US3025525A - Helmet liner - Google Patents

Helmet liner Download PDF

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Publication number
US3025525A
US3025525A US77576558A US3025525A US 3025525 A US3025525 A US 3025525A US 77576558 A US77576558 A US 77576558A US 3025525 A US3025525 A US 3025525A
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Prior art keywords
helmet
headband
member
cradle
front
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Expired - Lifetime
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Glen M Larson
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MSA Safety Inc
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MSA Safety Inc
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A42HEADWEAR
    • A42BHATS; HEAD COVERINGS
    • A42B3/00Helmets; Helmet covers; Other protective head coverings
    • A42B3/04Parts, details or accessories of helmets
    • A42B3/10Linings
    • A42B3/14Suspension devices

Description

G. M. LARSON HELMET LINER March 20, 1962 Filed Nov. 24, 1958 ($1.5M M 'I Hesmg INVENTOR.

United States Patent Ofitice 3,025,525 Patented Mar. 20, 1962 3,025,525 HELMET LINER Glen M. Larson, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Mine Safety Appliances Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Nov. 24, 1958, Ser. No. 775,765

9 Claims. (Cl. 2-3) v The present invention relates generally to protective hats and more particularly to a novel liner for use with helmets and the like. Specifically, the instant construction comprises a liner especially suitable for use with socalled bump hats, and which includes novel means for adjusting the size of the liner in several directions and for removably attaching it to the helmet, whereby one liner will fit all wearers.

Throughout the application, reference will be made to a helmet, but it is to be understood that the novel liner disclosed herein can be used with various types of rigid or so-called hard hats, as well as the aforementioned bump" hat.

Although helmets and helmet liners have been employed for many years, the liners in use at the present time are not completely satisfactory in that they are unduly costly and have had to be stocked in various sizes. Many prior liners do not fit the wearers head properly, making it difiicult to maintain the helmet in position, particularly when the wearer has to bend over and assume awkward positions, as for example, on a construction job.

It is an object of the present invention, therefore, to provide a novel helmet liner which can be easily and quickly adjusted to properly and comfortably fit the head of the wearer regardless of the size and shape of the wearers head. More particularly, it is an object to provide such a liner which includes means for quickly and easily adjusting the liner circumferentially and also in the vertical direction so as to control the position of the helmet relative to the top of the wearers head.

Another object is to provide a liner of universal size which can be shipped in a folded or flattened position so as to conserve space. More particularly, it is an object to provide such a liner which includes a cradle member which can be pivoted to a position adjacent to and in the same general plane of the headband member.

Yet another object is to provide such a liner which includes means for easily and quickly attaching it to and removing it from a helmet.

A further object is to provide a liner which contains novel attaching means which is adjustable to compensate for differences in head size, while at the same time maintaining the liner spaced from the helmet. More particularly, it is an object to provide such a liner which includes means for fastening it to the helmet and for adjusting the longitudinal position of the helmet relative to the wearers head.

Another object is to provide a liner which is made from a relatively inexpensive and readily available material, and which can be easily and quickly fabricated.

A further object is to provide a simple and relatively inexpensive adjusting means for both the headband and the cradle member.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent from the detailed description which follows, reference being had to the accompanying drawing wherein a preferred embodiment of the present invention is shown.

-In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a helmet containing a liner constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken on the line 2-2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken on the line 3-3 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal sectional View taken on the line 4-4 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line 5-5 in FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary vertical. sectional view similar to FIG. 5, showing an alternate type of snap construction; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the helmet liner per se.

Referring to the drawings more particularly by reference numerals, the number 10 (FIG. 7) indicates a liner embodying the teachings of the present invention, which is particularly adapted for use with a helmet 12 (FIGS. 1 and 2).

The liner .10 (FIG. 7) is preferably made from a tapelike polyethylene extrusion for reasons of economy and also for advantages in construction which will be discussed more fully hereinafter, and comprises a headband member 14 and a single cradle member 16 which is pivotally attached thereto by means of rivets 18' and 20.

The headband member 14 has two overlapping ends 22 and 24, the end 22 containing a series of equally spaced apertures 26 and the end 24 containing two outwardly projecting studs 28 which are spaced apart a distance equal to some multiple (preferably three) of the distance between the apertures 26.

Each of the studs contains an enlarged head portion which is slightly larger than the size of the apertures 26 (note FIG. 3 for similar construction on another portion of the liner), but because the material from which the liner 10 is fabricated is resilient and flexible, the enlarged ends of the studs 28 can be easily forced through the apertures 26, but at the same time the material is sufliciently resilient so as to maintain the connection until it is desired to separate the two members as by pulling them apart.

As will be readily apparent from a consideration of FIG. 7, the effective size of the headband 14 can be easily and quickly adjusted by moving the position of the studs 28 relative to the apertures 26. For further convenience, the various head sizes can be marked on the inner face of the headband adjacent the various: apertures.

One important advantage of the double stud construction on the headband 14 is that it obviates the necessity of having a loop around the end 24 to receive the end 22, as is necessary with the known belt-type adjusting means. This is particularly true if the tape-like material has a tendency to curve, due to the manner of extrusion or due to winding the extruded material on rolls before use in the invention, and if the tape-like material is oriented so that this tendency to curve makes the end 22 lie close to the main band. If desired, however, a loop can be employed to anchor the free end 227 Secured to the front portion of the headband 14 (FIGS. 3 and 7) are two spaced studs 30 which are used for adjustably attaching a forward adjusting strip 32 to the headband 14. Each of the free ends of the strap 32 contains a series of spaced apertures 34 whereby the length of the strap 32 between the studs 30 can be varied within predetermined limits, for adjusting the forward position of the helmet on the wearers head, as will be described more fully hereinafter. The strap 32 (FIG. 7) also contains two spaced apertures 36 near the center thereof for at- 3 taching the strap to the front portion of the helmet 12 (FIG. 3), as will be described in detail hereinafter.

Returning to a consideration of the single cradle mem- 361 16 which is pivotally fastened to the headband member, it comprises two elements 38 and 4f), the upper ends of which overlap as shown most clearly in FIG. 7. The element 38 preferably contains a series of spaced aper- Lures 42 which receive the spaced studs 44 which are fastened to the element 40. It will be readily apparent that :his construction provides the same type of adjustability and reliability for the cradle member 16 as it provides for the headband 14 by the similar stud and aperture construction previously described.

The adjustability of the cradle member 16 is important in that it permits an accurate and comfortable positioning of the helmet 12 relative to the top of the wearers head. Thus, it can be adjusted so that the helmet will not be so low as to obstruct the wearers vision, nor so high as not to afford adequate protection for the sides of his head. if this refinement is not desired, however, the cradle member 16 may be a unitary element formed of the tape-like material.

At the lower end of each of the cradle elements 38 and 49 is a tab 46 (FIGS. 7 and 2) which is preferably cut out from the body of the cradle member, and which contains an aperture 48 adjacent the free end thereof for removably and pivotally fastening the liner 10 to the sides of the helmet 12, as will be described more fully herein after.

Referring to FIG. 1, it will be noted that the helmet 12 (which is preferably of a molded plastic construction), contains two spaced removable studs 50 at the front portion thereof, the enlarged inner ends of which extend inside the helmet and protrude through the apertures 36 in the forward adjusting strip 32 (FIG. 3) previously described.

At each side of the helmet 12 (FIG. 1) there is a series of spaced apertures 52 (three are shown in the drawing), at least one of which contains a removable stud 54 similar in shape and function to the studs 50 at the front of the helmet. The enlarged inner ends of the studs 54 extend through the apertures 48 in the tabs 46 of the cradle ele ment (FIGS. and 2) so as to pivotally support the sides of the liner in spaced relationship with the helmet 12.

All of these studs previously referred to function in the same manner in that the large free ends thereof are inserted through the apertures contained in the lining members. The ends of the studs are slightly larger than the apertures, but because the plastic material from which the liner is made is flexible and resilient, the material around each aperture flexes outwardly so as to enlarge the opening and permit the entry of the end of the stud, and then resumes its original shape so as to hold together the stud and the plastic member until they are intentionally pulled part. Each of the studs thus constitutes one attachment element co-operative with another attachment element, e.g., the aperture receiving the free end thereof, to connect the two adjacent members linked by the stud.

However, if it is desired to use some other material for the liner 10, as for example a fabric which is not resilient, the aforementioned stud and aperture construction can be replaced by a conventional two-piece metal snap device. Referring briefly to FIG. 6, it will be noted that a male member 56 of such a device can be substituted for the aperture 43 in the tab 46, and a female member 58 can be substituted for the stud 54. Obviously, in such an alternate construction, it is necessary to use a plurality of such female members on each side of the helmet 12 in place of the apertures 52 previously described (FIG. 4).

Turning next to a consideration of the liner 10 as it is fastened within the helmet 12, it will be noted that the adjusting strap 32 holds the front portion of the headband 14 securely in position relative to the front part of the helmet, and in spaced relationship therewith (FIGS. 2

and 3). The tabs 45 in turn pivotally secure the sides of the liner 111 to the side portions of the helmet and in spaced relationship therewith (FIG. 5).

As previously mentioned, the circumferential or effective size of the headband 14 can be easily and quickly adjusted by means of the apertures 26 and the studs 23. Also, the vertical position of the helmet 12 relative to the wearers head can be readily adjusted in like manner by means of the apertures 42 and the studs $4 on the cradle member 16.

If we assume, for example, that the wearer has a relatively small head and desires to have the helmet centered on his head as to the front to rear direction, he can move the studs 30 to the outermost apertures 34 in the adjusting strap 32 so as to move the front portion of the headband 14 away from the front of the helmet, and then adjust the position of the tabs 46 on the studs 54 accordingly. On the other hand, if he desires to have his forehead close to the front of the helmet, he can move the studs 30 to the innermost apertures 34 in the adjusting strap 32.

Also, if the wearer has a relatively narrow head, the length of the tabs 46 on the cradle elements freely permits the inward movement of the sides of the headband 14 relative to the sides of the helmet.

Because the cradle member 16 is pivoted to both the sides of the helmet and to the headband 14, and is made from a fairly stiff material, it will automatically pivot to the proper position within the helmet when the size of the headband is varied, so as to permit the headband 14 to conform to the shape of the wearers head.

Because the liner is easily and quickly adjusted both circumferentially and vertically so as to fit heads of various shapes and sizes, it is only necessary for dealers to stock one size of helmet and one size of liner.

The pivoted connection between the headband and the cradle member permits the liners to be shipped in a flattened position. In addition, the pivotal connection between the headband and the cradle member together with the pivotal connection between the sides of the liner and the sides of the helmet permits the cradle to pivot so as to automatically compensate for the various head shapes and sizes.

The liner is preferably made from a tape-like polyethylene extrusion because this material is readily available and relatively inexpensive and is easy to fabricate. Also, due to the flexibility and resilience of such material, it can be made to function as one element of the relatively inexpensive stud and aperture fastening means previously described.

The use of the two spaced studs in conjunction with the spaced apertures in the plastic material, maintains the overlapped members in alignment and obviates the need for a separate loop for receiving the free end of one of the overlapped members, as in a conventional construction.

While it is preferred to employ two removable studs 51) to secure the strip 32, it is within the scope of the invention to rivet or otherwise secure the strip 32 directly to the helmet 12 and employ the studs 30 for detachably connecting the headband 14 to the strip 32. The helmets can then still be stacked for storage or shipment and can be readily assembled to the headband 14 and its connected elements when preparing the helmet for use.

It is to be understood that the foregoing description and the accompanying drawing have been given only by Way of illustration and example, and that changes and alterations in the present disclosure, which will be readily apparent to one skilled in the art, are contemplated as within the scope of the present invention which is limited only by the claims which follow.

What I claim is:

1. A liner for use with a helmet having a front portion and opposed side portions, comprising a tape-like annular headband having a front portion and opposed side portions; means for removably attaching the front portion of the headband to the front portion of the helmet; a single arcuate tape-like cradle member having the ends thereof pivotally fastened to said opposed side portions of the headband, said headband, attaching means, and cradle member being made of a material which is flexible yet sufficiently rigid to tend to retain its shape; and means for pivotally and removably attaching the cradle member to the side portions of the helmet adjacent the ends of said cradle member, the means for attaching the cradle member to the helmet being spaced vertically from the pivotal attachment of the cradle member to the headband to provide for angular displacement of the cradle member relative to the headband when the latter is moved longitudinally of the helmet.

2. A liner for use with a helmet having a front portion and opposed side portions, comprising a tape-like annular headband having a front portion and opposed side portions; means for removably attaching the front portion of the headband to the front portion of the helmet in adjusted spaced relationship; an arcuate tapelike cradle member having the ends thereof pivotally fastened to said opposed side portions of the headband, said headband, attaching means, and cradle member being made of a material which is flexible yet sufficiently rigid to tend to retain its shape; a longitudinally extending tab cut'from and connected to the cradle member adjacent each end thereof; and means for pivotally and removably attaching the free ends of said tabs to the helmet at the side portions thereof.

3. A liner for use with a helmet having a front portion and opposed side portions, comprising a tapelike annular headband having a front portion and opposed side portions; means for removably attaching the front portion of the headband to the front portion of the helmet; an arcuate tape-like cradle member having the ends thereof pivotally fastened to said opposed side portions of the headband, said headband, attaching means, and cradle member being made of a material which is flexible yet sufficiently rigid to :tend to retain its shape; a longitudinally extending tab cut from the cradle member adjacent each end thereof by a U-shaped out leaving the tab attached to the cradle member at the base of the cut and providing tabs with free ends that can be displaced from the plane of the cradle member; and means for pivotally and removably attaching the free ends of said tabs to the helmet at the side portions thereof.

4. A liner for use with a helmet having a front portion and opposed side portions, comprising a tape-like annular headband made from material which is flexible yet sufficiently rigid to tend to retain its shape, and having a front portion and opposed side portions; means for removably attaching the front portion of the headband to the front portion of the helmet in adjusted spaced relationship; a single arcuate tape-like cradle member made from material which is also flexible yet sufficiently rigid to tend to retain its shape, and having the ends thereof pivotally fastened to said opposed side portions of the headband; and means for pivotally and removably attaching the cradle member to the side portions of the helmet adjacent the ends of said cradle member, the means for attaching the cradle member to the helmet being spaced vertically from the pivotal attachment of the cradle member to the headband to provide for angular movement of the cradle member relative to the headband when the front portion of the latter is moved relative to the helmet.

5. A liner for use with a helmet having a front portion and opposed side portions, comprising a tape-like annular headband made from material which is flexible yet sufficiently rigid to tend to retain its shape, and having a front portion and opposed side portions; means for removably attaching the front portion of the headband to the front portion of the helmet; a single arcuate tapelike cradle member also made from material which is flexible yet sufficiently rigid to tend to retain its sha and having the ends thereof pivotally fastened to sai opposed side portions of the headband; a longitudinal] extending tab formed integral with the cradle membi adjacent each end thereof; and means for pivotally an removably attaching the free ends of said tabs to ti helmet at the side portions thereof.

6. A liner for use with a helmet having a front portic and opposed side portions, comprising a tape-like annul: headband having a front portion and opposed side po tions; an arcuate tape-like cradle member having the enr thereof pivotally fastened to the opposed side portior of the headband; an adjusting strap having a center po tion and two ends; means for fastening the ends of ti adjusting strap to the front portion of the headband i spaced relationship; means for removably attaching ti center portion of the adjusting strap to the front portic of the helmet; and means for removably attaching ti cradle member to the helmet at the side portions thereo said headband, cradle member, and adjusting strap bein made of a material which is flexible yet sufficiently rigi to tend to retain its shape.

7. A liner for use with a helmet having a front portic and opposed side portions, comprising a tape-like annul: headband having a front portion and opposed side po tions; an arcuate tape-like cradle member having tl ends thereof pivotally fastened to said opposed side po tions of the headband; a strap having a center portic and two ends; means for removably fastening the enr of the strap to the front portion of the headband in s lected spaced relationship whereby the length of the stra between the fastening means can be adjusted within pr determined limits; means for attaching the center p0 tion of the strap to the front portion of the helmet; ar means for removably attaching the cradle member to ti helmet at the side portions thereof, said headband, crad member, and adjusting strap being made of a materi which is flexible yet sufficiently rigid to tend to retai its shape.

8. A liner for use 'With a helmet having a front po tion and opposed side portions, comprising a tape-lil annular headband having a front portion and oppose side portions; means for adjusting the size of the heat band; an adjusting strap having a center portion and tn ends; means for removably fastening the ends of tl adjusting strap to the front portion of the headband selected spaced relationship whereby the length of tl adjusting strap between the fastening means can be a justed within predetermined limits; means for attachir the center portion of the adjusting strap to the front po tion of the helmet in at least two places; a single arcua tape-like cradle member having the ends thereof pivotal fastened to said opposed side portions of the headban a longitudinally extending tab formed integral with tl cradle member adjacent each end thereof; and meat for removably and pivotally attaching the free ends 1 said tabs to the helmet at the side portions thereof, sa headband, cradle member, and adjusting strap being mat of a material which is flexible yet sufficiently rigid tend to retain its shape.

9. In combination, a helmet having a front portir and opposed side portions; at least two laterally spact attachment elements supported by the helmet adjace the front portion thereof; a plurality of laterally spact attachment elements at each side portion of the helm a tape-like annular headband positioned within the h met and including a front portion and opposed side pc tions; means for varying the effective size of the hea band; an adjusting strap having a center portion and tv ends; means for removably fastening the ends of the a justing strap to the front portion of the headband selected spaced relationship whereby the length of t' adjusting strap between the fastening means can be a justed within predetermined limits; attachment elemer at the center portion of said strap in removable engag nent with the attachment elements at the front portion if the helmet; a single arcuate tape-like cradle member raving the ends thereof pivotally fastened to the opposed ide portions of the headband; a longitudinally extending ab connected to the cradle member adjacent each end 5 hereof; and an attachment element adjacent the end of ach tab in removable and pivotal engagement with one f the attachment elements at the side portion of the ielmet adjacent thereto, said headband, cradle member, 11d adjusting strap being made of a material which is 10 lexible yet sufficiently rigid to tend to retain its shape.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Strauss Feb.

Ludwell Dec.

Malcom Mar.

Turner Aug. Lewis Feb. Grancsay et a1. Aug. Bowers Sept. Simpson Mar.

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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3082428A (en) * 1961-03-06 1963-03-26 Joseph Buegeleisen Company Safety helmet
US3156922A (en) * 1961-12-07 1964-11-17 Sellstrom Mfg Company Cradle attachment for head protective equipment
US3516092A (en) * 1967-11-15 1970-06-23 Bullard Co Head suspension for safety hat
US3696440A (en) * 1971-03-11 1972-10-10 Gay Toys Inc Baseball helmet
US3706101A (en) * 1970-11-27 1972-12-19 Mario Plastino Head protecting headwear
US3714668A (en) * 1971-02-11 1973-02-06 Angelica Corp Protective helmet
US4443892A (en) * 1982-03-30 1984-04-24 Dadant & Sons, Inc. Helmet or hat and support means
US4551858A (en) * 1983-01-28 1985-11-12 Dragerwerk Aktiengesellschaft Protective helmet having a cooling harness
US4744358A (en) * 1984-01-18 1988-05-17 Mcginnis Gerald E Endotracheal tube holder
US5042093A (en) * 1988-10-21 1991-08-27 Comasec International Sa Headgear including an adjustable coif
US5044019A (en) * 1989-09-28 1991-09-03 Biokinetics And Associates Ltd. Helmet restraining device
US6481019B2 (en) * 2000-01-18 2002-11-19 Stryker Instruments Air filtration system including a helmet assembly
US20040068208A1 (en) * 1998-09-25 2004-04-08 Cimino William Wayne Surgical system console
US20050010992A1 (en) * 2003-07-18 2005-01-20 Conrad Klotz Head gear apparatus
WO2005016047A1 (en) * 2003-08-18 2005-02-24 Hans-Georg Knauer Helmet
US20050060788A1 (en) * 2003-09-23 2005-03-24 Lawrence Green Protective headgear system
US20060213523A1 (en) * 2005-03-24 2006-09-28 Stryker Corporation Personal protection system
US20070199136A1 (en) * 2005-12-22 2007-08-30 Brine William H Iii Sport helmet with adjustable liner
WO2008011936A1 (en) * 2006-07-27 2008-01-31 Uvex Sports Gmbh & Co. Kg Protective helmet, particularly bicycle helmet
US20090151054A1 (en) * 2007-12-14 2009-06-18 Stryker Corporation Personal protection system with head unit having easy access controls and protective covering having glare avoiding face shield
US20130191973A1 (en) * 2010-07-13 2013-08-01 Anton Pfanner Interior fitting for a protective helmet, in particular for forestry workers
US20130205477A1 (en) * 2010-07-13 2013-08-15 Anton Pfanner Protective helmet, in particular for forestry workers

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US2342501A (en) * 1942-01-30 1944-02-22 Albert A Strauss Hat
US2365422A (en) * 1941-07-23 1944-12-19 Bullard Co Suspension mounting for safety headgear
US2437748A (en) * 1945-06-11 1948-03-16 Chicago Eye Shield Company Adjustable headband construction
US2715227A (en) * 1951-07-30 1955-08-16 Helmets Ltd Helmets
US2735099A (en) * 1956-02-21 lewis
US2758306A (en) * 1954-09-24 1956-08-14 Stephen V Grancsay Helmet suspensions
US2763863A (en) * 1954-06-30 1956-09-25 Fibre Metal Prod Co Head protector cradle attachment
US2786204A (en) * 1954-06-28 1957-03-26 Ray O Vac Co Adjustable suspension for helmets

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2735099A (en) * 1956-02-21 lewis
US2365422A (en) * 1941-07-23 1944-12-19 Bullard Co Suspension mounting for safety headgear
US2342501A (en) * 1942-01-30 1944-02-22 Albert A Strauss Hat
US2437748A (en) * 1945-06-11 1948-03-16 Chicago Eye Shield Company Adjustable headband construction
US2715227A (en) * 1951-07-30 1955-08-16 Helmets Ltd Helmets
US2786204A (en) * 1954-06-28 1957-03-26 Ray O Vac Co Adjustable suspension for helmets
US2763863A (en) * 1954-06-30 1956-09-25 Fibre Metal Prod Co Head protector cradle attachment
US2758306A (en) * 1954-09-24 1956-08-14 Stephen V Grancsay Helmet suspensions

Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3082428A (en) * 1961-03-06 1963-03-26 Joseph Buegeleisen Company Safety helmet
US3156922A (en) * 1961-12-07 1964-11-17 Sellstrom Mfg Company Cradle attachment for head protective equipment
US3516092A (en) * 1967-11-15 1970-06-23 Bullard Co Head suspension for safety hat
US3706101A (en) * 1970-11-27 1972-12-19 Mario Plastino Head protecting headwear
US3714668A (en) * 1971-02-11 1973-02-06 Angelica Corp Protective helmet
US3696440A (en) * 1971-03-11 1972-10-10 Gay Toys Inc Baseball helmet
US4443892A (en) * 1982-03-30 1984-04-24 Dadant & Sons, Inc. Helmet or hat and support means
US4551858A (en) * 1983-01-28 1985-11-12 Dragerwerk Aktiengesellschaft Protective helmet having a cooling harness
US4744358A (en) * 1984-01-18 1988-05-17 Mcginnis Gerald E Endotracheal tube holder
US5042093A (en) * 1988-10-21 1991-08-27 Comasec International Sa Headgear including an adjustable coif
US5044019A (en) * 1989-09-28 1991-09-03 Biokinetics And Associates Ltd. Helmet restraining device
US20040068208A1 (en) * 1998-09-25 2004-04-08 Cimino William Wayne Surgical system console
US20050071909A1 (en) * 2000-01-18 2005-04-07 Diaz Luis A. Air filtration system including a helmet assembly
US6622311B2 (en) 2000-01-18 2003-09-23 Stryker Instruments Air filtration system including a helmet assembly
US6481019B2 (en) * 2000-01-18 2002-11-19 Stryker Instruments Air filtration system including a helmet assembly
US20050109337A1 (en) * 2000-01-18 2005-05-26 Diaz Luis A. Air filtration system including a helmet assembly
US6973677B2 (en) 2000-01-18 2005-12-13 Stryker Instruments Air filtration system including a helmet assembly
US7200873B2 (en) 2003-07-18 2007-04-10 Depuy Products, Inc. Head gear apparatus having improved air flow arrangement
US20070151002A1 (en) * 2003-07-18 2007-07-05 Depuy Products, Inc. Head gear apparatus having improved air flow arrangement
US20050010992A1 (en) * 2003-07-18 2005-01-20 Conrad Klotz Head gear apparatus
US6990691B2 (en) * 2003-07-18 2006-01-31 Depuy Products, Inc. Head gear apparatus
US20060101557A1 (en) * 2003-07-18 2006-05-18 Depuy Products, Inc. Head gear apparatus having improved air flow arrangement
US7937779B2 (en) 2003-07-18 2011-05-10 Depuy Products Head gear apparatus having improved air flow arrangement
WO2005016047A1 (en) * 2003-08-18 2005-02-24 Hans-Georg Knauer Helmet
US20050060788A1 (en) * 2003-09-23 2005-03-24 Lawrence Green Protective headgear system
US20060213523A1 (en) * 2005-03-24 2006-09-28 Stryker Corporation Personal protection system
US8407818B2 (en) 2005-03-24 2013-04-02 Stryker Corporation Method of manufacturing a hood for use with a personal protection system
US7752682B2 (en) 2005-03-24 2010-07-13 Stryker Corporation Personal protection system including a helmet and a hood, the helmet including a ventilation system that blows air on the neck of the wearer
US20070199136A1 (en) * 2005-12-22 2007-08-30 Brine William H Iii Sport helmet with adjustable liner
US7908678B2 (en) * 2005-12-22 2011-03-22 Brine Iii William H Sport helmet with adjustable liner
WO2008011936A1 (en) * 2006-07-27 2008-01-31 Uvex Sports Gmbh & Co. Kg Protective helmet, particularly bicycle helmet
US7797763B2 (en) * 2006-07-27 2010-09-21 Uvex Sports Gmbh & Co. Kg Protective helmet, especially bicycle helmet
US20090293180A1 (en) * 2006-07-27 2009-12-03 Werner Grau Protective helmet, especially bicycle helmet
US8234722B2 (en) 2007-12-14 2012-08-07 Stryker Corporation Personal protection system with head unit having easy access controls and protective covering having glare avoiding face shield
US20090151054A1 (en) * 2007-12-14 2009-06-18 Stryker Corporation Personal protection system with head unit having easy access controls and protective covering having glare avoiding face shield
US20130191973A1 (en) * 2010-07-13 2013-08-01 Anton Pfanner Interior fitting for a protective helmet, in particular for forestry workers
US20130205477A1 (en) * 2010-07-13 2013-08-15 Anton Pfanner Protective helmet, in particular for forestry workers
US9179728B2 (en) * 2010-07-13 2015-11-10 Pfanner Schutzbekleidung Gmbh Protective helmet, in particular for forestry workers
US9526288B2 (en) * 2010-07-13 2016-12-27 Pfanner Schutzbekleidung Gmbh Interior fitting for a protective helmet, in particular for forestry workers

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