New! View global litigation for patent families

US3039559A - Sound producing device - Google Patents

Sound producing device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US3039559A
US3039559A US81342859A US3039559A US 3039559 A US3039559 A US 3039559A US 81342859 A US81342859 A US 81342859A US 3039559 A US3039559 A US 3039559A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
housing
water
bag
oxygen
hydrogen
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
William M Ellsworth
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Pneumo Dynamics Corp
PNEUMODYNAMICS CORP
Original Assignee
Pneumo Dynamics Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10KSOUND-PRODUCING DEVICES; ACOUSTICS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10K15/00Acoustics not otherwise provided for
    • G10K15/04Sound-producing devices
    • G10K15/043Sound-producing devices producing shock waves

Description

June 19, 1962 w. M. ELLSWORTH 3,039,559

SOUND PRODUCING DEVICE Filed May 15, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 T i Jo 25 T22 I INVENTOR. FIG: 4 WILLIAM M. ELLSWORTH A T TORNE Y June 19, 1962 w. M. ELLSWORTH 3,039,559

SOUND PRODUCING DEVICE Filed May 15, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 mm INVENTOR.

WILLIAM M. ELLSWORTH FIG. 8 BY M 3,039,559 SOUND PRODUCING DEVICE William M. Ellsworth, Bethesda, Md, assignor, by mesne assignments, to PneumoDynamics Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio, a corporation of Delaware Filed May 15, 1959, Ser. No. 813,428 10 Claims. (Cl. 181-.5)

This invention relates generally to devices for producing implosive cavities in water and more particularly to a device for producing an underwater sound pulse by producing an implosion in water.

In the preferred form of a sound producing device embodying this invention, a flexible bag is inflated by a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen of preselected proportions such that upon ignition the hydrogen and oxygen combine to form water vapor, thus resulting in a vapor filled cavity. The water vapor condenses during the subsequent implosion of the cavity allowing a violent collapse and resulting in a sound wave of high peak amplitude.

It is an important object of this invention to provide a device for creating and underwater implosion to produce a sound impulse.

It is another important object of this invention to provide an underwater implosion by the combustion of hy drogen and oxygen in the proper quantities to produce a complete combustion.

It is another important object of this invention to provide a mechanism for producing an underwater implosion at a predetermined depth.

It is another important object of this invention to provide a sound impulse producing mechanism which mixes and ignites the proper quantities of hydrogen and oxygen to produce complete combustion when the device reaches a predetermined water depth.

It is still another object of this invention to provide an underwater sound impulse producing device which cannot be accidentally actuated.

Further objects and advantages will appear from the following description and drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of a sound producing device according to this invention shown with the protective cover in position;

FIGURE 2 is a view illustrating the sound producing device when the bag is filled with the explosive mixture of hydrogen and oxygen before ignition;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 illustrating the operation of the device after ignition of the explosive mixture of hydrogen and oxygen at the moment of rupture of the bag;

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURES 2 and 3 showing the device after the implosion;

FIGURE 5 is a side elevation partially in longitudinal section showing the internal structure of a preferred form of this invention;

FIGURE 6 is a cross section taken along 6-6 of FIGURE 5 illustrating the ignition portion of the mechanism;

FIGURE 7 is a cross section taken along 77 of FIGURE 5; and

FIGURE 8 is a schematic view of the wiring diagram of the ignition mechanism.

The preferred embodiment of this invention includes a housing 10 comprising a cylindrical body 16 formed with two axial bores 17 and 18 extending therethrough. Positioned in the bore 17 is a cylinder or bottle 12 and positioned in the bore 18 is a cylinder or bottle 13. An O-ring 19 is mounted in each of the cylinders 12 and 13 to provide sealing engagement between the respective cylinders and bores. The lower end of the cylindrical body 16 is normally closed by a cap 21 threaded thereon and 3,3559 Patented June 19, 1962 the upper end normally closed by a cap 22 secured by a nut 23 engaging a radial shoulder 24 formed on the upper cap 22 and screwed on the upper end of the cylindrical body 16. A gasket 26 is provided at each end of the cylindrical body 16 to provide a fluid tight joint between the body and the two end caps 21 and 22.

Threaded in the upper cap 22 immediately above the cylinder 12 is a pin 27 which cuts through a closure disc 27' forming the upper end of the cylinder 12 when the cylinder moves upwardly relative to the body 16. The pin 27, as it ruptures or punches the closure disc 27' in the cylinder 12, releases the hydrogen within a chamber 28 formed within the upper cap 22. A spring 29 extends between the upper cap 22 and the end of the cylinder 12 and resiliently urges the cylinder in the direction away from the pin into engagement with the lower cap 21 as clearly shown in FIGURE 5. A similar pin 31 is threaded into the end of the upper cap 22 immediately above the cylinder 13 and operates in a similar manner to release the oxygen from the cylinder when the cylinder moves upwardly against the pin. A spring 32 engages the upper end of the cylinder 13 and resiliently urges the cylinder away from the pin into engagement with the end cap 21. A hollow nipple 33 is threaded into the upper end cap 22 which provides a mounting for the open end of a rubber bag 11. To secure the rubber bag 11 in place on the nipple 33, a wire clamp 34 or the like can be used. The rubber bag may be of any desired configuration when deflated but is preferably made cylindrical of soft and readily expandable material and under certain conditions of operation, adapted to inflate and burst as hereinafter explained.

The lower cap 21 is formed with a downwardly extending hollow boss 37 normally closed by a frangible disc 36 secured thereon by a nut 38. This disc is arranged to rupture when the water pressure produced by a predetermined depth is reached.

To ignite the mixed gases within the inflated rubber bag 11, an electrical ignition mechanism is used, but it should be understood that other types of ignition devices could be used. Mounted within the upper cap 22, as shown in FIGURE 6, is a battery 41 preferably of the multicell mercury type which is capable of producing a relatively high voltage. Also mounted in the upper cap 22 is a condenser 42, one side of which is connected to one side of the battery 41 by an electrical conductor 43 and the other side of which is grounded by the conductor 47 on the upper cap 22. The other side of the battery 41 is connected to a conductor 44 which extends down along the cylindrical body 16 through a small bore 44' and is provided with a bared end 46 in the lower chamber 39. The conductor 44 is insulated from the cylindrical body so a closed circuit is not provided.

An arcing device 45 includes a grounded clip 48 mounted on the upper cap 22 and an insulated clip 49 also mounted on the upper cap 22. A conductor 51 connected to the side of the battery 41 connected to the condenser 42 is mounted on the insulated clip 49 and terminates at a bared end 52 immediately adjacent to the grounded clip 43. When suflicient voltage is provided between the bared end 52 and the grounded clip 48, an arc jumps the gap and ignites the combustion mixture of hydrogen and oxygen. The bared end 46, shown in FIGURE 5, is immersed in sea water when the lower chamber 39 is flooded by the rupture of the frangible disc 36 so that the conductor 44 is connected to the ground. This operates as a sea water switch 50 to complete the electrical circuit connecting the grounded side of the condenser so that the condenser 42 is connected in parallel with the battery 41. The condenser operates to prevent the are from being established immediately, providing suflicient time delay to permit the gases to flow J out of the cylinders 12 and 13 into the rubber bag 11 and also operates as a current reservoir to improve the spark and maintain it once it is established. The battery 41 has a very low current capacity so it takes a predetermined length of time to charge the condenser 42 and build up the required voltage potential across the gap between the bared end 52 and the grounded clip 43. Once the spark jumps across the gap, the gas is ignited to cause the rubber bag 11 to be further inflated and burst, thus producing the required explosion and subsequent implosion.

In operation, the protective cover 14 within which is normally stored the rubber bag 11 is removed from the device, and the device thrown overboard into the ocean. When the predetermined depth is reached, the frangible disc 36 breaks permitting sea water to enter into the lower chamber 39 formed within the lower cap 21. The pressure of the sea water causes the two cylinders 12 and 13 to move upwardly within the cylindrical body 16 and against their respective pins 27 and 31 to puncture the two closure discs 27' of the upper ends of the two cylinders to release the hydrogen and oxygen contained therein. The gas is thus released, mixed in the chamber 28, and inflates the rubber bag 11. As the bag is inflated, the sea water admitted into the lower chamber 39 operates to close the circuit by contacting the bared end 46 of the conductor 44 initiating charging of the condenser 42. The condenser 42 is sized so that it prevents the arcing between the grounded clip 43 and the bared end 52 until suflicient time has elapsed for the gas to mix and inflate the rubber bag 11. The electrical arc operates to ignite the combustible mixture within the rubber bag 11 which further inflates the bag, preferably until it bursts.

When the combustion of the gas is completed, the surrounding sea water is displaced to an extent equivalent to the size of the cavity filled with water vapor. The rapid cooling of the water vapor due to the cooling action of the water produces condensation which results in an implosion with no residual gas remaining to cushion the implosion. It may be desirable in some cases to arrange the bag so that it does not rupture when the gas is burned. In such cases, the cooling of the bag by the surrounding water will result in cooling of the Water vapor and produce the desired implosion. Normally, however, it is desirable to arrange the bag so that it is ruptured by the combustion of the gas so that an intimate contact will be provided between the water vapor and the surrounding sea water. This intimate contact will accelerate the condensation of the water vapor. It is recognized that other gases which react to chemicals combine and form a condensable gaseous chemical compound could be substituted for the hydrogen and oxygen as long as the condensation of the chemical compound resulted in a complete elimination of any cushioning gases which would limit the maximum peak amplitude of the implosion.

Since the springs 29 and 32 operate to prevent the cylinders from moving upward against their respective pins, the device can be safely handled on shipboard. An additional safety feature is provided by the sea water switch at the bared end 46 which prevents closing of the ignition circuit until the device is submerged.

Although a preferred embodiment of this invention is illustrated, it will be realized that various modifications or" the structural details may be made without departing from the mode of operation and the essence of the invcntion. Therefore, except insofar as they are claimed in the appended claims, structural details may be varied widely without modifying the mode of operation. Accordingly, the appended claims and not the aforesaid detailed description are determinative of the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. An underwater sound producing device comprising an inflatable bag adapted to expand by inflation, a closed housing provided with an opening, a frangible closure extending across the opening in the housing and secured to the housing and which is ruptured by a predetermined water pressure, a gas releasing device positioned in the housing and connected to said bag operable to inflate said bag with a chemically reactive gaseous mixture of preselected composition which chemically combines upon reaction to produce a condensable residual gas and expandsaid bag, and ignition means in the housing operable under the influence of water entering through the frangible closure after it has ruptured to ignite the gaseous mixture to expand the bag.

2. A submarine sound producing device comprising an inflatable bag adapted to expand by inflation, a closed housing provided with an opening, a gas releasing device positioned in the housing with the housing being connected to the bag, a frangible closure extending across the opening in the housing and secured to the housing and which is ruptured by a predetermined water pressure to release the gas, and ignition means in the housing operable under the influence of water entering through the frangible closure after it has ruptured to ignite the gas and expand the bag.

3. A device adapted to be immersed into sea water to produce displacement of water by explosion and implosion resulting in sound waves transmitted by said water, comprising an inflatable bag adapted to expand by inflation, a closed housing provided with an opening, a frangible closure extending across the opening in the housing and secured to the housing and which is ruptured by a predetermined water pressure, at least one container having a gas producing substance therein and the container being positioned in the housing, and ignition means in the housing operable under the influence of water entering through the frangible closure after it has ruptured and the substance has been released from the container to ignite the substance and expand the bag.

4. An underwater sound producing device comprising a housing, an inflatable element on said housing, separatcly confined oxygen and hydrogen in said housing, means on said housing operable in response to a pre determined pressure of the water in which said housing is immersed to release said hydrogen and oxygen into said element, ignition means operatively associated with said element operable to ignite the hydrogen and oxygen in said element, and means delaying the operation of said ignition means until said element is inflated by said oxygen and hydrogen.

5. An underwater sound producing device comprising a housing, an inflatable element on said housing, separately confined oxygen and hydrogen in said housing, means on said housing operable when said housing is immersed in water to release said hydrogen and oxygen into said element, and time delay ignition means operatively associated with said element operable to ignite the hydrogen and oxygen in said element after it is inflated causing said element to expand and burst.

6. An underwater sound producing device comprising a housing, an inflatable bag on said housing, separately conflned oxygen and hydrogen in said housing, pressure sensitive means on said housing, operable when said housing is immersed in water to a predetermined depth to release said hydrogen and oxygen into said bag, and time delay ignition means in said housing operable to ignite the hydrogen and oxygen in said housing after it is inflated causing said bag to expand and burst.

7. An underwater sound producing device comprising a housing, an inflatable bag on said housing, a predeter' mined weight of hydrogen under pressure confined in said housing, a weight of compressed oxygen eight times as great as said predetermined weight separately confined in said housing, pressure sensitive means on said housing operable when said housing is immersed in water to a predetermined depth to release said hydrogen and oxygen into said bag, and time delay ignition means in said 5 housing operable to ignite the hydrogen and oxygen in said bag after it is inflated.

8. An underwater sound producing device comprising a housing, an inflatable bag on said housing, a predetermined weight of hydrogen under pressure confined in said housing, a weight of compressed oxygen eight times as great as said predetermined weight separately confined in said housing, pressure sensitive means on said housing operable when said housing is immered in water to a predetermined depth to releast said hydrogen and oxygen into said bag, and electrical ignition means in said housing operable by said pressure sensitive means, said ignition means including a time delay device preventing operation thereof to ignite the hydrogen and oxygen in said bag to expand and burst same until a predetermined period of time passes to allow flow of hydrogen and oxygen into said bag.

9. A sound producing device for operation in water comprising a housing, an inflatable bag on said housing, containers in said housing separately confining oxygen and hydrogen under pressure and movable to an operated position in which said hydrogen and oxygen is released and mixed in said bag, a frangible closure in said housing which is ruptured by a predetermined water pressure normally isolating said containers from the water, rupture of said closure permitting water to move said containers to said operated position, and ignition means in said body operable to ignite said oxygen and hydrogen to expand said bag.

10. A sound producing device for operation in Water comprising a housing, an inflatable bag on said housing, containers in said housing separately confining oxygen and hydrogen under pressure and movable to an operated position in which said hydrogen and oxygen is released and mixed in said bag, a frangible closure in said housing which is ruptured by a predetermined water pressure normally isolating said containers from the Water, rupture of said closure permitting Water to move said containers to said operated position, and ignition means in said body operable under the influence of water entering through said ruptured closure to ignite said oxygen and hydrogen to expand and burst said bag.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,310,586 Straub et a1. July 22, 1919 1,500,243 Hammond July 8, 1924 2,586,706 Parr Feb. 19, 1952 2,679,205 Piety May 25, 1954

US3039559A 1959-05-15 1959-05-15 Sound producing device Expired - Lifetime US3039559A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3039559A US3039559A (en) 1959-05-15 1959-05-15 Sound producing device

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US3039559A US3039559A (en) 1959-05-15 1959-05-15 Sound producing device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US3039559A true US3039559A (en) 1962-06-19

Family

ID=25212341

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US3039559A Expired - Lifetime US3039559A (en) 1959-05-15 1959-05-15 Sound producing device

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US3039559A (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3188999A (en) * 1963-03-11 1965-06-15 Sonitrol Corp Jet resonator
US3246286A (en) * 1962-10-16 1966-04-12 Texas Instruments Inc Free-bubble gas sound source
US3379273A (en) * 1963-11-12 1968-04-23 Bolt Associates Inc Powerful sound impulse generation methods and apparatus
US3433202A (en) * 1966-07-14 1969-03-18 Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst Impact-energized sound source
US3658005A (en) * 1970-04-08 1972-04-25 Thiokol Chemical Corp Fuel-air explosive device
US4153134A (en) * 1977-09-06 1979-05-08 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Underwater seismic source
US4633969A (en) * 1983-01-12 1987-01-06 Palmer Malcolm G Signalling device
US5033354A (en) * 1973-11-21 1991-07-23 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Deep operating monitor and destruct device
US5973999A (en) * 1997-09-29 1999-10-26 Maxwell Technologies Systems Division, Inc. Acoustic cannon
US20050150714A1 (en) * 2003-08-26 2005-07-14 Michael Raleigh Non-explosive acoustic source
US8104406B1 (en) * 2009-06-22 2012-01-31 Shulte David J Explosive device
US8117966B1 (en) * 2007-12-06 2012-02-21 Graber Curtis E Stun grenade
US8887639B2 (en) 2012-06-21 2014-11-18 Curtis E. Graber Inflatable bag with burst control envelope and gas generator
US9574858B2 (en) 2012-06-21 2017-02-21 Curtis E. Graber Inflatable bag with burst control envelope and gas generator

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1310586A (en) * 1919-07-22 Pl-anoorapii co
US1500243A (en) * 1918-02-20 1924-07-08 Jr John Hays Hammond Submarine sound transmitter
US2586706A (en) * 1949-01-12 1952-02-19 Olive S Petty Seismic surveying
US2679205A (en) * 1949-02-18 1954-05-25 Phillips Petroleum Co Method of and apparatus for producing seismic waves

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1310586A (en) * 1919-07-22 Pl-anoorapii co
US1500243A (en) * 1918-02-20 1924-07-08 Jr John Hays Hammond Submarine sound transmitter
US2586706A (en) * 1949-01-12 1952-02-19 Olive S Petty Seismic surveying
US2679205A (en) * 1949-02-18 1954-05-25 Phillips Petroleum Co Method of and apparatus for producing seismic waves

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3246286A (en) * 1962-10-16 1966-04-12 Texas Instruments Inc Free-bubble gas sound source
US3188999A (en) * 1963-03-11 1965-06-15 Sonitrol Corp Jet resonator
US3379273A (en) * 1963-11-12 1968-04-23 Bolt Associates Inc Powerful sound impulse generation methods and apparatus
US3433202A (en) * 1966-07-14 1969-03-18 Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst Impact-energized sound source
US3658005A (en) * 1970-04-08 1972-04-25 Thiokol Chemical Corp Fuel-air explosive device
US5033354A (en) * 1973-11-21 1991-07-23 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Deep operating monitor and destruct device
US4153134A (en) * 1977-09-06 1979-05-08 The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space Administration Underwater seismic source
US4633969A (en) * 1983-01-12 1987-01-06 Palmer Malcolm G Signalling device
US5973999A (en) * 1997-09-29 1999-10-26 Maxwell Technologies Systems Division, Inc. Acoustic cannon
US20050150714A1 (en) * 2003-08-26 2005-07-14 Michael Raleigh Non-explosive acoustic source
US7028807B2 (en) * 2003-08-26 2006-04-18 Bae Systems Advanced Technologies, Inc. Non-explosive acoustic source
US8117966B1 (en) * 2007-12-06 2012-02-21 Graber Curtis E Stun grenade
US8104406B1 (en) * 2009-06-22 2012-01-31 Shulte David J Explosive device
US20120024182A1 (en) * 2009-06-22 2012-02-02 Shulte David J Explosive device
US8887639B2 (en) 2012-06-21 2014-11-18 Curtis E. Graber Inflatable bag with burst control envelope and gas generator
US9297603B2 (en) 2012-06-21 2016-03-29 Curtis E. Graber Inflatable bag with burst control envelope and gas generator
US9574858B2 (en) 2012-06-21 2017-02-21 Curtis E. Graber Inflatable bag with burst control envelope and gas generator

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3197234A (en) Safety device for vehicle passengers
US3191533A (en) Gas discharge apparatus
US3530759A (en) Explosively severable element
US2995088A (en) Multi-stage igniter charge
US6702033B1 (en) Hybrid fire extinguisher
US3915236A (en) Safety device
US6170867B1 (en) Airbag inflation gas generation via a decomposing material with a linear ignition source
US4089702A (en) Method of cleaning internal surfaces employing an explosive gas
US6412811B1 (en) Inflator
US3711115A (en) Pyrotechnic gas generator
US5364127A (en) Inflator assembly
US3393605A (en) Explosively actuated device for high pressure environment
US5078117A (en) Projectile propellant apparatus and method
US4003291A (en) Missile launching mine
US4094028A (en) Automatic inflating lifesaving buoy
US5344186A (en) Inflator assembly
US3930666A (en) Hybrid gas system for automobile passenger restraint system
US5350192A (en) Inflator assembly
US4159744A (en) Fire extinguishant mechanism
US3035285A (en) Explosively anchored buoy
US2953443A (en) Chemical heating composition, heating unit containing the same and method of manufacture
US4026188A (en) Modular buoy system
US6196584B1 (en) Initiator for air bag inflator
US3733180A (en) Solid state cool gas generator
US3774807A (en) Gas-generating valve