US3063536A - Step by step printer - Google Patents

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US3063536A
US3063536A US732961A US73296158A US3063536A US 3063536 A US3063536 A US 3063536A US 732961 A US732961 A US 732961A US 73296158 A US73296158 A US 73296158A US 3063536 A US3063536 A US 3063536A
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relay
contacts
line
signal
read
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US732961A
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Dirks Gerhard
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Dirks Gerhard
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J5/00Devices or arrangements for controlling character selection
    • B41J5/30Character or syllable selection controlled by recorded information
    • B41J5/44Character or syllable selection controlled by recorded information characterised by storage of recorded information
    • B41J5/48Character or syllable selection controlled by recorded information characterised by storage of recorded information on external storages
    • B41J5/51Character or syllable selection controlled by recorded information characterised by storage of recorded information on external storages on more than one separate storage, e.g. on additional correction strips or tapes

Description

Nov. 13, 1962 6. DIRKS 35063536 STEP BY STEP PRINTER- Filed May 5, 1958 s Sheets-Sheet 1 um: SPACE Ls z a 4 6 e 7 a o owe TYU\0P 'P- h s n F e H .1 L Q 2 c B N M a HYPHEN16 sp l 7 J H J F\G.2 cAsE: CHARACTER \6 1c 1b sum 1 SPACE. 5 m

INVENTOR BY 64M f/n%/ ATTORNEY Nov. 13, 1962 5, DlRKs 3,063,536

STEP BY STEP PRINTER Filed May 5, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 27H 18 JZBg J igge i2 g H5O 12951 23 0150 L DATA ON TRACK 8 41 ONCE MAN WAS OVER WHELMED HE.WA$.D\S ARMED 42 1 222 3 43 THE .COULD. BE 44 1 I TYPED ONCE THE MAN COULD BE. OVE R- WHELMED HE WA$ D\SARMED.

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as 41 FIG .7. e1 42 42' ,4o'='='==== Fl \45 43 H as 3 f 5% ssA l 57 as E I A E so z 46 (53 \9 SEE 47 4 51152 2, 48 51 63 43 so J fi i INVENTOR ATTORNEY Nov; 13, 1962 G. DIRKS 3,063,536

STEP BY STEP PRINTER Filed May 5, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR MM flow/ Nov. 13, 1962 G, Ks 3,063,536

, STEP BY STEP PRINTER Filed May 5, 195a 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 HOLD 115 START 10st: STOP INVENTORI ATTORNEY Nov. 13, 1962 e. DIRKS STEP BY STEP PRINTER Filed May 5, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 iosc Tlllllllllll IIIHMP n H50 CR$O MANUAL HIIIII ||||H|||||| CH FIG 12.

IN VE N TOR MM flew ATTORNEY 3,053,536 Patented Nov. 13, 1962 3,063,536 STEP BY STEP PRINTER Gerhard Dirks, Frankfurt am Main, Germany (12129 Edgeclifi Place, Los Altos Hills, Calif.) Filed May 5, 1958, Ser. No. 732,961 Claims priority, application Germany Oct. 1, 1948 4 Claims. (til. 19719) This invention relates to the recording in step by step printers of data character by character in lines within preset limits of line length and sensibly terminated and is a continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 498,051, filed March 30, 1955, now abandoned, which in turn is a continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 101,032, filed June 24, 1949, now abandoned.

An object of the invention is to enable the automatic typing of combined texts derived from two sources in revised format. Thus data from one source may have data incorporated from a correction source in which only the corrections are provided and these corrections are not confined to exact replacements of whole lines as heretofore done.

A further object is to enable the automatic typing of data in lines within predetermined limits of length. In automatic typing this is useful where the line end data is absent or inappropriate to the format required and in manual operation this relieves the operator of determining the line end.

In accordance with the present invention, line termination is placed under the control of an electrical contact operated at a position preset in the line. The contact prepares a line termination circuit which is rendered effective on the first occurrence of a space or hyphen thereafter.

A further feature of the invention is a pre-rnark hyphen key for efiecting printing of hyphens at the end of lines Without breaking up words in the text.

Another feature is the selection of either of two texts for combination, with suppression of any line end signals to allow automatic typing in revised format of the combined text.

The invention is generally applicable to recorders recording one character at a time with stepwise movement between paper and recorder and no limitation to the particular form of typewriter described is to be inferred.

In order that the present invention may be readily carried into effect, it will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, which refer to a well known typewriter, wherein:

FIGURE 1 shows a side section of a well-known automatic typewriter;

FIGURE 2 shows a keyboard;

FIG. 3 shows the standard line contact utilized in the invention;

FIG. 4 shows a pre-mark hyphen key;

FIGURE 5 shows the line end control circuit;

FIGURE 6 shows an example of stored data track and correction data track and the combined text;

FIGURE 7 shows a magnetic data storage and means for read-out including inductive distributors;

FIGURES 8, 9 and 10 show details of a distributor;

FIGURE 11 shows the sensing and control circuit; and

FIGURE 12 shows the code conversion and read-out to the typewriter solenoids.

The invention will be described in two stages, first as applied to a manually operated typewriter and secondly as applied to automatic typing of data selected automatically from two sources for typing in line format.

FIGURE 1 shows a side view of a typewriter of the 2 kind shown in US. Patents Nos. 1,777,055; 1,873,512; 1,955,614; 2,318,299 and many others.

FIGURE 2 shows the keyboard. The keyboard has the usual keys 1 for case shift, characters, and functions such as space SP and carriage return CRih and hyphen. Additionally, a pre-mark hyphen key 1e is also provided which effects printing of hyphens only when they occur at the end of a line.

The operation will be briefly described. The keys 1 (FIGURE 1) are mounted on cross bars supported in the frame. Depression of a key 1 (except the key 1e) releases a latch 2 from a cam 3 permitting a spring pressed lever to move the cam 3 against the periphery of a continuously driven roller 5. The cam 3 is rotated by contact with the roller 5 causing the lever 4 to rock in a direction for depressing a link 6. The link 6, through linkage 7, propels the type bar 8 carried by the basket 9 towards the platen 1.0 to elfect printing of the type denoted by the depressed key. Pre-mark hyphen key 1e merely operates contacts 26c and 26] (see FIGURE 4). The platen 10 is mounted in a carriage 11 movable transversely on guide rails 12. A spring urges the carriage in the direction of space movement and is controlled by a pair of pawls which alternately engage a rack 16 mounted on the carriage. One or the other pawl is released by the escapement lever 15 actuated by a universal bar '31 operated from an actuated type bar. The space pawl may also be operated by linkage 14 under space key control. A ratchet operates line spacing of the platen and this is automatically advanced on a carriage return. Carriage return is operated by a clutch controlled by the key CRlh (see US. Patent No. 1,753,450). The motor drive shaft via the clutch and gear (not shown) provides the power to drive the rack 16 to starting position.

A tab key 23 (FIGURE 3) is placed in rack 22 attached to the carriage at a position for determining the standard line length required. This operates to close a fixed contact 18 when the carriage is in this position. For the manually operated typewriter, only solenoids 30 (FIGURE 1) for operating the carriage return CRIh and the hyphen key are required. In the automatic operation, all keys are provided with similar solenoids 30, including the special premark hyphen key 1e. Each key also operates to close a contact 26, but for manual operation only space contact 26g (FIGURE 1) and pre-mark hyphen contacts 26:: and 267 (FIGURE 4) are used. For manual operation, words in excess of a limited number of characters, determined by the degree to which the lines are to be allowed to extend beyond the standard line length, are hyphenated by the operator depressing the pre-mark hyphen key 1e.

With the standard line contact connected as in FIG- URE 5 at, say, carriage column position 60 and words in excess of nine characters hyphenated with the pre-mark hyphen key the line will never extend beyond 70 characters. The operation is as follows.

Within the standard line length, depression of the premark hyphen key does nothing as contacts 27b, 270 are open. On the carriage reaching the standard line length, contact 18 is closed, energizing relay 27, which maintains its energization via its hold winding 27H and its own contact 27a and normally closed contact 29a. Upon completion of either a word or an expression mark if this follows a word, depression of the space kep SP completes a circuit to the carriage return solenoid CR30 by closing its contacts 26g. This completes the circuit to energize solenoid CR30 via contact 27b closed by operation of relay 27. CR30 then operates the carriage return key. A relay 29 is connected in parallel with the solenoid CR30. The relay 29 is slow acting, to allow completion of the carriage return operation, and on completion of the carriage return opens its contact 29a, releasing the holding of the winding of relay 27. If, however, the last word had been a long one hyphenated by the use of the prehyphen key, then, upon the closing of the contacts 26e and 26 two circuits are rendered efiective. Closure of the contacts 26 completes the circuit through the then closed contacts 27c to operate the hyphen key solenoid H36. The contacts 262 are connected in parallel with the contacts 26g and likewise operate the carriage return solenoid CR30. The printing of the hyphen is more rapid than the carriage return initiation and hence takes place before any return movement.

For automatic typing of data in line format, stored signals are selectively read out and decoded to operate solenoids 30 of the several keys. Sensible line terminations will be effected, as in the above manual operation, by means of the same line end circuit and by use of a code denoting hyphening for operating a solenoid Site for key 1e similar to the solenoid 30'controlling other keys as shown in FIGURE 1.

Paragraph indications may be provided for operating the carriage return solenoid CR30 directly to terminate short lines, but no code is required or utilized for terminating normal lines. This becomes of practical importance when matter has been recorded with line format code indications and correction matter is required which vitiates the original line format if lines are to be kept within preset limits. A different separate code combination is then employed for paragraph and line ends.

By way of example, it is assumed that the data to be printed is stored on a magnetic drum having two sets of four tracks, and each set comprises:

(1) An original text.

(2) Commands for positions of amendment, or for transferring to another set of tracks.

(3) A correction text.

(4) Commands for restoring control to the original text track or to another set of tracks.

FIGURE 6 shows an example of a message, a correction and commands for their organization.

The pro-mark hyphen code is represented as a cross and spaces are represented by a period.

It is required to combine the message and correction to form code signals for operating a typewriter, and to automatically terminate each line at the first hyphen or space signal after a word (including any expression mark concluding a word) utilizing as standard line length 23 character positions. This will then be typed in the form shown in the last two lines of FIGURE 6.

FIGURE 7 shows a magnetic drum 40 mounted on a shaft 36 supported in side plates 38, 38A and driven by a motor 37.

Also mounted on the shaft 36 are two stepping distributors (shown in section and broken) (FIGURES 7 to and two sets of slip rings 39 and 39A for connecting the distributors to stationary circuitry.

The magnetic drum 40 has two sets of four tracks 4-1, 42, 43, 44 and 41', 42, 43, 44'. Eight sensing heads 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, '51, 52, 53 cooperate with the tracks. One head is mounted for each track on frame member 45.

The distributors (FIGURES 7 to 10) are exactly similar, and similar parts of the right distributor associated with sensing heads 48 and 49 or 52 and 53 are similarly referenced to the like parts of the left distributor. Both distributors step, when operated by the stepping motors, in the same direction to effect distribution of a next character code. The data is recorded in the message and correction tracks in the form of a start mark S, followed by six code mark positions AF recorded in a combination representing a character or function, itself followed by a stop mark P. In the command tracks 42, 44, and 42, 44' only a code mark in three possible positions G, H, 1, corresponding to the first three code positions A, B, C of the adjoining track character, are utilized. Thus,

4 G signal is the command 2 of FIGURE 6 for efiectiug erasure. H signal is the command 1 for switching to the correction track and I signal is the command 3 for switching to the next set of tracks.

The left distributor comprises a series of wheels 54, each keyed to shaft 36 and having an inductive yoke 55 (see FIGURE 10) or tooth adapted to pass between the poles of a magnetizable core 56 (FIGURES 7, 9 and 10). Each core carries an input winding 57 and an output winding 58. For convenience of effectively spacing the cores within the arc of a sector representing start, code and stop they are each mounted in difierent positions around the respective wheels, but at distances from their related yoke so that when the yoke for the start core is opposite its core, the yokes of the other elements are each at their respective code signals distance away from their respective yokes. These cores are mounted on the distributor cup 59. Cores 56S, 56A-E, 56P represent the distributive elements for track 41. A set of cores 56G, 56H, 56] respectively similarly positioned to 56A, 56B, 56C and to their related yokes are provided for the track 42. The cup member 59 is graduated with sector marks for initial manual setting opposite the first recorded character position. When a core is magnetized by its input winding a voltage is delivered at the output winding when the inductive yoke completes the magnetic circuit so that on each revolution a signal is selected at the time a yoke is opposite its core.

In addition to the above start, stop, code and command distributor elements is a further similar element 54 carrying yoke 55K cooperating with core 56K for providing an end of revolution impulse, for each revolution. The connections from the coils are conveyed to the slip rings 39, which are insulatedly mounted on shaft 36 but fixed to move with the cup member 59 of the distributor. These slip rings are connected to the output heads by the fixed brushes 60.

When the start yoke is opposite the start core, each of the other yokes are at their respective code distances from their respective cores and the angular difference in timing of start and stop may be 3.6 allowing for nearly a hundred characters per circumferential data track. In one revolution, a single code character, and command, if any, is read out. At the end of the revolution, the cup member 59 is stepped on to bring the next character code into sensing position and the cores into appropriate position for distributing this next signal.

The stepping mechanism of a known kind comprises a solenoid-controlled ratchet drive shown in FIGURE 8.

Attached to the distributor cup member 59 is a gear wheel 61 by which it is advanced after each distribution. The solenoid-operated ratchet drive for the gear 61 comprises support members 62 and 63 carrying a shaft 64 (FIGURES 7 and 8). Freely mounted on the shaft 64 is a gear wheel 65 meshing with gear wheel 61. A ratchet wheel 66 is mounted on the shaft 64. Also freely mounted on the shaft 64 is a lever member 67 carrying a ratchet pawl 68 sprung for engagement with the ratchet. One end of the lever 67 is coupled to a spring 69 and the other end is attached to a plunger 71 adapted to be pulled against the spring tension of the spring 69 by a solenoid 70.

Energization of the solenoid 70 results in rotation of the lever 67 and disengagement of the ratchet, and subsequent deenergization of said solenoid results in the ratchet 66 being engaged and the lever 67 being rotated by the spring 69. This drive results in advancing the cup member 59 by one code sector, e.g. 3.6".

FIGURE 11 shows the circuit from the sensing head via the distributor coils to the code relay whose contacts control the solenoids of the typewriter, and the relays controlled by command signals for controlling which distributor is used and which one is to be stepped on and which set of tracks are to be used, and relays operated at a line end to prevent read-out during carriage return.

As before, similar parts of the two distributors have been similarly numbered for the first, or left, distributor and for the second, or right, distributor. The convention has been adopted of referencing relay contacts with the number of the relay followed by a, b, 0, etc. and a prime it related to the right distributor only.

The eight sensing heads 46-53 (FIGURE 7) form two alternative sets of four, selected by contacts of relays 77 and 77' (FIGURE 11) transferred by the command 3 represented by signal I operating gas tubes 92 or 194.

Thus, initially, heads 45, 47, 48 and 49* are selected for use by connection or closing of the contacts 77a, 77b, 77c, 77d, respectively. Hence a I signal from head 47 operates or energizes the tube 92, energizing relay 77. Subsequently, a J signal detected by head 53 operates or energizes the tube 104, energizing relay 77 until the end of the revolution when contacts 105a open, thus deenergizing relay 77 by the opening of contacts 77a. Thus, reset to the initial set of tracks is from the command correction track and is always preceded by a correction signal. The selected heads operate, via amplifiers 72, 73, 74, 75, the distributor input windings connected in series in each amplifiers anode circuit. Amplifier 72 operates input coils 57, start coil 578, stop coil 57F, code coils 57A to F. Amplifier 73 is connected to operate input coils S7G-J of the command track at times corresponding to 57A-C. The end of revolution input core 56K is magnetized by its input winding 57K being connected on one side via a resistance 76 to the positive line and to ground on the other side so as to provide a signal for every revolution. Amplifiers 74 and 75 are similarly connected to the input coils of the second distributor. A bias voltage is provided by resistors 73 and 79 for controlling the cathode potential of amplifiers 72, 73, 74, 75. For each input coil 57 there is a corresponding output coil 58. Each distributor output coil is connected to ground via a resistor and to the grid of a gas discharge tube in the same manner in which output coil 58K is connected to resistor 8t and to the grid of gas discharge tube 81. Each gas discharge tube 31-92 of the first (left) distributor and 93-104 of the second (right) distributor is biased at its cathode by the potentiometer formed by resistors 73 and 79 to prevent conduction until the yoke links its input core.

The table 81 is connected to an end of revolution relay 105 via normally closed contacts 1M1: and 11722 to the positive line. When the gas tube 82 becomes conductive as a result of the receipt of a start signal from the head 46, the start relay 106 is operated, opening contacts 106a, resetting relay 195 and extinguishing the tube 81.

The code tubes 84-89 have relays 107-112 in their respective anode circuits and are connected through said relays in common to code detection relay 114 and normally closed contact 1650. Contacts 105a close when relay 105 is deenergized by the start relay 106, opening contacts 106a at the start signal time, and are opened when the next end of revolution pulse occurs. The opening of these contacts resets code relays 107-112 and 114 and tubes 82-89. After the start signal, the code tubes representing the character signal combination are made conductive to operate a combination of code relays 107-112 and the signal detection relay 114. The code relays have contacts operating read-out to the typewriter. Upon signal detection, relay 114 closes contacts 114a which completes the circuit to the distributor stepping solenoid 70 to efiect its energization. At the end of revolution, stepping occurs as a result of contacts N542 opening and deenergizing the stepping solenoid 7 it. After the code signals, the stop signal occurs and operates the coil 58F and causes the tube 83 to become conductive. The tube 83 has stop relay 113 and normally open contacts web of the start relay 106 connected in series in its anode circuit. Operation of the start relay having preceded,

6 the anode circuit is complete at the time of the stop signal. Stop relay 113 has normally closed contacts 113a, which are then opened extinguishing the tube 82 and deenergizing the relay 106. Deenergization of the relay 106 opens contacts 106b, extinguishing the tube 83 and again releasing the relay 113. Command signal G of distributor output coil 586 is fed to the grid of gas discharge tube 90 and occurs at the same instant as the first code element signal on coil 58A. The tube 90' has relay 115 connected in its anode circuit. As previously, this resets at the end of the revolution by the opening of contacts 1 15a. The relay 115 has contacts 115a (FIGURE 12) which suppress read-out when the relay 115 is energized. Command signal H operates distributor input coil 58111 which is connected to gas tube 91. The gas tube 91 has relay 116 connected in its anode circuit. The relay 116 controls the selection of the distributor by its contacts 11611 controlling relay 117 (further explained hereinafter) and by its normally open contacts 116a prepares a circuit for operating relay 116" of a second distributor. Hence an H signal picked up by the head 47 transfers control to the head 48 and the head 49, and similarly, an H signal picked up by the head 49' releases the relay 116 to transfer control back again by the opening of contacts 116a in the anode circuit of the tube 91. Since the relay 116 only releases the relay 116, it remains ener gized for only one revolution and so is connected via contacts 1115a in a similar manner to the relay 77.

The selection of the distributor is controlled by contacts 117k of relay 117. Relay changeover may only occur between a revolution end and the start. Relay 117 can be energized via the closing of the contacts 3116b (relay 116 is operated at B code time by the command signal H and then maintains itself energized) as delayed by the normally closed contacts 1051'). The contacts 1115b are closed, however, between the end of revolution and start signals. This delays the operation of the relay 117 until after an end of revolution signal following a previously read-out signal has occurred via the first distributor. Relay 117 then maintains its energization via its hold winding and its own normally open contacts 117a and normally closed contacts 116]), with contacts 1415b in parallel. Changeover of contacts 117i) prevents operation of the relay 1G5 and makes the tubes 93-104 of the second right distributor available. Having changed over the distributor, the relay 117 can be released again by an H signal operating the relay 116. This opens the contacts 116]), which only become effective to break the circuit at the time in the cycle when the end of revolution relay also opens its contacts 16512 at the end of revolution signal, thus allowing read-out to be completed before changeover occurs. At the end of printing of the line, signal read-out and distributor stepping is prevented by opening the circuits of the code detecting relays 114 and 114' by contacts 11812 and 1180. The relay 118 is operated by closure of the carriage return key contact CR26. The relay 118 maintains its energization by its own contact 118a and the slow-operating relay 29 (FIGURE 5) contact 2% remains closed until the carriage return period has elapsed. The closing of carriage return contact 26 is as a result of a read-out signal and thus can only occur at a time after stop and before the next revolution signal. The code relays of the two distributors control read-out to the typewriter solenoids to operate the keys at the rate of one key per revolution.

FIGURE 12 shows in schematic outline the code relay contacts for each distributor. The relay contacts are wired in pyramid form to provide an output wire for each code combination, each of which is connected to a solenoid 30. Read-out is effected in the period between signal stop, when all code relays to be set must be set, and the end of revolution for that distributor. Contacts 1116c and 11. 66 of the start relays 1% and 1115' are open between start and stop for their respective distributors.

aoeaeas Contacts 105 and 105' are normally closed contacts and hence are closed between start (via stop) and the end of revolution for their respective distributors. That is relay 105 is energized between the end of revolution and the next start time, contacts 165d and 196a are in circuit with contacts 1170 in their rest position and per contra contacts 105a" and 106:2 with relay 11'7 energized (-FZGURE 11). The contacts 105d and 106a therefore limit the read-out to the required period and the relay 117 selects which distributor and which pyramid shall select a solenoid. Command G (erase) relays 115 and 115 control the suppression of read-out when energized by opening contacts 116c or 1160', respectively.

The code relays of the two distributors have their contacts for each distributor wired in pyramid formation in order to provide a unique circuit for each code combination of A B C D E F signals. Each like circuit in each pyramid is connected in common to a key operating solenoid 3! Three of such solenoids are actually shown in FIGURE 12; carriage return solenoid C1130 for paragraph end signals, solenoid HSti for pro-mark hyphen key operation, and solenoid StiSP for space key. The other solenoids are similarly connected. 7

The pyramid outputs as stated above are each connected to their related solenoid for operating the typewriter keys, except that if a combination has been recorded for carriage return, meaning line end, this is left disconnected by opening manual switch 119. If, however, this combination has not been so employed, it may be utilized in recording to mark carriage return at paragraph ends, in which case the combination is connected to the solenoids CR3tt for effecting paragraph ends in printing. Pre-mark hyphen symbols are allotted a code and the code outlet is connected to the pre-mark hyphen key solenoid H30, and the separate code allocated to hyphens is connected to the hyphen key solenoid.

It will be apparent therefore that, utilizing the example given (FIGURE 6), track 41 is read out one character per revolution until a l is read in track 42, whereupon the left distributor is not stepped on, and read-out from track 41 is suppressed, and read-out on the next revolution begun from track 43. Stepping was also prepared for the right distributor 59 at the changeover and becomes efiective for reading out the first character in track 43. The first 1 in command track 44 retransfers control to prepare for stepping on drum (left distributor) while actually stepping on the right drum 59' in preparation for the next correction character. The three 2s in the command track suppresses read-out of was via the relay 115 while permitting stepping on to occur. On reaching command 3, heads are switched to pick up recordings from the next group of tracks due, account having been taken in recording to position the starting characters in both the original and correction tracks in next positions sectorwise. This is readily efiected if read-in is efiected in similar manner to the read-out described herein. The typewriter includes a line ending circuit as described for manual operation.

When line end is called for under the joint control of a signal operating the space or hyphen key and the line end contact, the carriage is automatically returned, but meanwhile the drum is still revolving. Both read-out and stepping is suppressed during this period by closure of the contacts CR26, operating or energizing the relay 118. The relay 118 maintains its energization by normally open contacts 29b of relay 29 (FIGURE 5) and the closing of contacts 118a (FIGURE 11). This prevents relays 114 or 114' from operating by opening the normally closed contacts 11851 and 1180, thus opening the circuit to the anodes of the code read-out tubes 34-S9 and 961ti1 at a time towards the end of read-out. Upon contacts 2% reclosing at the end of carriage return, the

end of revolution relays 105 or 165 must be operated before a further signal can be effective. The status quo of the other gas tube controlled relays concerned with commands is unaffected by contacts 11% or 118a.

The line ends of the combined text arise from contacts 18 closing at character position 23, so making the premark hyphen etfective to print and to operate the carriage return with line spacing. The space after dis-armed (position 24) controls a line end. If the last symbol in the line is a period, i.e., an expression mark following a Word, a following space would call for line end in a like manner. The pre-mark hypen in disarmed having only operated the pre-mark key within the standard line length, i. e., position 19, no spacing results, and no hypen is recorded.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of this present invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and range of equivalence of the following claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a recording apparatus, in combination, rotatable storage drum means having a plurality of tracks, at least one of said tracks having stored therein data representing a series of first data items representing characters, spaces, punctuation, and selected commands, such data being sequentially recorded within a track corresponding to their appearance in a proposed printed line, at least another of said tracks having recorded therein a series of supplementary data items indicating any selected data items of one of said first series and said supplementary series located any place in said tracks to accordingly amend the said first series; read-out means for sensing recorded data in said tracks; stepwisely operating selecting means advancing data item by data item to control said read-out means to read out the next following data item; recording means operative under the control of data items sensed by said read-out means and including a record medium; means for producing a margin set signal after the recording of a determined number of data items; and line switching means conditioned by said margin set signal for advancing the record medium of said recording means into the next line position at the occurrence of a line advance signal supplied by the sensing of a data item representing one of a space, punctuation and selected command.

2. In a printing apparatus, in combination, rotatable storage drum means having a plurality of tracks, at least one of said tracks having stored therein data representing a first text, such data including data items representing characters, spaces, punctuation, and selected commands, such data being sequentially recorded within a track corresponding to their appearance in a proposed printed line, at least another of said tracks having recorded therein a correction text and reference signals indicating any selected portion of one of said first text and said correction text to accordingly amend the said first text; read-out means for sensing recorded data in said tracks; stepwisely operating selecting means advancing data item by data item to control said read-out means to read out the next following data item; printing means operative under the control of data items sensed by said read-out means and including a record medium; means for producing a margin set signal after the printing of a predetermined number of data items; and line switching means conditioned by said margin set signal for advancing the record medium of said printing means into the next line position at the occurrence of a line advance signal, supplied by the sensing of a data item representing 'one of a space, punctuation and selected command.

3. In a printing apparatus, in combination, rotatable storage drum means having a plurality of tracks, at least one of said tracks having stored therein data representing a first text, such data including data items representing characters, spaces, punctuation, and selected commands, such data being sequentially recorded within a track corresponding to their appearance in a proposed printed line, others of said tracks having recorded therein a correction text and reference signals indicating any selected portion of one of said first text and said correction text to accordingly amend the said first text, said reference signals being recorded at places where the corresponding selected portions of said first text and said correction text are recorded; read-out means for sensing recorded data in said tracks; stepwisely operating selecting means advancing data item by data item to control said read-out means to read out the next following data item; printing means operative under the control of data items sensed by said read-out means and including a record medium; means for producing a margin set signal after the printing of a predetermined number of data items; and line switching means conditioned by said margin set signal for advancing the record medium of said printing means into the next line position at the occurrence of a line advance signal supplied by the sensing of a data item representing one of a space, punctuation and selected command.

4. In a printing apparatus, in combination, rotatable storage drum means having a plurality of tracks, at least one of said tracks having stored therein data representing a first text, such data including data items representing characters, spaces, punctuation, and selected commands, such data being sequentially recorded within a track corresponding to their appearance in a proposed printed line, others of said tracks having recorded therein a correction text and correction insertions each indieating any selected portion of one of said first text and said correction text to accordingly amend the said first text, said correction insertions being recorded at places where the said correction insertions are to be inserted in said first text; read-out means for sensing recorded data in said tracks and simultaneously reading said first text and said correction text thereby to determine Where each of said correction insertions is to be inserted in the said first text; stepwisely operating selecting means advancing data item by data item to control said read-out means to read out the next following data item; printing means operative under the control of data items sensed by said read-out means and including a record medium; means for for producing a margin set signal after the printing of a predetermined number of data items; and line switching means conditioned by said margin set signal for advancing the record medium of said printing means into the next line position at the occurrence of a line ad Vance signal supplied by the sensing of a data item representing one of a space, punctuation and selected command.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,606,126 Houston Nov. 9, 1926 2,217,150 Ayres Oct. 8, 1940 2,283,538 Clark May 19, 1942 2,609,907 Lynch Sept. 9, 1952 2,646,155 Cardon July 21, 1953 2,717,686 Sceber Sept. 13, 1955 2,762,485 Bafour et al. Sept. 11, 1956 2,765,895 Higonnet et al. Oct. 9, 1956

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US3268049A (en) * 1961-12-28 1966-08-23 Grundig Max Function control arrangements having common drive means
US3297124A (en) * 1964-06-25 1967-01-10 Ibm Data recording and printing apparatus capable of responding to changed format
US3335409A (en) * 1964-06-25 1967-08-08 Westinghouse Electric Corp Permutation apparatus
US3340986A (en) * 1966-02-18 1967-09-12 Itt Typewriter margin control device having means to position carriage return codes
US3342298A (en) * 1966-02-21 1967-09-19 Itt Phantom carriage for automatic typewriter
US3386552A (en) * 1966-02-17 1968-06-04 Intercontinental Systems Inc Data editing and revision system with margin control
US3631957A (en) * 1969-07-03 1972-01-04 Ibm Variable right-hand margin-control system
US3837459A (en) * 1972-12-04 1974-09-24 Little Inc A Word processor with means for programming indented paragraph format
US3895704A (en) * 1972-05-18 1975-07-22 Little Inc A Word processor with right-hand margin control
DE2166981A1 (en) * 1970-11-25 1977-07-14 Ricoh Kk Redigierrand-control device for an electric typewriter
US4085836A (en) * 1975-11-17 1978-04-25 Scm Corporation Rotary magnetic storage medium for typewriters
US4270865A (en) * 1976-12-08 1981-06-02 Kokusai Denshin Denwa Co., Ltd. Editing printer
US4687353A (en) * 1967-01-16 1987-08-18 International Business Machines Corporation Automatic format, mode control and code conversion for data processing and printing apparatus
US5290109A (en) * 1986-12-26 1994-03-01 Seiko Epson Corporation Electronic typewriter for printing of documents having a fixed format

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US1606126A (en) * 1922-04-08 1926-11-09 Robert L Houston Automatic typewriter
US2217150A (en) * 1938-05-14 1940-10-08 Ibm Recording machine
US2283538A (en) * 1937-08-21 1942-05-19 Edgar H Clark Translating and recording device
US2609907A (en) * 1947-09-16 1952-09-09 Brush Dev Co Self-justifying printing device
US2646155A (en) * 1946-07-25 1953-07-21 Cardon Maurice Henri Correcting device for printing apparatus
US2717686A (en) * 1952-11-05 1955-09-13 Ibm Word writing typewriter
US2762485A (en) * 1954-03-24 1956-09-11 Georges P Bafour Automatic composing machine
US2765895A (en) * 1952-01-11 1956-10-09 Graphic Arts Res Foundation In Register for type composing apparatus

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US1606126A (en) * 1922-04-08 1926-11-09 Robert L Houston Automatic typewriter
US2283538A (en) * 1937-08-21 1942-05-19 Edgar H Clark Translating and recording device
US2217150A (en) * 1938-05-14 1940-10-08 Ibm Recording machine
US2646155A (en) * 1946-07-25 1953-07-21 Cardon Maurice Henri Correcting device for printing apparatus
US2609907A (en) * 1947-09-16 1952-09-09 Brush Dev Co Self-justifying printing device
US2765895A (en) * 1952-01-11 1956-10-09 Graphic Arts Res Foundation In Register for type composing apparatus
US2717686A (en) * 1952-11-05 1955-09-13 Ibm Word writing typewriter
US2762485A (en) * 1954-03-24 1956-09-11 Georges P Bafour Automatic composing machine

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3268049A (en) * 1961-12-28 1966-08-23 Grundig Max Function control arrangements having common drive means
US3335409A (en) * 1964-06-25 1967-08-08 Westinghouse Electric Corp Permutation apparatus
US3297124A (en) * 1964-06-25 1967-01-10 Ibm Data recording and printing apparatus capable of responding to changed format
US3386552A (en) * 1966-02-17 1968-06-04 Intercontinental Systems Inc Data editing and revision system with margin control
US3340986A (en) * 1966-02-18 1967-09-12 Itt Typewriter margin control device having means to position carriage return codes
US3342298A (en) * 1966-02-21 1967-09-19 Itt Phantom carriage for automatic typewriter
US4687353A (en) * 1967-01-16 1987-08-18 International Business Machines Corporation Automatic format, mode control and code conversion for data processing and printing apparatus
US3631957A (en) * 1969-07-03 1972-01-04 Ibm Variable right-hand margin-control system
DE2166981A1 (en) * 1970-11-25 1977-07-14 Ricoh Kk Redigierrand-control device for an electric typewriter
US3895704A (en) * 1972-05-18 1975-07-22 Little Inc A Word processor with right-hand margin control
US3837459A (en) * 1972-12-04 1974-09-24 Little Inc A Word processor with means for programming indented paragraph format
US4085836A (en) * 1975-11-17 1978-04-25 Scm Corporation Rotary magnetic storage medium for typewriters
US4270865A (en) * 1976-12-08 1981-06-02 Kokusai Denshin Denwa Co., Ltd. Editing printer
US5290109A (en) * 1986-12-26 1994-03-01 Seiko Epson Corporation Electronic typewriter for printing of documents having a fixed format

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