US3071194A - Marine drive assembly - Google Patents

Marine drive assembly Download PDF

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US3071194A
US3071194A US88976A US8897661A US3071194A US 3071194 A US3071194 A US 3071194A US 88976 A US88976 A US 88976A US 8897661 A US8897661 A US 8897661A US 3071194 A US3071194 A US 3071194A
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sleeve
water
drive assembly
blades
impeller
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US88976A
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William C Geske
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William C Geske
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63HMARINE PROPULSION OR STEERING
    • B63H1/00Propulsive elements directly acting on water
    • B63H1/02Propulsive elements directly acting on water of rotary type
    • B63H1/12Propulsive elements directly acting on water of rotary type with rotation axis substantially in propulsive direction
    • B63H1/14Propellers
    • B63H1/16Propellers having a shrouding ring attached to blades

Description

Jan. 1, 1963 w. c. GESKE MARINE DRIVE ASSEMBLY 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 13, 1961 IN YEA/TOR.
WILL mm C. 655/05,
By ATT RNEYS Jan. 1, 1963 w. c. GESKE 3,071,194
MARINE DRIVE ASSEMBLY Filed Feb. 15, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 /A/\/EA/TOR"' WILLIAM (L. 6551(5 United States Patent 3,071,194 MARINE DRIVE ASSEMBLY Wiiliam C. Geske, 13 Pembroke Lake Drive, Ferguson 35, Mo. Filed Feb. 13, 1961, Ser. No. 88,976 1 Claim. (Cl. 170-156) This invention relates to a fluid drive assembly and particularly to a drive assembly for translating motor power into a driving force for watercraft. The invention has secondary utility as a water pump.
The broadest form of the invention comprises a sleeve fixed to a rotary impeller. in the preferred form of the invention, the sleeve is of frusto-conical shape, although a cylindrically shaped sleeve, and a curved sleeve may be used. The impeller is attached to a rotatable shaft by any conventional manner, and the sleeve is attached to the outer edges of the impeller. Consequently, the sleeve rotates with the impeller. As the impeller and the sleeve rotate, the impeller forces water through the sleeve, the
impeller acting to drive the watercraft through the water. However, the sleeve has an important effect in increasing the driving power of the assembly, which effect is produced in several different ways.
Regardless of the impeller used, and there are several different types possible, the sleeve prevents the radial escape of water by the impeller, holding the path of the driven water to a direction that is generally parallel to the path of movement of the watercraft. Therefore, the full pushing power of the impeller is put to use. In addition, because the sleeve is attached to the impeller and rotates with the impeller, there is not the frictional resistance to flow of the swirling water that would exist if the sleeve did not rotate. It is, therefore, an object of the invention to provide a fluid drive assembly including an impeller and a sleeve surrounding the impeller, which assembly eliminates radial discharge of fluid from the impeller, but does not add materially to the frictional resistance of fluid flow.
Another object of the invention is to provide a fluid drive assembly that makes maximum use of the energy to be transmitted to the assembly by a boat motor.
Still another object of the invention is to provide a fluid drive assembly that includes an impeller surrounded by a sleeve attached to the impeller, the sleeve being formed with a continually reducing internal diameter along the path of fluid through it. This aspect of the v invention produces a hydraulic action, the effect of which is to increase the speed and pressure of fluid flowing through the sleeve.
A further object of the invention is to provide a flui drive assembly that incorporates impeller means and means for confining fluid within the influence of the impeller and for increasing the fluid intake to the impeller. This object is accomplished particularly effectively in one embodiment of the invention wherein several cutting blades are attached to the impeller means and resolve as the impeller rotates. These cutting blades force water into the area both a head of and following the impeller means creating greater pressure and speed of the water. This object is also solved by other embodiments of the invention wherein the confining means comprise solid-wall sleeves with enlarged open ends for admitting a maximum amount of water, the body of the sleeve being tapered toward the open rear end thereof.
Still another object of the invention is to provide a fluid drive assembly having water cutting edges of greater overall length than those of conventional devices, thereby increasing the driving or propelling power of the as sembly.
Another object of the invention is to provide a fluid drive assembly having a throat constriction at the dis- I from the sleeve.
3,071,194 Patented Jan. 1, 1953 charge end for increasing the thrust, thereby increasing speed or driving power of the assembly.
Another object of the invention is to utilize in combination the laws of hydraulics, venturis and cyclones as speed and power magnifiers.
Further objects and advantages will be apparent from a more detailed description of the invention.
In the drawings:
FIGURE l is a sectional view through the longitudinal axis of one form of the fluid drive assembly;
FIGURE 2 is a sectional view through the longitudinal axis of another form of the fluid drive assembly;
FIGURE 3 is a sectional view through the longitudinal axis of another form of the fluid drive assembly;
FIGURE 4 is a view in section taken along the longitudinal axis of still another form of the invention;
FIGURE 5 is a side elevation view of still. another form of the fluid drive assembly;
FIGURE 6 is a view in section taken along the line 64-6 of FIGURE 5;
FIGURE 7 is a partial isometric view in section showing the shape of the blades of the fluid drive assembly of FIGURE 4; and
FIGURE 8 is an isometric view with parts broken away of still another form of the invention employing a plurality of stages of driving elements.
Referring to FIGURE 1 of the drawings, there is shown a fluid drive assembly 10 that is mounted upon a rotatable shaft 11. The shaft 11 may be rotated by a typical boat motor, either outboard or inboard, it being understood that the fluid drive assembly is intended to be used under water.
The drive assembly 10 includes a sleeve 12 of frustoconical shape having open ends 13 and 14. The larger end 13 is the normal leading end and has a. tapered edge to reduce water resistance as illustrated. The trailing end 14 is the smaller end of the sleeve 12 and there is a neck-down portion 15 adjacent the end 14. The purpose of the neck-down portion 15 is to produce a venturi effect upon the water passing through the sleeve 12 and thereby to increase the discharge pressure and speed of the water. The beginning 16 of the venturi section 15 is gradual, and the end of the section 15 that terminates with the opening 14 is curved. This shape of the venturi section 15 minimizes the turbulence effect of the venturi section upon the water passing through it.
The inner surface of the sleeve 12 has attached to it the outer edge of a spirally wound rifling rib 19. The rifling rib 19 extends inwardly only a small distance from the inner surface of the sleeve 12. In addition, the rib 19 terminates short of the rear end 14 of the sleeve to somewhat ease the turbulence of the water emerging The rib 19 is attached by spokes 20 to a hub 21. The spokes 20 are directed with the same pitch as that of the -rib 19. The number of spokes 20 is optional. Also, the
spokes may be attached to either the rib 19 or to the inner surface of the sleeve 12. The hub 21 is taperedat both its forward end 22 and its rearward end 23 and is threaded, or otherwise formed, to receive the shaft 11. A pin 24 may be provided to lock the hub 21 to the shaft 11.
In addition to the rifling rib 19, there may be additional ribs 25 in any number (small portions of two such ribs 25 are illustrated in FIGURE 1). All the ribs 25 should be spirally wound in substantially parallel relationship to one another. The pitch of the rifling ribs (as well as the spokes) may be set at any desired angle according to the power vs. speed requirements of specific drive assemblies. Also, the fluid drive assembly 10 has one or more external, spirally wound ribs 28. The rib 28 spirals in the same direction as the rib 19 so that when the assembly 10 is rotated in a clockwise direction (as viewed from the left end of FIGURE 1) both the ribs 19 and 28 will force water toward the rear end 14 of the sleeve .12.
To further increase the power or thrust of the fluid drive assembly 10, there are a plurality of jets adjacent the rear end 14 of the sleeve 12.
The inner ends 31 of the jets 30 are flush with the inner surface of the sleeve 12, and the jets 30 extend outwardly from the sleeve in a direction that is substantially parallel to the direction of the ribs 19 and 28. Therefore, the jets will discharge a stream of fluid in a direction that is substanitally parallel to the direction of movement of the jets as the sleeve 12 rotates. Because of the direction in which the jets 30 project, they present a minimum of drag upon the normal movement of the fluid drive assembly 10. At the same time, the jets add to the effective area of the wall of still water against which the fluid drive assembly discharges moving water to provide motive power. In other words, the jets 30 add a discharge source to the rear opening 14. Furthermore, the openings through the jets are quite small so that they discharge small streams of water at high pressure.
In operation, for forward drive, the fluid drive assembly is rotated in a clockwise direction as viewed from the left end 14 in FIGURE 1. (Of course, the pitch of the driving elements may be reversed. If twin drive assemblies are to be used, there would be oppositely pitched assemblies, rotatable in opposite directions.) As the assembly rotates, the rifling ribs 19 and 28 force water rearwardly, the internal rifling ribs drawing water into the sleeve opening 13. The water drawn into the sleeve is propelled further toward the rear of the sleeve. This action alone produces a driving force. In addition, the presence of a sleeve prevents the radial escape of water from a position in the driving path of the ribs 19. Furthermore, the tapered shape of the sleeve 12 increases both the pressure and speed of water passing through it.
As the water within the sleeve approaches the rearward end 14 of the sleeve it is released from the direct action of the ribs 19. (It is still pushed rearward by the increasing flow of Water ahead.) The clearer span aft of the ends of the internal rifling ribs 19 allows the water to congeal somewhat prior to its being discharged through the venturi opening and through the jets 30.
Although the pressure and speed of the water near the rear end of the sleeve are high, the venturi opening 15 provides a final increase in both pressure and speed that causes the water to fairly explode from the sleeve. As a result, the driving force or thrust of the assembly is very high. The thrust is increased by the presence of the jets 30 which spray fine streams of water at high speed pressure.
The assembly may be rotated in the reverse direction to produce back-up, but the motive power will be at a reduced level. However, it is normally desired that backing be performed at lower speeds.
The embodiment of FIGURE 2 is similar to the fluid drive assembly 10 of FIGURE 1, except that the fluid drive assembly of FIGURE 2 provides a different means for propelling water through the sleeve 12. As illustrated, the fluid drive assembly 35 includes the sleeve 12 having open ends 13 and 14, the sleeve 12 being attached to the outer edges of the internal rifling ribs 19, which, in turn, is connected by spokes 20 to a hub 21.
However, in addition to the internal rifling or spirally wound ribs 19, the fluid drive assembly 35 includes a spirally wound screw 36 attached to the hub 21. The pitch of the screw 36 is the same as that of the rifling 19.
The operation of the fluid drive assembly 35 is similar to that of the assembly 10except the screw 36 adds greater pushing power to the water inside the sleeve 12.
It should be appreciated that the jets 30 and the external rifling ribs '28 could be added to the assembly 35.
In the embodiment of FIGURE 3, the frusto-c onical shaped sleeve 12 is used. However, the fluid drive assembly 40 of FIGURE 3 does not have-the riflingribs. The
impeller comprises a large spiral screw 41, the outer edges of which are attached to the sleeve 12. The screw 41 tapers toward its rear end 42 in conformity with the shape of the sleeve 12 and the rear end 42 of the screw 41 is spaced from the end 14 of the sleeve 12. The free space adjacent the end of the sleeve 12 allows the water to subside in turbulence before being discharged from the sleeve.
FIGURE 4 illustrates a fluid drive assembly 45 that comprises a cylindrical sleeve 46 having open ends 47 and 48. The drive assembly 45 may be attached to a rotary shaft 11 by means of a hub 21 similar to the hubs already described. The drive assembly 45 includes rifling ribs 49 having a spiral shape; the inner edges of the rifling ribs 49 are attached by spokes 50 to the hub 21, and the outer edges of the ribs 49 are attached to the inner surface of the cylindrical sleeve 46.
The purpose of the cylindrically shaped sleeve 46 is to restrict the flow of water in a radial direction. In other Words, because of the presence of the sleeve 46, the water that is driven through the sleeve by rotation of the rifling ribs 49 will be maintained within the confines of the sleeve 46 to increase the thrust of the assembly. Since the sleeve 46 is attached to the rifling ribs 49, and, therefore, rotates with the shaft 11, the friction of water against the sleeve 46 is reduced to a minimum.
The embodiment of FIGURE 5 is somewhat different from those described in conjunction with FIGURES 1 through 4. The drive assembly of FIGURE 5 has a pair of multi-blade impellers 56 attached to the hub 21 which is secured to the shaft 11. Any number of such impellers 56 may :be provided, and the number of blades of each impeller 56 may vary. As illustrated, each of the impellers 56 has three blades 57, and the pitch of the blades 57 is such that the impellers 56 will force wa ter rearward when the assembly 55 is rotated in the direction of the arrow in FIGURE 6.
There is a cylindrical band 58 attached to the outer ends of the blades 57 of each impeller 56. As can be seen in FIGURE 5, the bands and therefore the impellers 56, are spaced axially from one another.
Instead of the sleeve previously described, the impellers 56 are surrounded by a plurality of elongated blades 60. The blades 60 are all attached to the band '53 and project outwardly from the bands 58 at an angle, as illustrated in *FIGURE 6. Toward the rearward end of the assembly 55 (the left end as viewed in FIGURE 5) there is another band 61 to which the 'blades 60 are also attached, the band 61 serving to mainttain the relative positions of the blades 60 at the rearward end of the assembly 55.
The blades 60 are water cutting 'blades. As can beseen in FIGURE 7, the edges 62 of the blades 6% are tapered to provide a sharper cutting edge along one side of the blades 60 and to reduce turbulence at the trailing edge of the blades. 7
The fluid drive assembly 55 is intended to have water driven through it from right to left as viewed in FIG- URE 5, when the assembly is rotated in the direction of the arrow in FIGURE 6. As it is so rotated, the leading edges 62 of 'the blades 60 cut into the water and actually draw water into the assembly 55. Also, as the assembly 55 rotates, the blades 57 of the impellers 56 draw water into the central part of the assembly and force it rearward. The impellers 56 at the same time force rearward the Water that is drawn in by the blade 60. The result is an increase in pressure of the water that is drawn into the center of the assembly, which increase enhances the discharge force of the water, increasing the thrust of the assembly 55.
It is known that the greater span of cutting edge in a marine driving mechanism, the greater will be the thrust capacity of the driving mechanism. tion of the fluid drive assembly 55, it can be seen that "there is a great increase in the number of cutting edges From an examina- 62 that supplement the cutting edges of the blades 57 of the impellers 56. Because of this increase in water cutting capacity, together with the angle of the blades 69 that causes the water to be forced inward of the assembly 55, the speed of the water through the assembly is also increased. The increase in speed of the water further adds to the driving power that can be produced by the fluid drive assembly 55.
Finally, in FIGURE 8, another drive assembly 65 is illustrated that employs a plurality of stages of driving components. The fluid drive assembly 65 is attached to an elongated rotary shaft 66 that is rotated by a conventional boat motor (not shown). There are three impellers 67, 68 and 69 each having blades 76 attached to a hub 71. The hubs 71, each having tapered forward and rearward ends 72 and 73, respectively, are attached to the shaft 66 by pins 74.
There are three frusto-conical sleeves 75, 76 and 77. The sleeve 75 is attached to the outer edges of the blades 79 of the impeller 67. The sleeve 76 is attached to the outer edges of the blades 70 of the impeller 63, and the sleeve 77 is attached to the outer edges of the blades 76 of the impeller 69. Each of the sleeves 75, 76 and 77 has open forward and rearward ends 7% and 79, respectively, the ends 78 and 79 being tapered to sharp edges.
The pitch of the blades 70 of the impellers 67, 63 and 69 are all in the same direction so that the impellers will all drive water in the same direction, depending upon which direction the shaft 66 is rotated. The pitch of the blades of the impellers may be the same or they may increase with increased distance from the front of the fluid drive assembly 65 to take into account the increased speed of the water toward the end of the assembly.
To operate the fluid drive assembly 65, it is rotated. The impeller 67 drives water through the front end 73 of the sleeve 75. That water is driven through the sleeve 75 and discharged into the open forward end of the sleeve 76 The impeller 68 further drives that water rearward and, at the same time, additional water is introduced into the second sleeve "/6 through the space between the front end 78 of the sleeve 76 and the rearward end '79 of the sleeve 75. Consequently, a greater amount of water passes through the sleeve 76 than through the sleeve 75, with a resulting increase in both the pressure and the speed of the water traveling through the sleeve 76. Virtually all of the water discharged from the rearward end 79 of the sleeve 76 is picked up by the impeller 79 and driven through the sleeve 77. In addition, the sleeve 77 picks up still more water through the space between the forward end 78 of the sleeve 77 and the rearward end 79 of the sleeve 76. There is, therefore, an even greater pressure and speed of the water traveling through the sleeve 77. Consequently, as Water is discharged through the rearward end 79 of the sleeve 77, its discharge force is very high, and, therefore, the forward thrust imparted to the assembly 65 is very great.
Although the operation of each of the embodiments has been individually described, there are several principles of fluid action that are incorporated into the invention, and each of the embodiments incorporates one or more of these principles.
First of all, there is the cyclone effect of the water as it traverses the interior of the sleeve. Under this effeet, the swirling action imparted to the water tends to force it outwardly toward the inner surface of the sleeve.
It is along this inner surface of the sleeve that the rifling ribs are positioned so that the ribs exert their push against the water at the areas of highest pressure and velocity of the Water. In addition, the cyclone effect results in gradually higher pressures of the water as its distance from the center of the sleeve 12 increases, so that the water discharged from the rear end of the sleeve has a pressure concentration over a large area. This results in a further increase in the thrust of the fluid drive assembly.
The second principle involved and incorporated into the invention is the hydraulic effect of the water that is forced through the sleeve. This hydraulic effect produces a ram thrust of the water as it escapes from the sleeve.
The third principle involved is the venturi effect of the neck-down portion of the sleeve adjacent the rear end. This neck-down portion produces a greater concentration of pressure just prior to the expulsion of the water from the sleeve, and this greater pressure produces a greater thrust.
The fourth principle incorporated into the design of the fluid drive assembly is the screw effect. This effect is produced in various ways, as illustrated in the several embodiments, including the riding ribs, the screws, and the multi-blade impellers.
Various changes and modifications may be made within the process of this invention as will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art. Such changes and modifications are within the scope and teaching of this invention as defined by the claim appended hereto.
What is claimed is:
A fluid drive assembly comprising a frusto-conical sleeve, a plurality of blades attached to the inner surface of the sleeve, each extending only part of the Way toward the axis of the sleeve, each blade defining a spiral extending from adjacent one end of the sleeve toward the other and all the blades being parallel, a hub along the axis of the sleeve and extending forward of the larger end of the sleeve for attachment of the sleeve to a drive axis, a plurality of blades connecting the spiral blades to the hub, the connecting blades being parallel to the spiral blades, a plurality of outer blades on the outer surface of the sleeve, the outer blades being paraliel to the spiral blades, and a plurality of jet nozzles adjacent the smailer end of the sleeve, the jet nozzles extending substantially parallel to the blades and having holes through them in communication with the interior of the sleeve.
References Cited in the tiie of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 588 Ericsson Feb. 1, 1838 2,230,398 Benjafield Feb. 4, 1941 2,511,165 Gloss June 13, 1950 2,903,076 Johannesen Sept. 8, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 19,997 Great Britain 1911 15,012 Denmark Aug, 12, 1911 162,066 Great Britain Apr. 20, 1921 175,922 Great Britain Mar. 2, 1922 662,032 Germany July 2, 1938 530,483 Great Britain Dec. 12, 1940
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Cited By (22)

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US3148736A (en) * 1962-03-26 1964-09-15 Skopyk Joseph Propeller
US3156190A (en) * 1963-03-14 1964-11-10 Hidrostal Pump impeller
US3441088A (en) * 1966-08-25 1969-04-29 Felix Levy Hydraulic propeller by compound reaction
US3522997A (en) * 1968-07-01 1970-08-04 Rylewski Eugeniusz Inducer
US3598080A (en) * 1969-07-29 1971-08-10 Curtis E Shields Monoshaft propeller water-jet
JPS50121993A (en) * 1974-03-12 1975-09-25
US4086026A (en) * 1977-02-04 1978-04-25 Tamanini Robert J Windmill with radial vanes
US4836748A (en) * 1983-12-09 1989-06-06 Church Holdings Ring propeller
US5044884A (en) * 1989-09-05 1991-09-03 Trustees Of The University Of Pennsylvania Safety propeller
DE29721671U1 (en) * 1997-11-04 1999-02-04 P E A C E Ges Fuer Herstellung Screw for absorbing the energy of flowing water or moving air (wind)
WO1999015398A1 (en) * 1997-09-24 1999-04-01 Fosdick Hi-Tek Wind Turbine, Inc. Ducted turbine
US20070041823A1 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-02-22 Miller Donald C Fluid energy converter
US20090189397A1 (en) * 2001-04-26 2009-07-30 Fallbrook Technologies Inc. Continuously variable transmission
US20100001529A1 (en) * 2008-07-02 2010-01-07 Rosefsky Jonathan B Ribbon drive power generation and method of use
US20110088503A1 (en) * 2006-01-30 2011-04-21 Fallbrook Technologies Inc. System for manipulating a continuously variable transmission
US20110172050A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2011-07-14 Fallbrook Technologies, Inc. Continuously variable transmission
US8321097B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2012-11-27 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Automatic transmissions and methods therefor
US8360917B2 (en) 2009-04-16 2013-01-29 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Continuously variable transmission
GB2494571A (en) * 2007-11-16 2013-03-13 Elemental Energy Technologies Ltd Shrouded helical pump or turbine
US9677650B2 (en) 2013-04-19 2017-06-13 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Continuously variable transmission
US9828802B2 (en) 2014-01-27 2017-11-28 Sjm Designs Pty Ltd. Fluid pulse drilling tool
EP2858893B1 (en) 2012-06-06 2019-10-09 G.A.M. Manshanden Management B.V. Ship screw, pump screw or turbine screw

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Cited By (48)

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US3148736A (en) * 1962-03-26 1964-09-15 Skopyk Joseph Propeller
US3156190A (en) * 1963-03-14 1964-11-10 Hidrostal Pump impeller
US3441088A (en) * 1966-08-25 1969-04-29 Felix Levy Hydraulic propeller by compound reaction
US3522997A (en) * 1968-07-01 1970-08-04 Rylewski Eugeniusz Inducer
US3598080A (en) * 1969-07-29 1971-08-10 Curtis E Shields Monoshaft propeller water-jet
JPS50121993A (en) * 1974-03-12 1975-09-25
US4086026A (en) * 1977-02-04 1978-04-25 Tamanini Robert J Windmill with radial vanes
US4836748A (en) * 1983-12-09 1989-06-06 Church Holdings Ring propeller
US5044884A (en) * 1989-09-05 1991-09-03 Trustees Of The University Of Pennsylvania Safety propeller
WO1999015398A1 (en) * 1997-09-24 1999-04-01 Fosdick Hi-Tek Wind Turbine, Inc. Ducted turbine
US6053700A (en) * 1997-09-24 2000-04-25 Fosdick High-Tek Wind Turbines, Inc. Ducted turbine
DE29721671U1 (en) * 1997-11-04 1999-02-04 P E A C E Ges Fuer Herstellung Screw for absorbing the energy of flowing water or moving air (wind)
US7883442B2 (en) 2001-04-26 2011-02-08 Fallbrook Technologies Inc. Continuously variable transmission
US20090189397A1 (en) * 2001-04-26 2009-07-30 Fallbrook Technologies Inc. Continuously variable transmission
US20070041823A1 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-02-22 Miller Donald C Fluid energy converter
WO2007044128A3 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-07-19 Fallbrook Technologies Inc Fluid energy converter
US7600963B2 (en) 2005-08-22 2009-10-13 Viryd Technologies Inc. Fluid energy converter
US20100034656A1 (en) * 2005-08-22 2010-02-11 Viryd Technologies Inc. Fluid energy converter
WO2007044128A2 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-04-19 Viryd Technologies Inc. Fluid energy converter
US20110088503A1 (en) * 2006-01-30 2011-04-21 Fallbrook Technologies Inc. System for manipulating a continuously variable transmission
US8776633B2 (en) 2006-01-30 2014-07-15 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc System for manipulating a continuously variable transmission
GB2494571A (en) * 2007-11-16 2013-03-13 Elemental Energy Technologies Ltd Shrouded helical pump or turbine
GB2469760B (en) * 2007-11-16 2013-03-20 Elemental Energy Technologies Ltd A power generator
GB2494571B (en) * 2007-11-16 2013-04-24 Elemental Energy Technologies Ltd A propulsion or pump device
US8626409B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2014-01-07 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Automatic transmissions and methods therefor
US10704687B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2020-07-07 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Automatic transmissions and methods therefor
US9739375B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2017-08-22 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Automatic transmissions and methods therefor
US8321097B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2012-11-27 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Automatic transmissions and methods therefor
US9249880B2 (en) 2007-12-21 2016-02-02 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Automatic transmissions and methods therefor
US8398518B2 (en) 2008-06-23 2013-03-19 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Continuously variable transmission
US10066713B2 (en) 2008-06-23 2018-09-04 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Continuously variable transmission
US8641572B2 (en) 2008-06-23 2014-02-04 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Continuously variable transmission
US9074674B2 (en) 2008-06-23 2015-07-07 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Continuously variable transmission
US20110172050A1 (en) * 2008-06-23 2011-07-14 Fallbrook Technologies, Inc. Continuously variable transmission
US9528561B2 (en) 2008-06-23 2016-12-27 Fallbrook Intellectual Property Company Llc Continuously variable transmission
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