and projecting toward each other from the opposing faces of these two gears 92 and-95 are ooacting humps 97, 97 and 98, 98'wvhich, at the preselected time, engage each other and shift the hour hand gear 92 rearwardly for trippingithe electric switch, and for sounding the buzzer in certain settings, as will be presently described; The humps 9'7 and 98 project 'forwardly from diametrically opposite points of the hour hand gear 92, with the hump 97 traveling in a circle of relativelylarge radius, whereas the other hump 9% travels in a circle of relatively small radius: The other two humps 97 and 98 project rearwardly at diametrically (opposite points from the time settable gear 95, with the hump97 traveling'in a circle of relatively large radius, and the hump 98f traveling in a circleof relatively small 62 and front mounting plate 61, being rotatable and axially shiftable therein. Fixedly secured to this setting shaft directly in rear of the front mounting plate 61 is a double pinion hub 104 having a front set of pinion teeth 1% and a rear set of pinion teeth 106. When this double pinion hub 104 is in the forwardly shifted position shown in FIGURE 5, the frontset of pinion teeth 165 mesh with the peripheral gear teeth on the time settable gear 95, whereby rotation of the knob 50 is then operative to rotate the settable gear 95 into any preselected time position, as indicated by the front indicating hand 37. When the pinion hubv 164 is shifted rearwardly into the dotted line position shown in FIGURES, the front set of pinion teeth 105 are moved out of mesh with the gear teeth 95, and the rear set of'pinion teeth 166 are moved into mesh with the peripheral teeth 88' of the speed reducing gear wheel 88 interposed in the time train connecting the clock hands 34!- and 35. Thus, rotation of the setting knob St) in this rearwardly shifted position is operative to manually adjust the time setting of the hour and minute clock hands 3'4 and 35. Punched inwardly from the rearv base plate 62 is a forwardly projecting stop lug or tongue 107 which limits the rearward shifting movement of the pinion hub 104 to the dotted line position shown. The time settable gear 95 is frictionally held in any of the positions to which it may be manually adjusted through rotation of the setting knob 50, by the friction exerted by wayof a cupped spring washer 108 (FIGURE 5) confined between the front side of front mounting plate 61 and a front flange 96' projecting from the outer arbor 96 carrying the time indicating'pointer 37. The friction exerted bythe cupped or spring washer ltl8-prevents-the time settable gear 95 being dragged along by the" time driven gear 92 through the engagement of the humps 9'793'.

- .It will be seen from the foregoing that the time settable gear 95 can be rotated to any desired time selecting position through rotation of the rear setting knob 50, and that this will locate the diametrically opposite cam humps 97' and 98' in a certain fixed angular position denoted on the clock dial by the position of the time selecting pointer 37. When thecontinuously rotating time driven gear 92 brings its inner and outer diametrically opposite humps 98 and 97 into engagement with the stationarily positioned cam humps 93 and 97 the uphill sliding contact between the coacting humps'causes the time driven gear 92 to shift axiallyinwardly or rearwardly, such shifting movement tripping a time responsive tripping lever 110 which performs successive tripping functions having to do with the switch closing and buzzer sounding operations. Before describing in detail this time responsive tripping lever 110 audits associated sequence lever, buzzer control arm, etc.,

, scribed.

first-briefly describing the electric switch and the sounding an insulating housing 116. which has anchored mounting in the front mounting plate 61 and rear base plate 62; A rectangular lug 117 ({FIGURE 17) projects integrally from the front end of the switch housing 1 16and has anchored fittingwithin a rectangular opening 118 which is punched outin the front mounting plate- 61; and the outer portion of the switch housing has anchored mounting in'a rectangular aperture 119 which is punched out in the rear base plate 62. Apairof relatively long contactsprings 121 and 122 (FIGURES 3 and 4) have their outer or rear ends anchored inthe rear end of the switch housing 116 for establishing electrical connection with the circuit of the radio or'iother appliance being controlledby the clock switch; Carried at the forward ends of these contact springs 121,122 are the cooperating electrical contacts 123 and 124. which are normally biased to remain out of engagement witheach other. The switch housing 116 is formed with a transverse slot 126 adjacent tothe rear base plate 6 2, and mounted in this slot is aninsulating slide 127 which is operative to press the two contacts 123 and 124 together. The actuating end of this slide 127 projects from the inner side of the switch housing in position tobe depressed into switch closing position'by a switch actuating lever 130" (FIGURES 7, 8, etc.) which is of bell crank formation and is'pivotally mounted intermediate thefront and rear plates 61 and 62 :on a transverse mounting pin 135 which has its ends mounted in these front and rear plates. One arm 13 1 of this bell crank lever 130 is formed with a rearwardly bent lip or flange 132 which is operative to transmit inward switch closing motion to the slide 127, this switch actuating flange 132 having a downwardly inclined lip 1 32' at its outer end. The other arm 133 of the bell crank lever 130 has an angular extremity-134 which is adapted to be actuated by a carn13'6 mounted on the shaft 42 of the"SLEEP SWITCH knob 44, as will be later de- When the clock switch 30 is built directly into the radio housing or cabinet, the projecting ends of the switch contact springslZrl, 122 are wired directly to the radio circuit within this housing; but where the clock switch 30 isenclosed within an independent housing in theform of a control appliance separate and apart from the radio housingthese switch contact springs 121 and 122 are electrically connected with a plug in receptaclesocket mounted in the independent housing and adapted to receive the prong type of receptacle plug at the end of the extension cord" connecting with the radio or other appliance to-be' controlled.

Referring now to the sounding buzzer, this comprises a vibratory reed 140*- (FIGUR'ES 4, 7, etc.) which in its sounding condition is adapted to vibrate substantially in resonance with the alternating current magnetic field prevailing within-the synchronous drive motor 71. The main body portion. of this reed is almost as wide as the space I between the front and rear frame plates 61, 62, and the anchored end of this main body portion has a slightly royckable mounting between said frame plates on cars 142 which project outwardly from the edges of the reed and engage in slots 144. formed in bothmounting plates. These slots have-narrow lower ends 144a (FIGURES 7, 8, etc.) in whichthc lower edges of thev =ears.14-2 seat, and the slots have wider upper ends 144b that permit the slight rocking movement of the anchored end of the reed as the free end of thereed is flexed'inwardly and outwardly with respect to the magnetic fieldofthe synchronous motor 71. Projecting'rearwardly the free end of the vibratory reedis a relatively long arm 146 which has alaterally bent end 147- enteringa. slot 148 in the side of the motor houssing: (FlGU-RE4), thislaterally bent end. 14-7 being adcontrol arm 160 is formed with a relatively longiiat dwell mg 151 (FIGURE 17 which projectsforwardlythrougli the 4(I-Winker mechanism which will be later described.

A thin oblong leaf spring 153, preferably composed of berylium copper or the like, and having a bowed curvature, is interposed between the'outer side of the main body of the vibratory reed and the adjacent edge of the spacingleg 63a extending forwardly from the rear base plate =62. The lower portion of this leaf spring has. tongues 154 which extend outwardly through the wide portions 14% of the slots 1'44, and a finger portion 155? at the-upper end of this leaf spring bears inwardly against the vibratory reed so as to normally bias this reed in an inwarddirection for causing the laterally bent end of the reed to be present .ed into theiniluence of the alternating current magnetic lip is adapted to be deflected an upward and outward direction by a pivotally swinging buzzer control arm 160.

when the buzzer is to remain silent; and when the buzzer is to sound this buzzer controljarm swings into a-position which removes the outward "deflectingforce from the lip 158 so that the-vibratory reed 1'40 is free to vibrate. More specifically, the swinging outer edge of the buzzer 166a which is operative, when in engagement with the; lip 15%, to deflect the reed outwardly into a non-sounding position. Beyond this dwell leti'a is a valley 160b-and beyond the valley is a cam slope 1 60c. When the valley 160 b registers with the lip 158 the reed is free to vibrate, and when the cam slope 160a: moves overagainstthe lip 158 the reed is, again deflected outwardly into its non: sounding position, as will be described more in detail later.

Reverting back again swingrearwardly whenever the engagement of the bumps 97, 97 and 98, 98' at a preselected time causes the slidable hour hand gear 92 to shift axially rearwardly. This oc- V curs in all indexing positions of the indexing or'sequence knob 4-3, except when the knob is in the (#1)OFF position, (FIGURES 7 and 7A), as will be presently described. As shown in FIGURES 7, 8, etc. this lever 110 has an oval or polygonal-shaped opening 163'there-in through which passes the compression spring 94, minute mounting for this end of the lever inthe front mounting plate 61. A semicircular tongue 166 projects forwardly from the center of the front edge of the flange and in the pivotal mounting of thelever thistonguein a-downwardly bent form is threaded forwardly through a rectangular slot 167 (FIGURE 17) in theiron-t mounting plate 61; or is passed forwardly through this slot'in a straight form and is then bent over in adownwardly ex.- 7 tending direction on the front side of the mounting plate,

whereby the lower end of the lever is provided with a hingedmounting permitting fore and aft-swinging move:- rnent of the lever with the axial sh-ifting'of the hour hand gear 92.

Pivotally supported at the opposite swinging end of this time responsive lever 110 is a spring biased flipper latch 170 which is adapted to engage latching-shoulders on the buzzer control arm 1-60 andon a sequencecontrol lever both ofwhich control memberslie below the to'the time responsive trip-ping lever 110', it will be recalled that this lever is, caused to swinging end ofthe time resp onsive lever 11%. The pivotal i mounting of the flipper latch 170 is effectedin a hook-" shaped mounting notch 171 formed in, the'xlever, see FIGURE 8), this notch having a closed outer end 172 and ,closed side edges 173 but having an open inner e'ndt- As shown in FIGURES and 16, the flipper latch 17% comprises a latching shank portion 174 which is arranged to project forwardly or downwardly from the under side of in the opposite side edges of this shank portion 174 are the lever 110 substantiallyat right angles thereto. Formed notches 175 whichare adapted-to engagewith arather punched out of the front frame plate 61. This upper armportion 176 is preferably bent with a slight inclination in the direction of the pull of the tension spring 17-7, and I bent forwardly from the side-edges of this upper arm portion 176 are stopwings 170' which are adapted to have stop abutment against the "closed end 172 of the mounting notch 171; These stop wings limit the spring urged rocking movement of the flipper latch 17b (in a clockwise direction as viewed in FIGURE. 15 to an'upright position with thelatching shank portion 174 projecting inwardly at'right angles to the 'lever 110. However, the flipper latch 170 is free to swing reversely (in a counterclockwise direction asviewed in FIGURE '15) in opposition to the tension of the spring 17 7 whenever the latching shoulders on the control members beneath the lever 11tlmove toward the right (FIGURE 14) against the back side of the latching shank portion 174.

Punched downwardly from the swinging end of the time responsive lever 110, along its other edge opposite to the flipper mounting notch 171, is a lug 179 which is adapted to abut against the "back surface of the mounting plate 61 for limiting the inward swinging movement ofthe lever 110 substantially to the parallel, position shown in FIGURE 8A; it being noted in this regard that the downward inclination of the tension-spring 177 tend-s'to-sw ing the time responsive lever 111 inthis direction, in addition to'normally holding the flipper latch 170 in latching posi tion. If desired, the intermediate portion of the lever 1 10 maybe formed with downwardlyturned side lips 110' abutlnentagainst 2; lug 63d which is bent inwardly .ir'om therear base plate 62. Pressedtdownwardly to, project from the under side .of the circular hub portion 182 are spaced-bearing dimples 187 (FIG. 8) which have sliding I contact with the adjacent surface of the front mountingplate 61, whereby to reduce'the ,rotative' friction of the member 180. F I r Projecting outwardly from part of the periphery of hub portion 182 is a sector of gear teeth 188 that mesh with a pinion 189 which is secured, to the setting shaft 41 that carries the indexing or sequence setting knob 43 on its front end. The operatingrelati-cnship is such that when this indem'ng knob 43 is rotated intoeither one of the tour indexing positions designated OFFf fON,

AUTO; and ALARM, the switch sequence actuating member 180 is correspondingly rotated to occupy the successive positions shownin FIGURES 7, 8, 9 and 10. Limited rotative movement is transmitted from the rotatable sequence member 180 to the buzzer controlling arm 16llthroughan arcuate slot 191 formed in the sequence member l tland hence rotating therewith, into which rotatable slot extends a lug 192 bent forwardly (from the hub portion 193 of the buzzer controlling arm 160. This rotatable arcuate slot191 has a top stop shoulder 191' and a bottom stop shoulder 191" adapted to have cooperating stop engagement with the top and bottom edges respectively of the swingable lug 192. The lug 192 extends forwardly through the, swinging motion trans-.

m-itting slot-191 and enters a stationary ancuate slot 194 punched out of the front mounting plate 61 (FIGURE 17). This stationary arcuate slot 194 has, the same con-,

centric radius as the rotatable arcuate slot 1'91, but is of shorter angular length than .said rotatable slot.191; As best shown in FIGURE 17,-thisfstationary slot194likewise has top and bottom stop shoulders 194' and 194 adapted to have stop engagement with the top and bottom stud 134 which may have mounting support at one end in the front mounting plate 61; or they may be mounted in preassentbled relation on a similar pivot stud which has rotatable bearing mounting in the front and rear mounting plates 61 and 62, these two control arms 160' and 180 havinglimited relative rotation therehetween. The sequence controlling member 180 comprises a large circular hub portion 182, from which extends an outwardly projecting arm 183 which is adapted to operate the electric switch by rotatively wiping'across the top of the lip 132 of lever thereby depressing the contact actuating slide 127into switch closing position. This switch actuating sequence member is continuously biased to rotate ina counterclockwise direction (FIGURES 8, 9; etc.) by

,a torsion spring185 which is coiledaround the projecting edges respectively of the swingable lug 192, whereby this stationary slot 194 cooperates with the rotatable slot 191 and lug 192 to establish the two end stops which determine the end limits of the rotary motion of the manually actuated switch control or sequence member 180. The outwardly extending portion of the buzzer controlling member 160, which is formed with the dwells and valley 16tla-160c at its extremity, has an outwardly and upwardly bent offset 160 from the plane ofthe hubv portion 193st) that this offset arm portion will clear certain latching shoulders which are carried by the sequence or indexing member 180, these latching shoulders passingwbeneath this upwardly offset buzzer controlling arm. Such upwardly ofiset buzzer controlling arm lies in a plane, however, that will permit such controlling arm to pass beneath the outer extremity of-the time responsive lever 110 in any of the inward and outward positions of this lever 110. g A

The buzzer controlling member 160- and the switch controlling member 180 are provided with latching shoulders which rotate under the lower latching edge of flipper latch 176 along three different radii designated r1, r2

. and r3. The buzzer controlling arm 160 has a singlelatch- This single latching shoulder {195 is of relatively short angular length, and is bent upwardly from an extension 1% projecting from the hub portion 193 ofybuzzer controlling member 160. The switch controlling member 180 is provided with three latching shoulders 196, 197 and 198 all bent upwardly from the outer portions of the hub 182;. The first of these three latching shoulders, in the counterclockwise sequence around the hub 182 (FIGURES 8, 9, 13,"etc.) is" designated 196 and rotates at the intermediate radius r2. This first latching shoulder 1% carried by the hub 132 projects upwardly to a height 1 above any of the other latching shoulders 195, 197 or w 198 (see FIG. 14), and has a relatively long fiat top,

longer than'any of the other shoulders. The other two latching shoulders 197 and 198 carried by-the hub 182,

both rotate-one behind 'the other at the outer radius r3;

These'two latter shoulders have top edges of the same; height, and this height is the lowest in the series, being t V flipper latch. 1 70 (ire. the left 'hand face of shank portion 174,FIG.. 15 as these shoulders become successively unlatched' therefrom. Also, when the trailing or upper end 191? of the-motion. limiting slot 191' engages the motion transmitting lug 1 92 so as to cause the torque of thetorsion. spring 1 85 tobe transmitted to the buzzer control 1 arm 160,. the inner stop shoulder 195 carried: by this buzzer control: arm will. also present its right angle stop 'should'er to theinner or lower side of the flipper latch 170'.

Thelforce of thetension spring 177' is adequate to hold the flipper latch 170 against any of the right angle edges of the latching shoulders 195-498 i-n-opposition to the torque oftheitorsion spring 185. However, the flipper mounting, of the latch 170, the tension'of the spring 177' andthe torsion of the spring 185 are such that a firm rotative finger pressureapplied to. the indexing k nob 43in either direction of rotation is operative to cause manual rotation of the twoicontrolmemrbers I60-and180- in either direction, in

opposition t-o'the-tension spring 177' or torsion spring 185, whenever it is desired to manually turn the indexing knob 43 i-n either direction to a different indexing position.

I shall: first describe the ;OFF, ON, AUTO and ALARM positions illustrated in FIGURES 7, 8, 9 and 1-0,. describing the sequence of operationsoccurring when the sequencecontrol member 180 revolves in a clockwise direction. ('FIGURESR; 9 and 10) in passing through these diiferent'sequence or indexing positions.

\ FIGURESJ andI 7A illustrate theparts in the OFF or: #lposition, in-wh'ich the-switch control member 180 and the-buzzer control member 160 are disposed at the .limit of: 'their rotative movement in one direction, the parts being manually turned into this OFF or #1 positionthrough manual rotation of -the indexingknob 43. A continuous torsional biasis exertedby the torsion spring 18 5 tending toyieldingly hold thecontrol members .180 and160in this OFF position, this'spring bias acting'in a. clockwise directionas viewed in FIGURE 7, and in a countenclockwise direction as viewed in FIGURES 8-12. Tirestop. limit ot the rotative movement in this direction is established by the bottom edgeof the motion transmitting lug 192?engaging against the bottom stop shoulder 1 94 ofstationary slot 194, and-the top stop should-er 19'1 of rotata'ble sloti191' abutting the top edge of thelug 1922. Referring to FIGURE 7A, it will be seen that in this OFF positiontheflipper-latch 70 is restingon top of the relatively-high flat stop shoulder 196, in which posi tionthetime-responsive lever 110 is tilted up to an angle which-takes it beyond'the operating influence of the axially shiftable time driven gear 92, in'consequence of which theitime" selecting mechanism. can operate indefinitely without transmitting any movement to the time responsive lever 110; Inthis OFF position of the parts, the switch actuating arm-183 extends downwardly at such inwardly inclined angle that the switchiopierating slide 127 remains in :its uppermost posit-ionto hold the electric switch open. A'lsogin this OFF position the, upper endI191f of the rotatable:arcuate-slot191 hasreacteddownwardly' against the motion transmitting lug 192: to oscillate the buzzer oontrol*arm;160 in such: direction of rotation (clockwise, as viewedin-EIGURE; 7).. as to; bring therelatively long dwell 160a under the lip 8{f or holding" the buzzer reed flexed outwardly into its non-sounding position.

FIGURES 8 and 8A showthe position of the parts when the indexing knob 43 is manually rotated out of the OFF (#1) position into'the ON (#2) position.- The switch controlling member 180 swings the arm 183 into a substantially vertical position, thereby rocking the switch actuating lever 130 and depressing the switch slide 127 down into switch closingposition. This motion of switch actuating member. 180 is not transmitted to the buzzer control arm 160 because the arcuate slot 191'merely' it occupied in FIGURE 7, in which position the vibratory l reed is flexed outwardly into its non-sounding position. The switch controlling member 180' is latched in this ON (#2) position, with the radioturned on but the buzzer not sounding, by the action or" the flipper pawl 170 snapping off the flat top of the high latching shoulder 196 down into engagement against the forward or leading edge of this shoulder, as illustrated in FIGURE 8A. i

FIGURES 9 and 9A show the operating positions occupied by the parts when the indexing knob 43 is manually rotated through the next step up tothe AUTO (#3) position. This rotates the switch control member I 180 to swing the downwardly extending arm 183 ch of the high part of the switch actuating lever 130, thereby permitting the switch to. move to open circuit position and turn the radio off. The buzzer reed still remains flexed outwardly into its non-sounding position. because the frictional pressure of its curved end 158 against the fiat dwell 160a establishes enough friction against the end of the buzzer control arm 160. The length of the slot 191 permits this further angular movement of the switch actuating arm 180' without transmitting corresponding angular movement to the buzzer control arm 160; itbeing-noted, however, that the bottom edge of the motion transmitting lug 192 is now being engaged by the bottom end 191" of the rotatable slot 191. The parts are yieldingly latched in this AUTO position'by the action of'the latching shoulder 197 in rotating in a clockwise direction under the flipper latch 170 so that the flipper latch'drops down into latching engagement against the right angle leading edge of the latchingshoulder 197.

FIGURES 1 0 and 10A show the operating position" of the parts when the indexing knob 43' has'been manually rotated through the final step in this direction, into the ALARM (#4) position. Inthis position, the switch actuating arm 183 has been rotated still furtheraway from the switch actuating bell crank lever and the lower end 191 of the slot 191 has imparted rotating movement to'the lug 192 for swinging the buzzer control 'arm in a clockwise direction, into the position illustrated in FIGURE 10. In this fourth position of the parts, the abutment of the bottom stop shoulder 191" of therotatable slot 191 against the bottom'edge of lug 192, and the abutment of the top edge of lug 192 against the top stop shoulder 194' of stationary slot 194'estab lishes the stop limit of rotation in this direction of control member 180' and setting knob 43-. valley 16% has been swung beyond the hp 158 of the buzzer'reed, so that the cam slope160c has-been brought up against the lip 158 for continuing to hold the vibratory reed flexed outwardly into its non-sounding position; Thus, in this ALARM position, the radio remains turned olf and the buzzer remains in its non-sounding condition The parts are yieldingly latched in this relae tion' by theend latching shoulder 198' of the switch controlling member 180 moving clockwise under the flipper latch and having: its rightangle edgelatched behind or beyond'the flipper latch. Concurrently with the swing; ing. movement of the switch controlling member therbu'zzer control arm 1'60 hasrevolvedcorrespondingly In this position, the

and this has brought the back side of the flipper latch, with the two latching shoulders 1% and 19$ both occupying aligned radial positions in engagement against the back side of the flipper latch. The parts will remain in this ALARM (#4) position until the manual rotation of the indexingknob 43'causes the parts to assume a difierent positiom or until the arrival of the preselected time set upon the timesettable gear 9 5, whichresults in the timeresponsive lever 110 automatically Swinging outwardly'through the first stage of its time responsive latch tripping operation.

- We are'now starting the reverse direction of rotation ofthe switch controlmember l-eti and indexing knob 43, which reverse orcounterclockwise direction of rotation or the switch control memb'er 18d (FIGURES 11 and 12) results a different sequence of some of the control functions from what occurred during the clock- 'Wise rotation of the switchcontrol member 1189. V FIGURES 11 and 11A show the positions assumed by the parts after the time responsive lever 110 has moved outwardly through the first stage of its automatic the latching shoulder '19s a the l buzzer control arm back into latching engagement against A in the reverse direction to the ON (#2) position, which recloses the radio switch 115 but still leaves the lip of the vibratory reed bearing against the long dwell 160a (see FIGURE 8).

tripping operation, which first stage of automatic tripping operation initiates the first stage of such reverse or counter-clockwise rotation. The outward movement of this lever 110 is relatively gradual because of the relatively slow outwardcarnming of theftime driven gear 92 caused by the engagement of the sloping cam humps 97, 97' and 98, 98, and in consequencefofsuch slow outward camming the flipper latch 170 first'releases the latching shoulder 198- carried by-the switch actuating member 180, before the flipper latch '170 releases'the latching because of its above described setting.

shoulder-195 carried by the buzzer control arm 1663.

This prior releasing of the latching shoulder 1% occurs becausethe top of such shoulder is below the top of the inner shoulder 195. The flipper. latch 170, in releasing the first outer shoulder 198, also releases the second outer shoulder 197 because these two shoulders are of the same height. As a resultof this action, the switch control member 180 and the indexing knob 43 both revolve back through the AUTO (#3) position into the ON (#2) position, which brings the arm 185down into its vertical switch closing position. The radio is immediate-- 'ly turned on and begins playing, assuming that the volume control has been given the proper setting. The buzzer control arm 160 remains in the same position shown in- FIGURE 10 for the timerbeing, with the spring bias of the vibratory reed reacting against the cam slope 160a,

and the arcuate slot 191 still having idling motion with respect to the lug 19 2. v I

Meanwhile, the time responsive lever 116 continues to move outwardly at its gradual rate unit, after the lapse of a predetermined time interval, such as 10 minutes, the flipper latch 170 has been raised high enough to clear the inner tripping shoulder 195 carried by the buzzer control arm 160, This'control arm 160, which has been standing in theposition shown in FIGURE 10 with the reedlip I58 being biased or urged outwardly by reason of bearing against the cam slope 1600, is immediately cammed over: counterclockwise by the spring bias of the reed acting against this cam slope 16th:, as a result of the unlatchi ng, of the latchshoulder 195, sothat the valley depression 16012 thereupon moves into registry with the lip on the vibratory reed..

FIGURES l2 and 12A show this position of the parts,

with the valley depression 16% in registry with the lip on the reed, which completely frees the reed so that the buzzer'thereupon begins sounding, and willcontinue to sound until the indexing knob 43 is manually turned down into the OFF (#1) position, which swings the long flat dwell 160a-under the lip end of the vibratory reed (FIG URE 7) so that thesounding of the buzzer is stopped.

If it is de'siredth'at the playing of the radio be allowed I to continue, after the soundingof the buzzer 'has'been stopped, the indexing knob 43 isrnerely turned back "If it is desired to have the radio turn on automatically I without having the buzzer sound shortly thereafter, the

indexing knob 43 is placed in the AUTO (#3) position (FIGURE 9) instead of the ALARM (#4)position (FIGURE 10) Then, when the preselected time "arrives,

' the switch controlling member 18% swings into the ON I 2) position (FIGURE 11) for closing the radio switch j 115 and turning on the radio, but the camslope ldtlc continues to maintain outward pressure against the buzzer 'reedso that the buzzer will not thereafter sound as long 1 Thus, when the preselected time arrives, the switch controlling member lSd swings into the ON (#2) position (FIGURE 11) for closing the switch but no sound or a minimum amount of sound is emitted by the radio Approximately 10 minutes after the switch controlling member has moved into this"ON (#2) position (FIGURE 11'), the continued upward movement of the time responsive lever 110 trips out the latching shoulder 11% and permits the buzzer control lever 16% to swing'the valley depression 16% into register withthe lip end of the buzzer reed,

whereupon the buzzer starts to sound. If it is desired to have the buzzer begin sounding more nearly to the preselected time, the setting given to the time set table gear must be advanced slightly to compensate for the above 10 minute delay. 1 v

This completes the cycle of most or all of the control functionswhich can be performed manually by the rotation of the indexing 'knob 43, and which can be performed automatically by the timed movement of the time response lever pursuant to the establishment of a preselected time setting on the time settable gear 95.

Attention is directed to the fact-that in my improved construction the four position indexing knob 43 always indicates the true position of the electrical switch i.e. it always indicates whether the radio (or other conneotedappliance) is energized or not. In different competitive devices thathave come to. my attention, I have 7 found that their indexing'knobs or indexing" shafts do not advance or change position when the electrical switch closes .to turn on' the radio automatically. Hence, with these competitive device s, if the radio volume is set low, or if the radio station which' has. been tuned in should 'go ofi the air, the radio couldIrernain energized all night or indefinitely. Inmy improved construction, a mere glance-at the position designated by the indexing knob- 43 always tells whether or not the electric switch for energizing the radio is or is not closed.-

Referring now to the so-c'alled SLEEP SWITCH con- 1 trol mechanism 45 which is operated through the left hand setting knob 44, this knob 44 and its rib 46' are rotatable through almost from a top position denoted by 0 on an associated indicating scale, down to a lower position denoted by 60 on the scale. The 0 position indicates that the SLEEP SWITCH function is not then operative or has not been set to function. The 60 position indicates that the SLEEP SWITCH. function has been set to automatically turn off the radio in approximately '60 minutes.

The rotatable'shaftdz on which the knob 44 is mounted extends rearwardly through the two frame plates 11 and 62, and has fixedly secured thereto between these two 136' is'bearing against the bell crank arm 134.

' formed with an integral pinion 209 to provide for remote drive situations where -the"SLEEP SWITCH function may bemade responsive to a control removed from the clockswitch 30. -A pin 211 projecting rearwardly' from the diegcasting 208 swings in an arcu-ate slot 212 punched out of the rear base plate 62 to limit the range of rotative movement of theknob' 44 substantially to the angular span between the and 60 marks on the front scale. A torsion spring 214 coiled around the shaft 42 in back of the die. casting 20 8 has one end be'aringagainst the side of the stop pin- 211, and has its other end bearing against a lug 215 punched forwardly from the lower end of the arcuate slot 212, this torsion spring normally tending to hold the knob and die casting at the end of the front scale.

I The cam 1'36 rotates in the plane of the upwardly extending bell crank arm 134 of'the switch actuating lever 130; When the knob 44' is in its 0 position this cam is spaced slightly fromthe' bell crank arm, but as soon as the cam is manually rotated into aset position, it swings its raised dwell 136 over against the arm 134, oscillating the bell crank lever 1'30 downwardly into switch closing position. The fixed radius of the dwell 136' maintains the bell crank lever 130 depressed into a constant switch closing position so long as the dwell The SLEEP SWITCH knob 44 can be turned to any inter.- mediateposition between the 0 and the 60 positions when it is desired that the radio be turned off in a shorter interval of time, such as 10 minutes or minutes. When the SLEEP SWITCH cam 136 is rotated'into any desired position for establishing a sleep switch interval for automatically turning off the radio the sector gear 296 is also revolved into meshwitlr a time driven piniondriving cone 223-, and the time driven pinion has the adjacent end of its hub 22-4 for-med with a conical surface 225 for matching the friction driv'econe 223". Mounted I on the spindle 222 for free rotative and sliding movement thereon is a time driven gear 226 which derives its constant time driven rotation by its meshing relation with the time train gear 88. The inner end of this time driven gear 226 is formed with aconical' drive surface 227' which matches with a conical" driven surface 228 on the adjacent surface of the pihion hub 224, so'thatthepinion 220 has a'friction slippage di'ive transmitted thereto through its floating mounting'between the two'coni'cal'drive' surfaces 223 and 228 The hub 224' base; very loose radially shiftable' fit around the spindle between the two conical drivesurfac'es 2'23 and 227 sothat the. pinion 220 can shift radially if thereshould be end to end abutment between the teeth on the pinion 220 and the teeth" on the sector 206' when the sector swings into mesh with the pinion- 2202 A compression spring 229' confined between the front side of the shi-ftable driving gear226 and a washer 230bearing against the inner side of the frontimounting-plate 61 serves to hold the driving gear 226 pressed rearwardly against the front side of the pinion hub 224; which, in

turn,-ser ves-to hold the rear side of the pinion hub 224 pressedrea rwardl against the driving cone 223. It will be seen-from the foregoing that when the sector gear 206 is swung into mesh with the time driven pinion 220, should'there be any tendency to jam byreason of end-toend tooth abutment, the driving pinion 220 can readily accommodate meshing of the teeth by rotativefrictional slippage and also by inward radial shifting between the driving pinion and the conical drive surfaces 223 and 228. The driving pinion 220* automatically center from falling forwardly out of the slot 245.

with gear 88 of the clock train, the parts being so'proportion'ed as to revolve the sector gear 206' back through its 180 range of rotation in approximately 60 minutes,

starting with the time marking 6O on the scale and going back to the 0 marking. Y I

The forward end .of-the spindle 222 extends forwardly beyond the front mounting plate 61 and has a drive pinion 231 mounted thereon. This drive pinion 231 ob- 'tains the benefit of the friction slippage timedriven drive transmitted from the gear 22tl-to the spindle 222' by way I of the friction, slippage conical drive surfaces 223 and 228. This drive pinion 23-1 inoperative to transmit timed return rotation to a cam wheel constituting part of the buzzer-delay repeat mechanism, previously referred to as the 40-Winker mechanism 55.

Referring now to this'latter mechanism, and with particular reference to FIGURE 17, this mechanism is adapted to be actuated by the aforementioned vertically swinging lever 52 which projects outwardly-from one side of the device in position to be stroked downwardly by the finger. This lever is mounted on a transverse pivot 233 and extends out from-between the face plate 66 and front mounting plate 61. A stop wing 235 extends downwardly from the lever 52 for engaging the side of the device and thereby limiting the downward finger actuated' stroke: imparted to the lever 52. The downwardly extending actuating arm 236 of. this lever has a circular aperture 237 in its lower end which establishes pivotal swinging movement with a pivot lug 238 projecting forwardly from an actuating link 240'. A tension spring. 241 connected between the lower end of the link 240 and a notch in the front mounting plate 61 normally tends to hold the link 240 in the retracted position shown. The link extends diagonally upwardly, and at its upper end is formed with arearwardly bent lip 244 which projects rearwardly through a rectangular slot 245' punched out in the mounting plate 61', this slot 245 servingto guide the rearwardly bent hp 244' and to alford end stops for controlling its movement. plate 61 the hp 244 isformed with along forwardly extending guide tongue 246 for preventing the lip 244 The front edge of the rearward lip 244co'nstitutes an advancing nose 244" formed on the outer front portion of the link 2'40, and this advancing nose is adapted to impart advancing movement against successive notched shoulders 247 formed in. the right hand peripheral portion of a cam wheel 251 which is rotatably mounted ona pivot stud 252 carried by the mounting. plate 61'. Projecting rearwardly from thecam'wheel 251 is a lug254which extends into an arcuate slot 255 in the mounting plate 61 for limiting the range of oscillatory movement of the cam wheel 251. Formed in the upper portion of the'oarn wheel is a fiat cam slope 256 which, in the normal position of the cam wheel 251 shown in FIGURE 17, bears against or is spaced slightly from the inner or lower side of the lug 15-11 that projects forwardly from the edge of the vibratory reed through the slot 152. It will be seen from the foregoing that a single downward stroking of the finger lever 52 will operate through the advancing nose 244 and first pawl tooth 247 to advance the cam wheel 251 sufficiently far't'o bring the circular cam dwell-257 against the lug 151for forcing the vibratory reed out wardly into its non-sounding position. Successive-downward strokes imparted to the finger lever 52' are operative to cause'the advancing nose 244 to engage succeeding pawlteeth 247 for advancing the cam wheel 251 tomove more of the arcuate length ofthe-concentric carndwell 257 under the lug 151'. I p

As soon as the cam wheel 251' has-been; advanced In rear ofthe mounting V through one, two, or three steps, it begins slowly rotat-- ing back to the normal position shown, which permits sounding of the buzzer., This timed return rotation is revolved into mesh with the teeth of. the continuously rotating time driven pinion 231, as soon'as the finger lever is stroked downwardly either once, twice, or three times. The idler gear 262 is capable of a spring resisted radial shifting movement if the teeth of the gear sector 261 should 'accidently have end to end abutment with the 7 end which is anchored against a lug punched forwardly from the idler gear 262.. This spring normally holds the idler gear 262 shifted or thrust diagonally downwardly for effecting mesh between the sector teeth 261 and the teeth or" the drive pinion 231, but the spring permits momentary upwardshifting of the idler gear 262 if the teeth do not immediately mesh, suchupward shifting not disturbing the meshing relation between the sectors 261 i and 269, however.

As previously described in connection with-the friction slippage time driven drive to the sector gear 2% of the SLEEP SWITCH mechanism shown in FIGURE 5, the time driven pinion 231 also receives the benefit of the friction slippage time driven drive transmitted from the gear 226 to the spindle Z22. Hence, if there is any tendency of the teeth of the sector gear 261 and the teeth of the pinion 231 to have end-to-end abutment this is further accommodated without injury by reason of the friction slippage drive to the pinion 231. The timed relation of the drive from the spindle 222 to the cam wheel 251 is such as to cause this cam wheel to be driven back in a reverse direction to present the flat spot 256 to the lug 151 after the lapse of a relatively short time interval from the downward stroking of the finger actuated lever 52. Preferably, this buzzer time-delay interval is in the neighborhood of five to seven minutes for one downward stroking of the lever 52. With the three pawl teeth 247 provided in.

the cam wheel 251, the lever 52 can be stroked downwardly three times in quick succession for establishing a longer cumulative delay period ranging up to or minutes before the buzzer will sound again; or with two downward strokes the cumulative delay period would be approximately 10 to 14 minutes; It will be understood that the number of pawl teeth 24'? may be increased beyond the three teeth shown.

In summarizing the SLEEP SWITCH mechanism 45, and the -Winker mechanism 55, it will be seen that both are time driven back to normal positions throughthe single train of driving parts 88, 226, 223, 222, etc. ItWill also be noted that the single friction slippage drivemechanism 223, 225, 226 and'ZZI operates to transmit a time driven friction slippage drive to both the SLEEP SWITCH mechanism and to the 40-Winker mechanism.

While I have illustrated and described what I regard to be the preferred embodiment of my invention, nevertheless it will be understood that such is merely exemplary and that numerous modifications and rearrangements may be made thereinwithout departing from the essence of the invention. a

I claim: 1 r

l. A clock controlled switch mechanism for use between an electrical power source and apparatus to'be energized thereby comprising:

(a) a time driven rotatable member driven by a clock mechanism,

(b) a manually time settable rotatable member cooperating with said time driven member,

(c) one of said members being capable of shifting movement,

(d) cooperating cam surfaces on said member-s operative to effect a gradual shift of said shiftable member at the preset time which has been set up on said time settable member,

7 (e) a time responsive tripping lever adapted to have .pivotal movement imparted thereto by the gradual shifting movement of said shiftabler otatable member, (f) flipper latch means carried by said tripping lever, (g) a rotatable switch control member operative in diflierent positions to closeand open an electric switch, (h) a pivot post on which said switch control member is mounted for rotary movement,

(i) biasing spring means normally tending to rotate said switch control member in one direction of rotation about said pivot post,

(i) a m'anualy rotatable indexing knob operatively connected to rotate said switch control member in either direction of rotation about said pivot post,

(k) and latching shoulder means comprising a plurality of latching shoulders carried by said switch control member with which the flipper latch means on said tripping lever is adapted to have releasable latching engagement,

(I) said latching shoulders rotating with said switch control member in a plurality of circular paths concentric with said pivot post and at ditferen-t radii therefrom,

.(m) said flipper latch means extending substantially radially with respect to said pivot post so as to be capable of having latching engagement with said latching shoulders on said switch control member,

(11) certain of said latching shoulders projecting to different latching heights whereby they are released by said flipper latch means at different times as said tripping lever is gradually raised to progressively higher unlatching levels by the gradual shifitof said shiftable member.

2. The combination recited in claim 1 wherein:

(0) said switch control member is in the form of a disk, and (p) said latching shoulders project upwardly from one side or operating face of said disk substantially at i right anglesthereto. 3. The combination recited in claim 1:

, (0) wherein said switch control member is in the form of a disk,

( 2) wherein said latching shoulders project upwardly from one side or operating face of said disk substantially at right angles thereto and have substantially right angle leading edges and sloping trailing edges,

(q) wherein pivot means is provided for pivotally mounting said flipper latch means on said tripping lever, and v (1') wherein a biasing spring is provided for biasing said flipper latch means in one direction around said pivot means,

(s) said pivot means and said biasing spring cooperating to cause said flipper latch means to slide up'the sloping trailing edges of said latching shoulders by outward swinging movement of said tripping lever without said flipper latch means pivoting relatively to said lever, and

(t) said pivot means and said biasing spring also cooperating when the right angle leading edges of said latching shoulders actforcioly against said flipper latch means to cause said flipper latch means to pivot relatively to said tripping lever without causing outward swinging movement of said tripping lever.

*4. A clock controlled audible buzzer mechanism come prising:-

(a) a time driven rotatable member driven by a clock mechanism, p

(b) a manually time settable rotatable memberco- 7 operating with said time driven member,

(c)'one of said members being capable of shifting movement,

(d) cooperating registering surfaces on said members operative to effect a shift of said shiftable member at the preset time which has been set up on said time settable member,

(e) a time responsive tripping lever adapted to have pivotal movement imparted thereto by the shifting movement of said shiftable member,

(1) .fiipper latch meanscarried by said tripping lever,

(g) buzzer control means comprising a rotatable buzzer control disk operative in different rotated positions to interrupt or to permit the audible vibration of an-audible buzzer,

(h) a pivot'post on which said buzzer control disk is mounted for rotary movement,

(i) biasing spring means normally tending to rotate said buzzer control disk in one direction of rotation about said pivot post,

(1') a manually rotatable indexing knob operatively connected to rotate said buzzer control disk in either direction of rotation about said pivot post,

(k) and latching shoulder means carried by said buzzer control disk with which the flipper latch means on said tripping lever is adapted to have releasable latching engagement,

(I) said latching shoulder means comprising a latching shoulder projecting upwardly from one side or operating face of said buzzer control disk for rotation with said disk in a circular path about the axis of said pivot post,

(m) said flipper latch means extending substantially radially with respect to said pivot post and parallel to the operating face of said disk so as to be capable of having latching engagement with said latching shoulder on said buzzer control disk.

5. The combination as set forth in claim 4:

(11) wherein said latching shoulder has a substantially 1 right angle leading edge and a sloping trailing edge,

( wherein pivot means is provided for pivotallymounting said flipper latch means on said tripping lever, and 1 (p) wherein a biasing spring is provided for biasing said flipper latch means in one direction around said pivot means,

(q) said pivot means and said biasing spring cooperating to cause said flipper latch means to slide up the sloping trailing edge of said latching shoulder'by outward swinging movement of said tripping lever Without said flipper latch means pivoting relatively to said lever,

(r) and said pivot means and said biasing spring also cooperating when the right angle leading edge of' said latching shoulder acts forcibly against said flipper latch means to cause said flipper latch means to pivot relatively to said tripping lever without causing outward swinging movement of said tripping lever.

6. A clock controlled switch mechanism and audible buzzer mechanism comprising:

(a) a time driven rotatable member driven by a clock mechanism,

(b) a manually time settable rotatable member cooperating with said time driven member,

(c) one of said members being capable of shifting movement,

(d) cooperating cam surfaces on said members operative to effect a gradual shift of said shiftable member at the preset time which has been set up on said time settable member,

(e) a time responsive tripping lever adapted to have pivotal movement imparted thereto by the gradual shifting movement of said shiftable member,

( flipper latch means pivotally mounted on said tripping lever,

(g) spring means normally biasing said flipper latch means for rotation in one direction in its pivotal mounting on said tripping lever,

(h) a rotatable switch control member operative in 7 (k) biasing spring means normally tending to rotate said switch control member in one direction of rotation about said pivot post, p

(l) a manually rotatable indexing knob operatively connected to rotate said switch control member in either direction of rotation about said pivot post,

(m) motion transmitting means embodying a lostmotion connection for transmitting rotational motion from said switch control member to said buzzer control member in either direction about said pivot post,

(n) and a plurality of latching shoulders carried by said switch control member and by said buzzer control member with which the, flipper latch means on said tripping lever is adapted to have releasable latching engagement,

(0) said latching shoulders rotating with their respective control members in a plurality of circular paths concentric with said pivot post and dilferent radii therefrom,

(p) said flipper latch means extending substantially radially with respect to said pivot post so as to be capable of having latching engagement individually or simultaneously with said latching shoulders on said switch controlling member and on said buzzer controlling member,

(q) certain of said latching shoulders projecting to different latching heights whereby they are released by said flipper latch means at different times as said tripping lever is gradually raised to progressively higher unlatching levels by the gradual shift of said shiftable member.

7. The combination as set forth in claim 6:

(r) wherein said switch control member and said buz- Zer control member are both in the form of concentnically rotating disks, and

(s) .wherein said latching shoulders project upwardly from said disks substantially at right angles thereto and have substantially right angle leading edges and sloping trailing edges,

(t) whereby the right angle leading edges act forcibly against said flipper latch means to cause said flipper latch means to pivot relatively to said tripping lever without causing outward swinging movement of said tripping lever, and (u) whereby said sloping trailing edges cooperate with said flipper latch means to cause outward swinging movement of said tripping lever without said flipper latch means pivoting relatively to said lever.

8. Mechanism of the construction defined in claim 1:,

. a1 7 knob for indicating whether said indexing knob is in switch-open or switch-closed position, and

(q) wherein mechanism is also provided which positively compels said indexing'knob to be in register with the switch-closed marking legend whenever said electric'switch is in closed'position. 9,}Mechanism of the construction defined in claim 6: (r) wherein said manually rotatable indexing knob is operative in one direction of rotation to rotate said switch and buzzer control members through a pluralityof indexing positions in a forward sequence, and is operative in the other direction of rotation to rotate said control members through a plurality of said indexing positions in the reverse sequence, and

(s) wherein means is also provided which is'operative in onlyone direction of rotation of said indexing knob to cause 'said electric switch to move into closed automatic mechanism responsive to the actuation of said buzzer delay member -for rendering said'buzzer temporarily non-sounding,

(p) means driven by. said time driven member for autoi matically restoring said automatic mechanism to the position permitting sounding of said buzzer, I

i (q) and means comprising part of said automatic mechanism enabling the buzzer-control means toninter- V ruptlthe buzzer operationfor a time interval corresponding to a single actuation of said manually actuated buzzer-delay member, or to interrupt the buzzer operation for a cumulative period covering the totalized time intervals corresponding to a plurality of :actuations of said manually actuated buzzer-delay member.

11. A clock controlled audible buzzer mechanism com prising:

(a) clock mechanism driven by a synchronouselectric motor, a I I (b) a time driven member driven by said clock mechanism,

(c) a manually operated time settable member adapted to be manually set for timed coaction with said time driven member at apreselected time,

(d) tripping means responsive to said timed coaction at said preselected time,

(e) an audible alarm buzzercomprisi-ng a vibratory reed adapted to be vibrated rr'iagnetically by said electric motor, a

' -(f) buzzer control means operative to place said buzzer alternatively in a sounding condition or ina nonsounding condition,

(-g) said buzzer control means responding to said tripping means at the. preselected time to cause said buzzer to'sound to awaken a sleeping person, and

(h) manually actuated buzzer-delay mechanism for in-- stitutin-g a time controlled interruption of the buzzer operation to enable that person to get a desired additional amount of sleep by silencing the buzzer for a predetermined time interval, (i) said buzzer delay mechanism comprising a manual- 1y ac a ed b zz ry e ber se m d t be ma 22 ually. actuated once or a plurality of times in relatively quick succession, (j) automatic mechanism responsive to said actuation of said buzzendelay member for rendering said buzzer temporarily non-sounding by flexing said vibratory reed into a non-sounding condition,

(k) means driven by said time driven member for automatioally restoring said automatic mechanism to the position permitting sounding of said buzzer, and

(l) meanscomprising part of said automatic mechanism enabling the buzzer control means to interrupt the buzzer operation for a time interval corresponding to a single actuation of said manually actuated buzzer- I delay'member, .or to interrupt thebuzzer operation for a cumulative period covering the'totalized time intervals corresponding to a plurality of actuations out said manually actuated buzzer delay member.

'12. A 'clock controlled switch mechanism for use be- 1 tween an electrical power source and apparatus to be energized-thereby comprising:

(a) a time driven member driven "by a clock mechanism, I

(b) a manually operable time setbable member cooperating with said time driven member,

(0) a tripping lever caused to have outward pivoting (e) means mounting 'said switch controlling member for rotary movement,

(1) spring means normally tending to move said switch controlling member into a predetermined controlling position,

(g) and latch mechanism for opposing said spring means, p

(h) said latch mechanism comprising latching shoulders rotating with said switch controlling member,

(i) said latching shoulders having substantially right angle leading edges and'sloping trailing edges,

(j) a flipper latch carried by said tripping lever for engaging said latching shoulders,

(/c) pivot means pivota'lly mounting said flipper latch onsaid tripping lever,

(l) and a biasingspring for biasing said flipper latch in one direction around said pivot means,

i (m) said pivot means and biasing spring cooperating to cause said flipper latch to slide up the'sloping trailing edges of said latching shoulders by outward swinging movement of said tripping lever without said flipper latch pivoting relatively to said lever,

(It) said pivot means and biasing spring also cooper ating when the right angle leading edges of said latching "shoulders act forcibly against said flipper latch to J cause said flipper lat-ch to pivot relatively to said tripping lever without causing outward pivoting movement of said lever.

ReferencesCited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Claims (1)

1. A CLOCK CONTROLLED SWITCH MECHANISM FOR USE BETWEEN AN ELECTRICAL POWER SOURCE AND APPARATUS TO BE ENERGIZED THEREBY COMPRISING: (A) A TIME DRIVEN ROTATABLE MEMBER DRIVEN BY A CLOCK MECHANISM, (B) A MANUALLY TIME SETTABLE ROTATABLE MEMBER COOPERATING WITH SAID TIME DRIVEN MEMBER, (C) ONE OF SAID MEMBERS BEING CAPABLE OF SHIFTING MOVEMENT, (D) COOPERATING CAM SURFACES ON SAID MEMBERS OPERATIVE TO EFFECT A GRADUAL SHIFT OF SAID SHIFTABLE MEMBER AT THE PRESET TIME WHICH HAS BEEN SET UP ON SAID TIME SETTABLE MEMBER, (E) A TIME RESPONSIVE TRIPPING LEVER ADAPTED TO HAVE PIVOTAL MOVEMENT IMPARTED THERETO BY THE GRADUAL SHIFTING MOVEMENT OF SAID SHIFTABLER OTATABLE MEMBER, (F) FLIPPER LATCH MEANS CARRIED BY SAID TRIPPING LEVER, (G) A ROTATABLE SWITCH CONTROL MEMBER OPERATIVE IN DIFFERENT POSITIONS TO CLOSE AND OPEN AN ELECTRIC SWITCH, (H) A PIVOT POST ON WHICH SAID SWITCH CONTROL MEMBER IS MOUNTED FOR ROTARY MOVEMENT, (I) BIASING SPRING MEANS NORMALLY TENDING TO ROTATE SAID SWITCH CONTROL MEMBER IN ONE DIRECTION OF ROTATION ABOUT SAID PIVOT POST, (J) A MANUALY ROTATABLE INDEXING KNOB OPERATIVELY CONNECTED TO ROTATE SAID SWITCH CONTROL MEMBER IN EITHER DIRECTION OF ROTATION ABOUT SAID PIVOT POST, (K) AND LATCHING SHOULDER MEANS COMPRISING A PLURALITY OF LATCHING SHOULDERS CARRIED BY SAID SWITCH CONTROL
US3100961A 1959-10-15 1959-10-15 Clock operated electric switch and alarm buzzer control device Expired - Lifetime US3100961A (en)

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US3192776A (en) * 1963-07-31 1965-07-06 Gen Time Corp Timer drowse mechanism
US3247614A (en) * 1963-02-27 1966-04-26 Fisher Price Toys Inc Clock toy and sound mechanism therefor
US3475899A (en) * 1967-06-08 1969-11-04 Gen Electric Radio and alarm control mechanism
US3484769A (en) * 1966-10-12 1969-12-16 Gen Electric Timing device with optional signal
US3485968A (en) * 1967-06-07 1969-12-23 Gen Time Corp Twenty-four hour time switch
US3686878A (en) * 1969-10-16 1972-08-29 Gen Time Corp Radio clock mechanism having drowse feature
US3725617A (en) * 1972-04-07 1973-04-03 Gen Electric Alarm clock timer with switch actuating lever operable by cam or manual adjustment mechanism
US3882668A (en) * 1973-08-16 1975-05-13 Gen Electric Alarm clock timer
US3930358A (en) * 1973-08-16 1976-01-06 General Electric Company Alarm clock timer
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JPS51149068A (en) * 1975-06-17 1976-12-21 Tamura Electric Works Ltd Alarm mechanism of clock
US4218928A (en) * 1979-01-05 1980-08-26 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air Force Double acting delay mechanism
US4835349A (en) * 1988-03-16 1989-05-30 Taltronics Corporation Automatic shut-off appliance timer

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US2607186A (en) * 1946-06-28 1952-08-19 Claude W Schulze Clock alarm
US2512775A (en) * 1946-10-23 1950-06-27 Anthony J Parissi Signaling device
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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3247614A (en) * 1963-02-27 1966-04-26 Fisher Price Toys Inc Clock toy and sound mechanism therefor
US3192776A (en) * 1963-07-31 1965-07-06 Gen Time Corp Timer drowse mechanism
US3484769A (en) * 1966-10-12 1969-12-16 Gen Electric Timing device with optional signal
US3485968A (en) * 1967-06-07 1969-12-23 Gen Time Corp Twenty-four hour time switch
US3475899A (en) * 1967-06-08 1969-11-04 Gen Electric Radio and alarm control mechanism
US3686878A (en) * 1969-10-16 1972-08-29 Gen Time Corp Radio clock mechanism having drowse feature
US3725617A (en) * 1972-04-07 1973-04-03 Gen Electric Alarm clock timer with switch actuating lever operable by cam or manual adjustment mechanism
US3930358A (en) * 1973-08-16 1976-01-06 General Electric Company Alarm clock timer
US3882668A (en) * 1973-08-16 1975-05-13 Gen Electric Alarm clock timer
JPS513003Y1 (en) * 1973-11-27 1976-01-28
JPS51149068A (en) * 1975-06-17 1976-12-21 Tamura Electric Works Ltd Alarm mechanism of clock
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US4835349A (en) * 1988-03-16 1989-05-30 Taltronics Corporation Automatic shut-off appliance timer

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