US3020579A - Paint applying apparatus - Google Patents

Paint applying apparatus Download PDF

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US3020579A
US3020579A US77256658A US3020579A US 3020579 A US3020579 A US 3020579A US 77256658 A US77256658 A US 77256658A US 3020579 A US3020579 A US 3020579A
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paint
member
members
sponge
upper
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Donald J O'connor
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Donald J O'connor
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05CAPPARATUS FOR APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05C17/00Hand tools or apparatus using hand held tools, for applying liquids or other fluent materials to, for spreading applied liquids or other fluent materials on, or for partially removing applied liquids or other fluent materials from, surfaces

Description

Feb. 13, 1962 D. J. OCONNOR PAINT APPLYING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. '7, 1958 m m m m 4 9 94 0 94k 9%) DONALD J. ocouuon ATTORNEYS Feb. 13, 1962 D. J. OYCONNOR 3,020,579

PAINT APPLYING APPARATUS Filed Nov. 7, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 F|G.5 F|G.6

I I08 l I06 20 44 20 ms 64 68 FIG. 7

I FR

"6 a: I28 us I I24 I02 W 62 I22 I20 IN VEN TOR. DONALD J. O'CONNOR mm my W ATTORNEYS nitcd States 3,020,579 PAINT APPLYING APPARATUS Donald J. OConnor, East Hartford, Conn. Filed Nov. 7., 1958, Ser. No. 772,566 6 Claims. (Cl. -553) This invention relates to paint applying apparatus of the fountain type wherein paint is supplied to an applicator under pressure and wherein operation of the apparatus is characterized in consequence by the absence of the need for dipping or otherwise manually supplying paint to the applicator.

The general object of the invention is to provide an improved paint applying apparatus of the type mentioned which is adapted for the extremely rapid and yet highly eflicient application of paint to a work surface.

A further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of the type mentioned which includes an improved applicator which is adapted to receive paint sup plied under pressure and to apply the same uniformly over a work surface.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of the type mentioned which includes an improved distributor adapted to supply paint to an applicator in such manner that the paint is evenly distributed over the face of the applicator for uniform application to a work surface.

The drawings show a preferred embodiment of the invention and such embodiment will be described, but it will be understood that various changes may be made from the construction disclosed, and that the drawings and description are not to be construed as defining or limiting the scope of the invention, the claims forming a part of this specification being relied upon for that purpose.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a view showing the paint applying apparatus of the present invention in use.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view showing the paint applying apparatus of FIG. 1 in greater detail.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged perspective view showing only the applicator and distributor of the paint applying apparatus with the parts thereof in exploded relationship.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged plan view of a part of the distributor of the paint applying apparatus taken as indicated by the lines 4-4 in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a vertical transverse section through the applicator and distributor of the paint applying apparatus with a pivotally movable portion of the applicator shown in its normal position.

FIG. 6 is a vertical transverse section similar to FIG. 5 but showing the pivotally movable portion of the applicator in its pivoted position.

FIG. 7 is a vertical transverse section showing an alternative construction of the applicator.

FIG. 8 is a vertical transverse section showing another alternative construction of the applicator of the paint applying apparatus.

It will be observed from FIGS. 1 and 2 that the paint applying apparatus shown is particularly adapted for exterior painting of residence structures or the like. It should be understood at the outset, however, that the invention is not limited to paint applying apparatus par-' ticularly adapted for such purposes. The invention contemplates paint applying apparatus ofmany different sizes and apparatus particularly adapted for a wide variety of types of painting. It should also be understood that the apparatus of the present invention may be utilized for applying coating materials other than paint to work surfaces and may also find utility in the application of washing or cleaning materials to work surfaces.

In general, the paint applying apparatus shown com prises a head indicated generally at It) and which includes an applicator 12 and a distributor 14, an elongatedhandle 16 which supports the head 10, and means for supplying paint under pressure to said head, the last said means comprising means 18 for storing paint under pressure and fluid passageway means for delivering paint from the storage means 18 to the head. The distributor .14 receives the paint under pressure from the said fluid passageway means and distributes the paint evenly substantially through the length of the applicator for application to a work surface. The applicator, in accordance with the invention, includes at least one elongated sponge-like member preferably having a substantially ,fiat face throughout its length and as shown the applicator 12 in-' cludes upper and lower elongated sponge-like members it and 22 each having substantially flat faces throughout their length (FIG. 3). The upper and lower spongelike members 20 and 22 are connected with the distributor 14 and are held in substantially parallel and spaced apart relationship with their faces preferably in a common plane (FIG. 5). When the applicator is so constructed, the distributor 14 evenly distributes the paint substantially throughout the length of the space between the sponge-like members whereby to evenly distribute the paint along the length of the faces of said members for application to a work surface.

The handle 16 is shown as comprising first and second end sections 24 and 2d. The first end section 24 is adapted to support t e applicator 12 and distributor 14 in operative position with the sponge-like members substantially normal to the handle ,centerline and has a swivel attachment with the distributor 3.4 at its upper end. A bracket 28 fixedly secured to the distributor 14 may be adjustably secured to a lug 39 formed at the upper end of the end section 24 by means of a suitable bolt and a wing nut 32. The second end section 26 of the handle is adapted to be held by an operator of the paint applying apparatus and is provided with a suitable hand-grip 34. The handle 16 also comprises at least one and preferably a plurality of intermediate sections 36 which are adapted to be detachably connected'in end-toeend. "relationship with each other and with the end sections 24 and 26. Connecting sleeves (one indicated at 38) are provided for detachably connecting the intermediate sections 36 with each other and with the end sections.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that when .a plurality of intermediate sections 36 or" the handle 16 are provided, the length of said handle may be adjusted as desired. That is, a plurality of intermediate sections of different lengths may be provided and said sections may be interchanged to provide a handle of desired length. Alternatively, a plurality of intermediate sec tions 36 of similar lengths may be provided and diflerent numbers of intermediate sections may be used to provide a handle of a desired length. Thus, in painting a residence structure or the like, a relatively long handle may be provided and a first zone extending around the structure near the top thereof may be painted initially. The

handle may then be shortened and an adjacent zone 6X.

tending around the structure immediately below said first zone may be painted. Thereafter, by periodically shortening the handle 16, successive lower zones may be painted until the sides of the structure have been completely coated with paint.

The aforementioned fluidpassageway means -for delivering paint from a pressurized storage means to the distributor 14 is shown as comprising a plurality of tubes 7 40, 4th. The tubes 40, 4% are adapted to be disposed respectively in grooves 42, 42 which are formed in the end' and intermediate sections of the handle 16 and 'the' said tubes are adapted to be detachably connected together and connected with the distributor 14 when the handle Sections are connected together whereby to form a continuous paint supply tube. A connecting tube 44 is shown extending from the distributor 14 to the tube 40 associated with the first end section 2-.- of the handle 16 and a connecting tube 46 is shown extending from the said tube 40 to the tube 40 associated with the intermediate section 36 of said handle. A second connecting tube 46 (not shown) extends between the tube 48 associated with the intermediate section 36 and the tube 46 associated with the second end section 26 of the handle 16. When there are additional intermediate sections 36, a suitable number of additional tubes 40 and 46 are provided.

The fluid passageway means also comprises a tube 48 extending from the storage means 18 to the tube 40 associated with the end section 26 of the handle 16. Associated with the tube 48 is a manually operable flow control device comprising a valve 56 disposed in the said tube and adapted to be opened andclosed by a push button 52 associated therewith. The valve 50 and its operating button 52 may be of any known or preferred type and description of the detailed construction thereof is not necessary for an understanding of the invention. It will be apparent that when the valve 50 is opened, paint will be allowed to flow from the pressurized storage means 18 through the tube 48 to the tube 40. From the said tube 40 the paint will flow upwardly along the handle through the other tubes 40, 40 and the connecting tubes 46 and 44 to the distributor 14. In operation of the apparatus, the button 52 is depressed periodically to open the valve 50 and to thereby deliver a supply of paint to the applicator 12.

The pressurized paint storage means 18 may take a variety of forms within the scope of the invention. As shown, the said means comprises a container 54 for holding a supply of paint. A small air pump 56 associated with the container 54 is adapted for manual operation and provides a volume of pressurized air within the container which acts on the paint to force the same through the tube 48. The container is also provided with a pair of shoulder-straps 58, 58 so as to be readily carried by an operator of the paint applying apparatus.

The distributor 14 of the paint applying apparatus provides superior distribution of the paint to the applicator 12. That is, the paint is distributed evenly along the length of said applicator so that uniform application of the paint to the work surface is achieved without streaking or other undesirable results. In accordance with the invention, the distributor 14 includes means defining a labyrinth having an inlet port, a series of discharge ports, and a plurality of interconnected passageways disposed between said inlet and discharge ports. The discharge ports are arranged in a series along the length of the applicator to deliver paint thereto and the interconnected passageways are arranged to divide flow from the inlet port into a number of equal fractional parts equal to the number of discharge ports in a series of steps. Each step involves a like proportionate increase in the number of fractional parts of the flow, and, more specifically, each step consists in doubling the number of fractional parts of the flow as will be described hereinbelow.

The preferred construction of the distributor 14 is best illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4. In the said preferred construction, first and second or upper and lower elongated plate-like members 60 and 62 are provided. When upper and lower elongated sponge-like applicator members 20 and 22 are provided, the upper and lower distributor members 60 and 62 are adapted along their front edges to support said sponge-like members 26 and 22 respectively. The upper and lower plate-like members 60 and 62 are further adapted to be detachably connected together and when said members are so connected, the sponge-like members 26 and 22 respectively supported thereon are held in spaced substantially parallel relationship with each other and their faces lie substantially in a common plane. In addition, the members 60 and 62, when connected together, define a labyrinth of the type described above, the inlet port for the labyrinth being disposed at a rear portion of the said plate-like members and the discharge ports thereof being disposed in a series extending along a front edge portion of said members. Paint supplied to the labyrinth inlet port is thus evenly distributed along the length of the space between the upper and lower Sponge-like members 20 and 22 of the applicator 12 and is evenly distributed along the faces of said members for application to a work surface.

The manner in which the plate-like members 60 and 62 are adapted to support the sponge-like members 20 and 22 as well as the manner in which they are adapted to be detachably connected together may be varied widely the scope of the invention. As shown, the lower platelike member 62 has two bolts 64, 64 secured therein and extending upwardly therefrom. The upper plate-like member 60 is provided with two openings 66, 66 which are of suitable size and which are suitably spaced from each other so as to respectively receive the bolts 64, 64. A wing nut 68 is provided for each bolt 64 and when said nuts are tightened on their respective bolts, the members 60 and 62 are firmly clamped together.

As shown, the upper plate-like member 60 has rigidly secured along its front edge an upwardly extending mounting plate 76. The plate 76 has a short rearwardly extending flange 72 formed integrally at each end. The upper sponge-like member 20 has a backing plate 74 which is fixedly secured thereto and which has a rearwardly extending flange 76 formed at each end thereof. The rearwardly extending flanges 72 on the mounting plate 70 and the rearwardly extending flanges 76 on the backing plate 74 are formed respectively with openings 78 and 80. When the backing plate 74 is engaged flatly with the mounting plate 70 on the member 60 the openings 80, 80 in the backing plate flanges 76, 76 register with the openings 78, '78 in the flanges 72, 72. Suitable small bolts (not shown) are entered in the flange openings 78 and S0 for detachably connecting together the plate-like member 60 and the sponge-like member 20.

Detachable connection of the lower sponge-like member 22 with the lower plate-like member 62 is accomplished in a similar manner. A mounting plate 82 rigidly secured along the front edge of the member 62 extends downwardly therefrom and is provided at each end with a rearwardly extending flange 84. The flanges 84, 84 each have an opening 86 formed therein and similar rearwardly extending flanges 88, 88 formed at the ends of a backing plate 94) for the sponge-like member 22 have openings 92, 92 provided therein. The openings 86 and 92 are in register when the sponge-like member 22 is mounted on the plate-like member 62 and are adapted to receive suitable bolts (not shown) which detachably fasten the said members 62 and 22 together.

The manner in which the afore-mentioned labyrinth is defined between the plate-like members 60 and 62 of the distributor when they are connected together may also be varied widely. As shown, the upper plate-like member 60 has a plurality of grooves 94, 94 formed in its lower surface (FIG. 4). The grooves 94, 94 are interconnected and are arranged so that paint supplied to the rearwardmost groove 94a will be successively divided in steps into a plurality of separate and equal flows or streams as it progresses toward the front edge of said member. That is, the paint in the groove 94a is divided into two separate and equal flows in two grooves 94b, 94b. Each of the flows of paint in the grooves 94b, 94b is then divided into two separate flows in a battery of four grooves 94c, 94c. Each of the flows of paint in the grooves 940, 94a is then divided into two separate and equal flows in a battery of eight grooves 94d, 94d. The fiows of paint in the grooves 94d, 94d are each divided again and the divided flows are received in a battery of sixteen grooves 94c, 942. Each of the grooves 94:: is provided with two discharge grooves or ports 96, 96 and the said discharge grooves or ports are arranged in a series along a front edge portion of the lower plate-like member 62 for distributing paint to the applicator 12. It will be apparent from the foregoing that paint supplied to the groove 94a is divided substantially equally among the several discharge grooves or ports 96, 96, the said division being accomplished in a number of steps each consisting in doubling the number of fractional parts of the paint flow. Further, it will be apparent that paint supplied to the groove 94a encounters substantially equal resistance in flowing to any one of the discharge ports or grooves 96, 96. The passageways connecting said grooves or ports with the said groove 94a are obviously substantially equal in length and area and thus offer substantially equal resistance to paint flow. The provision of equal flow from each of said discharge grooves or ports effects a uniform distribution of paint along the length of the applicator 12 as stated.

Paint is supplied to the groove 94a in the upper platelike member 69 through an inlet port 98 which is supplied with paint in turn from an inlet conduit Hit) formed integrally on the upper surface of said member. The aforementioned connecting tube 44 extending between the distributor and the tube 40 in the handle section 24 is connected with the inlet conduit 1% for supplying paint thereto as best illustrated in FIG. 5.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the platelike members 60 and 62. may be connected together as described above to cover the grooves 94 and provide a labyrinth having separate fluid-tight passageways. It is the presently preferred practice to provide a gasket between the members 60 and 62 so that a narrow space may be conveniently provided between said members adjacent their front edges for receiving the paint from the discharge ports 96, 96. It will be seen that the separate flows from said discharge ports will tend to fan out and join together in such a space and will form a substantially uniform an continuous flow along the length of the space. This insures that the paint will not be delivered to the space between the sponge-like members 2t) and 22 in a longitudinal series of separate flows, but will instead be delivered to said space and thence to the faces of said members in a continuous and uniform stream along the length of the members. Streaking and other undesirable characteristics in the coat of paint applied to the work surface Will thus be minimized if not eliminate A gasket 162 is shown in the drawings as being disposed between the plate-like member-s66 and 52. Two similar holes 1%, 1M- in the gasket 162 (E6. 3) are provided for receiving the bolts 64, 6a which extend upwardly from the lower plate-like member 62. The said gasket is shaped to substantially cover all but a front edge portion of the upper surface of the plate-like member 62, said front edge portion of the surface which is not covered by the gasket terminating short of the ends of the plate. As best illustrated in FIG. 5, paint flows from the discharge ports 96, 96 into a narrow space 103 which is defined between the said front edge portion of the upper surface of the plate 62 and an adjacent portion of the lower surface of the plate-like member. 6i? and which is open to the applicator. In the said space the individual flows from said ports fan out and join together to provide the desired uniform continuous flow along the length of the space.

The detailed construction of the applicator 12 of the paint applying apparatus may vary considerably. While the sponge-like member or members of the applicator are preferably formed of plastic foam, other sponge-like materials may be used, the term sponge-like denoting a comparative-ly light, porous and somewhat elastic material which may be characterized as close grained'and of low absorbency. The sizes and shapes chosen for the spongelike members may vary widely as required for particular painting operations. Where two spaced substantially parallel sponge-like members are provided as shown, it is tions be suiiicient to return the upper portion thereof to' its normal position after it has been pivoted rearwardly.

preferred practice to form the members so that theyengage each other at their ends to prevent the endwiseescape of paint from the space therebetween. Thus, in the applicator shown the upper sponge-like member 21 has a clownwardly extending enlargement 165 formed at each end and when said member is held in its operative position relative to the lower sponge-like member 22, the enlargements 1%, 165 engage the upper surface of said lower member and confine the paint to the space between said two members 20 and 22. i

When the paint applying apparatus is particularly adapted for exterior painting of residence structures or the like as shown, the upper sponge-like member 20 of the applicator is preferably adapted for painting both vertical and horizontal surfaces. The member is so adapted to permit the generally horizontal bottom surfaces of clapboards or shingles, as well as their vertical side surfaces, to be readily painted. In FIGS. 5 and 6 of the drawings, it will be observed that the backing plate 74 of the upper sponge-like member 2a does not extend to the top of the rear surface of said member. The backing plate 74 is so constructed to permit an upper portion of the member 20 to be pivoted rearwardly from a lower portion of said member as illustrated in FIG. 6. Thus, the normally vertical face of the member 20 can be transformed to a generally L-shaped cross-sectional configuration and the bottom surfaces of shingles or clapboards can be effectively painted by forcing the member diagonally upwardly into the corners formed between vertically adjacent clapboards or shingles.

It will also be observed in FIGS. 5 and 6 that a biasing means is provided for urging the upper portion of the sponge-like member 2% forwardly to its normal vertical position. Such means are optional as the natural resiliency of the sponge-like member may in some construc- The biasing means shown comprises a pair of leaf springs 106, 106 and a pivotally supported bias plate 108. The plate 188 is pivotally supported on a slender rod 110 (FIG. 3) which is supported at its ends in suitable open- I ings in the flanges 78, 78 which are formed on the mounting plate 7t!- secured to the upper plate-like member 60.

The springs 166, 106 are secured respectively at one end i to the plate-like member 50 as by suitable rivets 112, 112 and their opposite ends engage the bias plate 108- and urge the same forwardly whereby to urge the upper portion of the sponge-like member 29 forwardly to its normal position.

In FIG. 7 an alternative applicator construction is illus trated. An important feature of the alternative applicator construction of FIG. 7 is the provision of an accumulator or reservoir for storing paint delivered to the space between the upper and lower sponge-like members thereof. is provided in the upper surface of the lower sponge-like member of the applicator of FIGS. 5 and 6, it will contract and expand as the member is engaged with and compressed by a work surface and then withdrawn from engagement with the surface. It will be further apparent that paint may be stored in the groove when the applicator is not engaged with a work surface and the said paint will be forced out of the groove and supplied to the faces of the applicator members when the groove contracts upon engagement of the applicator members with a work surface. While the provision of such a simplified type of accumulator or reservoir falls within the scope of It will be apparent that if a longitudinal groove dinal paint storing groove 122 formed in its upper surface which communicates with the groove 118 in the upper member 116. Formed on the upper surface of the lower member 120 adjacent the groove 122 therein is a longitudinal flange 124 which extends upwardly into the groove 118 and which normally engages the front wall of said groove. Another longitudinal flange 126 is formed along the face of the lower sponge-like member 129 and extends outwardly or forwardly therefrom. When the applicator members 116 and 120 are advanced toward a work surface, the flange 126 on the face of the lower member 12il engages the said surface and causes relative movement between the said members 116 and 120, i.e., the member 120 is moved rearwardly relative to the member 116. This results in rearward movement of the flange 124 on the member 120 relative to the front wall of the groove 113 and paint within the grooves 118 and 122 is allowed to fiow forwardly over the said flange and toward the faces of the applicator members. Thus, the flange 124 serves as a movable dam which normally confines the paint within the grooves 118 and 122, but which is moved rearwardly to permit the paint to flow to the faces of the applicator members when said members are advanced into engagement with a work surface.

It will be noted that the upper sponge-like member 116 in the alternative construction of FIG. 7 has an upper portion of reduced thickness 116 with a rounded upper surface. The said upper portion 116 of the member is adapted to be pivoted rearwardly for painting horizontal surfaces and the natural resiliency of the sponge-like member is depended upon for returning the said portion of the member to its normal position.

An additional feature of the alternative applicator construction of FIG. 7 is the provision of longitudinal ribs on the back surfaces of the sponge-like members 116 and 120. A rib 128 formed along the back of the upper sponge-like member 116 is received in a suitable groove 130 formed in a backing plate 132 for the said member. The groove 130 is formed in said backing plate by olfsetting a longitudinal section of the backing plate and the said offset section of the plate 132 is in turn received in a longitudinal groove formed in a mounting plate 134 which is fixedly secured to the front edge portion of the upper distributor member. The lower sponge-like member 118 has a similar longitudinal rib 136 which is entered in a groove 138 defined by an offset portion of a backing plate 149 for the said member. The offset portion of the backing plate 140 is received in a suitable groove in a mounting plate 142 supported on the front edge portion of the lower distributor member. It will be seen that the provision of the ribs on the sponge-like members and the construction of the backing plates and mounting plates in the manner described results in added rigidity of the connection of the sponge-like members with the distributor. In addition, leakage of the paint downwardly between the backing plate 140 and the mounting plate 142 associated with the lower sponge-like member 120 is prevented when the applicator is so constructed.

In FIG. 8 another alternative construction of an applicator is illustrated. An upper sponge-like member 144 of the applicator shown therein is of substantially the same construction as the upper sponge-like member 116 of FIG. 7, the rib 128 of the said member 116, however, being eliminated in the construction of the member 144. The construction of a lower sponge-like member 146 corresponds similarly to the construction of the lower spongelike member 120 with one additional difference. Said additional difference arises from the provision in the upper surface of the sponge-like member 146 of two longitudinal grooves 148, 143. The longitudinal grooves 148, 148 are disposed in the upper surface of the member 146 between a flange or dam 150 and the face of said member and serve as secondary paint accumulators or reservoirs. As paint flows forwardly over the dam toward the faces of the sponge-like members, it collects in the grooves 146 and when the said grooves have been filled, the paint proceeds to the faces of the members. When the members 144 and 146 are withdrawn from a work surface, the size of the grooves 148, 148 will be increased and any paint which is located between the dam and the faces of the members 144 and 146 will be collected in said grooves and will be prevented from flowing to the faces of the members and possibly dripping therefrom.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that a paint applying apparatus has been provided which is capable of extremely rapid and yet highly eflicient application of paint to a work surface. With the applicator and distributor constructions described, a relatively long head may be provided so that a comparatively large work surface area may be painted with each stroke and the paint will yet be applied uniformly to the work surface without streaking or other undesirable results. In addition, and as mentioned previously, apparatus embodying the invention has general utility and may be used to advantage in a wide variety of work surface treating operations other than painting.

The invention claimed is:

l. A paint applying apparatus comprising an applicator which includes an upper elongated close grained spongelike member of low absorbency having a generally flat face and a lower elongated close grained sponge-like member of low absorbency disposed in spaced parallel relationship with said upper member and having a generally flat face extending approximately in a common plane with the face of said upper member, said lower member also having a groove running lengthwise in its upper surface which holds a supply of paint when the member is out of engagement with a work surface and which can be contracted to deliver said paint to a work surface when said member is in engagement with and is compressed by a work surface, a distributor connected with the applicator and provided with a paint inlet and a plurality of distributing passageways connected with said inlet to conduct paint therefrom to the space between said sponge-lilre members, said passageways being arranged to discharge paint substantially throughout the length of said space and the resistance to paint flow offered by said passageways being substantially equal so as to provide for substantially equal paint ilow therethrough and a uniform distribution of paint along the length of said space and said groove, an elongated handle supporting the applicator and distributor in operative positions with the elongated sponge-like members of the applicator substantially normal to the handle ccnterline, and means for supplying paint under pressure to the distributor inlet including a manually operable flow control device.

2. A paint applying apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein the upper sponge-like member of the applicator is provided with a groove running lengthwise along its bottom surface which communicates with the groove in the lower sponge-like member, and wherein one of said sponge-like members is provided with a first longitudinal flange on its face and with a second longitudinal flange which is located adjacent its groove and which projects into the groove in the other of said sponge-like members and normally engages the front wall thereof whereby to serve as a dam and to prevent flow from said two grooves when the sponge-like members are not engaged with a work surface, said first flange serving to effect relative movement betwen said sponge-like members when said members are engaged with a work surface and to move said second flange rearwardly away from the said front wall of the groove in said other sponge-like member whereby to permit paint to flow from said two grooves adjacent said front wall to the work surface.

3. A paint applying apparatus as set forth in claim 2 wherein at least one longitudinal groove is provided in the upper surface of the lower sponge-like member in addition to the first-mentioned longitudinal groove therein, said additional groove being disposed between the face of the member and the longitudinal flange which serves as a dam.

4. A paint applying apparatus comprising an applicator which includes elongated upper and lower close grained sponge-like members of low absorbency having generally flat faces, a distributor including upper and lower elongated plate-like members detachably connected together and respectively supporting along their front edges said upper and lower sponge-like members in substantially parallel spaced relation with their faces disposed approximately in a common plane, said upper plate-like member having a plurality of grooves formed therein in its lower surface and said lower plate-like member having a substantially flat upper surface whereby said two surfaces cooperate to define a labyrinth, said labyrinth having an inlet port for receiving a flow of paint under pressure and having a series of discharge ports extending adjacent the space between said sponge-like members for distributing the paint evenly throughout the length of said space, the resistance to paint flow in said labyrinth between said inlet port and each of said discharge ports being sub stantially equal, an elongated handle fixedly holding said distributor with said sponge-like members substantially normal to the handle centerline, and means for supplying paint under pressure to the labyrinth inlet port in the distributor including a manually operable flow control device.

5. A paint applying apparatus comprising an applicator which includes elongated lower and upper close grained sponge-like members of low absorbency having generally flat faces, a substantially flat lower distributor plate supporting along its front edge portion said lower spongelike member of the applicator, a gasket supported on the upper surface of said lower plate and substantially covering all but a longitudinally extending front edge portion of said surface which portion terminates short of the ends of the plate, a substantially flat upper distributor plate supporting along its front edge portion the upper sponge-like member of the applicator and detachably connected with said lower plate and gasket, said upper plate having a plurality of grooves provided in its lower surface which form with said gasket a labyrinth having an inlet port for receiving a flow of paint under pressure and having a series of discharge ports extending adjacent said uncovered front edge portion of the lower plate surface for distributing the paint to said sponge-like members, the resistance to paint flow in said labyrinth between said inlet port and each of said discharge ports being substantially equal, an elongated handle fixedly holding said upper and lower distributor plates with said sponge-like members substantially normal to the handle centerline, and means for supplying paint under pressure to said labyrinth inlet port including a manually operable flow control device.

6. A paint applying apparatus comprising an applicator which includes elongated lower and upper close grained sponge-like members of low absorbency having general ly flat faces, a substantially flat lower distributor plate detachably holding along its front edge portion said lower sponge-like member of the applicator, a gasket adapted to be supported on the upper surface of said lower plate and substantially covering all but a front edge portion of said surface which portion terminates short of the ends of the plate, a substantially fiat upper distributor plate detachably holding along its front edge portion said upper sponge-like member of the applicator and detachably connected with said lower plate and gasket, said upper plate having a plurality of grooves provided in its lower surface which form with said gasket a labyrinth having an inlet port for receiving a flow of paint under pressure and having a series of discharge ports extending adjacent said uncovered front edge portion of the lower plate surface for distributing the paint to said sponge-like members, the resistance to paint flow in said labyrinth between said inlet port and each of said discharge ports being substantially equal, an elongated handle fixedly holding said upper and lower distributor plates with said sponge-like members substantially normal to the handle centerline, and means for supplying paint under pressure to said labyrinth inlet port including a manually operable flow control device.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 420,035 Dixon et al. Jan. 28, 1890 467,778 Clair Jan. 26, 1892 753,125 Cooper Feb. 23, 1904 1,254,429 Parmeley Jan. 22, 1918 1,409,259 Sykora Mar. 14, 1922 1,498,246 Spencer June 17, 1924 1,887,447 Balinger Nov. 8, 1932 1,899,392 Larkin Feb. 28, 1933 2,070,206 Hudson Feb. 9 1937 2,286,944 Altland June 16, 1942 2,647,273 Eagle Aug. 4, 1953 2,678,458 Vosbikian et al May 18, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 5,953 Great Britain May 3, 1886

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Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3135005A (en) * 1961-08-31 1964-06-02 Henry E Karkut Inc Combined paint pump and roller applicator
US3331093A (en) * 1964-11-12 1967-07-18 Theresa E Mayden Pressurized paint supply assembly with extension applicator
US3363279A (en) * 1966-02-15 1968-01-16 Sylvester R. Bright Jr. Mortar joint painter
US3580008A (en) * 1969-04-24 1971-05-25 Whirlpool Co Icemaker with water distributor
US3690779A (en) * 1970-10-08 1972-09-12 Bastt Rollr Inc Wipe-on paint applicator with pressurized feed
US3776645A (en) * 1972-09-13 1973-12-04 H Walker Pressurized continuous flow liquid applicator with shut-off valve
US3989388A (en) * 1975-09-17 1976-11-02 Sparr Sr Anders V Fountain-type pipe cleaning brush
DE3335252A1 (en) * 1982-10-07 1984-04-12 Johannes Zimmer Device for the uniform or regular distribution of flowable media in a predetermined width
FR2557816A1 (en) * 1984-01-06 1985-07-12 Bouyer Jean Michel Device for applying a liquid onto a surface
US4550681A (en) * 1982-10-07 1985-11-05 Johannes Zimmer Applicator for uniformly distributing a flowable material over a receiving surface
US4552477A (en) * 1978-08-09 1985-11-12 Black & Decker Inc. Apparatus for feeding a liquid to an applicator
FR2564752A1 (en) * 1984-05-25 1985-11-29 Stern Donald Apparatus paint and method for delivering a liquid, especially paint, from a source of supply has an application support, wall, ceiling or the like
US4572435A (en) * 1984-05-30 1986-02-25 Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation Foamable liquid distributing means
US4684551A (en) * 1986-02-06 1987-08-04 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Thixotropic material coating apparatus, distributor device and method
US4722625A (en) * 1985-09-26 1988-02-02 Triune Automated Painting Systems Remote control device for powered painting system
US4822194A (en) * 1987-02-27 1989-04-18 Power Flo Products Corp. Applicator head
US4981384A (en) * 1984-09-27 1991-01-01 Taiyo, Ltd. Applicator
US5133105A (en) * 1991-06-24 1992-07-28 Ingersoll-Rand Company "V" filter cleaning lance
US5248089A (en) * 1988-08-15 1993-09-28 Wagner Spray Tech Corporation Combination carrying case/paint container
US5334247A (en) * 1991-07-25 1994-08-02 Eastman Kodak Company Coater design for low flowrate coating applications
US5441204A (en) * 1993-06-10 1995-08-15 United Air Specialists, Inc. Electrostatic fluid distribution nozzle
US5454656A (en) * 1994-05-02 1995-10-03 Rowe; Richard A. Paint pad assemblies with a pump supplied reservoir
US6340122B1 (en) * 1998-06-18 2002-01-22 Casco A/S Spreader for spreading a fluid, such as an adhesive
US20030197027A1 (en) * 2002-04-23 2003-10-23 3M Innovative Properties Company Mop handle assembly adapted to dispense liquid
US20050117959A1 (en) * 2003-09-23 2005-06-02 Master Stroke Tools, Inc. Paint cartridge edger and spreader
WO2005095001A1 (en) 2004-04-02 2005-10-13 Wladimir Janssen Efficient and flexible multi spray electrostatic deposition system
US20070131109A1 (en) * 2005-12-08 2007-06-14 Bruggeman Daniel J Airless sprayer with hardened cylinder
US20070269254A1 (en) * 2006-05-05 2007-11-22 Root-Lowell Manufacturing Company Stain and sealant applicator
US20090107579A1 (en) * 2007-10-26 2009-04-30 Smith Robin E Loading system
US7540380B2 (en) 2005-07-25 2009-06-02 Diversified Dynamics Corporation Roller rest enclosure
US7556447B2 (en) 2005-07-25 2009-07-07 Diversified Dynamics Corporation Metered twist paint stick
US20100200108A1 (en) * 2007-06-14 2010-08-12 Akzo Nobel Coatings International B.V. Paint dispensing nozzle arrangement
WO2014117823A1 (en) * 2013-01-29 2014-08-07 Hewlett-Packard Indigo B.V. Fluid distribution circuits
US9266139B2 (en) 2012-07-10 2016-02-23 Diversified Dynamics Corp. Paint/stain stick pad with roller/pad applicator
US9486063B2 (en) * 2015-02-27 2016-11-08 Jose Roman Paint application assembly
EP2210925A3 (en) * 2009-01-21 2018-01-10 Rohm and Haas Company Light touch sealant applicator device

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US420035A (en) * 1890-01-28 Fountain scrubbing-brush
US467778A (en) * 1892-01-26 Brush
US753125A (en) * 1904-02-23 Painting-brush
US1254429A (en) * 1916-03-30 1918-01-22 Charles H Parmeley Automatic painting apparatus.
US1409259A (en) * 1920-02-11 1922-03-14 Sykora Rudolf Fluid-distributing nozzle
US1498246A (en) * 1922-10-28 1924-06-17 Floyd L Spencer Washing apparatus
US1887447A (en) * 1932-09-17 1932-11-08 William J Wesseler Cleaning device
US1899392A (en) * 1931-05-11 1933-02-28 Larkin Specialty Mfg Co Floor wax applicator
US2070206A (en) * 1934-11-13 1937-02-09 Hudson Joseph Edward Method of and apparatus for supplying ink to printing presses
US2286944A (en) * 1941-05-23 1942-06-16 Altland Ernest Mop
US2647273A (en) * 1949-11-02 1953-08-04 Pennie S Eagle Liquid applicator
US2678458A (en) * 1949-05-04 1954-05-18 Peter S Vosbikian Mop with detachable brush

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US420035A (en) * 1890-01-28 Fountain scrubbing-brush
US467778A (en) * 1892-01-26 Brush
US753125A (en) * 1904-02-23 Painting-brush
US1254429A (en) * 1916-03-30 1918-01-22 Charles H Parmeley Automatic painting apparatus.
US1409259A (en) * 1920-02-11 1922-03-14 Sykora Rudolf Fluid-distributing nozzle
US1498246A (en) * 1922-10-28 1924-06-17 Floyd L Spencer Washing apparatus
US1899392A (en) * 1931-05-11 1933-02-28 Larkin Specialty Mfg Co Floor wax applicator
US1887447A (en) * 1932-09-17 1932-11-08 William J Wesseler Cleaning device
US2070206A (en) * 1934-11-13 1937-02-09 Hudson Joseph Edward Method of and apparatus for supplying ink to printing presses
US2286944A (en) * 1941-05-23 1942-06-16 Altland Ernest Mop
US2678458A (en) * 1949-05-04 1954-05-18 Peter S Vosbikian Mop with detachable brush
US2647273A (en) * 1949-11-02 1953-08-04 Pennie S Eagle Liquid applicator

Cited By (45)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3135005A (en) * 1961-08-31 1964-06-02 Henry E Karkut Inc Combined paint pump and roller applicator
US3331093A (en) * 1964-11-12 1967-07-18 Theresa E Mayden Pressurized paint supply assembly with extension applicator
US3363279A (en) * 1966-02-15 1968-01-16 Sylvester R. Bright Jr. Mortar joint painter
US3580008A (en) * 1969-04-24 1971-05-25 Whirlpool Co Icemaker with water distributor
US3690779A (en) * 1970-10-08 1972-09-12 Bastt Rollr Inc Wipe-on paint applicator with pressurized feed
US3776645A (en) * 1972-09-13 1973-12-04 H Walker Pressurized continuous flow liquid applicator with shut-off valve
US3989388A (en) * 1975-09-17 1976-11-02 Sparr Sr Anders V Fountain-type pipe cleaning brush
US4552477A (en) * 1978-08-09 1985-11-12 Black & Decker Inc. Apparatus for feeding a liquid to an applicator
DE3335252A1 (en) * 1982-10-07 1984-04-12 Johannes Zimmer Device for the uniform or regular distribution of flowable media in a predetermined width
US4550681A (en) * 1982-10-07 1985-11-05 Johannes Zimmer Applicator for uniformly distributing a flowable material over a receiving surface
FR2557816A1 (en) * 1984-01-06 1985-07-12 Bouyer Jean Michel Device for applying a liquid onto a surface
US4639156A (en) * 1984-05-25 1987-01-27 Stern Donald J Painting apparatus and method
WO1985005574A2 (en) * 1984-05-25 1985-12-19 Stern Donald J Painting apparatus and method
WO1985005574A3 (en) * 1984-05-25 1986-01-16 Donald J Stern Painting apparatus and method
FR2564752A1 (en) * 1984-05-25 1985-11-29 Stern Donald Apparatus paint and method for delivering a liquid, especially paint, from a source of supply has an application support, wall, ceiling or the like
US4572435A (en) * 1984-05-30 1986-02-25 Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation Foamable liquid distributing means
US4981384A (en) * 1984-09-27 1991-01-01 Taiyo, Ltd. Applicator
US4722625A (en) * 1985-09-26 1988-02-02 Triune Automated Painting Systems Remote control device for powered painting system
US4684551A (en) * 1986-02-06 1987-08-04 E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And Company Thixotropic material coating apparatus, distributor device and method
US4822194A (en) * 1987-02-27 1989-04-18 Power Flo Products Corp. Applicator head
US5248089A (en) * 1988-08-15 1993-09-28 Wagner Spray Tech Corporation Combination carrying case/paint container
US5133105A (en) * 1991-06-24 1992-07-28 Ingersoll-Rand Company "V" filter cleaning lance
US5334247A (en) * 1991-07-25 1994-08-02 Eastman Kodak Company Coater design for low flowrate coating applications
US5441204A (en) * 1993-06-10 1995-08-15 United Air Specialists, Inc. Electrostatic fluid distribution nozzle
US5454656A (en) * 1994-05-02 1995-10-03 Rowe; Richard A. Paint pad assemblies with a pump supplied reservoir
US6340122B1 (en) * 1998-06-18 2002-01-22 Casco A/S Spreader for spreading a fluid, such as an adhesive
US20030197027A1 (en) * 2002-04-23 2003-10-23 3M Innovative Properties Company Mop handle assembly adapted to dispense liquid
US20050117959A1 (en) * 2003-09-23 2005-06-02 Master Stroke Tools, Inc. Paint cartridge edger and spreader
US7306389B2 (en) 2003-09-23 2007-12-11 Master Stroke Tools, Inc. Paint cartridge edger and spreader
WO2005095001A1 (en) 2004-04-02 2005-10-13 Wladimir Janssen Efficient and flexible multi spray electrostatic deposition system
US20080067269A1 (en) * 2004-04-02 2008-03-20 Wladimir Janssen Efficient and Flexible Multi Spray Electrostatic System
US7845307B2 (en) 2004-04-02 2010-12-07 Wladimir Janssen Efficient and flexible multi spray electrostatic deposition system
US7540380B2 (en) 2005-07-25 2009-06-02 Diversified Dynamics Corporation Roller rest enclosure
US7556447B2 (en) 2005-07-25 2009-07-07 Diversified Dynamics Corporation Metered twist paint stick
US7347136B2 (en) 2005-12-08 2008-03-25 Diversified Dynamics Corporation Airless sprayer with hardened cylinder
US20070131109A1 (en) * 2005-12-08 2007-06-14 Bruggeman Daniel J Airless sprayer with hardened cylinder
US7891900B2 (en) 2006-05-05 2011-02-22 Clarke Michael T Stain and sealant applicator
US20070269254A1 (en) * 2006-05-05 2007-11-22 Root-Lowell Manufacturing Company Stain and sealant applicator
US20100200108A1 (en) * 2007-06-14 2010-08-12 Akzo Nobel Coatings International B.V. Paint dispensing nozzle arrangement
US8863787B2 (en) * 2007-06-14 2014-10-21 Akzo Nobel Coatings International B.V. Paint dispensing nozzle arrangement
US20090107579A1 (en) * 2007-10-26 2009-04-30 Smith Robin E Loading system
EP2210925A3 (en) * 2009-01-21 2018-01-10 Rohm and Haas Company Light touch sealant applicator device
US9266139B2 (en) 2012-07-10 2016-02-23 Diversified Dynamics Corp. Paint/stain stick pad with roller/pad applicator
WO2014117823A1 (en) * 2013-01-29 2014-08-07 Hewlett-Packard Indigo B.V. Fluid distribution circuits
US9486063B2 (en) * 2015-02-27 2016-11-08 Jose Roman Paint application assembly

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