US3054210A - Dust and liquid spray device - Google Patents

Dust and liquid spray device Download PDF

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Publication number
US3054210A
US3054210A US775543A US77554358A US3054210A US 3054210 A US3054210 A US 3054210A US 775543 A US775543 A US 775543A US 77554358 A US77554358 A US 77554358A US 3054210 A US3054210 A US 3054210A
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valve
container
tube
dust
gas
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Expired - Lifetime
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US775543A
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James C Kratzer
William L Kennedy
Jr Frank G Balfe
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Union Carbide Corp
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Union Carbide Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D83/00Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents
    • B65D83/14Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents for delivery of liquid or semi-liquid contents by internal gaseous pressure, i.e. aerosol containers comprising propellant for a product delivered by a propellant
    • B65D83/60Contents and propellant separated
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D83/00Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents
    • B65D83/14Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents for delivery of liquid or semi-liquid contents by internal gaseous pressure, i.e. aerosol containers comprising propellant for a product delivered by a propellant
    • B65D83/16Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents for delivery of liquid or semi-liquid contents by internal gaseous pressure, i.e. aerosol containers comprising propellant for a product delivered by a propellant characterised by the actuating means
    • B65D83/20Containers or packages with special means for dispensing contents for delivery of liquid or semi-liquid contents by internal gaseous pressure, i.e. aerosol containers comprising propellant for a product delivered by a propellant characterised by the actuating means operated by manual action, e.g. button-type actuator or actuator caps
    • B65D83/201Lever-operated actuators
    • B65D83/202Lever-operated actuators combined with a hand grip

Description

Sept. 18, 1962 Filed Nov. 21, 1958 J. c. KRATZER ET AL 3,054,210

DUST AND LIQUID SPRAY DEVICE 2. SheetsSheet 1 2 INVENTORS JAMES C. KRATZER WILLIAM L. KENNEDY FR-ANK G. BALI-E, JR.

? AAL ATTORNEY Sept. 18, 1962 J. c. KRATZER ET AL 3,054,210

DUST AND LIQUID SPRAY DEVICE Filed Nov. 21, 1958 2 sheets sheet 2 .a 5 a2 INVENTORS JAMES C. KRATZER WILLIAM L. KENNEDY FRANK G. BALFE, JR.

A 7' TORNE V Patented Sept. 18, 1962 Fine 3,054,210 DUST AND LIQUID SPRAY DEVICE James C. Kratzer, Riverside, and William L. Kennedy,

Noroton, Conn, and Frank G. Balfe, J12, Bennington,

Vt., assignors to Union Carbide Corporation, a corporation of New York Filed Nov. 21, 1958, Ser. No. 775,543 8 tClaims. (Cl. 43-147) This invention relates to a spray device, and more particularly, the invention relates to a spray device which may be used interchangeably for the dispensing of dusts and liquids.

In the prior art, many devices are available for the dispensing of liquids. These devices are of an extremely wide range and include watering cans, hose-end Sprayers, aerosol bombs, pressure cylinders of the pump and carbon dioxide type, hand pump sprayers and electric sprayers. Likewise, a wide range of dust dispensing devices are available including flexible squeeze packages, mechanical dusters, either hand or battery operated, and pressure dusters of the aerosol and carbon dioxide type.

The principal disadvantage of these devices of the prior art is their lack of flexibility. Each device is more or less suitable for a particular purpose but if it is attempted to widen its range of usefulness, the inherent disadvantages in the individual device due to its construction and principle of operation will far outweigh any desirable characteristics it may have. In particular, there is no device presently available which will allow the efiicient dispensing of both liquids and dusts, and therefore, if a person is desirous of having means available for carrying out all types of spraying operations it is necessary for him to obtain a wide range of spray devices, and this is highly expensive.

Accordingly, the principal object of the invention is to provide a flexible spray device which may be used interchangeably in many areas of home gardening and housekeeping.

A concurrent object of the invention is to provide a spray device which may be adapted to efliciently dispense both liquids and dusts.

Another object of the invention is to provide a spray device which may be adapted to efficiently dispense both liquids and dusts in a wide range of spray rates, patterns and distances.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a multi-purpose spray device which is characterized by a relatively low initial cost and cost of operation.

A further object of the invention is to provide a multipurpose spray device which is completely portable, not hampered by attached electrical connections, noiseless in operation and yet the propelling action is provided effortlessly and safely.

Broadly stated, the objects of the invention are accomplished by a spray device wherein two containers, one containing a liquefied propellant gas under its own vapor pressure as the power source and the other containing the liquid or dust to be dispensed, are separated by a selfclosing valve in the gas container. Due to this self-closing valve, which is opened by an external triggering device that isolates the two containers, either container may be removed from the spray device without loss of propellant gas or of the material to be dispensed. By the employment of a specially designed tube the device may be readily converted to the dispensing of dusts, and by its removal back to the dispensing of liquids. This allows extreme flexibility, which can be further increased by the use of a number of containers, each containing a material that is commonly sprayed.

The use of a liquefied gas contained under its own vapor pressure as the propellant force is advantageous for many reasons. For example, a long-term supply of propellant may be contained in a small container thereby rendering the subject spray device highly portable. Also, the pressure available for dispensing the liquid or dust material remains fairly constant as long as there is any liquefied gas present, as opposed to the pressure drop experienced when using air or gaseous carbon dioxide under pressure. Since two separate containers are used, the material to be dispensed does not have to be mixed with the propellant as is necessary in the aerosol bombs, but due to the use of a liquefied propellant gas the spray device of the invention has the instant response of the aerosol bombs. EX- arnples of liquefied gases that may be used in the practice of the invention are fluorinated hydrocarbons, butane, isobutane and mixtures thereof.

The invention will be more readily understood by reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a vertical elevation partially in section of one embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 2 is a vertical elevation of a fitting having a pressure relief valve that may optionally be used in the spray device of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a vertical elevation partially in section of another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 4 is a view along line 44 of FIG. 3.

Referring now to FIG. 1, this embodiment of the spray device of the invention comprises a housing H, having a front plate 6.0, a can 12, fitted with a self-closing valve, containing the propellant gas, and a container 14, suitably a metal, plastic or glass jar, containing the liquid or dust to be dispensed. The housing H is fitted with an apertured transverse plate 16 by any conventional means. To the plate 16, a valve device 18, which is an actuating device for the valve in the propellant can 12, is attached, and the propellant can 12 is detachably secured to the underside of the transverse plate 16 by being threaded onto the valve device 18 which passes through one of the apertures in the plate 16. Also passing through the apertures in the plate 16, in gas tight relationships, are a hollow threaded tubular fitting 20, which has dependingfrom it a detachably aflixed apertured, generally J-shapedrigid tube 22, and a threaded valve V, having a nipple 26 extending from the valve seat retainer 28 of the valve V. A flexible tube 24 is detachably aflixed to the nipple 26. To the underside of the transverse plate 16, an apertured container cover 30 is affixed, also having the valve V and the fitting 20 passing through it in gas tight relationships. Detachably threaded onto this container cover 30, in a gas tight relationship provided by a gasket 32, is the container 14 which thereby encloses the rigid tube 22 and the flexible tube 24.

Still referring to FIG. 1, the operation of the spray device is as follows: When a trigger 34 is squeezed, a trigger finger 36 pivots on a trigger hinge 38, about a pin 40, thereby raising a vertical link 42 which will cause a horizontal link 44 to pivot on a pin 4-6 thereby depressing the far end 48 of the horizontal link 44 which is fitted with a nut 50 and a bolt 52 and which will press against a spring member 54 on the valve device 18, causing the valve in the propellant can 12 to open. The trigger finger 36 pivoting on the trigger pin 40 will, after a slight delay' provided by a gap 56-, make contact with nuts 58 threaded onto the top of the valve stem 60 and thereby open the valve V by depressing the valve stem 60 so as to lift it from the valve seat 62. The upper end of the valve stem 60, below the nuts 58 is provided with a spring 64 which will cause the valve V to close automatically when the trigger 34 is released, due to the tension in the spring 64. The delay provided by the gap 56 is important, for it aids in maintaining the proper pressure in the container 14, and also aids in flufling up any dust that is to be sprayed.

The propellant gas released from the can 12 by the opening of its valve will flow from a nipple 66 on the valve device 18 to the hollow fitting 20 through a tube 60.

When the spray device is to be used for dispensing a liquid, the rigid tube 22 is removed, allowing the flexible tube 24 to hang freely to the lowest point in the container 14 under the influence of a weight 70. The weight 70 provides for the etficient removal of the maximum quantity of material from the container 14, no matter at what angle the container 14 is held. The propellant gas upon entering the container 14 through the hollow fitting 20 applies a pressure to the head space above the liquid in the container 14 and forces the liquid up the flexible tube 24 through the valve V and a valve nipple 72 threaded into the valve V, in a gas-tight relationship, and finally out a mechanical break up nozzle N.

When the spray device is to be used for dispensing a dust, the mechanical break up nozzle N is removed and the generally J-shaped rigid tube 22 is connected to the fitting 20 and to the flexible tube 24. The rigidity of the tube 22 enables it to be properly located in the container 14 of relatively dense dust after rotation of the container 14 in attaching it to the container cover 30. The first aperture 78 in the rigid tube 22 combined with the delayed action of the valve V as explained above, first allows the propellant gas to enter the container 14 near its bottom to loosen up the dust, which tends to pack on standing. The pressure of the gas in the container 14, in combination with gravity, forces the dust and gas mixture to enter the second aperture 80 of the rigid tube 22 from whence it flows into the flexible tube 24, through the valve V and finally out the valve nipple 72. Preferably, a crimp 81 is provided in the rigid tube 22 between the apertures 78 and 80.

A small gas clean out hole 82 may be provided in one side of the valve nipple 26, which extends from the valve seat retainer 28. When dispensing liquids, the flexible tube 24 is fitted high enough on the valve nipple 26 to cover the hole 82 so that the propellant gas will not be needlessly lost, but the hole 82 is left uncovered when dispensing dusts and if any plugging of the valve seat area occurs, the pressure which builds up in the container 14 will force a stream of relatively dust-free gas into the valve seat area thereby cleaning it out without packing more dust behind it.

If desired, the hollow fitting 20 of FIG. 1 may be replaced with the fitting 84 of FIG. 2, which has a pressure relief valve 86 incorporated within it. In this case the propellant gas flows into the fitting 84 through a port 88 and out a port 90 into the container 14 or the rigid tube 22 as the case may be. If the pressure in the container 14 commences to build up for any reason, the pressure relief valve 86 in the fitting 84 will open at a preselected pressure due to a ball 92 rising from a gasket 94 causing a spring 96 to rise against a screw 98 thereby allowing gas to escape until the pressure drops to the desired safety point at which time the tension in the spring 96 will automatically cause the pressure relief valve 86 to close.

A more compact embodiment of the spray device of the invention is shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, and comprises a container 100, suitably a metal, plastic or glass jar, containing the liquid or dust to be sprayed, a washer 102 around the rim of the container 100 and a properly apertured container cover 104 threaded onto the container 100 in a gas tight relationship. Passing through the container cover 104, also in gas tight relationships, are aerosol type valve 106, adapted to receive a suitable mechanical break up nozzle 108, and valve device 110. A can 112, containing the liquified propellant gas is threaded onto the valve device 110, which is an actuating device for the valve of the propellant can 112, in such a. manner that the propellant can 112 resides within the container 100. This entire unit is mounted in a housing 114, by means of a rim 116 on the container cover 104. The housing 114 contains a mechanical linkage for actuating the valve device which will cause the valve in the propellant can 112 and the valve 106 to open.

Still referring to FIGURES 3 and 4, the operation of the spray device is as follows: Depression of a press button 118 which is connected to a horizontal link 120 at pivot point 122 causes a lever arm 124 on the valve device 110 to open the valve in the propellant can 112 and subsequently, in due time, due to the choice of the proper pivot point 122, the horizontal link 120 presses down on the mechanical break up nozzle 108 causing the aerosol type valve 106 to open.

As shown in FIG. 4, when the valve in the propellant can 112 is opened the propellant gas will flow from the valve device 110 into a rigid connecting tube 126, thence to a flexible connecting tube 128 and finally, when dust is to be sprayed, into an apertured, generally J-shaped rigid tube 130, whose other end is inserted within a flexible tube 132 whose end is connected to the aerosol type valve 106. The first aperture 134 in the rigid tube combined with the delayed action of the valve 106 as explained above, first allows the propellant gas to enter the container 100 near its bottom to loosen up the dust. The pressure of the gas in the container 100 in combination with gravity, forces the dust and gas mixture to enter the second aperture 136 of the rigid tube 130 from whence it flows into the flexible tube 132, through valve 106 and finally out nozzle 108. Preferably, a crimp 137 is provided in the rigid tube 130 between the apertures 134 and 136.

For spraying liquids, the apartured rigid tube 130 is disconnected from the flexible tube 132 and also the flexible connecting tube 128 is disconnected from the rigid connecting tube 126, but the rigid tube 130 remains in place for it is firmly fastened to the container cover 104, such as by soldering. The flexible tube 132 now hangs freely to the lowest point in the container 100 under the influence of a weight 138. The weight 138 provides for the efiicient removal of the maximum quantity of material from the container 100, no matter at what angle the container 100 is held. The propellant gas, upon entering the container 100 through the connecting tube 126, applies a pressure to the head space above the liquid in the glass jar 100 and forces the liquid up the flexible tube 132', through the valve 106 and finally out a suitable mechanical break up nozzle 108.

As a safety precaution the container 100 may be enclosed in a cardboard or rigid plastic sleeve 140. Optionally, a metal bottom piece 142 may be fitted across the ends of the protective sleeve 140 to protect the bottom of the container 100.

From the above discussion of spray devices embodying the principles of the invention, it is obvious that the two specific embodiments discussed could be modified in many ways. Other forms of the invention could include variations in sizes and in the relative positioning of the two containers, alterations in the mechanical linkage and actuating mechanism, variations in valve designs, tubing, connections, nozzles, and also changes in materials and the employment of different protective devices. For example, while the above discussed generally J shaped, rigid dust pick-up tube which is provided with two apertures in its lower end separated by a crimp as shown in the drawing is preferred in the practice of the invention, any dust pick-up tube arrangement that allows uninterrupted passage of the propellant gas while the dust is introduced into the continuous propellant gas stream at one or several points or in an agitated region is suitable. This includes the directing of one tube onto the entrance to another such that a continuous passage is kept open between them and the use of a continuous tube with an aperture or apertures for dust pick-up by gravity and/ or venturi action.

The advantages of the spray device of the invention over those of the prior art are many. The smaller spray device described is excellent for the dispensing of many household chemicals or pharmaceuticals now normally handled in relatively expensive aerosol type containers. The larger spray device described is excellent for outside garden work and other volume applications. It may also be used for paint spraying when used in combination with a suitable nozzle.

In additional to the pecuniary advantages flowing from the extreme flexibility of the spray device of the invention, the dust that is dispensed with the device is finely dispersed and surges under the influence of the gas in the expelled stream to uniformly coat both upper and lower surfaces of a typical object being sprayed, such as foliage. In liquid dispensing a range of rates, patterns and distances is available, depending on the propellant gas pressure and nozzle characteristics selected.

What is claimed is:

1. A gas activated spray device adaptable to dispense both dust and liquid material, which comprises a liquified propellant gas-containing can, said can having a selfclosing valve provided with an actuating device; a gas tight container into which said material to be sprayed is dispensed, said container being provided with an exit valve having a flexible tube, having a weight at its lower end, depending from the intake of said valve and a tubular fitting having a pressure relief valve within it; a tube connection between said self-closing valve on said gas can and said tubular fitting; and a rigid tube connection between the interior end of said tubular fitting and said flexible tube, said rigid tube being disconnectable from said tubular fitting and said flexible tube and being provided with at least one aperture in its lower end; said exit valve being provided with a mechanical break-up nozzle which is detachable therefrom; said can and said container being provided with a housing having a mechanical linkage triggering device for actuating said actuating device on said self-closing valve, and after a slight delay, opening said exit valve.

2. The spray device of claim 1 wherein said exit valve has a small gas clean out hole and wherein said disconnectable apertured tube connection is a generally J shaped tube having at least two apertures in its lower end, said tube being closed between said apertures by a crimp in said tube.

3. In a gas activated material spraying device which comprises a liquified propellant gas-containing can, said can *having a self-closing valve provided with an actuating device; a gas tight container into which said material to be sprayed in dispensed, said container being provided With an exit valve; and tubular connections for conveying said propellant gas exiting from said self-closing valve to said exit valve on said container; the improvement which comprises one of said tubular connections being a generally J shaped rigid tube having at least two apertures in its lower end, said tube being disconnectable from one of said tubular connections which leads from said self-closing valve and disconnectable from one of said tubular connections which leads to said exit valve; said rigid tube being closed between said apertures by a crimp in said tube, said disconnectable tube rendering said spray device adaptable to the dispensing of both dust and liquid material.

4. A gas activated device for dispensing dust material which comprises a liquid propellant gas-containing can, said can having a self-closing valve provided with an actuating device; a gas tight container into which said dust to be sprayed is dispensed, said container being provided with an exit valve having a gas clean out hole and a flexible tube having a weight at its lower end depending from the intake of said valve, said container also provided with a tubular fitting having a pressure relief valve withinit; a tube connection between said propellant gas can valve and said tubular fitting; and a generally J shaped rigid connection between the interior end of said tubular fitting and said flexible tube, said rigid tube having at least two apertures in its lower end; said rigid tube being closed between said apertures by a crimp in said tube;

said can and said container being provided with a hous ing having a mechanical linkage triggering device for actuating said actuating device on said self-closing valve and, after a slight delay, opening said exit valve.

5. A gas activated spray device adaptable to dispense both dust and liquid material, which comprises a gas tight container into which said material to be sprayed is dispensed, said container being provided With an exit valve having a flexible tube depending from the intake thereof; a liquified propellant gas-containing can enclosed within said container having a self-closing valve provided with an actuating device; a rigid tube which is provided with at least one aperture in its lower end also being enclosed within said container; tubular connections between said self-closing valve on said propellant can and the upper end of said rigid tube, the lower end of said rigid tube being connected with said flexible tube; one of said tubular connections being disconnectable from said valve on said gas can, and said rigid tube being disconnectable from said flexible; said exit valve on said container being provided with a mechanical break-up nozzle which is detachable therefrom.

6. A gas activated spray device adaptable to dispense both dust and liquid material, which comprises a gas tight container into which said material to be sprayed is dispensed, said container being provided with an exit valve having a flexible tube, having a weight at its lower end, depending from the intake thereof; a liquified propellant gas-containing can enclosed within said container having a self-closing valve provided with an actuating device; a generally J-shaped rigid tube also being enclosed within said container; tubular connections between said self-closing valve on said propellant can and the upper end of said rigid tube, the lower end of said rigid tube being connected with said flexible tube; one of said tubular connections being disconnectable from said valve on said gas can, and said rigid tube being disconnectable from said flexible tube and having at least two apertures in its lower end, said rigid tube being closed between said apertures by a crimp in said tube; said exit valve on said container being provided with a mechanical break-up nozzle which is detachable therefrom; said container being provided with a housing having a mechanical linkage triggering device for actuating said actuating device of said self-closing valve and, after a slight delay, opening said exit valve; said housing being provided with a sleeve and bottom piece for protection of said container.

7. A gas activated device for dispensing dust material which comprises a gas tight container into which said dust to be sprayed is dispensed, said container being provided with an exit valve having a flexible tube depending from the intake thereof; a propellant gas-containing can enclosed within said container, said can having a valve; a rigid tube which is provided with at least one aperture in its lower end also being enclosed within said container; tubular connection between said valve on said propellant can and the upper end of said rigid tube, the lower end of said rigid tube being connected with said flexible tube; said exit valve on said container being provided with a mechanical break-up nozzle which is detachable from said valve.

8. A gas activated device for dispensing dust material which comprises a gas tight container into which said dust to be sprayed is dispensed, said container being provided with an exit valve having a flexible tube having a weight at its lower end depending from the intake of said exit valve; a liquified propellant gas-containing can enclosed within said container, said can having a selfclosing valve provided with an actuating device; a generally J-shaped rigid tube also being enclosed within said container; tubular connection between said valve on said propellant can and the upper end of said rigid tube, the lower end of said rigid tube being connected with said flexible tube; said rigid tube having at least two apertures in its lower end, said tube being closed between said apertures by a crimp in said tube; said exit valve in said container being provided with a mechanical break-up nozzle which is detachable from said valve; said container being provided with a housing having a mechanical linkage triggering device for actuating said actuating device on said self-closing valve and, after a slight delay, opening said exit valve; said housing being provided with a sleeve and a bottom piece for protection of said container.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Gordon May 7, 1899 Foster Mar. 12, 1929 Wytcherley May 14, 1929 Kitto May 30, I933 Andvig Aug. 1, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE, OF CORRECTION Patent No, 3 O54 2lO September 18 I 1962 James (1.. Kratzer et al0 It is hereby r ified that error appears in the above numbered 15st; ent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read es corrected below. v

Column 6 line 20 after "flexible" insert tube -e Signed and sealed this 15th day of Januaryl963,

iEAL) ENEST w. SWIDER: DAVID LADD testing Officer Commissioner of Patents

US775543A 1958-11-21 1958-11-21 Dust and liquid spray device Expired - Lifetime US3054210A (en)

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GB266059D GB922347A (en) 1958-11-21 1959-08-05 Improvements in and relating to spraying

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3245582A (en) * 1963-07-06 1966-04-12 Geigy Chem Corp Pressure container
US3261557A (en) * 1963-12-11 1966-07-19 Seaquist Valve Co Aerosol dispenser
US3386628A (en) * 1965-12-28 1968-06-04 Kiekens Wervelwind Holland N V Device for discharging a powdered material from a container
US3705689A (en) * 1970-10-27 1972-12-12 Chemair Corp Of America Liquid spray apparatus
US6168781B1 (en) * 1997-03-17 2001-01-02 Kao Corporation Spraying apparatus for artificial hair augmenting agent
US20070234639A1 (en) * 2006-04-05 2007-10-11 David Robinson Self-watering plant hanger

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB2185537A (en) * 1985-09-24 1987-07-22 Metal Box Plc Aerated liquid storage/dispensing apparatus
AU3281589A (en) * 1988-03-22 1989-10-16 Konrad Baumann Spray can and device for supplying it with compressed air
GB8811758D0 (en) * 1988-05-18 1988-06-22 Reed Packaging Ltd Dispensing valve
GB8811759D0 (en) * 1988-05-18 1988-06-22 Reed Packaging Ltd Dispensers for gasified beverages
US5339988A (en) 1992-10-19 1994-08-23 Ballard Medical Products Disposable tray sump foamer, assembly and methods

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US402921A (en) * 1889-05-07 Atomizer
US1705398A (en) * 1927-06-08 1929-03-12 Emory M Foster Spraying machine
US1712804A (en) * 1926-07-26 1929-05-14 Wytcherley Edward Sand-blast device
US1911367A (en) * 1931-04-04 1933-05-30 Hoover Co Spraying device
US1920165A (en) * 1931-05-16 1933-08-01 Andvig Hans Mouth cleansing device

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US402921A (en) * 1889-05-07 Atomizer
US1712804A (en) * 1926-07-26 1929-05-14 Wytcherley Edward Sand-blast device
US1705398A (en) * 1927-06-08 1929-03-12 Emory M Foster Spraying machine
US1911367A (en) * 1931-04-04 1933-05-30 Hoover Co Spraying device
US1920165A (en) * 1931-05-16 1933-08-01 Andvig Hans Mouth cleansing device

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3245582A (en) * 1963-07-06 1966-04-12 Geigy Chem Corp Pressure container
US3261557A (en) * 1963-12-11 1966-07-19 Seaquist Valve Co Aerosol dispenser
US3386628A (en) * 1965-12-28 1968-06-04 Kiekens Wervelwind Holland N V Device for discharging a powdered material from a container
US3705689A (en) * 1970-10-27 1972-12-12 Chemair Corp Of America Liquid spray apparatus
US6168781B1 (en) * 1997-03-17 2001-01-02 Kao Corporation Spraying apparatus for artificial hair augmenting agent
US20070234639A1 (en) * 2006-04-05 2007-10-11 David Robinson Self-watering plant hanger
US7596905B2 (en) * 2006-04-05 2009-10-06 David Robinson Self watering plant hanger

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