US3008140A - Means for independent orientation of antennas on a mast - Google Patents

Means for independent orientation of antennas on a mast Download PDF

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US3008140A
US3008140A US360707A US36070753A US3008140A US 3008140 A US3008140 A US 3008140A US 360707 A US360707 A US 360707A US 36070753 A US36070753 A US 36070753A US 3008140 A US3008140 A US 3008140A
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mast
antenna
antennas
section
means
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US360707A
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Joseph K Rose
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Joseph K Rose
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01QANTENNAS, i.e. RADIO AERIALS
    • H01Q3/00Arrangements for changing or varying the orientation or the shape of the directional pattern of the waves radiated from an antenna or antenna system
    • H01Q3/005Arrangements for changing or varying the orientation or the shape of the directional pattern of the waves radiated from an antenna or antenna system using remotely controlled antenna positioning or scanning

Description

J. K. ROSE Nov. 7, 1961 MEANS FOR INDEPENDENT ORIENTATION OF ANTENNAS ON A MAST Filed June 10, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 java; AQO 4Q J. K. ROSE Nov. 7, 1961 MEANS FOR INDEPENDENT ORIENTATION OF ANTENNAS ON A MAS 3 Sheets-Sheet Filed June 10, 1953 J. K. ROSE Nov. 7, 1961 MEANS FOR INDEPENDENT ORIENTATION OF ANTENNAS ON A MAST 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 10, 1953 United States Patent Ofiime 3,008,140 Patented Nov. 7, 1961 3,008,140 MEANS FOR INDEPENDENT ORIENTATION OF ANTENNAS ON A MAST Joseph K. Rose, 2323 W. Devon Ave., Chicago, Ill. Filed June 10, 1953, Ser. No. 360,707 2 Claims. Cl. 343-758) This invention relates to means for independent orientation of antennas on a mast to selectively receive the television signals from broadcasting stations located in substantially different angular positions relative to the receiving antennas.

One of the characteristics of a television antenna is its directivity. This means that when pointed to or directed toward the transmitting antenna or signal source the signal pickup will be a maximum.

If the television antenna is rotated away from this direction, the signal pickup will be reduced. In the mechanical installation of a television antenna on its mast or tower, means must 'be provided for rotating the antenna until it is pointed in the direction of maximum signal pickup. It must then be mechanically secured to the mast or tower and kept in this fixed position without further movement.

If it is desired to pick up the signal selectively of two or more broadcasting stations located in substantially different directions from the receiving antenna, it is necessary to use a rotor which rotates the mast until the antenna is pointed at or correctly oriented for one of the desired signals. To receive the signal of the other broadcasting station, the mast or tower must again be rotated until the signal of the other station is received.

Another method of selectively receiving the signal of two or more stations located in substantially different angular positions relative to the receiving antennas is to use an antenna for each of the desired stations. Each antenna is directed toward the desired station.

To orient a single antenna on a mast or tower is relatively simple as the mast or tower can be rotated at the bottom until the antenna at the top is properly positioned rotationally.

However, if there are two or more antennas on such a mast or tower, this method can be used for one of the antennas only. To orient the other antenna, it is necessary to get up on a ladder and orient the second antenna without disturbing the position of the mast or tower,

If a tower is used, the tower can be climbed. However, rn-ost installations use a mast or single tube which can not be climbed. To reach the antenna with a ladder is difficult and dangerous. If the mast is mounted on a roof top the difliculty and danger is increased because of the sloping nature of most home roof constructions.

In my method, any one of two or more antennas can be independently oriented from the base of the mast or tower without disturbing the orientation of any of the other antennas. This is accomplished in two ways:

In one method, the mast is composed of concentric sections and an antenna is rigidly secured to the top of each section. The mast is mounted at its base in such a manner that each concentric section can be rotated to a new fixed position without afiecting the position of the other concentric sections. Thus, each antenna is independently oriented.

In the other method the boom or longitudinal member of the antenna is rotatably secured to the mast or tower by means of a worm gear assembly. The worm gear is rotated by a set of bevel gears one of which is reached through a funnel shaped member.

When it is desired to change the orientation of one of the antennas, a person standing adjacent the base of the mast extends a rod upwardly with the upper end extending into the mouth of the funnel-shaped member which guides it into engagement with a hollow stem extending downwardly from one of the bevel gears into the neck of the funnel-shaped member. The hollow stem is rotatable in the neck of the funnel-shaped member, and its inside surface is non-circular. The upper end of the rod fits into the hollow stem, and the bevel gear is rotated by rotating the rod. This rotates the worm gear which turns a larger gear rigidly secured to a sleeve to which the boom of the antenna is secured. Thus the antenna is oriented to the desired point.

Wind or other forces exerted on the antenna will not change its rotational position. This is because it is characteristic of a worm gear that the worm will cause the gear to which it is engaged to rotate, but the gear itself is locked against the worm and can not rotate against it.

By either of these two methods a person standing at the base of the mast, whether it be on the ground or on the roof, can safely and easily orient any of the antennas without affecting the orientation of the other antennas and without the necessity of getting up on a ladder.

It is an object or" my invention to provide simple, eflicient means for securing a plurality of antennas to a mast or tower and for readily orienting any one of the antennas from a position adjacent the base of the mast or tower without disturbing the orientation of any of the other antennas.

Another object is to provide a mast of a plurality of concentric sections which may be rotated independently from a position adjacent the base of the mast, and to secure an antenna rigidly to each of said sections.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a mast or tower with a plurality of antennas each secured to a separate gear assembly arranged at difierent radial positions relative to the mast or tower and to provide each gear assembly with means for guiding a rod raised upwardl'yfrom a position adjacent the base of the mast or tower into engagement with the gear assemblies whereby any of said gear assemblies may be actuated to orient an antenna secured thereto.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent upon reading the following specification, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings showing two preferred embodiments of the invention, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a mast mounted on the top of a house and provided with three antennas;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective View showing a portion of the mast with a single antenna mounted thereon and a rod for orienting the antenna to any desired position;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view showing the means for mounting the antenna on the mast;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the structure shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the structure shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is another side elevational view showing the structure of FIG. 3 from a different angle;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view of the upper end of the rod adapted to orient the antenna relative to the mast in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 6, inclusive;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a sectional mast having an antenna rigidly secured to each section of the mast;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary cross sectional view, on an enlarged scale, showing the construction and manner of supporting the lower end of the sectional mast;

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view showing the means for mounting the mast to facilitate erection thereof;

FIG. 11 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 1111 of FIG. 9; and

FIG. 12 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 1212 of FIG. 9.

Although in the following description the structure to which the antennas are secured will, for convenience, be referred to as a mast, it will be understood that either a mast or tower may be used.

Referring to the drawings, and particularly to FIGS. 1 to 6, the reference numeral 2 indicates a mast mounted in conventional manner on -a rooftop 3. A plurality of antennas 4, 5, and 6 are mounted adjacent the top of the mast. The antenna 4 is rigidly mounted because it may be set in desired position to improve the reception of the television channel to which it is oriented at the time the mast is originally erected. However, it is obvious that it may also be mounted in the same manner as the antennas 5 and 6. The mounting for the antennas 5 and 6 is the same so the following description will be limited to a single antenna.

An inverted funnel-shaped guide member 7 is rigidly secured to the mast 2 by means of a pair of split clamp members 8 and 9, each of which is held in tightened position by means of bolts. The clamping arms 8 and 9 are preferably integral with the funnel-shaped member 7, but, if desired, may be formed separately and rigidly secured to the funnel-shaped member. A sleeve 12 is rotatably mounted on the mast 2 above the upper clamping arm 8 and is supported thereby. The upper end of sleeve 12 is provided with a groove 13 adapted to receive a U-shaped clamp 14 which holds the antenna 5 rigidly to the sleeve. A simple way of securing the antenna in place is illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 5 wherein the U-clamp projects through apertures in the stem of the antenna and nuts 15 are tightened against the outer surface of the stem to hold the antenna securely in place. Any suitable means for securing the antenna rigidly against the sleeve 12 may be used. The sleeve 12 is provided with a worm wheel 16 which is preferably integral with the sleeve but may be formed separately and rigidly secured to the sleeve in any desired manner.

The funnel-shaped member 7 is provided at its upper edge with an open upstanding neck portion 17. A bevelled gear 18 is provided with a stem 19 which fits into the neck portion 17 and is rotatable therein. The stem 19, which may be integral with the bevel gear 18 or may be rigidly secured thereto, is hollow, and its interior surface is prefer-ably square, although any non-circular surface might be used. The bevel gear 18 is manually rotated from a position adjacent the base of the mast by means of a rod 21 having its upper end shaped like a truncated pyramid, as indicated at 22. A crank 23 is secured to the lower end of the rod 20 and is preferably provided with a handle 24, by means of which the rod may be rotated. The rod may be of a single length, but for convenience is preferably made of telescoping sections which are held in extended position by means of a set screw 25. When the rod is fully extended, the end 22 is inserted through the bottom of the funnel-shaped member 7 and, because of its shape, will find its way in the hollow stem 19. Rotation of the rod 20 will then cause rotation of the bevel gear 18 in the same direction.

A frame member 26 integral with the funnel-shaped member 7 extends upwardly therefrom in the shape of a hollow rectangle and is provided on its vertical branches with a pair of horizontally extending bearings 27 and 28 which are axially aligned with each other. A shaft 29 is rotatably mounted in the bearings 27 and 28. A worm gear 30 and a sleeve 31 are mounted on the shaft 29 between the bearings 27 and 28. The worm 30 is provided on its outer surface with teeth 32 meshing with the teeth of worm wheel 16. A bevel gear 33, having its teeth in mesh with the teeth of bevel gear 18, is mounted on the sleeve 31.

When the gear 18 is rotated it will in turn rotate the gear 33. Since the gear 33 is keyed to the shaft 29, its rotation will cause the worm 30, which is also keyed to the shaft 29, to rotate. The teeth 32, which mesh with the worm wheel 16, will thereupon rotate the Worm wheel to move the sleeve 12, to which the antenna is rigidly secured. Accordingly, it is a very simple thing to rotate the antenna in either direction without disturbing the setting of any other antennas mounted on the mast. The pitch of the teeth 32 and the teeth of the worm wheel 16 will prevent rotation of the worm wheel by wind blowing against the antenna. Accordingly it is not necessary to provide any other means for locking the antenna against such rotation. It should also be noted that the funnelshaped member 7 of each antenna is preferably displaced angularly relative to the funnel-shaped members of the other antennas so that any of them is easily accessible to the rod 20.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 8 to 12, the mast comprises a plurality of concentric sections 34, 35 and 36. The intermediate and outer sections are tubular, and the inner diameter of the outer section is slightly larger than the outer diameter of the intermediate section which fits therein. The intermediate section extends beyond both ends of the outer section. The inner section fits within the intermediate section and extends beyond each end thereof. The antennas 37, 38 and 39 are respectively secured rigidly to the upper edge portion of these mast sections. Each of the mast sections is rotatable independently of the other sections as hereinafter described. A pair or" upstanding channel members 40, rigidly secured to a rooftop 41, as indicated at 42 in FIG. 9, provide a suitable support for the lower portion of the mast. A cup shaped member 43 is pivotally secured to the channel member 44) by means of a pair of screws or bolts 44. The cup member 43 is provided with an offset internal shoulder 45. The bottom Wall 46 is provided with an aperture 4-7. The bottom wall 46 supports the lower end of the inner mast section 34, and the shoulder 45 supports the lower end of the intermediate mast section 35. The mast section 34 is either tubular or has a vertical bore in its lower edge portion, and a stud 48 which fits into the aperture 47 projects into the hollow bottom portion of the inner mast section 34. The upper portion of the stud 48 is provided with an enlarged portion 49 which fits snugly against the interior surface of the inner mast section into which it projects. Preferably the outer periphery of the enlarged portion 49 and the inner surface of the mast section 34 are serrated, as indicated at 50 in FIG. 12, to insure rotation of the inner mast section 34 when the stud 48 is rotated. The lower edge of the enlarged portion 4-9 extends slightly beyond the periphery of the aperture 47 and rests on the bottom wall 46 so that the stud 48 can not drop out of place. A nut 51 is threaded on the lower portion of the stud 48 and tightened against the bottom of the cup member 43 to hold the stud securely in place. The lowermost end of the stud 48 which projects below the bottom of the cup member 43 is provided with a square end, as indicated at 52, so that it may be turned by a wrench to rotate the inner mast section 34.

The intermediate mast section 35 is provided with a plurality of radially spaced apertures 53 positioned above the upper end of the cup member 43. The intermediate mast is rotated by inserting a rod into any of the apertures 53 and exerting pressure in a radial direction. A pair of screws 54, threaded through the wall of the cup member 43, bear against the outer surface of the intermediate mast section 35 to prevent rotation of the intermediate mast section when either of the other mast sections is rotated. The screws 54 are loosened when it is desired to rotate the intermediate mast section.

A sleeve 55 is secured to the upper edge portions of the channel members 40 above the apertures 53 by means of a pair of screws 56. The sleeve 55 is provided with an aperture 57 in its bottom wall through which the intermediate mast section 35 projects. An internal shoulder 58 is provided adjacent the bottom of the sleeve 55 to furnish suitable support for the lower end of the outer mast section 36 which rotates in the sleeve 55. The outer section 36 is provided with apertures (not shown) similar to the apertures 53 so that it may be rotated in the same manner as the intermediate mast section. A pair of screws 59 extending through the vertical walls of the sleeve 55 bear against the outer surface of the outer mast section 36 to prevent accidental rotation thereof. The screws 59 are loosened when it is desired to rotate the outer mast section.

When the mast is to be erected, the supporting channel members 40 are rigidly secured to the rooftop, and the mast is completely assembled except for the screws 56. This assembly may be done while the mast is substantially parallel to the rooftop, as indicated in FIG. 10. The mast is then moved upwardly pivotally on the screws 44 until it is aligned with the channel members 40. The screws 56 are then inserted in place and the mast is held in upright position.

From the foregoing it will be seen that I have devised a television mast or tower upon which a plurality of antennas may be mounted in such a manner that any of the antennas may be oriented independently of the others. This arrangement permits each antenna to be individually oriented to tune in a particular broadcasting channel so that no manipulation of the mast or antennas is required when the television viewer changes the receiver from one channel to another. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 7 the antennas are each rotated relative to the mast, while in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 8 to 12 the mast is made sectional, and each antenna is rigidly secured to one of the sections so that any antenna may be oriented merely by rotating the mast section to which it is secured.

Although I have described two preferred embodiments of my invention in considerable detail, it will be understood that the description is intended to be illustratvie, rather than restrictive, as many details may be modified or changed without departing from the spirit or scope of my invention. Accordingly, I do not desire to be restricted to the exact structure described, except as limited by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination, a rigid supporting member, a cup shaped member mounted in said supporting member, said cup shaped member having a bottom wall and an internal shoulder positioned above said bottom wall, a sleeve mounted in said supporting member above said cup shaped member and concentric therewith, said sleeve having an internal shoulder, a television mast, said mast comprising an inner section having its lower end seated on the bottom wall of said cup shaped member, a tubular intermediate section substantially enclosing said inner section and having its lower end seated on the shoulder of said cup shaped member, and a tubular outer section substantially enclosing said intermediate section and having its lower end seated on the shoulder of said sleeve, each of said mast sections being independently rotatable, an antenna rigidly secured to each of said mast sections, each of said antennas being spaced vertically from the others a distance suificient to permit it to operate substantially independently from the others, and means for rotating each of said sections independently whereby said antennas may be individually oriented to diiferent broadcasting stations.

2. In combination, a rigid supporting member, a cup shaped member pivotally supported in said supporting member, said cup shaped member having a bottom wall provided with an aperture therein and an internal shoulder positioned above said bottom wall, a sleeve provided with an internal shoulder and mounted in said supporting member concentrically above said cup shaped member, a television mast comprising a tubular outer section having its lower end seated on the internal shoulder of said sleeve, an intermediate tubular section positioned in said outer section and having its lower end seated on the internal shoulder of said cup shaped member, and an inner section positioned in said intermediate section and having its lower end seated on the bottom wall of said cup shaped member, a stud projecting through said aperture into the lower end of said inner section, the lower end of said stud being shaped to facilitate rotation thereof, the upper end of said stud engaging the inner surface of said inner mast section to rotate it independently of said other mast sections when said stud is rotated, means for independently rotating said intermediate and. outer mast sections, and an antenna rigidly secured to each of said mast sections, each of said antennas being spaced vertically from the others a distance suflicient to permit it to operate substantially independently from the others.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,744,548 Hershey Jan. 21, 1930 1,812,695 Harms June 30, 1931 2,280,738 Bace Apr. 21, 1942 2,535,049 De Rosa Dec. 26, 1950 2,583,210 Edwards Ian. 22, 1952 2,605,417 Andrews July 29, 1952 2,623,999 Kulikowski Dec. 30, 1952 2,631,238 Hills Mar. 10, 1953 2,642,754 De Conti June 23, 1953 2,643,335 Anderson June 23, 1953

US360707A 1953-06-10 1953-06-10 Means for independent orientation of antennas on a mast Expired - Lifetime US3008140A (en)

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US360707A US3008140A (en) 1953-06-10 1953-06-10 Means for independent orientation of antennas on a mast
US12590261 US3146452A (en) 1953-06-10 1961-06-27 Remotely operated hand crank and gear drive for orientation of antennas on a mast

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3299429A (en) * 1963-08-05 1967-01-17 Decibel Prod Vertical array of folded dipoles adjustably mounted on support mast
WO1982004502A1 (en) * 1981-06-10 1982-12-23 Gary L Ellingson Antenna tower assembly and method
US5003320A (en) * 1990-01-25 1991-03-26 Rafael Miranda Manually rotatable antenna
US5649394A (en) * 1993-11-05 1997-07-22 Ohba Building Maintenance Co., Ltd Apparatus for inhibitively preventing birds from crowding
US6850130B1 (en) 1999-08-17 2005-02-01 Kathrein-Werke Kg High-frequency phase shifter unit having pivotable tapping element
US20050057242A1 (en) * 1995-12-27 2005-03-17 Swain William Hall SNR improvement by selective modulation
US7031751B2 (en) 2001-02-01 2006-04-18 Kathrein-Werke Kg Control device for adjusting a different slope angle, especially of a mobile radio antenna associated with a base station, and corresponding antenna and corresponding method for modifying the slope angle
US9668468B1 (en) * 2013-10-01 2017-06-06 Michael L. Nichols, Sr. Nesting deterrent

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1744548A (en) * 1927-05-31 1930-01-21 Hershey Irving Radioantenna
US1812695A (en) * 1926-04-12 1931-06-30 Albert G Harms Loop aerial
US2280738A (en) * 1940-11-27 1942-04-21 Du Mont Allen B Lab Inc Directional antenna
US2535049A (en) * 1945-11-14 1950-12-26 Standard Telephones Cables Ltd Antenna structure
US2583210A (en) * 1951-01-05 1952-01-22 Walter J Edwards Manually rotatable directional antenna
US2605417A (en) * 1950-05-27 1952-07-29 Andrews Johnnie Transmission tower
US2623999A (en) * 1946-01-15 1952-12-30 Edwin F Kulikowski Antenna system
US2631238A (en) * 1949-02-16 1953-03-10 Belmont Radio Corp Antenna array
US2643335A (en) * 1951-11-09 1953-06-23 Henry C Andersen Television antenna
US2642754A (en) * 1948-12-11 1953-06-23 Conti Maurice P De Rotatable antenna for televisions

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1812695A (en) * 1926-04-12 1931-06-30 Albert G Harms Loop aerial
US1744548A (en) * 1927-05-31 1930-01-21 Hershey Irving Radioantenna
US2280738A (en) * 1940-11-27 1942-04-21 Du Mont Allen B Lab Inc Directional antenna
US2535049A (en) * 1945-11-14 1950-12-26 Standard Telephones Cables Ltd Antenna structure
US2623999A (en) * 1946-01-15 1952-12-30 Edwin F Kulikowski Antenna system
US2642754A (en) * 1948-12-11 1953-06-23 Conti Maurice P De Rotatable antenna for televisions
US2631238A (en) * 1949-02-16 1953-03-10 Belmont Radio Corp Antenna array
US2605417A (en) * 1950-05-27 1952-07-29 Andrews Johnnie Transmission tower
US2583210A (en) * 1951-01-05 1952-01-22 Walter J Edwards Manually rotatable directional antenna
US2643335A (en) * 1951-11-09 1953-06-23 Henry C Andersen Television antenna

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3299429A (en) * 1963-08-05 1967-01-17 Decibel Prod Vertical array of folded dipoles adjustably mounted on support mast
WO1982004502A1 (en) * 1981-06-10 1982-12-23 Gary L Ellingson Antenna tower assembly and method
US5003320A (en) * 1990-01-25 1991-03-26 Rafael Miranda Manually rotatable antenna
US5649394A (en) * 1993-11-05 1997-07-22 Ohba Building Maintenance Co., Ltd Apparatus for inhibitively preventing birds from crowding
US20050057242A1 (en) * 1995-12-27 2005-03-17 Swain William Hall SNR improvement by selective modulation
US6850130B1 (en) 1999-08-17 2005-02-01 Kathrein-Werke Kg High-frequency phase shifter unit having pivotable tapping element
US7031751B2 (en) 2001-02-01 2006-04-18 Kathrein-Werke Kg Control device for adjusting a different slope angle, especially of a mobile radio antenna associated with a base station, and corresponding antenna and corresponding method for modifying the slope angle
US7366545B2 (en) 2001-02-01 2008-04-29 Kathrein Werke Kg Control apparatus for changing a downtilt angle for antennas, in particular for a mobile radio antenna for a base station, as well as an associated mobile radio antenna and a method for changing the downtilt angle
US9668468B1 (en) * 2013-10-01 2017-06-06 Michael L. Nichols, Sr. Nesting deterrent

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