US3042174A - Positioning printer - Google Patents

Positioning printer Download PDF

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US3042174A
US3042174A US808604A US80860459A US3042174A US 3042174 A US3042174 A US 3042174A US 808604 A US808604 A US 808604A US 80860459 A US80860459 A US 80860459A US 3042174 A US3042174 A US 3042174A
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print
cam
cable
clutch
character
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US808604A
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Howard Bernard
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Mite Corp
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Mite Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41JTYPEWRITERS; SELECTIVE PRINTING MECHANISMS, e.g. INK-JET PRINTERS, THERMAL PRINTERS, i.e. MECHANISMS PRINTING OTHERWISE THAN FROM A FORME; CORRECTION OF TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
    • B41J1/00Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the mounting, arrangement, or disposition of the types or dies
    • B41J1/22Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the mounting, arrangement, or disposition of the types or dies with types or dies mounted on carriers rotatable for selection
    • B41J1/32Typewriters or selective printing mechanisms characterised by the mounting, arrangement, or disposition of the types or dies with types or dies mounted on carriers rotatable for selection the plane of the type or die face being parallel to the axis of rotation, e.g. with type on the periphery of cylindrical carriers
    • B41J1/44Carriers stationary for impression
    • B41J1/46Types or dies fixed on wheel, drum, cylinder, or like carriers
    • B41J1/48Types or dies fixed on wheel, drum, cylinder, or like carriers with a plurality of carriers, one for each character space

Description

July 3, 1962 B. HOWARD 3,042,174
POSITIONING PRINTER Filed April 24, 1959 8 Sheets-Shea?l l INVENTOR l 55m/Ae@ Home@ I Q Q BY M M ATTORNEYS July 3, 1962 B. HOWARD POSITIONING PRINTER 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 24, 1959 July 3, 1962 B. HOWARD 3,042,174
POSITIONING PRINTER Filed April 24, 1959 8 Sheets-Shea?l 5 1NVENT0R ge/V420 How/1x20 BY #a M ATTORNEYS July 3, 1962 B HowARD I 3,042,174
PosIToNING PRINTER Filed April 24, 1959 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR l 55E/V420 #0M/.42D
July 3, 1962 B. HOWARD 3,042,174
POSITIONING PRINTER Filed April 24, 1959 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 IN V ENTOR. (4,0 55E/V14 1 D HOW/IED July 3, 1962 B. HOWARD PosIToNING PRINTER 8 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed April 24l 1959 INVENTOR E/zN/mp How/:e0
ATTORNEYS July 3, 1962 B. HOWARD 3,042,174
PosITIoNING PRINTER Filed April 24, 1959 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 ATTORNEYS United States Patent Office 3,042,174 Patented July 3, 1962 .3,642,174 POSITIONING PRINTER Bernard Howard, Ramsey, NJ., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Mite Corporatiom'New Haven, Conn., a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 24, 1959, Ser. No. 808,604 38 Claims. (CL 197-2) This invention relates to printing mechanisms, and more particularly to a positioning printer.
In printing mechanism it is known to use a cylinder and to divide the selection between axial motion and rotation, with consequent reduced inertia and higher speed operation. In the present case it is desired to print `on a flat recording medium mounted on a block or backboard, so that no hammer can be used on the opposite side. In such case it is not feasible to use a cylinder.
In accordance with one object of the present invention a working cylinder is made up of individual wheels disposed side by side and rotated in unison. They act as a cylinderV for most purposes, but are arranged so that one wheel or another may be moved toward the recording medium for printing. Still another obje/et is to maintain parallelism as between the character or type face, and the flat recording medium.
A further object of the present invention is to provide the foregoing mechanism in a positioning printer, that is, one which may be moved axially over a substantial distance, either backward or forward, so that characters may be printed in any ione of a large number of columns. Another object is to provide mechanism for such column selection, and to combine such mechanism `with the mechanism for side' to side character selection.
Still another object is to provide relatively large characters which are easily legible, and which are printed at close spacing despite the fact that the characters are on individual print lwheels with associated mechanism making it impossible for the wheels to be at an equally close spacing. In accordance with this object of the invention, the spacing of the print wheels is larger than and is independent of the spacing of the characters printed on the recording medium.
A further object is to provide such a positioning printer which is small enough to be moved bodily in a vertical direction, for vertical positioning of the printing point.
Another object is to provide a printing unit adapted for -use in a computing machine employed for aircraft tratiic control.
To accomplish the foregoing general objects, and other more specific objects which will'lhereinafter appear, my invention resides in the positioning printer and the elements thereof and their relation one to another, as are hereinafter more particularly described in the following specication. The specification is accompanied by drawings in which:
FIG. 1 is a partially sectioned front elevation of a positioning printer embodying features of my invention, with the inking band removed;
FIG. 2 is a schematic plan view, drawn to small scale, and showing the location of the printer relative to a computer console on `which it is used;
FIG.- 3 is a transverse section taken approximately in the plane of the line 3--3 of FIG. 1;
FIG. 3A`shows a distributor stator for a four-position cam and clutch;
FIG. 3B shows the wiper or rotor of the electrical distributor;
t FIG. 4 is a bottom view of a typical cam follower and pulley arm;
IFIG. 5 is a plan View of the printer, with `the ink band removed; i l
FIG. 6 is an inverted transverse section of the rear portion of the printer, taken through one of the clutches, and in the plane of the line 6 6 of FIG. 8;
PIG. 7 is an inverted transverse section through the clutch taken in the plane of the line 7 7 of FIG. 8;
FIG. 8 is a section taken diametrically through a distributor-clutch-cam combination;
FIG. 9 is a perspective and schematic View explanatory of the cable and pulley system of the printer;
IFIG. 10 is a fragmentary end elevation showing a locking pawl and drums for the return spring tensionof the cables;
FIG. l1 is a fragmentary front elevation showing one of the print wheels;
FIG. l2 is a partially sectioned elevation showing the print wheel with associated gearing, and the arm carrying the same;
FIG. 13 is a fragmentary section taken in the of the line 13--13 of FIG. 12;
FIG. 14 is a perspective view looking toward the Ifront of the printer from one end, with the ink band removed;
FIG. 15 is a wiring diagram explanatory of the electrical circuitry of the printer;
FIG. 16 is a morecomplete diagram showing how the printer may be controlled and operated by a perforated tape;
FIG. 17 shows one of a large number of diodes used in FIG. 16;
FIG. 18 is a top view of a yoke which causes sliding movement of the cylinder of type wheels;
FIG.` 19 is a section taken on the line 19--19 of FIG. 18;
FIG. 20 is a perspective view looking toward the back 'of the printer in inverted position with the ink band in place;
FIG. 21 shows a four-position cam forming a part of the column selection mechanism;
FIG. 22 shows a veeposition cam forming a part of the column selection mechanism; f
FIG. 23 shows a six-position cam `forming a part of the character selecting mechanism;
plane FIG. 24 is a front elevation of the print hammer; and Y FIG. 25 is a side elevation of the same.
Referring to the drawing, and more particularly to FIG. 14, the printer P comprises a group of print wheels W making up a print cylinder, and character selection is obtained by rotation and by axial movement. Although the wheels make up a cylinder for many purposes, any one wheel may be struck forward by means of a print hammer, thus making it possible to print from one side only of the recording medium, which then may be a stifcardboard or a sheet mounted on a block or backboard. In addition, the cylinder and print hammer may be bodily moved axially back and forth to print in vany desired column, as required lfor a iso-called updating computer. The mechanismfor character selection and positioning is located behind the print wheels. Inking may be provided by means of a wide ink band extending entirely around the mechanism, as shown at B in FIG. 20.
Referring now to FIG. 2 of the drawing, which is a plan view, the printer P in the present case is mounted on an arm 10 which -forms a part of a. computery console C, and which is moved vertically on upright guide rods 12 by console mechanism not shown and not forming a part of the present invention. 'Ilhe printer operates on a recording medium 14 mounted on a backboard 16.
In thespecic case here shown, the updating computer is for aircraft traic control, and at the front of the console there are inserted a large number of superposed blocks 16, eachV having ya height of say one inch, and each carrying a narrow rectangular card for receiving vis a small pulley at the motor and a large pulley S at the printer, and there is an overall gear reduction, in this case of 9 to 1 from 3600 to 400 r.p.m.
A multi-wire flexible loop of cable leads to the printer from the console circuitry, and controls the printer as is described later. The printer P has spacers 440 at its right end which are secured to arm 10. A sheet metal cover is U-shaped in section and is slid around the printer from the front toward the recording medium 14.
Rotary Character Selection Referring to FIG. 3, the print wheel W is rotatably adjusted by means of a splined shaft 22 carrying a gear 24 meshing with an idler 26 which meshes with gear teeth on or combined with the print wheel W. These parts are more clearly shown in FIGS. 11, 12, and 13, referring to which it will be seen that the print wheel W is combined vnth a gear 28 meshing with idler 26 which in turn meshes with gear 24 on the splined shaft 22.
These figures also show how the parts referred to are carried by a flat platelike carrier arm 30. FIG. 13 shows how gear 28 and its hub 32 are rotatably carried by a headed bearing stud 34 which is iixedly riveted to plate 30 at 36. The type carrying print wheel W is secured to the hub 32, `as by means of two Allen head set screws 29. The idler 26 has a hub 3S and is similarly rotatably carried on a headed bearing stud which is riveted to carrier arm 30 at 42.
The lower end of the carrier arm is provided with a hub 44 (FIG. 11) and is freely rotatable an a sleeve 46 which is about as long as the group of print Wheels making up the print cylinder. The gear 24 is keyed on splined sleeve 46, as is indicated at 48 in FIG. 12, and the sleeve 46 is freely slidable along shaft 22, these parts also being splined as indicated by the keys 49 in FIG. 12. In the specific case here shown, there are six print wheels, each having six characters, providing thirtysix characters in all. The splined shaft 22 assumes any one of six positions which are 60 apart, and turns all of the gears and print Wheels in unison.
Referring now to FIG. 9 of the drawing, the splined shaft 22 is turned by means of a cable 50 connected to a wheel 52 on .said shaft. The opposite end of the cable is fixed at 54, and the cable may be effectively shortened or lengthened by means of a movable selector pulley S6 carried by a cam follower arm 58 pivoted at 60 and cooperating with a six-position cam 62. The cable 50 'is trained about a guide pulley 63 so that the strands leading to and from the movable pulley 56 are in U shape and parallel in the direction of movement of the pulley. This applies also to three more selector pulleys to be described later. It will be evident that rotary character selection is obtained by rotary positioning of the cam 62 in any desired one of six positions having different radii.
The rotational selection provided by cable 50 requires a return spring, suggested at 51 in FIG. 9, and referring now to FIG. 1, the return spring is shown at 51, it being a spiral spring surrounding an extension of splined shaft 22 and having its inner end connected to or passing through a slit in the shaft. It outer end is fixed to a housing 53, but may be adjusted to vary the spring tension. An adjustment for this purpose is shown in FIG. 10, in which the housing 53` is held agains rotation by the tooth at the lower end of a lock dog 55'. When this is released thehousing maybe turned to tighten or loosen the spring, and then may be locked in its new position by means of the dog 55, the tooth of which is received in one of a number of radial passages 57.
FIG. 1 also shows the cable 50 which is wrapped around and connected to the drum 52 on splined shaft 22.
Axial Character Selection Referring again to FIG. 1 of the drawing, the six carrier arms S0 with their type wheels W and gears 24 and 28 are mounted between the arms 64 of a yoke 66. 'Ihis yoke is slidable on and is guided by a round rod 68 extending parallel to the splined shaft 22. The yoke also rests on the sleeve 46 on the splined shaft 22, and therefore is not rotatable although it is slidable.
Referring now to FIGS. 3, 18, and 19, the shape of the yoke arms is shown at 64, While the guide rod is located at 68. In the present case the yoke is a single cast member. The yoke arms partially surround the sleeve and splined shaft at 69 (FIG. 19). The yoke is moved by a cable 70, clamped in position by means of a screw 72. The main purpose of the yoke is to transfer the cable movement to the type wheels for axial movement thereof.
Referring now to FIG. 9, the cable 70 is shown connected to yoke 66, which is slidable on guide rod 68 as well as splined shaft 22. One end of the cable turns on guide pulley 71 and is connected to a return spring 74. For clarity this is shown as a simple pull spring, but in practice the cable is connected to a large diameter wheel 76 which is spring actuated in proper direction by means of a spiral spring inside the wheel. The other end of cable 70 is trained around guide pulleys 78, S0, S2 and 84 to a movable selector pulley 86 carried on a cam follower arm 8S pivoted on rod 60 and cooperating with a selector cam 90. With six type wheels as here shown, the selector cam has six positions, and pulley 86 serves to shorten or lengthen the cable 70 in increments corresponding to the spacing between the print wheels, in order to position the selected print wheel in front of the desired printing point. The latter corresponds also to the position of a print hammer which moves the proper print wheel `forward against the recording medium. The end 92 of cable 70 is connected to an integrating drum 94, and for the present purpose it may 'be assumed that the integrating drum is stationary so that the end 92 of cable 70 is fixed in position.
FIGURE 10 also shows the cable 70 guided by pulley 71 to spring drum 76, mounted outside one end of the printer. These parts also show at the left end of FIG. 5.
The Print Action Referring to FIGS. 3, 5, and 12, there is a print hammer 100 disposed behind an upstanding finger 102 formd ing a part of the print wheel carrier 30. The hammer when moved forward to the broken line position 100" (FIG. 3) moves the carrier 30 and the print wheel W forward to the broken lline position W', so that the type strikes the recording medium (not shown), with the ink band B (FIG. 20) therebetween. The hammer is dimensioned to strike only one of the six carriers, that one being determined by the axial selection previously described, because the wheels are moved relative to the hammer.
Referring now to FIG. 12 the carrier 30 has a rearwardly extending arm 104 connected to the upper end of a restoring spring 106, the lower end of which is connected to a bar 108 (FIGS. 18 and 19) yhaving a length corresponding to that of the yoke 66. The bar 108 has six holes 109 for the springs. There is -also an integral support 112 to which the cable 70 is clamped, and the entire yoke is slidable on and guided by stationary rod 68. The sides 64 of the yoke are held rigidly in spaced apart relation by the bar `'108 with its adjacent integral sleeve 107, and by a rod at 114. FIGS. 3 and 14 show the rod. The return or clockwise movement of the upright dat carrier 30 as viewed in FIG. 12 is limited, by a stop arm 116 yformed on each of the carriers 30 and bearing against the flat top of the bar 108 ofthe cast yoke.
The particular gear arrangement shown here for rotary selection has important advantages. The forward motion of the `carrier arm 30 takes place about the axis of the splined shaft 22 and therefore the gears remain in mesh despite the movement of the type wheel. Moreover, in the present case the gears 24 and 28 are made equal in diameter, and a direction changing idler 26 is interposed between the gears 24 and 28. 'Ihe result of this arrangement :is that the type wheel W turns clockwise an amount Acorresponding to the counter-clockwise rotation of the carrier arm 30, and therefore the front or printing face of the type wheel maintains parallelism.` If the type is vertical as shown in FIG. 3, it remains vertical as it moves forward, and will print properly on a backed vertical recording medium. This is particularly important when as in the present case the distance between the recording medium and the printer may vary slightly because of imperfect lvertical alignment of the removable blocks on which the cards are secured.
Reverting to FIGS, l and 3, the hammer 100 is actuated by a pair of widely spaced hammer arms 120 connected at their upper ends by a bar 122 which slidably carries the hammer. The lower ends of arms 120 are secured to a shaft i124 which is rocked by means of a cam follower arm 126 cooperating with a cam 340 (FIG. 3) on a master cam shaft 128. In the present case the cam turns a halt` revolution and has two drops. The arm 126 is moved by a spring 127. .In FIG. 3 the cam 340 has already turned about a quarter turn.
Referring to FIG. 1, this rock shaft 124 is carried in bearings 130 in side plates 132, 134. The arms 120 are located just inside the plates and are `connected at their upper ends by screws 136 to the hammer bar 122. The huh of the cam follower arm is shown at `126. Reverting to FIG. 3, the arm 126 -is secured to rock shaft 124 by means of a pin 137.
Column Selection It lhas already been mentioned that the entire group of print wheels or print cylinder is axially movable to print in any desired one of a number of columns, -in this case twenty columns. Referring to FIG. 9, this axial movement is obtained by means of the same cable 70` as was previously referred to. It will be recalled that the cable passes around guide pulleys 78, 80, 82 and 84 to selector pulley `86 and thence to an integrator drum 94. Another cable 140' is connected to drum 94 and -is trained about a movable selector pulley 142, and thence over guide pulleys 144 and 146 to another movable selector pulley 14S, and thence to a fixed point 150. Selector pulley 142 is carried at the end of Va cam follower arm 152, and selector pulley 148 is carried at the end of a cam follower arm 154. These are like the arms 58 and 88 previously referred to, and are similarly pivoted on the rod 60, and are similarly moved by multiple position cams (not shown in FIG. 9) on the master cam shaft v128.
In the present case one cam has four dwell positions which move the cable 140 a substantial amount covering four main areas or groups of columns comprising ve columns in each area or group. The other cam is a fiveposition cam which shortens or lengthens the cable 140 in `small increments corresponding to the spacing of the columns in any of the four areas. By appropriate combinations-of cam positions, the cable 140 may be changed to locate the printing pointat any desired column. For this purpose it may be assumed that cables 140 and 70 are simply connected end to end, as though the integrator drum 94 were a mere `direction changing pulley, and as so far described it might be a pulley and the cables might be one cable.
However, the integrator drum 94 is used in order to separate Ithe axial movement of the print wheel into its two components, one component being for character selection is convenient because it is also necessary/to move the print hammer for column selection, but the hammer must not move in response to character selection.
In FIG. 9 the hammer 100 is secured to a cable 160, one end of which passes around pulley 167 and is connected to a spring drum 162, here more simply symbolized bya pull spring 164. FIG. 10 .also shows pulley 167, cable 166, and a part of spring drum 162. These are also shown at the left of FIG. 5. Reverting to FIG. 9, the other end of cable 160 pass around pulleys 166, 168 and 171? to the integrator drum 94. The direction in which it is connected is the same as the direction of cable 146, so that both cables move the same amount in 4the same direction. Thus, the bodilymovement of the print cylinder is accompanied by an equal movement of the hammer, and the amount of this movement is determined by the integrator drum 94, which in turn is determined by the column selection pulleys 142 and 148.
In addition, the cable 70 has a further movement which the cable does not have, namely, the movement imparted by the character selection pulley 86, which in effect will cause the type wheels to slide one way or the other relative to the hammer for selection of the appropriate type wheel which is to be used.
One more advantage of the present arrangement is that the length of single increments of movement for character selection is independent of and may differ substantially from the length of single increments of movement for column selection. This is important so that the characters may be printed closely together, that is, the columns may be nearly as narrow as the characters, even though the print wheels require a greater spacing because of the room needed for the carrier arms and the gears carried thereby. In the particular case here shown Ithe print wheels are at a spacing of one-quarter inch, and the character selecting increments are therefore 0.25, but the characters have a width of only 0.125", and are printed at a spacing of 0.15, which is substantially less than the type Wheel spacing of 0.25.
Referring now to FIGS. 24 and 25, the type hammer 101i` is formed on a somewhat larger body 172 which is slidable on the hammer bar 122 previously referred to. The body 172 has depending ears 174 to which the cable 160 is connected through a generally upright pivoted link 176. Link 176 has cable 160 clamped thereto by means of a clamp 178 and screw 179. It will be evident that link 176 accommodates the forward movement of the hammer without pulling the cable forward. 'Instead the cable is given only a slight twist on its own axis.
Clutch-Cam-Distributor Combination As so far described, the apparatus requires four multiple position cams, one for rotary character selection, another for axial character selection, and two for column selection. the present printer, and referring to FIG. 23, the cam 130 has six equally spaced dwell positions indicated at 182, 184, 186, 188, and 192. Each dwell position has a uniform radius, and between the dwell positions the cam rises from smaller to larger radius, with a sharp drop between positions 192 and 182. A cam of this type may be used for both rotary and axial character selection.
The column selection employs a four-position cam and a five-position cam to handle twenty columns. The four-position cam 200 is shown in FIG. 2l, it having four dwell positions each of uniform radius at 202, 204, 206 and 208. The cam rises from smaller to larger radius between the dwell positions, and then drops between positions 268 and 202. The difference in radius is substantial because the change here sought is the major change from one area or group of columns lto another.
The tive-position cam 210 is shown in FIG. 22, it having tive dwell positions each of uniform radius at 212, 214, 216, 218 and 220. The cam rises between The first two cams are six-position cams in spring 250 connected at 252.
dwell positions, and drops between positions 220 and 212. The rise here is small, compared to cam 26d, because l the change is for one column spacing.
The cams are yassociated with clutches mounted on a continuously rotating drive shaft. The clutch and drive shaft arrangement may be like that described in greater detail in my prior U.S. application Serial No. 637,184, filed Ianuary 30, 1957, now Patent No. 2,965,204, granted December 20, 1960, and entitled Multiple Clutch. FIGS. 6, 7 iand 8 here are inverted for easier understanding, and for closer relation to said prior application. The continuously rotating drive shaft is shown at 128. Each clutch comprises a cage disc 222 (FIG. 8) held between housing discs 224 and 226. Referring to FIG. 7, the cage 222 has notches 228 which locate rollers 23) (in this case four) in spaced relation around the shaft 128. These rollers are longer than the thickness of the cage disc so that the rollers extend also through the housing disc at each side of the cage disc.
Referring now to FIG. 6, the housing disc 226 has sloping cam or wedge surfaces 232 which cooperate with the rollers 230. The opposite housing disc (226 in FIG. 8) has similar wedge surfaces. Countenclockwise rotation of shaft 12S will wedge the rollers and cause corresponding rotation of the housing discs 224 and 226, which are the driven parts of the clutch. These housing discs are xedly connected to one another by means of four rivets 234. These have tubular spacers between the two housing discs, and the spacers are slightly longer than the thickness of the cage disc, so that the cage disc can turn relative to the housing discs.
Reverting now to FIG. 7, the rivets 234 4with their tubular spacers 236 pass through slots 23S and 240 in the cage disc. Compression springs 242 are inserted in slots 240 and they urge the cage disc in `couritenclocltwise or wedging direction relative to the housing disc, so that the springs 242 further ensure the normal tendency of the clutch to engage.
However, the cage disc 222 has a series of stop teeth 244 which .may be engaged by a stop finger 246 pivoted at 248. In the present case the stop finger is hook shaped and acts in tension, but it may be disposed in opposite direction and act in compression. The stop finger is urged into engagement with the stop teeth by means of a pull Referring to FIG. 6, the other end of spring 250 is connected to `a stationary hook 254. The spring action may be adjustably stopped by means of an adjustable stop screw 256, running parallel to and alongside the spring, or behind the spring as viewed in FIG. 6. The adjustment of screw 256 may be locked by means of a lock nut 258.
The stop finger is pulled 'away from the stop tooth by means of a magnet 260 having poles 262 adjacent an armature 264 movable with the stop finger. The magnet core is U-shaped and is built up of U-shaped laminations which are perpendicular to the drawing. When the magnet is energized the clutch is engaged, and when the magnet is de-energized the clutch is disengaged. With six stop teeth as here shown, the clutch may be stopped in any of six positions. There are two such clutches. A 4third clutch has five stop teeth, and a fourth has four stop teeth. A fifth clutch which operates the print hammer may have any desired number of teeth depending on the particular cam used, and in the present case it has two stop teeth because the carn (340 in FIG. 3) 'has two lobes.
The magnet 269 is carried on a spacer 261 mounted on a support bar 263 having a stepped cross section. The stop screw 256 is threaded through the lowest step, and spring 250 passes through a hole in that step. The spring support 254 is secured to an intermediate step. The same bar 263 carries yall of lthe magnets, screws, and springs.
One of the two housing discs may be provided with back stop teeth, and in FIG. 6 the housing dire '226 has back stop teeth 266 which face in a direction opposite to ythe stop` teeth 244. The back stop teeth are acted on by a back stop dog 268 pivoted on the same rod 60 which also carries the cam follower pulley arms, in this case the arm 58. (its cam is not shown.) The back stop dog 268 is normally urged into engagement by means of a pull spring 270 connected to angle lever arm` 272 formed integrally with the back stop dog 268. The other end of spring 270 is connected at 274 to a screw 276. The back stop arrangement is not essential but is convenient in order to avoid possible clutch chatter. lFor this purpose the position of the dog is preferably accurately adjustable, and in the present case the dog is split at 278 and clamped by a screw 28@ around a bushing which is eccentrically related to the rod 6i), so that by changing the angular position of the eccentric, the position of the dog may be adjusted.
Reverting now to FIG. 8, one of the cams, in this case the six-position cam ist), is secured to the housing discs 224 and 226. This is preferably done by some or all of the same rivets 234 that were previously referred to. In the present case a spacer -disc 282 is interposed between housing disc 226 and cam in order -to afford more clearance for the carn follower pulley arm previously referred to. The general configuration of this arm is shown in FIG. 6, it having a cam follower roller 284 in addition to the movable pulley 56 for cable 50. A sheet metal guard 286 may be positioned around a part of the pulley to help confine the cable 56.
Referring to FIG. 4, the pulley arm 58 comprises spaced sides 2&8 and 294B welded or other-wise secured to a hub 292 which is received on the rod 66. The cam follower roller 234 and the pulley 56 are rotatable between the sides 288 and 29d. The cam follower pulley arms have substantially the same construction for each of the other three cams, Ialthough there may be slight changes in configuration where the cam shape is quite different. It is because of the two-sided construction of the cam follower arm that itis preferred to space the cam 1S@v (FIG. 8) by means of the spacer disc 282, so that the sides of the cam follower arm can straddle the cam somewhat.
The stop position of the clutch and cam is here controlled by means of 1an electrical distributor, the rotor of which is also secured to the clutch and cam. In FIG. 8 the rotor is shown at 292, and turns relative to a stator 294. The latter rests on and floats with the master cam shaft 12S, but it does no rotate. For this purpose the insulation body 294 of the stator is cemented at 296 to the flange 298 of a bushing 300 made of appropriate ywear-resisting material. Referring to FIGS. 6 and 7, the stator 294 has an outwardly projecting part 302 which acts as a terminal board `for electrical connections to the segments of the stator, and it also has a radially projecting arm 304, the bifurcated end of which fits around the rod 60, thereby preventing rotation of the stator without, however, unduly restraining it against floating freely on the cam shaft 128.
The stators have four, five or six segments, depending on whether the clutch is a four, tive or six-position clutch. In FIGS. 6 and 7 there are six segments, and therefore seven terminals, the seventh being for the slip ring or common connection. The stator with four segments is shown in FIG. 3A. The segments are deposited on the insulation body 396 by means of printed circuitry techniques, and there is some printing on both sides of the stator. FIG. 3A shows |what might be termed the back of the stator, which 'has printed thereon only the connections 308, 310 and 312. The four segments i are printed on the opposite face of the stator and are shown in dotted lines at 314, 316, SIS and 320. The terminal connection to segment 314 is on the same side of the stator and is shown at 322. Similarly, the terminal connection for the segment 320` is shown at 324. These connections require no crossover. However, the connections 308 and 312 leading to segments 318 and 3M would cross the other segments and it is therefore convenient to print them on the reverse side of the stator. There are more such connections for the six-position stator, as will be seen in FIGS. 6 and 7. Only the adjacent two segments are connected on the same side as the segments.
For a common connection to the rotor a slip ring 326 (FIG. 3A) is provided, and the connection 310 leads to the slip ring 326.
The cooperating rotor is shown in FIG. 3B, and it comprises a resilient metal wiper secured to the insulation disc 292 previously referred to. The wiper may consist of a single piece of sheet metal stamped to provide an inner wiper 328 which engages the slip ring 326 (FIG. 3A) and an louter wiper 330 (FIG. 3B) which engages the segments. The metal wiper is secured to the insulation disc 292 by means of diametrically placed rivets at 332. At its center the disc 292 may be fitted with a hardened bushing 334 to reduce wear against the continuously rotating clutch shaft y128. This bushing is shown in FIG. 8, which also shows the offset of the wipers 328 and 330 to resiliently engage the stator 294.
The distributor rotor 292 is secured to the housing disc 224 (FIG. 8) of the clutch by means of several short rivets 235 passing through holes which are out of alignment with the long rivets 234 extending through the clutch and cam. The rotor first may be assembled to the housing disc 224 by rivets 235. Later the clutch and cam may be assembled, to facilitate which the rotor has holes 237 (FIG. 3B) which are large enough to pass the heads of the long rivets (234 in FIG. 8). Other methods of assembly may be used, including for example, long rivets through the entire assembly.
It will be understood that the rotor is the same for each of the four distributors. The stators are substantially the same in physical dimension and construction, but the stator for the five-position clutch has ve segments instead of four, with six terminals instead of five, while the stator for the six-position clutch has six segments and seven terminals. In each case the extra terminal is lfor the slip ring which connects the circuit to the rotor.
In FIG. 8 the complete distributor-clutch-cam assembly is held against axial movement on the cam shaft 128 by means of snap rings 336 received in grooves 338. The use of snap rings .in this fashion makes it possible to dispose the distributor-clutchcam assemblies in immediate end to end relation, where necessary.
The print hammer cam is shown in FIG. 3, it having two main lobes 340. This cam is secured directly to a clutch having cage and housing discs all as previously described, except that the cage disc has only two stop teeth 180 apart. 'Ihe clutch is released by a magnet as previously described, 'but there is no distributor. Instead the clutch, after being engaged by a pulse from the computer circuitry, is invariably disengaged after a half revolution, therefore no distributor is needed. During the half revolution the print hammer operates to print a previously selected character. For this purpose the cam cooperates with the cam follower 126. The latter is pulled upward by means of a pull `spring 127. The shaft l128 turns in clockwise direction and after the cam has turned about a quarter turn, the abrupt cam drop is reached and the cam follower is pulled upward by the spring 127 at which time the hammer is moved forward 'from the solid line position 100 to the broken line position 100. This takes place regardless of the sideward location of the hammer along the hammer bar 122.
Cam Shaft Assembly The manner in which the various clutch-cam-distributor 'assemblies are put on a single cam shaft is shown in FIG. 5. The main clutch drive shaft is shown at 128, and is carried at one end in a bearing in end plate 134. The other end is carried in a bearing in end plate I132. At this end the shaft projects beyond the end 10 plate, where it is split at 138 to receive a driving shaft belted to the driving motor as is indicated in FIG. 2. The projecting end carries a gear 354 driving a rgear 356 for ribbon feed.
The clutch for the print hammer comprises cage disc 360 (FIG. 5) Ibetween housing discs 362. The print cam 340 is secured to the clutch with a spacer 364 therebetween. The clutch is controlled by a stop finger 366 which is like the stop finger 246 in FIGS. 6 `and 7 and which is similarly pivoted on rod 248. This extends all the way between the end plates, and serves to pivot all five clutch stop fingers for the five clutches. The stop finger is normally engaged by means of a pull spring 368 (like spring 250 in FIG. 6.), and is released to engage the clutch by means of an electromagnet (like magnet 266 in PIG. 6). The adjustable stop screw is shown at 379 (like screw 256 in FIG. 6).
In FIG. 5 the clutch at the left is a six-position clutch driving the six-position cam 62 for rotary character selection. The next clutch 3601, 362 is the aforesaid twoposition clutch driving the two-position cam 340 to operate the print hammer. The next clutch is a six-position clutch driving a six-position cam `for axial character selection. The next clutch is a five-position clutch driving a five-position cam 21) for column selection within one of four areas. The final or righthand clutch is a four-position clutch driving a four-position cam 200 for major column selection by area or groups of columns.
All clutches except the print hammer clutch have rotors and distributors, and the harness 400 (part of which is broken away to expose shaft coupling 138) carries conductors leading as shown to the terminals of the different distributors.
I have made this unit with five instead of six character wheels, thus providing thirty instead of thirty-six characters. In such case the essential change is the use of a ve-position clutch and a five-position cam at cam 98 for axial character selection. There then are six and five-position clutches for character selection, and five and four-position clutches for column selection. Such a machine is capable of somewhat higher printing speed.
The Ink Band Referring to FIG. 20, which is looking toward the back with the printer inverted, the type is inked by means of a broad band B of a suitable fabric, typically nylon. This passes around four rollers at the four corners of the printer and in FIG. 20 the rollers are shown at 418, 412, 4l6 and 418. Three of these rollers are mere direction changing rollers, while the fourth roller 413 acts also as a drive roller to shift the position of the ink band. For this purpose the roller 418 is preferably of larger diameter and is preferably knurled at two spaced parts 428 which correspond to the edges or hems 422 of the band. These hems 422 preferably enclose elastic material so that the band tends normally to contract, and it is the contracting hems which bear against the knurled parts 42). The band width is suicient to accommodate the twenty columns which are to be printed. The roller 4I8 is driven by means of a ratchet wheel 424.
These parts are more clearly shown in FIG. 14 in which cam shaft 128 carries a gear 354 meshing with gear 356. This carries an eccentric 428 which reciprocates a pawl arm 430 carrying a pawl '432. In the present case this has a hook and acts as a pull pawl. Return motion of the ratchet wheel 424 is prevented by means of a check dog 434.
The rigid spacer posts 440 serve to mount the printer on the arm for vertical movement by means of the console. Reverting to FIG. 2, the printer P is carried by arm l. It is overhung (mounted at one end only) by means of the spacer posts 440. When the arm is cast with proper shape the posts 449 may be eliminated, the printer being secured directly to the arm.
' magnet is de-energized and the clutch is stopped.
The circuit diagram ofthe print head is shown in FIG. 15. The clutch release magnet for the print hammer is shown at 370. The clutch magnet for a sixposition clutch is shown at 26), its distributor stator being shown at 372. Similarly the clutch magnet 374'controls the second six-position clutch, the distributor of which is shown at 376. r[he clutch magnet 372i controls a tive-position clutch with a five segment distributor 389. The clutch magnet 382 controls a four-position clutch with a four segment distributor 306, the rotor of which is indicated at 292, the latter two having been shown in greater detail in FIGS. 3A and 3B.
In the present circuitry, current is supplied to all of the segments but one, and when the segments are alive the associated magnet is energized and the clutch turns. However, on reaching a dead segment, the associated In this way, the cam may be stopped in any one of its positions depending on which segment is kept dead while the others are kept alive. In the event of an open circuit, the cam will no longer turn. This description applies to all four distributors, for in each case all segments are alive but one, as signalled from the computer.
As so far described, the operation is as though the magnet were directly in series with the distributor which is picking up current fromthe slip ring, and such a circuit might be employed. However, in the present case it is preferred to energize the magnets from an independent power supply, and the magnets are therefore energized from the console by means of relays in the console circuitry, the said relays being controlled by the distributor segments.
FIGS. 5, 14 and 2O show the heavy harness or multiple wire cable 49) which extends in a deep slack loop be tween the printer and the console circuitry of the computer. In the present case this harness has thirty-one conductors, and in FIG. 15 there are thirty-one terminals corresponding to the thirty-one conductors. The terminals 1, 11, 18, 25 and 29 control the magnets, with their common return at 3i?. The terminals 2-5 lead to the four-segment distributor; the terminals 6-10 lead to the tive-segment distributor; the terminals liz-17 lead to one of the six-segment distributors; and the terminals 19-24 lead to the other six-segment distributor. The terminal 31 is a common return for the rotors of all four distributors.
This leaves only the terminals 26-28. Terminals 26 and 27 lead to a contact 402 which signals when the print hammer has operated. This information is wanted back at the computer because the present printer does not print at a uniform or clock rate. The printing of one character may take longer than the printing of another, as when the positioning of one stacked block or one character is far and requires more time. The information for the next character is not sent out from the cornputer until the previous character has been printed, and the Contact 402 is operated by the print movement of the hammer in order to indicate to the computer that the previous character has been printed. The switch `or this purpose is shown at 402 in FIGS. and 14. It is a microswitch, the pin of which is moved by a blade 464 secured at its upper end and movable at its lower end. This is operated by a generally upright arm 406, the lower end of which is secured to one end of the hammer shaft 124. In its normal or rest position the arm 466 bears against the switch. Each time the print hammerl operates, the switch is actuated by movement of arm 406 away from the switch.
It may be mentioned that this circuitry with its multiple wire harness makes i-t possible tor all ofthe clutches to operate simultaneously rather than sequentially. The printer is thus a so-called PIP printer, that is, a parallel input printer.
To better explain the electrical operation in more complete fashion, attention is directed to FIG. 16. This shows how the printer may be actuated in response to a perforated tape, and for the present purpose an eleven-level code is used, that is, the tape has eleven llines of perforations. A fragment of the Itape is shown at 450i, iand it passes over la metal bottom plate 452, and beneath eleven contacts or sensing elements generally designated by arrows 454. These are adapted to pass through the perforations 456 :and to make contact with the bottom plate 452. The contacts supply current from `a suitable source, here indicated schematically by battery 458, to eleven circuits controlling eleven relays. The four-position distributor 306 requires only Itwo double contact relays 461 and 462 to establish four combinations of relay position. The five-position distributor 380 requires more than this, and consequently I provide three double contact relays 463, 464, and 465. These three relays could provide eight A positions for an eight-contact distributor, and thus there .are three excess possible combinations which are not made use of.
Similarly the three double contact relays 466, 467 and 468 take care of the six-position distributor 376, with two combinations in excess and unused. Also the sixposition distributor 372 is taken care of by three relays 469, 470 and 471, :again with two combinations in excess. Altogether there are eleven relays, 461 through 471, for the complete circuitry.
The diagram also shows the clutches with four, five and six stop teeth respectively, and their stop pawls each releasable by energization of -a magnet, the magnets being marked 382, 37S, 374 and 260 respectively (the numbers corresponding to those used in FIG. 15). FIG. 16 lalso shows the two-position clutch 350, the stop dog of which is released by magnet 370. The cams associated with these clutches diier, but for simplicity =a uniform single lobe has been shown (eg. 472) lat all of the clutches to merely symbolize the presence of an appropriate cam.
Referring to distributor 306 as the simplest example, with the relays 461 and 462 in the positions shown, current is supplied starting at ybattery 474 through relay coil 476 -and conductor 478 and clutch magnet 382 to relay contact `480. In its lef-t position this supplies current through conductor 482 to distributor segment 484. It also supplies current through conductor 486 to distributor segment 488.
Current also runs from clutch magnet 382 to the other relay contact 490 which is in its right position and thus supplies current through conductor 4&6 to distributor segment 488 (redundantly) and supplies current through conduetor `492 to distributor segment 494.
It will thus be seen that three of the four segments are energized, while the fourth segment 496 has no connection and is cie-energized or dead. The clutch turns until the distributor rotor reaches segment 496, whereupon the local clutch magnet 382 is cle-energized; the clutch dog moves in; and the clutch cam distributor combination is stopped with the cam in its desired position.
If now we suppose relay 461 to be de-energized by the perforated tape so that contact 490 is in its left position, then current will be supplied through conductor 498 to the previously dead segment 496, Ibut current no longer will be supplied to the previously live segment 494. Thus, all segments will lbe energized except segment 494, and the clutch cam and distributor combination will be stopped in that position if the tape de-energizes -both relays 461 `and 462.
Similar reasoning will -apply to the remaining positions of distributor 3%, and the circuitry similarly may be traced for the other distributors. However, in tracing the wiring for the other distributors some apparent possibilities of full energization `may `be found but these correspond to the excess combinations previously referred to, which arise from the fact that three 'double contact relays make eight combinations possible, which is greater than the number of distributor segments here used. They are unused combinations. The combinations that are used have one dead segment each.
rifhe various distributors and clutches function in parallel and therefore operate simultaneously. So long as any clutch is still turning, the relay 175 remains energized, and the clutch magnet 37% of the print cam 34d is deenergized. However, the instant all clutches come to a stop, which means that the selected character is `ready to be printed in the selected column, the relay is deenergized because all distributors are on a dead segment. Clutch magnet 37) then is energized, thus releasing the print clutch, and causing operation of the print hammer to print the selected character.
When the tape moves to the next line of perforations, another character is selected, positioned, and printed, and so on. F or purpose of the present circuitry it is assumed that the tape is moved step by step, with each step corresponding to the printing of another character. Interlocking means such as the contact 4t2 shown in FlG. 14 may be provided to cause the next step or feed of the tape after each printing operation.
In FIG. 16 the connections or matrix between the double contact relays and their local ydistributor are shown as hollow circles. These represent diodes, and the said connections `are preferably made through diodes. FIG. 17 shows one of these circles drawn to larger scale, fand it will be seen that the horizontal conductor is connected to the vertical conductor 502 through a diode 594. Thus, the current ilow is unidirectional, `and this is convenient when working with la matrix of connections as here shown, `because it eliminates concern over possible completion of ran undesired circuit by reason of current flow in reverse direction.
It is believed that the construction and operation of my improved positioning printer', as well as the advantages thereof, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description. lIt will be also be apparent that while I have shown and described my invention in a preferred form, changes may be made in the structure shown without departing from the scope of the invention as sought to be defined in the following claims.
I claim:
1. A printer comprising a print wheel, a carrier arm carrying said print wheel, a shaft spaced from the axis of the print wheel and carrying said arm to afford movement of the print wheel toward or away from a recording medium, a driving gear rotated `by said shaft, an idler carried by said arm and meshing wtih said gear, and a driven gear rotatable with the print wheel and meshing with the idler, means for rotating said shaft to select a desired character on the print wheel, and means for moving the free end of the arm toward the recording medium when a character is to be printed, said driving and driven gears having the same diameter wherebyl the print wheel maintains parallelism to the recording medium as it is moved toward or away from said medium.
2. A printer comprising a print wheel, a flat platelike carrier arm carrying said print wheel, a shaft spaced from the axis of the print wheel and carrying said arm to aiford movement of the print wheel toward or away from a recording medium, a driving gear splined to said shaft, an idler carried `by said arm and meshing with said gear, and a driven gear rotatable with the print wheel and meshing with the idler, means for rotating said shaft to select a desired character `on the print wheel, resilient means for retracting the arm, and a print hammer for striking the free end of the arm toward the recording medium when a character is to be printed, said driving and driven gears having the same diameter, whereby the print wheel maintains parallelism to the recording medium as it is moved toward or away `from said medium.
3. A printer comprising 'a plurality of adjacent print wheels, a plurality of carrier arms carrying said print wheels, a shaft spaced from the axis of the print wheels, and carrying said arms to afford movement of said print wheels toward or away from a recording medium, a driv` ing gear for each wheel splined to said shaft, an idler for each wheel carried by its arm and meshing with said gear, and a driven gear rotatable with each print wheel and meshing with its idler, means for rotating said shaft to select a desired character on a print wheel, resilient means for retracting the arms, and a print hammer for moving one of the arms toward the recording medium when `a character is to be printed, said driving and driven gears having the same diameter whereby the print wheel maintains parallelism to the recording medium as it is moved toward or away from said medium.
4. A printer comprising a plurality of adjacent print wheels, a plurality of ilat plate-like carrier arms carrying said print wheels, a shaft spaced ifrom `the axis of the print wheels and carrying said arms to afford movement of said print wheels toward or away `from a recording medium, a driving gear for each wheel splined to said shaft, `an idler for each wheel carried. by its arm and meshing with said gear, and a `driven gear rotatable with each print wheel and meshing with its idler, means for rotating said shaft to select `a desired character on a print wheel, resilient means for retracting the arms, a print hammer for striking the free end of one of the arms toward the recording medium when a character is to be printed, said driving and driven gears having the same diameter whereby the print wheel maintains parallelism to the recording medium as it is moved toward or away from said medium, and means to shift the group of wheels axially on the shaft relative to the hammer in order to select which wheel is to print.
5. A printer comprising a print wheel, means for causing rotational selection of a character, and means for bodily moving the print wheel axially to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, a pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radins cam connected to said pulley for moving the same in increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam` 6. A printer comprising a print wheel, means for causing rotational selection of a character, and means for bodily moving the print wheel axially to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same, a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same a different amount, and a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam.
7. A printer comprising a print wheel, means for causing rotational selection of a character, and means for bodily moving the print wheel axially to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, a rst pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, -a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same over large increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another multiple radius cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same over small increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam.
8. A printer comprising a print cylinder, means for causing rotational selection of a character, a print harnmer, means for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, a pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to said pulley for moving the same in increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam.
9. A printer comprising a print cylinder, means for causing rotational selection of a character, a print hammer, means for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same, a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same a different amount, and a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam.
l0. A printer comprising a print cylinder, means for causing rotational selection of a character, a print hammer, means for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammerand cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the saine over large increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another multiple radius cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same over small increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam.
11. A printer comprising a print cylinder, means for causing rotational selection of a character, a print hammer, a first cable and pulley system for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a second cable, a pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to said pulley for moving the same in increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, an integrating drum, said rst cable being connected to said drum, said second cable being connected to said drum as though end to end, the other end of one cable being connected to the cylinder, the other end of the other cable `being fixed, and a third cable connected at one end to the hammer and at its other end to the drum.
l2. A printer comprising a print cylinder, means for causing rotational selection of a character, a print hammer, a rst cable and pulley system for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial 'number of columns, said last means including a second cable, a rst pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same, a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same a different amount, a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam, an integrating drum, said iirst cable being connected to said drum, said second cable being connected to said drum as though end to end, the other end of one cable being connected to the cylinder, the other end of the other cable being fixed, and a third cable connected at one end to the hammer and at its other end to the drum.
13. A printer comprising a print cylinder, means for causing rotational selection of a character, a print hammer, a first cable and pulley system for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a second cable, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same over large increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and `said cam, another multiple radius cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same over small increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam, an integrating drum, said first cable being connected to said drum, said second cable being connected to said drum as though end to end, the other end of one cable being connected to the cylinder, the other end of the other cable being fixed, and a third cable connected at one end to the hammer and at its other end to the drum.
14. A printer comprising a print wheel, means to move the same axially to print a character on a recording medium in any desired one of a plurality of columns on said medium, an ink fabric in the form of a wide endless band surrounding the printer mechanism, and rollers on said mechanism to support the band, one of said rollers having driving mechanism, whereby the ink band is disposed between the print wheel and the recording medium to be printed regardless of the position of the print wheel.
l5. A printer comprising a print wheel, means to move the same axially to print a character on a recording medium in any desired one of a plurality of columns on said medium, an ink fabric in the form of a wide endless band surrounding the printer mechanism, and rollers on said mechanism to support the band, one of said rollers having driving mechanism and having projections and recesses where it receives the edges of the ink band, the said edges being provided with means to better engage the projections and recesses of the roller, whereby the ink band is disposed between the print Wheel `and the recording medium to be printed regardless of the position of the print wheel.
16. A printer comprising a print wheel, means to move the same axially to print a character on a recording medium in any desired one of a plurality of columns on siad medium, an ink fabric in the form of a wide endless band surrounding the pirnter mechanism in a direction covering the top, front, bottom and back of said mechanism, and `four long rollers extending parallel to the recording medium at the corners of said mechanism to support the band, one of said rollers having driving mechanism, and said band having a width as wide as the plurality of columns to be printed, whereby the ink band is disposed between the print wheel and recording medium to be printed regardless of the position of the print wheel.
17. A printer comprising a print wheel, means to move the same axially to print a character on a recording medium in any desired one of a plurality of columns on said medium, an ink fabric in the form of a wide endless band surrounding the printer mechanism in al direction covering the top, front, bottom and back of said mechanism, and Afour long rollers extending parallel to the recording medium at the corners of said mechanisms to support the band, one of said rollers having driving mechanisms and having projections and recesses where it receives the edges of the inl; band, the said edges being 17 provided with means to better engage the projections and recesses of the roller, yand said band having a width as Wide as the plurality of columns to be printed, whereby the ink band is disposed between the print Wheel and the recording medium to be printed regardless of the position of the print Wheel.
18. A printer comprising a print cylinder, said cylinder being made up of a plurality of adjacent print wheels, a plurality `of vcarrier arms carrying said wheels, a splined shaft spaced from the axis of the wheels and carrying the yarms to afford movement of said Wheels toward or away from a recording medium, gearing between said shaft yand said wheels to select a character, a print hammer to move a carrier arm and its wheel, means for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one f a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, a pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to said pulley for moving the same in-increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam.
19. A printer comprising a print cylinder, said cylinder being made up of a plurality of adjacent print wheels, a plurality o f carrier arms carrying said wheels, a splined shaft spaced from the axis of the wheels and carrying the arms to afford movement of said wheels, toward or away from a recording medium, gearing between said shaft and said wheels to select a character, a print hammer to move a carrier arm and its wheel, means for causing V axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back `and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same, a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same a different amount, and -a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam.
20. A printer comprising a print cylinder, said cylinder being made up of a plurality of adjacent print wheels, a plurality of carrier arms carrying said Wheels, a splined shaft spaced from the axis ofthe wheels iand carrying the arms to afford movement of said wheels toward or away from a recording medium, gearing between said shaft and said wheels to select a character, a print hammer to move a carrier arm and its wheel, means for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a cable, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same over large increments, `a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another multiple radius cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same over small increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam.
21. A printer comprising a print cylinder, said cylinder being made up of a plurality of adjacent print wheels, a plurality of carrier arms carrying said wheels, a splined shaft spaced from the axis of the wheels and carrying the arms to afford movement of said wheels toward or away from a recording medium, gearing between said shaft and said wheels to select a character, a print hammer to move a carrier arm and its Wheel, a first cable and pulley system for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth Ito print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a second cable, a pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to said pulley for moving the same in increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, an integrating drum, said first cable being connected to said drum, said second cable being connected to said drum as though end to end, the other end of one cable being connected to the cylinder, the other end of the other cable being fixed, and a third cable connected at one end to the hammer and at its other end to the drum.
22. A printer comprising a print cylinder, said cylinder being made up of a plurality of adjacent. print wheels, a plurality of carrier arms carrying said Wheels, a splined shaft spaced from the axis of the wheels and carrying the arms to afford movement of said wheels toward or away from a recording medium, gearing between said shaft and said wheels to select a character, a print hammer to move a carrier arm and its Wheel, a first cable and pulley system for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in anyone of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a second cable, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same, a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same a different amount, a stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam, an integrating drum, said first cable being connected to said drum, said second cable being connected to said drum as though end to end, the other end of one cable being connected to the cylinder, the other end of the other cable being fixed, and a third cable connected at one end to the hammer and at its other end to the drum.
23. A printer comprising a print cylinder, said cylinder being made up of a plurality of adjacent print wheels, a plurality of carrier arms carrying said wheels, a splined shaft spaced from the axis of the wheels and carrying the arms to afford movement of said lwheels toward or away from a recording medium, gearing between said shaft and said wheels to select a character, a print hammer to move a carrier arm and its wheel, a first cable and pulley system for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said last means including a second cable, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same over large increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam, another multiple radius cam connected to the other of. said pulleys for moving the same over small increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam, an integrating drum, said first cable being connected to said drum, said second cable being connected to said drum as though end to end, the other end of one cable being connected to the cylinder, the other end of the other cable being fixed, and a third cable connected at one end to the hammer and at its other end to the drum.
24. A printer comprising a plurality of adjacent print wheels making up a cylinder, means for causing rotational selection of a character, a print hammer for moving one print wheel forward to print, means for causing axial selection of a character relative to the hammer, and means for additionally bodily moving the hammer and cylinder axially back and forth to print a character in any one of a substantial number of columns, said means for causing axial selection operating to move the cylinder in increments corresponding to the axial spacing between wheels, and said means for bodily moving the hammer and cylinder operating to move the same in smaller increments corresponding to the desired spacing between characters, whereby characters may be printed at closer spacing than that of the wheels.
25. A printer as defined in claim 18 in which said means for causing axial selection operates to move the cylinder in increments corresponding to the axial spacing between wheels, and said means for bodily moving the hammer and cylinder operates to move the same in smaller increments corresponding to the desired spacing between characters, whereby the characters may be printed at closer spacing than that of the wheels.
26. A printer .as dened in claim 19 in which said means for causing axial selection operates to move the cylinder in increments corresponding to the axial spacing between wheels, and said means for bodily moving the hammer and cylinder operates to move the same in smaller increments corresponding to the desired spacing between characters, whereby the characters may be printed at closer spacing than that of the wheels.
27. A printer as defined in claim 20 in which said means for causing axial selection operates to move the cylinder in increments corresponding to the axial spacing between wheels, and said means for bodily moving the hammer and cylinder operates to move the same in smaller increments corresponding to the desired spacing between characters, whereby the characters may be printed at closer spacing than that of the wheels.
28. A printer comprising a plurality of adjacent print Wheels, a plurality of flat plate-like carrier arms carrying said print wheels, a shaft spaced from the axis of the print Wheels and carrying said arms to afford movement of said print wheels toward or away from a recording medium, a driving gear for each wheel splined to said shaft, and a driven gear rotatable with each print wheel, means for rotating said shaft to select a desired character on a print wheel, resilient means for retracting the arms, a print hammer for striking the free end of one of the arms toward the recording medium when a character is to be printed, and means to shift the group of Wheels axially on the shaft relative to the hammer in order to select which wheel is to print.
29. A printer comprising a print body, and means for causing selection of a character, said means including a cable operatively connected to the print body to move the same, a pulley around which the cable is trained in U-form, a main drive shaft, a multiple radius cam cornnected to said pulley for moving the same in at least three increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam to select any desired one of the multiple increments.
30. A printer comprising a print wheel, and means for causing rotational selection of a character, said means including a cable operatively connected to the print wheel to rotate the same, a pulley around which the cable is trained in U-form, a main drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to said pulley for moving the same in at least three increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam to select any desired one of the multiple increments.
31. A printer comprising a print cylinder, and means for causing rotational and axial selection of a character, said means including a rst cable operatively connected to the print cylinder -to rotate the same, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U-form, a main drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to said pulley for moving the same in at least three increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam to select any desired one of the multiple increments, a second cable operatively connected to said print cylinder to move the same axially, a pulley around which the second cable is trained in U-form, a second multiple radius cam connected to said pulley for moving the same in at least three incre-ments, and a second multiple position stop clutch between said main drive shaft and said second cam to select any desired one of the multiple increments.
32. A printer comprising a print body, and means for moving the print body, said means including a cable operatively connected to the print body, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U-form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U- form, a main drive shaft, a multiple radius cam con'- nected to one of said pulleys for moving the same over at least three increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam to select any desired one of said multiple increments, another multiple radius cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same over at least three increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said' second cam to select any desired one of said multiple increments.
33. A printer comprising a print body, and 4means for moving the print body, said means including a cable operatively connected to the print body, a first pulley around which the cable is trained in U form, a second pulley around which another part of the cable is trained in U form, a main drive shaft, a multiple radius cam connected to one of said pulleys for moving the same over at least three large increments, a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said cam to select any desired `one of said multiple large increments, another multiple radius cam connected to the other of said pulleys for moving the same over at least three small increments, and a multiple position stop clutch between said drive shaft and said second cam to select any desired one of said multiple small increments.
34. A printer as deiined in claim 5 in which the clutch and cam have associated therewith an electrical distributor with a stationary part and a rotatable part, the rotatable part of said distributor being secured to said cam for rotation therewith, and electrical circuitry including said distributor for controlling said clutch.
35. A printer as dened in claim 6 in which each clutch and cam has associated therewith an electrical distributor with a stationary part and a rotatable part, the rotatable part of each distributor being secured -to its respective cam for rotation therewith, and electrical circuitry including said distributors for controlling said clutches.
36. A printer as dened in claim 29 in which the clutch and cam have associated therewith an electrical distributor with a stationary part and a rotatable part, the rotatable part of said distributor being secured to said cam for rotation therewith, and electrical circuitry including said distributor for controlling said clutch.
37. A printer as defined in claim 3l in which each clutch and cam have associated therewith an electrical distributor with a stationary part and a rotatable part, the rotatable part of each distributor lbeing secured to its respective cam for rotation therewith, and electrical clrcuitry including said distributors for controlling Said clutches.
38. A printer as deiined in claim 32 in which each clutch and cam has associated therewith an electrical distributor with a stationary part and a rotatable part, the rotatable part of each distributor being secured to its respective cam for rotation therewith, and electrical circuitry including said distributors for controlling said clutches.
References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,365,913 Stenfors Dec. 26, 1944 2,366,914 Le Clair et a1 Jan. 9, 1945 2,769,029 Howard Oct. 30, 1915 6 2,843,243 Masterson July 15, 1958 2,865,486 Capellaro Dec. 23, 1958
US808604A 1959-04-24 1959-04-24 Positioning printer Expired - Lifetime US3042174A (en)

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Cited By (18)

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US3227259A (en) * 1963-08-22 1966-01-04 Mite Corp Electrically operated printer with type body axially movable and rotatable
US3256969A (en) * 1962-12-17 1966-06-21 Olivetti & Co Spa High speed serial printing device
US3283876A (en) * 1962-05-14 1966-11-08 Siemens Ag Endless ink ribbon arrangement for typewriters
US3306415A (en) * 1965-05-11 1967-02-28 Brunswick Corp Tape controlled matrix printing system for recording bowling scores
US3308917A (en) * 1964-02-20 1967-03-14 Siemens Ag Type carrier positioning means employing two motors
US3310147A (en) * 1965-07-12 1967-03-21 Clary Corp Wheel striking data printer
US3326346A (en) * 1965-10-20 1967-06-20 Sasaki Rentaro Type drum printer with hammer mounted inside of and coaxial with drum
US3353648A (en) * 1965-08-31 1967-11-21 Fujitsu Ltd Typewriter with typewheel and hammer mounted on movable carriage
US3374873A (en) * 1964-02-17 1968-03-26 Codamite Corp Printing apparatus employing bidirectional stepping motors to position type member
US3482511A (en) * 1966-07-20 1969-12-09 Kienzle Apparate Gmbh Printing arrangement with tabulated printing cylinder
US3561581A (en) * 1968-02-27 1971-02-09 Codamite Corp Signal-controlled printer
US3596746A (en) * 1968-09-25 1971-08-03 Sagem Multitype wheel printing machine
US3752288A (en) * 1971-02-18 1973-08-14 Olivetti & Co Spa Electrographic printer with plural oscillating print head
US3767020A (en) * 1971-07-02 1973-10-23 Ibm Manually positionable automatic printer
US3804225A (en) * 1971-08-31 1974-04-16 C Ulin Device in a type printer
US4109778A (en) * 1975-12-08 1978-08-29 Hermes Precisa International S.A. Transmission mechanism, notably for typewriters
US4141662A (en) * 1976-03-09 1979-02-27 Elmes Staub & Co., Ag Recording ribbon mechanism for instrument recorders
USRE30942E (en) * 1979-04-23 1982-05-25 Tracor, Inc. Printing apparatus employing bidirectional stepping motors to position type member

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JPS5910916B2 (en) * 1979-07-09 1984-03-12 Alps Electric Co Ltd

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US2366914A (en) * 1941-01-04 1945-01-09 Le Clair Printing mechanism
US2769029A (en) * 1954-05-27 1956-10-30 Teleprinter Corp Telegraph printer
US2843243A (en) * 1955-08-09 1958-07-15 Sperry Rand Corp Printing device
US2865486A (en) * 1954-01-11 1958-12-23 Olivetti & Co Spa Printing mechanism for typewriting machines

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US2365913A (en) * 1939-11-30 1944-12-26 Stenfors Tor Typewriter provided with type wheel or type roller
US2366914A (en) * 1941-01-04 1945-01-09 Le Clair Printing mechanism
US2865486A (en) * 1954-01-11 1958-12-23 Olivetti & Co Spa Printing mechanism for typewriting machines
US2769029A (en) * 1954-05-27 1956-10-30 Teleprinter Corp Telegraph printer
US2843243A (en) * 1955-08-09 1958-07-15 Sperry Rand Corp Printing device

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3283876A (en) * 1962-05-14 1966-11-08 Siemens Ag Endless ink ribbon arrangement for typewriters
US3256969A (en) * 1962-12-17 1966-06-21 Olivetti & Co Spa High speed serial printing device
US3227259A (en) * 1963-08-22 1966-01-04 Mite Corp Electrically operated printer with type body axially movable and rotatable
US3374873A (en) * 1964-02-17 1968-03-26 Codamite Corp Printing apparatus employing bidirectional stepping motors to position type member
US3308917A (en) * 1964-02-20 1967-03-14 Siemens Ag Type carrier positioning means employing two motors
US3366214A (en) * 1964-02-20 1968-01-30 Siemens Ag Code comparison system for setting a type roller
US3306415A (en) * 1965-05-11 1967-02-28 Brunswick Corp Tape controlled matrix printing system for recording bowling scores
US3310147A (en) * 1965-07-12 1967-03-21 Clary Corp Wheel striking data printer
US3353648A (en) * 1965-08-31 1967-11-21 Fujitsu Ltd Typewriter with typewheel and hammer mounted on movable carriage
US3326346A (en) * 1965-10-20 1967-06-20 Sasaki Rentaro Type drum printer with hammer mounted inside of and coaxial with drum
US3482511A (en) * 1966-07-20 1969-12-09 Kienzle Apparate Gmbh Printing arrangement with tabulated printing cylinder
US3561581A (en) * 1968-02-27 1971-02-09 Codamite Corp Signal-controlled printer
US3596746A (en) * 1968-09-25 1971-08-03 Sagem Multitype wheel printing machine
US3752288A (en) * 1971-02-18 1973-08-14 Olivetti & Co Spa Electrographic printer with plural oscillating print head
US3767020A (en) * 1971-07-02 1973-10-23 Ibm Manually positionable automatic printer
US3804225A (en) * 1971-08-31 1974-04-16 C Ulin Device in a type printer
US4109778A (en) * 1975-12-08 1978-08-29 Hermes Precisa International S.A. Transmission mechanism, notably for typewriters
US4141662A (en) * 1976-03-09 1979-02-27 Elmes Staub & Co., Ag Recording ribbon mechanism for instrument recorders
USRE30942E (en) * 1979-04-23 1982-05-25 Tracor, Inc. Printing apparatus employing bidirectional stepping motors to position type member

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GB944951A (en) 1963-12-18

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