US3016858A - Sail boat safety device - Google Patents

Sail boat safety device Download PDF

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US3016858A
US3016858A US18007A US1800760A US3016858A US 3016858 A US3016858 A US 3016858A US 18007 A US18007 A US 18007A US 1800760 A US1800760 A US 1800760A US 3016858 A US3016858 A US 3016858A
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bag
pressure vessel
valve
plug
boat
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US18007A
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Robert F Johnson
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ROBERT MARK JOHNSON
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ROBERT MARK JOHNSON
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B43/00Improving safety of vessels, e.g. damage control, not otherwise provided for
    • B63B43/02Improving safety of vessels, e.g. damage control, not otherwise provided for reducing risk of capsizing or sinking
    • B63B43/10Improving safety of vessels, e.g. damage control, not otherwise provided for reducing risk of capsizing or sinking by improving buoyancy
    • B63B43/14Improving safety of vessels, e.g. damage control, not otherwise provided for reducing risk of capsizing or sinking by improving buoyancy using outboard floating members

Description

R. F. JOHNSON 3,016,858

SAIL BOAT SAFETY DEVICE Filed March 28, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jan. 16, 1962 Filed March 28, 1960 R.FJOHNSON SAIL BOAT SAFETY DEVICE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 -42 fly. M. 52

Bab /f I fan/2.10m Q 9" Jan. 16, 1962 R. F. JOHNSQN 3,016,858

SAIL BOAT SAFETY DEVICE Filed March 28, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Haber) Ely/H710 Jan. 16, 9 R. F. JOHNSON 3,016,858

SAIL BOAT SAFETY DEVICE Filed March 28, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 1-7 .17. g g, r

Jan. 16, 1962 Filed March 28, 1960 R. F. JOHNSON SAIL BOAT SAFETY DEVICE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Fl 2 fil m z a 4 Raberf f. fa/m on United States Patent Ofiice 3,015,858 Patented Jan. 16, 1962 3,916,858 SAIL BOAT SAFETY DEVICE Rohert F. Johnson, Las Vegas, Nev., assignor to Robert Mark Johnson, Las Vegas, Nev. Filed Mar. 28, 1960, Ser. No. 18,007 7 Claims. (Cl. 114-351) This application is a continuation in part of my application for Letters Patent for a Sail Boat Safety Device, filed December 7, 1959, Ser. No. 857,756, now abandoned.

My invention relates to safety devices for sail boats. The principal objective is to resist the capsizing of the sail boat. Other objectives will appear as the specification is proceeded with.

Sail boats require wind for their operation. However, too much wind can cause them to capsize. This is especially true of the catamaran type.

In 1912 Patent No. 1,026,336 was issued to one William H. Williams which shows the use of flotation tanks mounted on the mast head, the idea being that the tanks would provide buoyancy when the mast head hit the Water and thus prevent the boat from turning upside down.

Today boats are sailed for pleasure and everything possible is usually done to take advantage of any wind. Speed appears to be of the essence and flotation tanks of any useful size mounted on the mast head would greatly retard the movement of the boat, although they might fulfill their objective should the mast head hit the water.

In my device the objective of Williams flotation tanks is met without creating any additional resistance to the movement of the boat.

How this objective is accomplished is illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 of the drawings shows an elevation of the in flatable bag in place at the mast head; FIG. 2 is a vertical section showing a movable pressure vessel within the bag support; FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical section of the plug shown in FIG. 2; FIG. 4 shows the diaphragm puncturing means; FIG. 5 shows an enlarged guide wheel for the movable pressure vessel; FIG. 6 shows the bag core threadedly connected to the rigging support; FIG. 7 shows the bag core secured to the rigging support with screws; FIG. 8 shows an attachment to the rigging support whereby the bag may be inflated or deflated; FIG. 9 shows a vertical section through a stationary type of pressure vessel; FIG. 10 is an enlarged vertical section of the diaphragm and puncturing means shown in FIG. 9; FIG. 11 is a plan View of a crane type of rigging sup port; FIG. 12 is an elevation of the vertical leg type of rigging support shown in FIG. 11; FIG. 13 is an elevationpartly in section-of a short coupled vertical leg type of rigging support; FIG. 14 is an elevation of the opposite-port or starboard-side of the rigging support shown in FIG. 13; FIG. 15 is an elevation of a stationary pressure vessel with a solenoid-operated valve of the Kidde type; FIG. 16 is a diagram showing the solenoid circuit and the CO line from the pressure vessel to the inflatable bag; FIG. 17 is an elevation of a mechanically operated valve; FIG. 18 shows a partial elevation of the same means from the opposite quarter; FIG. 19 shows a vertical section through a Kidde type of valve; FIG. 20 is an elevation of a stationary pressure vessel whose valve is operated by disintegrating a plug to release the tension stored up in a spring; FIG. 21 is an elevation of the same arrangement but from the opposite quarter; FIG. 22 is a diagrammatic elevation of a catamaran heeled over; FIG. 23 is an elevation showing a method of attaching the bag support to an old boat; FIG. 24 shows the same elevation wherein hook bolts are used to secure the support to the old boat ring.

Basically my safety device D includes six principal elements, namely: the mast head or rigging support 2 which is mounted on the mast head 1, a. support or core 3 supported by and above said cap, an inflatable bag 4 fitting the core 3 when not inflated, a pressure vessel 5 having an expansive medium within, means as 6 to release the expansive medium into the bag automatically at a predetermined time, and means as 7 to deflate the bag.

In any event the un-inflated bag 4 is only slightly larger in diameter than the mast head 1 and hence presents a minimum of resistance to the wind which is some thing all sail boat owners strive for.

The mast head cap or rigging support 2 of my safety device D may be formed in several ways, several of which are shown.

FIG. 2 shows the use of two hollow cylindrical Shells 8 and 9 separated by the diaphragm 10. The lower shell 9 is made a snug fit over the mast head 1 and the upper shell 8 is threaded for the reception of the lower end of the hollow cylindrical support or core 3 for the inflatable bag 4. Apertured rigging lugs 11 are provided on the four sides of the cylindrical shell 9 as shown.

Most sail boats, particularly the smaller ones, use a ring at the mast head provided with lugs to which the rigging is attached. My safety device may be readily attached to boats already in use by tacking (weld) the members 8 and 10 to the ring R shown dotted in FIG. 23, or extending the diaphragm member 10 beyond the upper shell 8, as shown in FIG. 24, so that hook bolts as 12 may be used to make the attachment.

In FIGS. 11 to 14 the lower cylindrical shell 9 is dispensed with and is superseded by the vertical leg 13 disposed beneath the diaphragm 10 in a fore and aft direction. In the larger boats, where more sail clearance is required, this vertical leg 13 may be extended as shown in FIGS. 11 and 12 and stiffened by the flange 14. Rigging apertures 15 are provided at the leg extremities and apertured rigging lugs 16 are shown on the upper cylindrical shell 8 as shown in FIGS, 13 and 14.

From the lower edge of the vertical leg 13 extend the spaced lugs 17 disposed to bear tight against the opposite sides of the ferrule 18 which surrounds the mast head 1. To install this type of mast head cap or rigging support 2 a slot 19 is cut in the mast head 1 to snugly receive the vertical leg 13. The bolt 20 serves to clamp together the two portions 21 of the bifurcated mast head 1 with the vertical leg 13 of the mast head cap or rigging support 2 therebetween.

The use of standard aluminum pipe is preferred with the arrangement shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 wherein the pressure vessel 5 is positioned adjacent the mast head 1 and within the bag support or core 3 which is shown threaded into the mast head cap 2 and provided with oppositely disposed keyseats 22 cut in its interior wall for the reception of the guide wheels 23 disposed on each end of the pressure vessel 5. Where pipe is used for the bag core 3 a cast hemispherical head 24 is welded to the top end thereof. However, since C0 creates a pressure of 838# p.s.i. the pressure vessel 5 should be made of aluminum alloy 6061-T6 in order to comply with ASME and State codes. The use of aluminum is preferred for the core 3 and the pressure vessel 5 because of Weight which creates considerable leverage on the mast 1A when the boat or catamaran heels over to 45 degrees or more.

In the bottom head 25 of the pressure vessel 5 is po sitioned the check valve 26 through which the pressure vessel 5 is charged. A cap 27 is provided as a guard against leakage through the check valve.

The head 28 on the discharge end of the pressure vessel 5 is tapped for the reception of the plug 29 formed to bear against the puncturable diaphragm 30 as shown in smaess FIGS. 2 and 3. The plug 29 is provided with a bore 31 and has its outer end 32 squared for the reception of a wrench (not shown) whereby said plug 29 may be tight.- ened against the diaphragm 30. This bore 31 is in alignment with the bore 33 formed in the head 28. The perforations 34 in the outer end of the plug 29 permit the escape of CO from the pressure vessel when the end of the plug 29 is in contact with the boss 35 formed on the hemispherical head 24 of the bag support 3. This boss 35 serves as a stop to limit the travel of the pressure vessel 5 within the bag core 3. It also mounts the diaphragm puncturing means 36 which is receivable in the bore 31 of the plug 29 when the outer end 29A of the plug 29 comes into contact with the boss 35 at which time the needle-chisel point 36A will have passed through the diaphragm thus liberating CO into the bag support or core 3 from whence it passes through the perforations 37 in said core 3 into the bag 4 inflating it.

When the catamaran C heels over until the mast head 1 touches the water W, as shown in FIG. 22, the included angle A between the mast 1A and the water W will approximate 15 degrees. As a consequence the pressure vessel 5 will be inclined accordingly and will roll down ward on its wheels 23 until the end 29A or" the plug 29 contacts the boss on the hemispherical head 24 on the bag core 3 at which time the diaphragm puncturing means 36 will have come into play. The operation is automatic.

Nylon makes a strong diaphragm 30 but it should be designed for the pressure against it and it follows that the weight of the pressure vessel should be sufiicient to permit the needle-chisel point 36A to puncture it.

It is the practice of commercial companies to fill their tanks two-thirds full of liquid CO thus leaving the rest of the tank to be occupied with gas which creates within the tank a pressure of 838# p.s.i. at 70 degrees F.

This practice has been followed in determining the size of the pressure vessel 5 and in its charging. 8.7 cubic feet of gas will be provided by l# of liquid CO at 75 degrees F. and atmospheric pressure. It follows that an inflated bag of one cubic foot will displace one cubic foot of water, and each cubic foot of water displaced will provide an upward reaction, so as to speak, of 62.4#.

The bag 4 shown in FIG. 1 will assume the shape of a sphere when inflated.

The bag 4 is preferably made of neoprene since sunlight has a deleterious effect on natural rubber. However, natural rubber has better elongation and when treated with Hypalon its life is greatly increased.

When inflated the pressure Within the bag will vary from 0.5 to 1.5# above atmospheric pressure depending upon the type and thickness of rubber used. The thickness of the bag 4 may vary from 0.050 to 0.125". It is pointed out that when either natural or synthetic rubber is repeatedly stretched or stretched beyond its elastic limit it does not come back to its original size and shape. However, when the bag 4 is not stretched beyond its elastic limit it has a tendency to hug closely the core 3 when the bag 4 is deflated. This is very desirable and is one of my objectives.

In FIG. 9 the supply line 38 from the pressure vessel 5 is connected to the mast head cap or rigging support at any suitable point. By providing the valves 39 and 40 in the supply line 38 this line may be used to deflate the bag 4 by closing the valve 39 and opening the valve 40. At all other times the valve 39 remains open and the valve 40 remains closed.

It is to be noted at this point that where threaded and keyseated bag cores are not involved or required plain spun cores as 41 shown in FIG. 7 are preferable because they are cheaper and lighter in weight.

The diaphragm puncturing means 36 shown in FIG. 2 is exterior of the pressure vessel 5 while in FIG. 9 the diaphragm puncturing means are within the pressure vessel 41. This pressure vessel 41 includes a piece of suitable tubing 42 sealed at both ends by the Welded-in heads 43 and 44. The bottom head 43 is provided with a check valve 26 and a cap 27 through which CO may be introduced into the pressure vessel 41. The outer portion of the top head 44 is tapped for the reception of the plug 45 which holds the diaphragm 46 in place in the counterbore 47 in the top head 44, said counterbore having connection with the interior of the pressure vessel through the passages 48. The plug 45 is tapped for the reception of the pipe fitting 49 which connects with the passage 56 in said plug. This pipe fitting 49 is adapted to receive one end of the copper tubing supply line 38 which connects with the mast head cap 2.

It is quite apparent that when the stationary pressure vessel 41 is employed and connected to the mast head cap 2 the movable pressure vessel 5 is omitted from the core 3.

In practice the stationary vessel 41 may be placed in any convenient place either above or below the deck (not shown). In any event it will follow the inclination of the mast 1A. When the mast head 1 touches the water W the ball 51 rolls downwardly within the pressure vessel 41 into contact with the diaphragm puncturing pin 52 foreing it through the diaphragm 46 thus permitting CO within the vessel 41 to flow out through the passages 48, the passage 50 in the plug 45, into the copper tubing 38 from which it flows into the bag core 3 and out through the perforations 37 therein into the bag 4 inflating it.

At this point note is made that only suflicient CO is provided in the pressure vessel used to produce the gas required to inflate the size bag desired, taking into consideration besides temperature and pressure, the bag size, material, and thickness.

Since CO and other expansive mediums are used for many purposes, standard containers of various sizes have been developed for them. One of these, as 53, is shown in FIG. 15 to which a standard solenoid-operated Kidde CO dispensing valve K is attached which comprises the valve proper 54 and the solenoid 55 for its operation. A section through this valve 54 is shown in FIG. 19. Incidentally the valve 54 may be operated mechanically in many ways, for instance, as shown in FIGS. 17 and 18. Whether operated by a solenoid or mechanically the stem 56 is depressed thus lowering the plug 57 thereon from its seat 58 to permit CO from the container 53 to pass between the plug 57 and its seat 58 to the valve opening 59. The opening 59 is connected to a standard Imperial 3-way valve 60 in which the flow is from any one side of the line to the branch. In other words, the CO from the container 53 may pass directly to the mast head cap or rigging support 2 through the copper tubing 38 connected to the branch 61 of the 3-way valve 60, or an inflated bag 4 may be deflated through the branch 61 and the valve line opening 62. The container may be charged through the branch 61 and the line opening 63. When charging the container 53 the solenoid core (not shown) is held down by the screw 64 so that the plug 57 is removed from its seat 58 to permit CO to flow between the seat and plug into the container. When the plug stem 56 is free from pressure applied downwardly the plug 57 is held tight against its seat 58 by the pressure applied by the coil spring 65 beneath it.

The two mechanisms heretofore described come into action when the boat or catamaran C has heeled over more than 90 degrees. However, the boat owner might desire that the bag 4 of the safety device D be inflated when the mast 1A is at an inclination of say degrees. His desire may be fulfilled especially when a solenoidoperated valve is used. Since the solenoid is energized by an electric current, as from a battery 66, only at a predetermined time, Honeywell mercury switches 67 are employed in the circuit 68 as shown in FIG. 16. These switches 67 are set an an angle from the center line of the container 53, which incidentally coincides,

with the center line of the mast 1A, so that they close the circuit 68 when the mast 1A is at an angle of 80 degrees. It is deemed unnecessary to show or describe these well known switches other than to say that a pool of mercury connects or disconnects the terminals upon the tilting of the switch.

The advantages of the solenoid-operated device illustrated in FIG. 15 may be had with the mechanicallyoperated device illustrated in FIGS. 17 and 18 whose description follows. The same mast head cap, bag core, inflatable bag, CO container 53, Kidde valve proper 54 and the Imperial 3-way valve 60 may be used in this mechanical arrangement. In this arrangement the top portion of the Kidde valve body is turned down to form a shoulder 69 for the lever-carrying member 70 counter-bored to receive it. This member 73 is slotted down to the top of the counter-bore 71 for the reception of the oppositely disposed levers 72 pivotally connected to the member 70 by the fulcrum or hinge pins 73 positioned therein.

The top of the valve stem 56 is shown to be on a level with the top of the counterbore 71 and the bottom of the levers 72 whose ends are formed with a cam surface 74 to better engage the top of the valve stem 56 as it is depressed. On the outer end of each lever 72 is a movable weight 75 which may be shifted along the lever 72 as desired and held in position by the set screw '76. The movement of the levers 72 around their hinge pin 73 is fixed in one direction by the cam surface 74 coming into contact with the valve gland 77 and in the other direction by the contact of the lever 72 with the bottom 78 of the slot 79.

In the drawing solid lines show the levers 72 at right angles to the center line of the container 53 whose center line 80 is normally vertical and in alignment with the center line of the boat or catamaran mast 1A. The evers 72 will remain in this position until the boat heels over beyond 90 degrees at which time the center of gravity of the weighted levers will shift and the levers move to the dotted position X and the valve stem 56 depressed whereupon CO from the container 53 will be released into the bag 4 to inflate it. The movement of the CO to and from the bag 4 follows the route described with FIG. 15.

Now if it is desired to have the above action take place when the boat heels over to 80 degrees instead of 90 degrees the weighted lever is moved as to the position Y and the bottom 78 of the slot 79 adjusted to suit.

The arrangement in FIGS. 20 and 21 shows how the valve stem 56 may be depressed by means other than that shown in FIGS. 17 and 18, although the same container and valves are used in both arrangements. The lugs 81 of the Kidde valve proper 54 that were turned off in preparing the valve for use in FIGS. 17 and 18 are retained in this instance to support the fulcrum pin 82 for the lever 83 whose upper end is provided with the roll 84 to engage the valve stem 56 and whose lower end is provided with the socket S5 for the reception of one end of a coil extension spring 86 whose opposite end is positioned in the enlarged socket 87 formed in the support 88 for the CO container 53. This enlarged spring socket 557 is a continuation of the smaller bore 89 in said support. This smaller bore is enlarged at its outer end to form the shoulder 90 against which bears a plug 91 made of a material which will disintegrate upon contact with water. This plug has a hollow core 92 through which passes the rod 93 having an enlarged end 94 adapted to bear against the plug 91 and a threaded end provided with a nut 95 by means of which the extension spring 86 may be normally held under compression.

Converging water channels 96 having a reservoir 97 at the lower end of each are formed in the CO container support 88 and have communication with the plug 91. Whenever the boat or catamaran C heels over to starboard or port, say 90 degrees, water from one of the reservoirs will reach the plug 91 and cause it to disintegrate whereupon energy stored in the compressed spring 86 will be released and the lever 83 pushed out to its broken line position W and the roll 84 at the opposite end of the lever brought into contact. with the valve stem 56 and the same depressed to permit CO from the container 53 to be released into the bag 4 to inflate it. The movement of the CO to and from the bag 4 follows the route described with FIG. 1.5.

The angularity of the water channels 96 and their reservoirs 97 permit water to reach the plug )1 before the boat heels over to degrees. In other words their angularity may be made to meet ones wishes or the requirements.

Any of the five species of my sail boat safety device described and claimed herein admit of many modifications without departing from the basic idea, therefor I do not limit my invention to the exact design shown and described but extend it to all that comes fairly within the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim as new over the art follows:

I claim:

1. In a safety device for a sail boat in combination with the boat and a mast thereof an inflatable bag mounted on the mast head, means to automatically inflate the bag when the boat heels over to a predetermined degree, and means to deflate the bag.

2. In a safety device for a sail boat in combination with the boat and a mast thereof, a rigging support on the mast head, an inflatable bag on the mast head above the rigging support, a core to support the bag when not inflated, a pressure vessel having a connection with the bag. an expansive medium normally confined within the pressure vessel, means to automatically release the expansive medium from the pressure vessel into the bag when the boat heels over to a predetermined degree, and means to deflate the bag.

3. The structure of claim 2 in which the means to automatically release the expansive medium from the pressure vessel into the bag when the boat heels over to a predetermined degree includes a movable pressure vessel having a diaphragm and a diaphragm-puncturing means contactable upon endwise movement of the pressure vessel.

4. The structure of claim 2 in which the means to automatically release the expansive medium from the pressure vessel into the bag when the boat heels over to a predetermined degree includes a diaphragm, a diaphragm-puncturing means, and a ball adapted to drive the puncturing means through the diaphragm upon endwise movement or" the ball.

5. The structure of claim 2 in which the means to automatically release the expansive medium from the pressure vessel into the bag when the boat heels over to a predetermined degree includes a solenoid operated valve on the pressure vessel, a source of electric current, an electric circuit from the source of supply to the solenoid, a pair of mercury switches in said circuit one adapted to close the circuit when the boat heels to starboard a predetermined degree and the other when the boat heels a predetermined degree to port.

6. The stiucture of claim 2 in which the means to automatically release the expansive medium from the pressure vessel into the bag when the boat heels over to a predetermined degree includes a valve on the pressure vessel having a stem depressible to open the valve, means to depress the stern including a pair of oppositely disposed levers, a pair of spaced apart fulcrums one for each lever, each lever lying normally at right angles to the centerline of the valve when the same is closed and each lever having a weighted end and an end opposite formed to engage the valve stem to depress it to open the valve when the weighted end of the lever swings over to the opposite side of tie valve centerline as the boat heels over beyond 90 degrees in the same direction.

7. The structure of claim 2 in which the means to i automatically release the expansive medium from the pressure vessel into the bag when the boat heels over to a predetermined degree includes a valve on the pressure vessel having a stem depressible to open the valve, means to depress the valve stem at a predetermined time including a lever hingedly connected to the valve and having one end thereof positioned adjacent the valve stem and formed to engage the same to depress it and having the opposite end formed to receive one end of an expansion spring, an expansion spring, a base portion for the pressure vessel having a bore therein for the reception of the other end of said spring, said bore having a counterbore to provide a shoulder for a plug to bear against, a plug having an axial opening therethrough for the reception of a rod, said plug being adapted to disintegrate upon contact With water, a rod having an enlarged end portion adapted to engage one end of the plug and a nut on the other end to draw the lever toward the plug to compress the expansion spring, a Water reservoir in the base formed to have access to the plug to deliver Water thereto when the boat heels over to the predetermined degree to cause the plug to disintegrate and release the tension stored in the compressed spring to move the lever to depress the valve stem to open the valve.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,026,336 Williams May 14, 1912 2,444,526 Pawley July 6, 1948 2,752,615 Parker July 3, 1956

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3952350A (en) * 1974-10-04 1976-04-27 Emil Moucka Gravity weight trigger for a life raft
US5255624A (en) * 1992-06-01 1993-10-26 Legare David J Sailboat mast floatation device
WO2000029284A1 (en) * 1998-11-14 2000-05-25 Lopez Perea Lloveres Vicente System for keeping afloat any type of boat in case of a leak
FR2791317A1 (en) * 1999-03-26 2000-09-29 Charles Gros Capsizing prevention safety system for sailing boat consists of inflatable float installed at mast head and pumped up by manual or automatic system
WO2007028847A1 (en) * 2005-09-07 2007-03-15 Kafloat S.L. Flotation device, method of mounting same and operation thereof
US20070284188A1 (en) * 2006-06-13 2007-12-13 Kathryn Chippindale Evacuation slide having lateral ridges

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1026336A (en) * 1912-01-30 1912-05-14 William H Williams Boat.
US2444526A (en) * 1944-10-12 1948-07-06 Jr William D Pawley Sailboat
US2752615A (en) * 1952-05-19 1956-07-03 Leland L Parker Marker buoy

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1026336A (en) * 1912-01-30 1912-05-14 William H Williams Boat.
US2444526A (en) * 1944-10-12 1948-07-06 Jr William D Pawley Sailboat
US2752615A (en) * 1952-05-19 1956-07-03 Leland L Parker Marker buoy

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3952350A (en) * 1974-10-04 1976-04-27 Emil Moucka Gravity weight trigger for a life raft
US5255624A (en) * 1992-06-01 1993-10-26 Legare David J Sailboat mast floatation device
WO2000029284A1 (en) * 1998-11-14 2000-05-25 Lopez Perea Lloveres Vicente System for keeping afloat any type of boat in case of a leak
ES2163958A1 (en) * 1998-11-14 2002-02-01 Lloveres Vicente Lopez-Perea System for keeping afloat any type of boat in case of a leak
AU749679B2 (en) * 1998-11-14 2002-07-04 Kafloat, S.L. System for keeping afloat any type of boat in case of a leak
US6431108B1 (en) 1998-11-14 2002-08-13 Vicente Lopez-Perea Lloveres System for keeping afloat any type of boat in case of a leak
FR2791317A1 (en) * 1999-03-26 2000-09-29 Charles Gros Capsizing prevention safety system for sailing boat consists of inflatable float installed at mast head and pumped up by manual or automatic system
WO2007028847A1 (en) * 2005-09-07 2007-03-15 Kafloat S.L. Flotation device, method of mounting same and operation thereof
ES2286926A1 (en) * 2005-09-07 2007-12-01 Kafloat, S.L. Flotation device, method of mounting same and operation thereof
US20080229997A1 (en) * 2005-09-07 2008-09-25 Kafloat S.L. Flotation Device, Method of Mounting Same and Operation Thereof
US20070284188A1 (en) * 2006-06-13 2007-12-13 Kathryn Chippindale Evacuation slide having lateral ridges

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