US3083656A - Sewing machine - Google Patents

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US3083656A
US3083656A US670574A US67057457A US3083656A US 3083656 A US3083656 A US 3083656A US 670574 A US670574 A US 670574A US 67057457 A US67057457 A US 67057457A US 3083656 A US3083656 A US 3083656A
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cam
pattern
operatively
shaft
frame
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US670574A
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Lawrence E Miller
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ROCKFORD SEWING MACHINE CO
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ROCKFORD SEWING MACHINE CO
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B19/00Programme-controlled sewing machines

Description

April 2, 1963 V 1.. E. MILLER 3,os3,656
L. E. MILLER SEWING' MACHINE April 2, 1963 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July s, 1957 033. MLLLER April 2, 1963 L. E. MILLER 3,083,656
sEwING MACHINE Filed July s, 1957 7' Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTO R LAWRENCE E MILLER a a www L. E. MlLLER SEWING MACHINE April 2, 1963 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed July 8, 1957 FIG. 4
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April 2, 1963 L. E` MILLER 3,083,656
sEzwING MACHINE Filed Jhly 8, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 INV ENT OR April 2, 1963 Filed July 8, 1957 NEEDLE. UP
L. E. MILLER SEWING MACHINE NEEDLE 'Down 'T Sheets-Sheet 6 I N VEN TO R LAwRENcE E. MzLusR 'wtf v L. E. MILLER SEWING MACHINE April 2, 1963 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed July 8, 1957 S GE INVEMTQR E. MIER LAWRENC v TTY.
United States Patent O 3,083,656 SEWING MACI-IINE Lawrenee E. Miller, Muskegon, Mich., assignor to Rockford Sewing Machine Co., Rockfor, lll., a Corporation of Illinois Filed July 8, 1957, Ser. No. 670,574 21 Claims. (Cl. 112-158) This invention relates to sewing machines and more particularly what have come to be known as zig-zaggers.
Zig-zag sewing machines have been available for some -time equipped with a manual zig-Zag control lever on the head, which, when disposed in one extreme position, causes the machine to operate as a Conventional straight sewing machine, vand which, when shifted more or less toward another extreme position, causes themachine to stitch zig-zag, the amplitude of the needles zig-zag movements depending upon the position of the lever. Some sewing machines have also appeared on the market in which the mere depression of any one of a series of control buttons determines the particular zig-zag stitch obtainable out of a number of such stitches, according to the number of control buttons provided. 'Ihe latter machines are much more complicated and expensive than the machines first described. It is, therefore, the principal object of my invention to provide a zig-zag sewing machine retaining all of the advantages of the first mentioned machines, while giving the advantages of the other machines with much less complications and expense.
In accordance with my invention an automatic zig-zag mechanism is installed in an existing machine without rebuilding the same, and the same operates the manual control lever and depends for its operation upon the application to a cam shaft in the mechanism of a selected cam, of which any suitable number may be provided, each giving its own individual pattern, the manual control lever, in the absence of the cam being operable just as freely as before the automatic mechanism Was applied. Among the cams is preferably included one which when applied to the cam shaft gives straight sewing, the manual control lever in such case being rendered inoperable.
The zig-zag control mechanism of my invention includes the following novel features and important advantages:
(1) A two-to-one ratio between the cam shaft and the mechanism operated thereby cuts the loading in half, so that there is no danger of overloading the motor, and consequently no need of Changing motors.
(2) By virtue of the two-to-one ratio between the needle and cam, two stitches can be made during each dwell of the control cam, and hence, assuming a cam is profiled with a view to providing thirty-two dwells, there are sixtyfour stitches, thus making possible longer patterns and many designs that would not otherwise be possible with less stitches per cycle.
(3) A brake is provided for frictionally holding the cam in each indexed position to insure close uniformity in the repetition of a pattern, the brake element being preferably molded of nylon to reduce wear, give quiet operation, and elimnate the necessity for lubrication.
(4) The pattern cams -applicable interchangeably to the cam shaft are individually marked with an illustration of the pat-tern obtainable with it, whereby to eliminate the need of referring to a chart or instruction book, and, what is even more important, avoid spoilage of a garment or piece of material by reason of a mistake in the selection of the cam, each cam being furthermore provided with a starting index mark, which, when set to -a mark on the head, enables starting zig-zag sewing of the pattern exactly where desired, this feature being also especially handy in the stitching of buttonholes and of advantage where the operater desires to exercise her ingenuity in ice order to obtain interesting variations in patterns by manually indexing the cam.
(5) The pattern cams are preferably molded of nylon to obtain the same advantages mentioned above in regard to the nylon brake sleeve and to make it possible to have enough elasticity in the hub portion of each cam to take care of slight variations in the sizes of the cam shaft so `that the cams will hold without the help of -a set screw and can, therefore, be put on and taken olf so much more readily.
(6) A roller is used as the cam follower for free and easy movement on the cam, and for a similar reason a roller is provided where movement is given the zig-zag control lever by the cam follower arm, the latter having its motion transmitting end disposed as near as possible to the plane of the slide block to avoid hinding, the aim being thereby to make available the same full width of pattern with this automatic mechanism as Was heretofore obtainable only with manual operation.
(7) The automatic zig-zag mechanism is mounted on the cam shaft on top of the head, where it is easily accessible and can be installed most easily, and where diiferent cams can be most easily applied for sewing difierent patterns. Allowance is made in the mounting of the mechanism for a certain amount of oscillatory adjustment relative to the cam shaft of the arm carrying the mechanism so that the cam follower is certain of being in the proper relationship to the high and low portions of the cam, regardless of anticipated run-out in any given machine. 'Ihe present mechanism is also designed -to give the zig-zag lever as wide a range of movement, necessary for full width of pattern, as in manual operation.
The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which- FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the head of a zig-zag sewing machine embodying my invention, both the hood and the pattern cam being removed to enable better illustration;
FIG. 2 is a Vertical section through the head as it appears ibefore the automatic mechanism is applied, namely, with only the manual zig-zag control;
'FIG. 3 is a plan view of FIG. 1;
FIG. 4 is a vsection on the line 4-4 of FIG. `3
FIG. 4A is a plan view of a portion of FIG. 4;
FIGS. 5 and 6 are top and bottom perspect-ive views of one of the pattern cams;
FIG. 6A is a view like 'FIG. 6 of a pattern cam for straight sewing;
FIG. 7 'is -an exploded perspective view of the mechanism seen FIGS. 4 and 4A;
FIGS. 8 :and 9 are plan views on line 8-8 of FIG. 2 for an action study of the zig-zag sewing machine with only manual control, the control lever being shown in a maximum position, and
PIGS. 10 and 1-1 are views similar to PIGS. 8 and 9 but showing automatic control, these views being related to FIG. 1, FIG. 10 having its central portion taken on the line -10 of FIG. 4, -an'd FIG. ll having its central portion taken on (the line 11-11 of FIG. 4, FIG. ll showing the lever in dotted lines in maximum position and in ffull lines in mnimum or straight sewing position, for which latter position the special cam of FIG. 6A is interchangeable with cams like that of PIGS; 5 and 6.
The same reference numerals are applied to corresponding parts lthrough the views.
Referiring first to FIGS. 2, 8 -and 9, the reference numeral 12 designates the manual control lever, which, as shown in FIG. 1, is shiftable laterally in ``a slot 13 in the head 14 to turn a slide or swivel block '15 about its vertioal pivot 116 relative to the supporting anm 1,7 more or less :from -a straight sewing or zero position, depending upon the width of zig-zag stitching desired, the lever 12 3 being shownV in FIGS. 8 and 9 in maximum position as when shifted to the numeral in FIG. l, and being shown in position in FIG. 2 for straight sewing, corresponding 'to the zero position of FIG, 1. The slide block 15 has a diarnetrically extendng groove 18 provided therein in which a block pivoted on the lower end portion of a cross-pin 19 is reciprocable so that, according to the vangularity for which 'lever 12 is set, the frame 20,V which is oscillated by -a cam 21 in timed relationship to the reciprocation of the needle bar 22 and connected to 4a crank 23 by an atm 24, lwilfl transmit a proportionate Vamplitude of oscillation to the needle bar carrier 25 Ito'which the crank 23 is pivotally connected by a link 26. The cam 21 is segmental shaped vand is in one or 'the other of its dead center or dwell positions at the opposi-te extremes of movement of the needle 27, the up' position being shown in FIG. 8 and the down position in FIG. 9, and, inasmuch as the cam 21 is turned in timed relationship to the operation of the needle, as
Vby a bevel gear 23 integral with the cam meshing with a bevel pinion 29 fixed on [the driven sha-ft 39, While the latter is connected by crank 31 and pitman rod 32 with the needle bar 22, it should be clear that there is no danger of needle breakage-by reason of any transverse movement of the needle while in the material. The bobbin -under the bedplate is also operated in timed relationship 'to the rest of the machine by virtue of the driving connection aifo'rded by crank 33 on shaft 30 and pitman -rod 34 connected to said crank. The usu-al hand-Wheel 35 mounted on the outer end of sha-ft 30 is driven by means of a belt 36 running onpulley 37, which in turn is driven by means of another pulley 38, as ndicated in FIG. 3, the latter pulley being driven by a belt 39 running on a pulley 40 mounted on the armature shaft of an electric motor 41. The latter is arranged to be started and stopped and controlled as to speed in the usual way. In' passing, attention zis called to the yoke 42 fixed in the head 14, as at 43, and providing a support for the shaft 44 on which the gear 2'8 -and cam 21 are mounted for rotation. The cover plate 45, under which the frame 20 slides as a guide, is held in place by a yoke 46 fastened by means yof a screw 47 threaded in a hole in the upper end of the sliaft 44, and the automatic zig-zag mechanismV 48 provided in accordance with my invention is assemhled on the shaft 44 as a post after the screw 47 and yoke 46 are rem'oved.
Referring now to PIGS. 1 `to 7, and 11, the automatic zig-za-g mechan'ism of my invention, indicated generally by the reference numeral 48, operates the control leverV 12 ditferently with different cams 49 to produce different Ispecific patterns. Each of the cams 49, in 'accordance with my invention, is preferably marked on top both with a serial number, las at 50, and a pattern diagram, as at 511, so rthat the user can select the cam by number or pattern, yor both, and hence there will be no likelihood of any costly mistakes being made, inasmuch as a garment, or at least a piece of material, could easily be ruined by the stitching thereon of the Wrong pattern vor design. To
help further toward the Successful use'of the present invention, an index mark 52 is provided radially on the top of the :cam 49 in register with an index mark 53 on the periphery, which in turn is adapted to be placed in register With lan index mark 54 provided on top of the hood 55 on the he'ad of the sewing machine, so that the user when she sets the cam with these index marks in registerv knows that she will l`ohtain the pattern 5-1 from the starting point thereof instead of from some interrnediate point. The hood 55 is the same as the hood 55' indicated in FIG. 2 Originally provided on the sewing machine head but has an opening providedtherein to accommodate the cam shaft 56 `and cam 49 or any alternate cam of the series. Ags will soon appear, `Whenever there is no cam in place on shaft 56 (and it will be noticed that the cams 49 have D-holes 57 provided theren permitting mountng thereof on the milled-off end 58 of the cam shaft 56 in only one position) the machine may be` operated with manual control of lever 12 the same as before the automatic zig-zag means 48 was installed. On the other hand, the series-of'cams 49 provided with the automatic zig-za-g unit 48 may include a cam like that shown at 49' in FIG. 6A that is profiled with a concentric channel 71' Lfor straight sewing, which when the Vcam 49' is applied to cam shaft 56 cooperates with the follower roller 59 to hold the lever 12 positively in the straight sewing or zero'position. Inasmuchfas the machine is operated to such a large entent for straight sewing it is important to avoid any likeh'hood of the lever 12 being tampered with by youngsters between operations of the'machine, and this straight sewing cam 49' offers some insurance against such tampering. VThe cam 49', of course, requires no index markings 52-53 nor any pattern marking 51, unless it be a straight line to repreSentstIaight sewing. This cam/49' may, of course, he numbered on top, as indi'cated at 50, with a zero (indicating no pattern) or with the numeral 1 or 10 or whatever else is considered appropriate in relation to the series of cams provided. The cams 49-49' are preferably molded of nyl'on with a view to durability without need of lubrication and :to insure quiet operation and also make for economy of production. This material also has enough elas- -ticity so that the -huhs 60 on the cams may be purposely Vmade a trifie undersize in relation to the milled end 58 of the cam shaft 56 to take hold securely enough so that there is no need -for any set screws and the elasticity in the connection rwill more than compensate for such slight variation in size v'as there is apt to occur in quantity production of the parts 56. Each hub 6% is split diametrically as shown at a, Iand has three small longitudnal ri'bs b in the bore 5-7, apart. The ribs b assure a good snug fit even the shaft 56 is undersize. If the shaft 56 is of regul-'ation size or voversize, the slots a allow enough give for easy application of the cam. The caxns 49-49' being on the outs-ide of the head 14 and hood 55 can be put on and taken off easily and yet are not so easily removable that a youngster in tampering with the machine is apt to take one ofi'. In passing, I would mention that 'the ratchet 61 and associated pawl 62, which form an important part of the automatic zig-zag means 48, are responsible Vfor permit-ting themanual turning of the cam 49 to the starting position, as above described, and further ad- Vantage may be taken of this-feature by providing quanter, half, and three-quarter mark-s on top of the cams 49 or hood 55, or 90, and 270, as indicated in dotted i lines at 63 in FIG. 3, so that Ia user, once she has gained suflicient experience with the automatic zig-zag machine, can obtain interesting changes in patterns by `manually indexing the cam 49 back to the starting position after each 90 or l80 of travel, if experimenting shows that pleasing variations in patterns are obtaina-ble that way.
The cam follower roller 59 is mounted on one end of a bell-crank lever 64 that is pivoted intermediate its end,'as at 65, on a plate 66 fixed on top of a yoke 67 suitably held against turning with respect to thehead l14 as by a press fit between parallel flat faces 63 provided von the inner side of the front and back walis of the head 14, Where the yoke 46 previously men'tioned was previously mounted.
The bell-crank lever 64 'has a slot 69 provided in its V free end in which is slidably engageda roller on pin 70v fixed with lever 12 to the top' of slide block '15 in radially offset lrelationship to the pivotal axis 61 thereof, where'ny to turn the slide block 15 through a certain angularity when the follower roller 59 moves one way or fthe other -as it follows the profiled surface 71 'of the cam 49. A torsion spring 72 is mounted on another pin 70'1fixed like pin 70'on slide block E15 in radially offset relation to pivotal axis 16 and serves by slidable engagement at its one end with the inside of head 14 and engagement with pin 70 at its other end to urge the levers 12 and 64 normally toward the zero or straight sewing postion, thereby keeping the follower -roller 59 always resiliently engaged with the cam surface 71. As will soon appear, the cam shaft 56 is turned intermittently in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 3, and, hence, the lever 12 and slide block 15 are turned first in one direction and then another through different angles according to the profile of the cam to obtain zig-zag stitching of whatever pattern 51 the cam 49 in use at a given time is designed for. Two screws 73 are entered through cars 74 provided on a Split brake sleeve 75 and are entered through registering holes 74' in plate 66 and threaded in registering holes 7 in yoke 67 to fasten the three parts together, holding the brake sleeve 75 -against turning, so that it can serve as a friction grip for the cam shaft 56 to hold it in each indexed position. The holes 74' are large enough in relation to holes 74" to permit a predetermined amount of oscillatory adjustment of plate 66 about cam shaft 56 as an axis to secure the right relationship of the cam follower 59 to the high and low portions of the cam surface 71, regardless of any usual runout in the sewing machine. A screw 76 is entered freely through a hole in one of two ears 77 provided on the split side of the sleeve 75 and is threaded in a registering hole in the other of said ears and is arranged to -be adjusted to provide the right amount of friction to hold the shaft 56 in each indexed position without causing too much drag on the operation. The scrcw 76 can be adjusted also to compensate for wear between the parts 56 and 75, although wear is reduced to a lby molding the brake sleeve 75 of nylon, this material having the further advantage of giving quiet operation even though there is and should -be no lubrioant present. Sleeve 75, besides serving as a brake for cam shaft 56, serves as an upper bearing for it, said shaft using shaft 44 as a loWer bearing, as seen in FIG. 4.
The pawl 62 which engages the ratchet 61 to index the cam 56 is pivoted at 78 on an arm 79 oscillatable at one end 80 about the cam shaft 56 as a center. A single coil wire torsion spring 81, which is looped around the pivot 78 and has one end abutting the arm 79 and the other end -abutting the pawl 62, serves to hold the pawl in spring-pressed engagement with ratchet 61. A radial slot 82 is provided in the outer end of the arm 79 for slida-ble pivotal connection of the arm 79 with the enlarged upper end portion 83 of the cross-pin 19 on frame 20. Hence, arm 79 is oscillated per oscillation of frame 20 by cam 21, regardless of whether the frame 20 is given much or any longitudinal movement, according to the position of the control lever 12 and slide block 15. The oscillationofarm 79 is through the same angularity with respect to the cam shaft 56 for each rotation of the cam 21, thereby indexing the cam through the same angularity by means of the pawl 62 and ratchet 61. The cam shaft '56 can at any time be turned manually in a counterclockwise direction, the ratchet 61 then overrunning the pawl 62. That was mentioned before in connection with the discussion of the cams 49. Now, it is important to note the tWo-to-one ratio between gears 28 and 29. The needle v27 and cam shaft 5-6 are, therefore, in that same two-to-one relationship, so that the needle can make two stitches for each cam dwell, and, inasmuch as the ratchet 61 has thirty-two teeth providing thirty-two dwells per cam v49, it follows that there will be sixty-four stitches per rotation of the cam 49. That makes possible longer patterns and hence many more designsrthat would not be possible -with less stitches per cycle. It is also ideal lfor blind stitching Where the needle must move from a minimum to a maximum position per dwell of the cam to make a stitch on each side of a hem. This ability to go from minimum to maximum in one dwell also enables stitching many patterns with intricate designs where other constructions not designed to permit such abrupt drop-off are accordingly limited as to range of patterns. In passing, it will be noticed that the arm 79 is recessed, as shown at 84, to accommodate the pawl 62, ratchet 61, and spring 81 for maximum compactness, and also enable locating the arm 79 much closer to the plane of the frame 20 to avoid binding. This same principle is applied in the case of the cam follower arm 64 which for this reason has the downvwardly extending end portion With the inwardly bent extremity186 in which the slot 69 for connection with the pin 70 is provided as close to the plane of the slide block 15 as possible to avoid binding. The arm 79, as indicated by the cross-hatching of FIG. 4, is molded of nylon the same as the cams 49 and brake sleeve 75, for similar reasons. The give, :which the nylon construction of arm 79 afords, is of great advantage in preventing expensive damage to the sewing machine in the event the -free to and fro movement of lever 12 is blocked, as by entry of something in slot 13 in front of or -behind the lever, or by setting a stop or stops, such as are provided as guides for manual oscillation of the lever. When the lever `'12 is vblocked and the mechanism is jammed, the slotted end 32 of arm 79 flexes harmlessly -with each oscillation of frame 20. Normal operation is resumed again when the block is removed and lever 12 is free to move again.
It is believed the -foregoing description conveys a `good Understanding of the objects and advantages of my invention. The -appended claims have been drawn to cover all legitimate modiications and adaptations.
Iclaim:
1. In a zig-zag sewing machine, an endwise reciprocatory and laterally shiftable needle-bar, an oscillatory member in which said needle 'bar is mounted for end- Wise reciprocation and lateral shifting, a rotary driven shaft operatively connected with said needle bar to reciprocate the same, a rotary cam, a frame oscillated :by said cam and operatively connected to oscillate said oscillatory member laterally, means for turning said cam in synchrom'sm With said shaft, -a manually oscillatable pattern control lever, a slide block turnable with said lever having a transversely extending slot provided therein, a cross-pin on said frame slidable at its one end in said slot to transmit some or no endwise movement to said frame vin the oscillation thereof relative to said slide block depending on the position of said block, an intermittently rotatable pattern cam, means operatively connected with the other end of said cross-pin -for indexing said pattern cam -in the oscillation of said frame, and a follower engaging said pattern cam operatively connected with said slide block to turn the same in either direction in accordance with the profile of said pattern cam.
2. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 1, wherein the means for turning the first mentioned cam in synchronism with the shaft turns said first mentioned cam at half the speed of the shaft.
3. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 1, including brake means for holding said pattern cam in indexed positions.
4. In a zig-zag sewing machine, an endwise reciprocatory and laterally shiftable needle-bar, an oscillatory member in which said needle bar is mounted for endwise reciprocation and lateral shifting, a rotary driven shaft operatively connected with said needle bar to reciprocate the same, a rotary cam, a frame oscillated by said cam and operatively connected to oscillate said oscillatory member laterally, means for turning said cam in synchronism with said shaft, a manually oscillatable pattern control lever, a slide block turnable with said lever having a transversely extending slot provided therein, a crosspin on said frame slidable at its one end in said slot to transmit some or no endwise movement to said frame in the oscillation thereof relative to said slide block depending on the position of said block, an intermittently rotatable pattern cam, means operatively connected -with the other end of said cross-pin for indexng said pattern cam in the oscillation of said frame, and a follower engaging said pattern cam operatively connected with said slide block to turn the same more or less in either direction in accordance with the profile of said pattern cam, said pattern cam and follower having means Whereby they are detachably engageable, whereby to permit manual control of the pattern by operation of the control lever when the pattern is not automatically controlled by said pattern cam.
V 5. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 4, wherein the pattern cam is profiled for straight sewing holding the follower and control lever in straight sewing position and said pattern cam is one of a'plurality of interc'nangeable pattern cams, each dierently protiled for a different pattern.
' 6. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 4, wherein the pattern cam has an index mark thereon indicating the starting point of the pattern for which the pattern cam is profiled, the machine having an index mark thereon arranged to havethe index mark on the pattern cam registered with it.
7. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 4, wherein the pattern cam has an index mark thereon indicating the starting point of the pattern for which the pattern cam is profiled, the machine having an index mark thereon arranged to have the index mark on the pattern cam registered With it, the pattern cam being rotatably adjustable manually relatve to its indexing means to permit setting the pattern cam to zero or any other position.
' 8. In a zig-zag sewing machine having a needle bar carrier that is laterally shiftable and has a needle bar reciprocable' therein, said machine comprising a main driven shaft operatively connected to reciprocate the needle bar, and a cam shaft fixed in right angle relation to said driven shaft rotatably mountingV a cam operatively connected to be driven in synchronism with said driven shaft, a frame oscillated by said cam and operatively connected with said needle bar carrier to shift it back and forth laterally with variable amplitude, andV a swivel control element operatively connected with said frame so that the position of the element determines the amplitude between zero and maximum, the improvement which consists in the provision of a secondary cam shaft that is hollow at one end and telescopes on the aforesaid cam shaft and carries a ratchet Wheel, a pattern cam detachably mountable on said secondary cam shaft to turn intermittently therewith, a cam follower engaging said pattern cam, means operated by said follower and operatively-connected withsaid swivel control element to shift the latter in response to lateral movement of the follower, and means operatively connected to oscillate with said frame and carrying a pawl engaging the ratchet Wheel so as to index said pattern cam.
9. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 8, including a'brake for holding said secondary cam shaft against turning between indexes thereof.V
10. In a zig-zag sewing machine having a needle bar carrier that is laterally shiftable and has a needle bar reciprocable therein, said machine comprising a main driven shaft operatively connected to reciprocate the needle bar, and a cam shaft fixed in right angle relation to said driven shaft rotatably mounting a cam operatively connected to be driven in synchronism with said driven shaft, a frame oscillated by said cam and operatively connected with said needle bar carrier to shift it back and Vforth laterally with variable amplitude, and a Vswvel control element operatively connected with said frame so that the position of the element determines the amplitude between zero and maximum, themprovement which consists in the provision of a secondary cam shaft that is hollow at one end and telescopes on the aforesaid cam` shaft and carries a ratchet Wheel, a pawl engaging' said ratchet Wheel and pivotally mounted on an arm oscillatable relative to said secondary cam shaft, said arm being operatively connected with said frame for oscillation thereby, a supporting `bracket fixed in the machine having a hole provided therein, a plate carried on said bracket having a registering hole provided therein, said secondary cam shaft'projecting through said holes, means securing said plate to said bracket permitting some rotaryxadjustment of the plate relative to the bracket about said secondary cam shaft as a center, an arm pivotally mounted intermediate its ends on said plate carrying a cam follower on one end and having an operative connection at its other end with the control element to V 11. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 10, in-
cluding a brake collar carried on said bracket having said secondary cam shaft extending therethrongh and held thereby against turning between indexes thereof;
12. A sewing machine as set forth Vin claim 10, including a brake collar carried on said bracket having said secondary cam shaft extendingV therethrough and held thereby against turning between indexes thereof, said collar having ears thereon with screw holes provided thereing registering with screw holes provided in the bracket, the means securing said plate to said bracketv comprising screws entered in said screw holes through registering slightly larger holes in the plate, whereby said plate is rotatably adjnstable and adapted to be clamped in adjusted position between the bracket and collar while also securing said collar to said bracket.
V 13. 'In a zig-zag sewing machine havinga needle bar carrier that is laterally shiftable and has a needle bar reciproca-ble therein, said machine comprising a main driven sha-ft operatively connected to reciprocate the needle bar, and a cam shaft fixed in right angle relation to said driven shaft rotatably mounting a cam operatively connected to be driven in synchronism with said driven shaft, a frame oscillated by said cam 1and operatively connected with said needle bar carrier to shifty it back and forth laterally with variable ampli-tude, and a swivel control element operatively connected with said frame so that the position of the element determines the amplitude beween zero and maximum, the improvement which con- Isists in the provision of a secondary cam shaft that is hollow at one end and telescopes on the afor'esaid cam shaft and carries a ratchet Wheel, a plurality of pattern cams interehangeably detachably mountable on said secondary cam shaft to turn inter-mittently therewith, each pattern cam having a different profilerfor a different pattern to be sewed with zig-zag stitching, a cam vfollower arranged to engage a pattern carnwhen the vlatter is mounted on said secondary cam shaft, means operated `by said follower and operatively connected with saidv control element to shift the latter in response to lateral movement of the -follower, and means operatively connected to oscillate with said frame and carrying a pawl engaging the ratchet Wheel so as to index said pattern cam. V
15. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 13, wherein each patern cam has an index mark thereon indicating the starting point of the pattern -for whichthe cam 'is profiled, the machine having an index mark thereon arranged to have the index mark on the cam registered with it, the coopervating pawl and ratchet permitting rotary setting of the cam torzero or any other position When fixed on the secondary cam shaft. V
16. 'A sewing machine as set forth in claim 13, wherein oneof the pattern cams is for straight sewing.
17. InV a zig-zag sewing machine comprising'a head with an ar-m extending th'erefrom on which a needle carrier -bar is reciprocable and laterally movable, a manually operable pattern control lever extending -from the front of said arm and shiftable laterallyfrom a straight sewing V' position to determine the amplitude of zig-zag movement of the needle bar, mechanism on said arm operatively connected vvith said lever Iand driven with the needle bar to shift said lever antomatically through a predetermined cycle of movements for the zig-zag sewing of a pattern, and a plurality of pattern -cams each having means thereon for detachable Operating connection with means included in the aforesaid mechanism on said arm, whereby said cams :are separately and directly and without the necessity for the employment of any other means applicable interchang'eably to said mechanism to give different cycles of lever movements for different patterns, said mechanism including means driven in tirned relation to the needle to index the cam, one part of said mechanism through which movement is transmitted in the automatic operation of said pattern control lever being resilient and yieldable, whereby to prevent damage to said mechanism in the event movement of said lever is blocked.
18. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 1 wherein at least one part of the combinaton described through which movement is transmitted in the automatic operation of said manually oscillatable pattern control lever is resilient and yieldable whereby to prevent damage to the sewing machine in the event movement of said lever is blocked.
19. In a zig-zag sewing machine, an endwise reciprocatory and laterally shiftable needle-bar, lan oscillatory member in which said needle bar is mounted for endwise reciprocation -and lateral shifting, a rotary driven shaft operatively connected with said needle bar to reciprocate the same, a rotary cam, a frame oscillated by said cam and operatively connected to oscillate said oscillatory member laterally, means for turning said cam in synchronism with said shaft, a swivel block having a transversely extending slot provided therein, a cross-pin on said frame slidable at its one end in said slot to transmit some or no endwise movement to said frame in the oscillation thereof relative to said swivel block depending on the position of said swivel block, an intermittently rotatable pattern cam, means operatively connected with the other end of said cross-piu for indexing said pattern cam in the oscill-ation of said frame, and a follower engaging said pattern cam operatively connected with said swivel block to turn the same in either direction in accordance With the profile of said pattern cam.
20. A sewing machine vas set forth in claim 19, wherein the means for turning the first mentioned cam in synchronism with the shaft turns said first mentioned cam at half the speed of the shaft.
21. A sewing machine as set forth in claim 19, including hrake means for holding said pattern cam inindexed positions.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 671,680 Parkes Apr. 9, 1901 1,518,1S9 Lund Dec. 9, 1924 2,267,409 Massini Dec. 23, 1941 2,445,223 Kieffer July 13, 1948 2,682,845 Casas-Robert et al July 6, 1954 2,684,649 Scarpa July 27, 1954 2,755,754 Urscheler July 24, 1956 2,764,895 Bono Oct. 2, 1956 2,819,695 Gergen et al Jan. 14, 1958 2,82%,704 Enos Apr. 1, 1958 2,829,740 Stack Apr. 8, 1958 2,905,119 Bono Sept. 22, 1959 2,966,868 Theenhausen et al Jan. 3, 1961 FOREIGN PATENTS 543,731 Italy May 24, 1956 554,537 Belgium Feb. 15, 1957

Claims (1)

1. IN A ZIG-ZAG SEWING MACHINE, AN ENDWISE RECIPROCATORY AND LATERALLY SHIFTABLE NEEDLE-BAR, AN OSCILLATORY MEMBER IN WHICH SAID NEEDLE BAR IS MOUNTED FOR ENDWISE RECIPROCATION AND LATERAL SHIFTIN, A ROTARY DRIVEN SHAFT OPERATIVELY CONNECTED WITH SAID NEEDLE BAR TO RECIPROCATE THE SAME, A ROTARY CAM, A FRAME OSCILLATED BY SAID CAM AND OPERATIVELY CONNECTED TO OSCILLATE SAID OSCILLATORY MEMBER LATERALLY, MEANS FOR TURNING SAID CAM IN SYNCHRONISM WITH SAID SHAFT, A MANUALLY OSCILLATABLE PATTERN CONTROL LEVER, A SLIDE BLOCK TURNABLE WITH SAID LEVER HAVING A TRANSVERSELY EXTENDING SLOT PROVIDED THEREIN, A CROSS-PIN ON SAID FRAME SLIDABLE AT ITS ONE END IN SAID SLOT TO TRANSMIT SOME OR NO ENDWISE MOVEMENT TO SAID FRAME IN THE OSCILLATION THEREOF RELATIVE TO SAID SLIDE BLOCK DEPENDING ON THE POSITION OF SAID BLOCK, AN INTERMITTENTLY ROTATABLE PATTERN CAM, MEANS OPERATIVELY CONNECTED WITH THE OTHER END OF SAID CROSS-PIN FOR INDEXING SAID PATTERN CAM IN THE OSCILLATION OF SAID FRAME, AND A FOLLOWER ENGAGING SAID PATTERN CAM OPERATIVELY CONNECTED WITH SAID SLIDE BLOCK TO TURN THE SAME IN EITHER DIRECTION IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROFILE OF SAID PATTERN CAM.
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US4085690A (en) * 1976-06-21 1978-04-25 The Singer Company Needle jogging mechanisms

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