US3095657A - Traction footwear - Google Patents

Traction footwear Download PDF

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US3095657A
US3095657A US208862A US20886262A US3095657A US 3095657 A US3095657 A US 3095657A US 208862 A US208862 A US 208862A US 20886262 A US20886262 A US 20886262A US 3095657 A US3095657 A US 3095657A
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Prior art keywords
strap
cleat
heel
toe
ice
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Expired - Lifetime
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US208862A
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Lawrence E Fradette
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Lawrence E Fradette
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/06Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-spurs, ice-cleats, ice-creepers, crampons; Climbing devices or attachments, e.g. mountain climbing irons
    • A43C15/061Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-cleats, ice-creepers
    • A43C15/063Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-cleats, ice-creepers with ice-gripping means projecting from the front foot region
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/06Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-spurs, ice-cleats, ice-creepers, crampons; Climbing devices or attachments, e.g. mountain climbing irons
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/06Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-spurs, ice-cleats, ice-creepers, crampons; Climbing devices or attachments, e.g. mountain climbing irons
    • A43C15/061Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-cleats, ice-creepers
    • A43C15/066Ice-gripping devices or attachments, e.g. ice-cleats, ice-creepers with ice-gripping means projecting from the heel area, e.g. ice spurs

Description

United States Patent 3,095,657 TRACTION FOOTWEAR Lawrence E. Fradette, 915 Mill St., Algonac, Mich. Filed July 10, 1962, Ser. No. 208,862 4 Claims. (Cl. 36--7.6)

The present inventtion broadly relates to traction footwear and more specifically to an improved ice creeper which can be readily mounted on a boot or shoe providing for engagement with slipper surfaces such as ice or crusted snow.

A variety of traction footwear of the so-called ice creeper type have heretofore been used or proposed for use which are constructed in a manner that conventionally causes rapid fatigue to the wearer while walking on slipper surfaces such as ice. In accordance with the improved ice creeper construction comprising the present invention, excellent gripping qualitie are incorporated while simultaneously providing for restricted movement of the ice-engaging spikes relative to the wearers boot or shoe providing for walking characteristics similar to that encountered with conventional footwear. By virtue of this improved construction, muscular strain on the wearers foot and leg muscles is substantially reduced minimizing fatigue and greatly enhancing the comfort and equilibrium of the wearer on slippery surfaces.

It is, accordingly, a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved traction footwear or ice creeper construction which overcome the disadvantages and fatigue inducing tendencies of ice creeper constructions of similar type heretofore known.

Another obj-cot of the present invention is to provide an improved ice creeper which is readily adjustable and removably attachable to the soles of ones boots or shoes and which provides excellent engaging characteristics with ice surfaces enhancing the comfort and equilibrium of the wearer.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved ice creeper construction which is of simple design, of economical manufacture, and of versatile and durable use.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the present invention are achieved by an ice creeper construction including a flexible central strap to which a toe cleat and a heel cleat incorporating a plurality of depending ice-engaging spikes are secured for independent restricted pivoting movement relative to the strap. The toe and heel cleats are, also, provided with suitable laterally adjustable clamping brackets for engaging the side portions of the wearers shoes or boots and include straps thereon for removably securing the ice creeper to the underside of the users shoe.

Other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the subsequent de scription and the appended claims, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation view of an improved ice creeper construction incorporating therein the preferred embodiments of the present invention;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the underside of the ice creeper shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view through the ice creeper shown in FIGURE 2 and taken substantially along the line 33 thereof, and

FIGURE 4 is a front elevation view of the ice creeper shown in FIGURE 1 with the strap shown fragmentarily.

Referring now in detail to the drawings, an ice creeper construction providing for improved comfort and gripping characteristics comprises an elongated central strap 6 which is preferably of a suitable pliable or flexible material such as leather, for example, or other suit-able na- Patented July 2, 1963 "ice tural or synthetic materials such as plastics enabling twisting and longitudinal bending of the strap facilitating conformance thereof with the configuration of the underside of a shoe or boot to which it is applied as well as providing for bending as occasioned during walking by the wearer. The forward end portion of the strap 6 is formed with a series of longitudinally spaced apertures 8 extending along the longitudinal axis of the strap 6. The series of apertures 8 provide for the adjustable fastening of a toe cleat 10 in appropriate longitudinal disposition therealong.

The toe clea-t 10 as may be best seen in FIGURE 2, is of a T-shaped configuration incorporating a plurality of downwardly depending spikes or tangs 12 which are adapted to engage the ice or other slippery surface preventing slippage of the wearer. The spikes 12, as shown in the drawings, are preferably inclined approximately 10 from the vertical to reduce the tendency of ice or snow from becoming impacted against the underside of the cleat.

The toe cleat 10 is formed with a central hole generally indicated at 14 (FIGURE 3) through which a pin or pivot screw 16 extends and is secured thereto by means of a nut 18 threadably engaged on the projecting threaded shank end portion thereof. As may be best 'seen in FIGURE 3, the head portion of the pivot screw 16 is countersunk in the aperture 8 through the central strap 6 providing a flush uninterrupted upper surface on which the underside of the wearers shoe or boot is placed. The nut 18 on the pivot screw 16 is tightened to the ex tent that the toe cleat 10 can pivot about the .axis of the pivot screw 16 relative to the central strap 6.

The degree of pivoting movement of the toe cleat 10 is restricted by suitable stop means comprising an arcuate slot 20 disposed symmetrically relative to the longitudinal axis of the toe oleat and concentrically with respect to the hole 14. The shank end portion or" a pin or stop screw 22 extends through and is adapted to coact with the end portions of the arcuate slot 20 restricting angular pivoting movement of the toe cleat relative to the central strap. The length of the arcuate slot 20 is controlled so as to provide angular movements of the toe cleat up to about 20 and more usually up to about 10. The stop screw 22 as may be best seen in FIGURES 2 and 3 is positioned in an aperture 8 of the central strap rearwardly of the pivot screw 16 and is provided with a nut 24 threadably secured on the threaded shank end portion thereof having its inner surface disposed in sliding bearing contact against the adjacent surface of the toe cleat 10.

Similarly, a heel cleat 26 including a plurality of downwardly depending spikes 28 is pivotally affixed to the rearward end portion of the central strap 6 by means of a pivot screw 30 projecting through an aperture 32 (FIGURE 3) in the strap 6 and through a hole 34 through the heel cleat 26. A suitable nut 36 is threadably engaged on the pivot screw 30 to maintain the underside of the strap and the upper surface of the heel cleat in bearing sliding contact. The restricted pivoting movement of the heel cleat 26 relative to the strap 6 is achieved by an arcuate slot 38 through which the shank end portion of a stop screw 40 extends and is adapted to en gage the ends of the arcuate slot restricting relative angular pivoting movement therebetwee-n. The stop screw 4-0 similarly is formed with a recessed head disposed in one of the series of apertures 3-2 in the rearward portion of the strap and provided with a nut 42 threadably engaged on the projecting shank end portion thereof, which is tightened to the extent that the inner surface thereof is disposed in bearing sliding contact with the underside of the heel cleat adjacent to [the arcuate slot.

In accordance with the arrangement shown in the drawings and hereina'bove described, it will be apparent that the flexibility provided by the central strap 6 in combination with the restricted independent pivoting movement of the toe cleat 10 and the heel cleat 26 relative to the strap provides for slight movements of the We-arers feet as occcasioned during a natural Walking movement without disengaging the spikes from the surface engaged therewith thereby reducing muscle strain and fatigue and resulting in a substantial increase in comfont. Moreover, the provision of the series of apertures 8 enables the toe cleat 19 to be longitudinally adjustably positioned relative to the heel cleat 26 in accordance with the specific length of the wearers shoe or boot so as to achieve optimum comfort and gripping characteristics.

The ice creeper, as shown in the drawing, may be removably secured to the underside of a wearers boot or shoe by means of a toe strap 44 and an ankle strap 46 including suitable buckles 48 for achieving and maintaining the appropriate tension thereof. The toe strap 44 is affixed at each end thereof .to a pair of L-shaped brackets 56 adjustably aflined to the upper and laterally extending portion of the toe cleat it} by a pair of i asteners such as a screw and nut assembly indicated at 52 as may be best seen in FIGURES 2 and 4. A plurality of laterally spaced apertures 54 are provided through the outer projecting portions of the toe cleat It for adjustably positioning the L-shaped brackets '56 in appropriate transverse spaced relationship consistent with the particular width of the wearers boot or shoe.

The heel portion of the ice creeper is formed with an arcuate U-shaped heel strap 56 which is secured at each of its sides and at its rearward end to a series of L-shaped brackets 58 having the upstanding leg portions thereof overlying the outer surface of the heel strap 56. As is best seen in FIGURES 1 and 3, the heel strap 56 is provided with a plurality of apertures 6%) through which a series of nuts and screws 62 are adapted to be positioned for securing the heel strap 56 in appropriate adjusted relationship to the L-shaped brackets 58 consistent with the particular width and length of the heel portion of the wearers boot or shoe. Longitudinal shifting movement of the rearward end portion of the heel strap 56 is accomplished by selectively positioning a screw and nut indicated at 64 (FIGURES 2 and 3) in one of a series of longitudinally spaced apertures 66 in the heel cleat 26.

The transverse width of the heel strap "'56 is adjusted in a manner similar to that hereinbefore described in connection with the toe strap 44 whereby a series of apertures 68 (FIGURE 2) are provided in transversely spaced increments through the heel cleat 26 enabling the L- shaped brackets 58 to 'be positioned in appropriate transverse spaced relationship. It will be apparent that the adjustability afforded by the construction of the ice creeper shown in the drawings enabling adjustment of the length as well as the transverse width thereof to accommodate boots and shoes of different sizes and shapes, enhances the flexibility and versatility of the ice creeper.

While it will be apparent that the preferred embodiments of the invention disclosed are well calculated to fulfill the objects above stated, it will be appreciated that the invention is susceptible to modification, variation and change without departing from the proper scope or fair meaning of the subjoined claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An ice creeper comprising an elongated central strap, a toe cleat including a plurality of downwardly depending spikes which is pivotally secured to the forward end portion of said strap, a heel cleat including a plurality of downwardly depending spikes which is pivotally secured to the rearward end portion of said strap, stop means for restricting the independent pivoting movement of said too cleat and said heel cleat relative to said strap, and means for removably securing said ice creeper to the underside of a shoe.

2. An ice creeper comprising an elongated flexible central strap, a toe cleat including a plurality of downwardly depending spikes which is pivotally secured to the forward end portion of said strap, :a heel cleat including a plurality of downward-1y depending spikes which is pivotally secured to the rearward end portion of said strap, stop means including a pair of pins afiixed to and projecting from said strap and adapted to co-act with said toe cleat and said heel cleat respectively for restlicting the independent pivoting movement thereof relative to said strap, and means for removably securing said ice creeper to the underside of a shoe.

3. An ice creeper comprising an elongated flexible central strap, a toe cleat and a heel cleat pivotally secured in longitudinally spaced relationship to the forward and rearward end portions, respectively, of said strap; each of said cleats comprising a flat plate including a pivot aperture thercthrough for pivotally securing said cleat to the underside of said strap, said plate including an arcuate slot disposed concentrically of said pivot aperture for receiving a stop pin secured to said strap restricting the magnitude of the pivoting movement of said cleat relative to said strap, and a plurality of downwardly depending spikes afiixed to said plate for engaging a slippery surface, and means for removably securing said ice creeper to the underside of a shoe.

4. An ice creeper comprising an elongated flexible central strap, a toe cleat and a heel cleat pivotally secured in longitudinally spaced relationship to the forward and rearward end portions, respectively, of said strap; each of the cleats comprising a substantially flat plate including a plurality of downwardly depending spikes aifixed thereto for engaging a slippery surface, said plate formed with a pivot aperture therethrough for pivotally securing said cleat to the underside of said strap, said plate further formed with an arcuate slot extending symmetrically of the centerline of said cleat and concentrically of said pivot aperture, a pin affixed to said strap and disposed in sliding relationship in said arcuate slot for restricting the magnitude of pivoting movement of said cleat relative to said strap, and strap means connected to said toe cleat and said heel cleat for removably securing said ice creep er to the underside of a shoe.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,008,286 Soderburg Nov. 7, 1911 1,229,406 Brehm June 12, 1917 2,189,884 Dow Feb. 13, 1940 2,441,998 Fisher May 25, 1948 2,579,953 Morris Dec. 25, 1951

Claims (1)

1. AN ICE CREEPER COMPRISNG AN ELONGATED CENTRAL STRAP, A TOE CLEAT INCLUDING A PLURALITY OF DOWNWARDLY DEPENDING SPIKES WHICH IS PIVOTALLY SECURED TO HTE FORWARDLY END PORTION OF SAID ST RAP, A HEEL CLEAT INCLUDING A PLURALITY OF DOWNWARDLY DEPENDING SPIKES WHICH IS PIVOTALLY SECURED TO THE RARWARD END PORTION OF SAID STRAP, STOP MEANS FOR RESTRICTING THE INDEPENDENT PIVOTING MOVEMENT OF SAID TOE CLEAT AND SAID HEEL CLEAT RELATIVE TO SAID STRAP, AND MEANS FOR REMOVABLY SECURING SAID ICE CREEPER TO THE UNDERSIDE OF A SHOE.
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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3229389A (en) * 1964-08-10 1966-01-18 Adams George Gripping attachment for boots
US4286396A (en) * 1979-12-13 1981-09-01 Deacon Robert H Traction device for walking on ice
WO1982000244A1 (en) * 1980-07-15 1982-02-04 L Peyser Multi-purpose crampon
FR2627357A1 (en) * 1988-02-19 1989-08-25 Dubus Philippe Crampons fixed to sole of town shoe - has light supple plates fixed perpendicularly to central plate, and crampons fixed to plates
US5341582A (en) * 1993-04-06 1994-08-30 Sherpa, Inc. Anti-slip device for footwear
US20020095820A1 (en) * 2001-01-23 2002-07-25 Giovale Daniel G. Flexible traction system for common shoes
US20060080861A1 (en) * 2004-10-14 2006-04-20 Park Wan D Safety crampon with generality put on
US20130042503A1 (en) * 2011-08-17 2013-02-21 Sure Foot Corporation Heel Traction Aid and Method of Manufacture Therefor
US9364047B2 (en) * 2014-07-03 2016-06-14 Frank L Fackler Ice flop stopper

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1008286A (en) * 1911-02-03 1911-11-07 Carl A Soderburg Ice-creeper.
US1229406A (en) * 1917-03-21 1917-06-12 Ray A Brehm Ice-creeper.
US2189884A (en) * 1938-02-10 1940-02-13 Bartlett A Dow Antislipping device
US2441998A (en) * 1946-05-14 1948-05-25 Gertrude F Fisher Ice creeper
US2579953A (en) * 1951-02-13 1951-12-25 Naomi M Morris Adjustable shoe gripper

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1008286A (en) * 1911-02-03 1911-11-07 Carl A Soderburg Ice-creeper.
US1229406A (en) * 1917-03-21 1917-06-12 Ray A Brehm Ice-creeper.
US2189884A (en) * 1938-02-10 1940-02-13 Bartlett A Dow Antislipping device
US2441998A (en) * 1946-05-14 1948-05-25 Gertrude F Fisher Ice creeper
US2579953A (en) * 1951-02-13 1951-12-25 Naomi M Morris Adjustable shoe gripper

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3229389A (en) * 1964-08-10 1966-01-18 Adams George Gripping attachment for boots
US4286396A (en) * 1979-12-13 1981-09-01 Deacon Robert H Traction device for walking on ice
WO1982000244A1 (en) * 1980-07-15 1982-02-04 L Peyser Multi-purpose crampon
US4344238A (en) * 1980-07-15 1982-08-17 Peyser Leonard F Multi-purpose crampon
FR2627357A1 (en) * 1988-02-19 1989-08-25 Dubus Philippe Crampons fixed to sole of town shoe - has light supple plates fixed perpendicularly to central plate, and crampons fixed to plates
US5341582A (en) * 1993-04-06 1994-08-30 Sherpa, Inc. Anti-slip device for footwear
US7089688B2 (en) 2001-01-23 2006-08-15 Kahtoola, Inc. Flexible traction system for common shoes
US20020095820A1 (en) * 2001-01-23 2002-07-25 Giovale Daniel G. Flexible traction system for common shoes
US20040187353A1 (en) * 2001-01-23 2004-09-30 Giovale Daniel G. Flexible traction system for common shoes
US6742286B2 (en) * 2001-01-23 2004-06-01 Kahtoola, Inc. Flexible traction system for common shoes
US20060080861A1 (en) * 2004-10-14 2006-04-20 Park Wan D Safety crampon with generality put on
US7461467B2 (en) * 2004-10-14 2008-12-09 Wookyung Tech Co., Ltd. Safety crampon with generality put on
US20130042503A1 (en) * 2011-08-17 2013-02-21 Sure Foot Corporation Heel Traction Aid and Method of Manufacture Therefor
US9161593B2 (en) * 2011-08-17 2015-10-20 Sure Foot Corporation Heel traction aid and method of manufacture therefor
US9364047B2 (en) * 2014-07-03 2016-06-14 Frank L Fackler Ice flop stopper

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