US2977425A - Hearing aid - Google Patents

Hearing aid Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2977425A
US2977425A US839629A US83962959A US2977425A US 2977425 A US2977425 A US 2977425A US 839629 A US839629 A US 839629A US 83962959 A US83962959 A US 83962959A US 2977425 A US2977425 A US 2977425A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
stem
hearing aid
bit
lower housing
bowl
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US839629A
Inventor
Irwin H Cole
Original Assignee
Irwin H Cole
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Irwin H Cole filed Critical Irwin H Cole
Priority to US839629A priority Critical patent/US2977425A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2977425A publication Critical patent/US2977425A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R25/00Deaf-aid sets, i.e. electro-acoustic or electro-mechanical hearing aids; Electric tinnitus maskers providing an auditory perception
    • H04R25/60Mounting or interconnection of hearing aid parts, e.g. inside tips, housings or to ossicles
    • H04R25/604Mounting or interconnection of hearing aid parts, e.g. inside tips, housings or to ossicles of acoustic or vibrational transducers
    • H04R25/606Mounting or interconnection of hearing aid parts, e.g. inside tips, housings or to ossicles of acoustic or vibrational transducers acting directly on the eardrum, the ossicles or the skull, e.g. mastoid, tooth, maxillary or mandibular bone, or mechanically stimulating the cochlea, e.g. at the oval window
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R25/00Deaf-aid sets, i.e. electro-acoustic or electro-mechanical hearing aids; Electric tinnitus maskers providing an auditory perception
    • H04R25/65Housing parts, e.g. shells, tips or moulds, or their manufacture

Description

March 28, 1961 I. H. COLE HEARING AID Filed Sept. 14, 1959 [WA-1220f //PA///1/ h. 0014 50am $7dwm iwekajfl HEARING AID Irwin H. Cole, 926 Elm Place, Glencoe, Ill.

Filed Sept. 14, 1959, Ser. No. 839,629

Claims. (Cl. 179-107) The present invention relates generally to a smoking pipe hearing aid and more particularly to an acoustic smoking pipe apparatus wherein a single unit functions as a tobacco pipe and also as a self-contained hearing aid utilizing osseous or bone conduction, i.e., conversion of sound waves to mechanical vibrations which are transmitted through the teeth and bone structure of the head to .the auditory organs.

While bone conduction is a very eifective method of aiding certain types of faulty hearing, it is usually quite diflicult or inconvenient to get good contact between a means for transmitting vibrations and a suitable bone. One method which has been employed to meet this problem is to provide a device which is gripped in the teeth, and along those lines there have been several prior attempts to provide hearing aids in the form of pipes which rely on osseous conduction. However, because of certain ditlieulties involved the known form of hearing aid pipes were not capable of being smoked and the dummy pipe served only as a disguise for part of a hearing aid. Also, of even greater importance the prior pipe hearing aids were not entirely satisfactory for their intended purpose and, therefore, were generally not accepted commercially.

Accordingly, the principal object of the present invention is to provide in a single compact and easy-to-handle unit a functional smoking pipe which is also an effective but inconspicuous hearing aid.

A further object is to provide such a hearing aid which can be used and handled in the manner of an ordinary smoking pipe without adversely affecting its hearing aid function.

Another object is to provide such a device wherein the microphone and mechanical vibrator are located along the stem of the pipe in spaced relation to avoid intereference between and to position each for more effective operation.

A still further object is to provide a pipe hearing aid in which the smoking portion of the pipe is separated from the hearing aid components so that tobacco, dirt, saliva and heat from the smoking portion do not adversely effect the operation of the hearing aid components.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description and accompanying drawings of one preferred embodiment thereof.

In the drawings: v

Figure l is a longitudinal sectional view of an acoustical smoking pipe embodying some of the features of the invention.

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken along line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a side view of the bowl, the stem, and the bit (partially broken away) as assembled. I V

Figure 4 is a bottom view of the lower housing of the pipe stem.

Figure 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 of Figure 4.

atent Figure 6 is an enlarged fragmentary view, partly in section, of the structure in Figure 1.

Briefly, the present invention is a smoking pipe hearing aid which serves the dual function of being a usable tobacco smoking pipe as well as a bone conduction hearing aid.

In the illustrated embodiment of the invention the smoking pipe hearing aid is comprised of a bowl 7, an elongated stem 9, and a short bit 11 sequentially joined together. As shown in Figure 1, the bowl 7 is suitable for smoking tobacco and is connected to the front end of the elongated stem 9. The stem 9 is made up to two elongated, parallelly oriented portions.

The upper housing portion 13 which supports the bowl 7 at its front end is comprised of a frame 14 which supports both several integrally connected sections and a separate elongated hollow tube 33. That tube 33 has an internal passageway 17 which extends the entire length of the stem 9 and connects with the bowl 7 of the pipe to accommodate the flow of smoke from the bowl. The lower housing portion 15 of the stem is separably'connected to the underside of the upper housing portion 13 and holds an electrical hearing aid unit 19 which picks up sound waves and changes them to mechanical vibrations. The microphone 43 of the electrical unit is mounted on foam rubber to reduce case noise and is located at the front of the stem farthest from the output 21 of the unit to combat interference such as electrical put 21 of the electrical unit 19 through the upper housing portion 13 and lower portion 15 of the stern so as to receive the vibrations therefrom. An elongated internal passageway 23 extends the full length of the 'bit. When the bit is connected with the stem the two passageways 17 and 23 form one continuous passageway for the smoke to travel from the bowl to the mouth 'of the smoker.

More particularly, in the embodiment of the inven-' tion shown in the drawings, the bowl 7 is a vertically oriented, generally cylindrically-shaped, hollow standard smoking pipe bowl. At the lower end of the bowl 'its external diameter is reduced and it is externally threaded so as to screw into a mating internally threaded pan 28 in the front end of the upper portion 13 of the stem.

The stem 9, illustrated in Figures 1 and 3, is an elon-L parallelly oriented separable portions. The upper housing portion 13 is made gated member comprised of two up of the separate elongated tube 33 and a generally elongated casting of aluminum or like material whichis comprised of the frame 14 supporting the pan 28 at its front end and supporting an annular, bit-receiving.

section 39 at its rear end. The pan 28 serves as a bottom for the cylindrical bowl 7.

The frame 14, which is' integrally connected to the; rear of the pan 28 supports the elongated tube 33. The: tube 33 defines the passageway 17 which extends. the full length of the stem 9, opening at its front end intothe pan 28 and at its rear end into a passageway 23 in the bit 11. The elongated tube '33- is preferably} grooved to increase its surface area and thus its ability to dissipate heat. Part of the frame 14 surrounding the tube might also be cut away to aid cooling of the tube, Also, the tube is located above the electrical unit so that heat from the tube will rise away from the unit.

The frame holds the tube 33 spaced from the electrical components held in the lower housing of the stem in order to prevent tobacco, dirt, saliva or the heat given off by the tube from adversely affecting the operation of the electrical unit.

At the rear end of the upper housing portion 13 of the stem is an integrally connected annular or ring section 39 which extends downwardly therefrom and which has its axis parallel to, but below, the axis of the elongated tube 33. The annular section 39 is closely adjacent to a portion of the mechanically vibrating output 21 and aids in locating, securing, and acoustically connecting the output 21 to the bit 11 which is fitted into the ring 39. There are four vertical, internally threaded holes 41 in the upper portion 13 of the stem, two at the front and two toward the rear, which receive screws (not shown) which pass through four matching holes 44 in the lower portion 15 of the stem thereby removably securing it to the upper portion 13. The mechanical vibrating output 21 is located to the rear of the rearmost two screws, between them and the bit 11, so as to avoid any dampening effect of the screws.

The lower housing portion 15 of the stem, as seen in Figures 1 to 5, is an elongated hollowed-out casting of aluminum or a like material which is open at the top and has several holes through its bottom surface (the functions of which will be explained below). As described above, and illustrated in Figure 1, the lower housing portion 15 is detachably secured to the underside of the upper housing portion 13 of the stem so that the two lie parallel to one another. The lower housing portion 15 holds the electrical unit 19 which changes sound waves to mechanical vibrations, with the microphone 43 at the front end and with the output 21 located at the rear end of the stem. A pair of small plates and 40 of Bakelite or like material are attached to the lower housing 15 to assist in securing the electrical unit 19 in position. Several small elements 42 attached to the plates 40 and 40' and to the lower housing also assist in securing various components of the unit.

The unit 19 includes conventional components used in transistor type hearing aids. Briefly, the microphone 43 located beneath the bowl at the front of the stem picks up the sound waves and converts them to electrical waves. The forward location of the microphone 43 is preferred as it avoids interference and places the microphone at the point in the device closest to the sound source. The microphone is cushioned with foam or similar soft rubber to eliminate pick-up of mechanical vibrations from the output. The electrical waves are amplified by a transistor-amplifier 45, powered by a miniature battery 47 and including an interstage transformer 49, which amplifier is connected to the microphone. The transducer or vibrator which serves as the output 21 of the hearing aid is connected to the output of the amplifier and converts the electrical waves into mechanical vibrations. The vibrator preferably vibrates perpendicular to the axis of the stem. It is mechanically fixed to the rear end of the lower housing portion 13 closest to the user so as to more effectively transmit the vibrations through the stem and bit to said user. There is a small hole 53 through the bottom surface of the lower housing portion 15 of the stem at its front end directly adjacent the microphone 43 which allows for free passage of sound waves to the microphone 43 as well as aiding to ventilate the pipe. Located between the microphone 43 and the amplifier and also at the front of the stem is a volume control and off-on switch 55 which is operated by a knob 57 which extends vertically downward from the switch 55 through a hole 53 in the bottom surface of the lower housing 15. Thus, the pipe can be handled as an ordinary smoking pipe and the hearing aid can be regulated or shut off without the necessity of touching the rear portion of the pipe where the output vibrator 21 is located and which would dampen the vibrations being transmitted. The greatest amount of heat is generated in the bottom of the bowl at the front ofthe pipe and there is less and less heat as you move'rearward. Accordingly, as shown particularly in Figure 1, the components of the electrical unit most susceptible to heat are placed toward the rear end of the pipe.

The bit 11, which is a relatively short member, has the rear end of the elongated tube 33 press fitted into its front end. Then that front end is itself press fitted into the annular section 39 of the upper portion of the stem. A method utilizing prior freezing of the parts may be used to accomplish this press fit. The bit 11 is tapered toward its rear end to form a suitable mouth piece for gripping between the smolzers teeth.

With reference particularly to Figure 6, it will be noted that the output vibrator 21 includes a movable elemeat 68 which is responsive to the electrical signal transmitted through the transistor-amplifier and thereby caused to strike an anvil plate 62 on the lower housing 15. The resulting vibrations are carried through lower housing 15, upper housing 13, the ring 39, and the bit 11 to the teeth of the user.

In order to provide for easy replacement of the battery 47, the lower housing 15 is preferably provided with a side opening 64 and the battery is mounted in a pivotable frame 66 (Fig. 2) which may he swung outwardly of the housing to afford access to the battery.

The specific details of the illustrated embodiment may obviously be varied without departing from the broader scope of the present invention.

Features of the invention believed novel and patentablc are set forth in the following claims.

i claim:

1. A hearing aid adapted to transmit vibrations through the teeth of the user, comprising a smoking pipe having a bowl, an elongated stem, and a bit portion to be gripped between the teeth of the user, said elongated stem includ ing an upper housing portion and a lower housing portion. the upper housing portion including a passageway providing communication between said bowl and said bit, the lower housing portion having therein an electrical unit for receiving sound waves and converting same into chanical vibrations, said electrical unit including a microphone located forwardly along said stem and a mechanical vibrator located rearwardly of said stem adjacent to said bit, whereby the vibrations produced in response to the sound waves picked up by said microphone are transmitted through said bit to the teeth of the user.

2. A hearing aid adapted to transmit vibrations through the teeth of the user, comprising a smoking pipe having a bowl, an elongated stem, and a bit portion to be gripped between the teeth of the user, said elongated stem including an upper housing portion and a lower housing portion. the upper housing portion supporting said bowl at its forward end and including a passageway providing communication between said bowl and a communicating passage through said bit, the lower housing portion being detachably secured to said upper housing portion and having therein an electrical hearing aid unit for receiving sound waves and converting same into mechanical vibrations, said electrical hearing aid unit including a micro phone located forwardly along said stern and a mechani cal vibrator located rearwardly of said stern adjacent to said bit, said vibrator acting against said stem and the latter being closely fitted with said bit, whereby the vibrations produced in said stern are transmitted through said bit to the teeth of the user.

3. A smoking pipe hearing aid, comprising a bowl, an elongated stem connected to said bowl and a bit adapted to be gripped between the teeth of the user, said stem including an upper housing portion having an internal passage leading from said bowl to a communicating 'passageway in said bit, an adjustable electrical means positioned in said lower housing portion in spaced relation to said passage in said upper housing, said electrical means being adapted to receive and convert sound waves to mechanical vibrations, said lower housing portion including an opening therethrough adjacent the bowl end of said stem, said electrical means including a microphone positioned adjacent said opening in the lower housing and a mechanical vibrator positioned adjacent said bit in the rearward portion of said lower housing, and said bit being closely fitted with respect to said stem to receive therefrom the vibrations produced in said lower housing portion by said vibrator.

4. A smoking pipe hearing aid, comprising a bowl, an elongated stem connected to said bowl in rearwardly extending relation thereto, and a bit fixed to the rearward end of said stem and adapted to be gripped between the teeth of the user, said stem including an upper housing portion having an internal passage leading from said bowl to a communicating passageway in said bit, an adjustable electrical hearing aid unit positioned in said lower housing portion and operable to receive and convert sound waves received forwardly of said stem to mechanical vibrations at the rear of said stem, said lower housing portion ineluding an opening therethrough adjacent the forward end of said stem, said hearing aid unit including a microphone positioned adjacent said opening in the lower housing, an amplifier connected with said microphone, and a mechanical vibrator positioned adjacent the rearward portion of said lower housing which is operable to produce vibrations in said lower housing in response to sound waves picked up by said microphone, said upper housing including an annular section at its rearward end which receives said bit and which is integrally connected with the rear end of said upper housing which is in contact with the rearward portion of said lower housing, whereby the vibrations produced in said lower housing are transmitted through said upper housing, said annular section and said bit to the teeth of the user.

5. A hearing aid adapted to transmit vibrations through I the teeth of the user, comprising a smoking pipe having a how], an elongated stem supporting said bowl at the for- 1 ward end of said stem, and a bit portion-at the rear end a of said stem and adapted to be gripped between the teeth of the user, said stem including an upper housing portion and a lower housing portion, the upper housing portion including a passageway providing communication between said bowl and said bit, the lower housing portion being secured to said upper housing portion, an electric hearing aid unit for receiving sound waves and converting said waves into mechanical vibrations disposed in said lower housing portion and having its components References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,161,169 Iefien's June 6, 1939 2,167,377 Schwencke July 25, 1939 2,230,397 Abraham Feb. 4, 1941 2,439,459 Eddy Apr. 13, 1948 2,868,876 Ticchioni Jan. 13, 1959 2,896,024 Tommey Iu1y21, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 761,169 Great Britain Nov. 14, 1956

US839629A 1959-09-14 1959-09-14 Hearing aid Expired - Lifetime US2977425A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US839629A US2977425A (en) 1959-09-14 1959-09-14 Hearing aid

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US839629A US2977425A (en) 1959-09-14 1959-09-14 Hearing aid

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2977425A true US2977425A (en) 1961-03-28

Family

ID=25280252

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US839629A Expired - Lifetime US2977425A (en) 1959-09-14 1959-09-14 Hearing aid

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2977425A (en)

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0560679A1 (en) * 1992-03-13 1993-09-15 François-Xavier Laurec Ear ornament
US5902167A (en) * 1997-09-09 1999-05-11 Sonic Bites, Llc Sound-transmitting amusement device and method
WO1999022833A1 (en) * 1997-10-31 1999-05-14 Sonic Bites, Llc Denta-mandibular sound-transmitting system
WO1999025153A1 (en) * 1997-11-07 1999-05-20 Sonic Bites, Llc Sound recording and playback system
US20070280493A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2007-12-06 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20080064993A1 (en) * 2006-09-08 2008-03-13 Sonitus Medical Inc. Methods and apparatus for treating tinnitus
US20080070181A1 (en) * 2006-08-22 2008-03-20 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems for manufacturing oral-based hearing aid appliances
US20080304677A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2008-12-11 Sonitus Medical Inc. System and method for noise cancellation with motion tracking capability
US20090028352A1 (en) * 2007-07-24 2009-01-29 Petroff Michael L Signal process for the derivation of improved dtm dynamic tinnitus mitigation sound
US20090052698A1 (en) * 2007-08-22 2009-02-26 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Bone conduction hearing device with open-ear microphone
US20090105523A1 (en) * 2007-10-18 2009-04-23 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods for compliance monitoring
US20090149722A1 (en) * 2007-12-07 2009-06-11 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide two-way communications
US20090208031A1 (en) * 2008-02-15 2009-08-20 Amir Abolfathi Headset systems and methods
US20090220921A1 (en) * 2008-03-03 2009-09-03 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide communication and monitoring of user status
US20090226020A1 (en) * 2008-03-04 2009-09-10 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Dental bone conduction hearing appliance
US20090270673A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2009-10-29 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and systems for tinnitus treatment
US20090268932A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2009-10-29 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Microphone placement for oral applications
US7682303B2 (en) 2007-10-02 2010-03-23 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US20100098270A1 (en) * 2007-05-29 2010-04-22 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide communication, positioning and monitoring of user status
US20100194333A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2010-08-05 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Intra-oral charging systems and methods
US20100290647A1 (en) * 2007-08-27 2010-11-18 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Headset systems and methods
US7974845B2 (en) 2008-02-15 2011-07-05 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Stuttering treatment methods and apparatus
US8150075B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2012-04-03 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Dental bone conduction hearing appliance

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2161169A (en) * 1938-01-24 1939-06-06 Erwin H Wilson Dentiphone
US2167377A (en) * 1938-01-12 1939-07-25 Edmund H Schwencke Acoustical device
US2230397A (en) * 1937-09-06 1941-02-04 Abraham Lewis Crowford Acoustic apparatus for the deaf
US2439459A (en) * 1945-08-06 1948-04-13 Television Associates Inc Sound pickup unit
GB761169A (en) * 1954-05-11 1956-11-14 Fortiphone Ltd Improvements in or relating to hearing aids
US2868876A (en) * 1951-06-23 1959-01-13 Ticchioni Ruggero Vocal device
US2896024A (en) * 1954-10-28 1959-07-21 Texas Instruments Inc Hearing-aid having directional reception characteristics

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2230397A (en) * 1937-09-06 1941-02-04 Abraham Lewis Crowford Acoustic apparatus for the deaf
US2167377A (en) * 1938-01-12 1939-07-25 Edmund H Schwencke Acoustical device
US2161169A (en) * 1938-01-24 1939-06-06 Erwin H Wilson Dentiphone
US2439459A (en) * 1945-08-06 1948-04-13 Television Associates Inc Sound pickup unit
US2868876A (en) * 1951-06-23 1959-01-13 Ticchioni Ruggero Vocal device
GB761169A (en) * 1954-05-11 1956-11-14 Fortiphone Ltd Improvements in or relating to hearing aids
US2896024A (en) * 1954-10-28 1959-07-21 Texas Instruments Inc Hearing-aid having directional reception characteristics

Cited By (77)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0560679A1 (en) * 1992-03-13 1993-09-15 François-Xavier Laurec Ear ornament
FR2688388A1 (en) * 1992-03-13 1993-09-17 Laurec Francois Xavier Early ornament.
US6115477A (en) * 1995-01-23 2000-09-05 Sonic Bites, Llc Denta-mandibular sound-transmitting system
US5902167A (en) * 1997-09-09 1999-05-11 Sonic Bites, Llc Sound-transmitting amusement device and method
WO1999022833A1 (en) * 1997-10-31 1999-05-14 Sonic Bites, Llc Denta-mandibular sound-transmitting system
WO1999025153A1 (en) * 1997-11-07 1999-05-20 Sonic Bites, Llc Sound recording and playback system
US8170242B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2012-05-01 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US20070280495A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2007-12-06 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20070280491A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2007-12-06 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20070280493A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2007-12-06 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20070286440A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2007-12-13 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US20080019542A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2008-01-24 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US8254611B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2012-08-28 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US20110116659A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2011-05-19 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US9906878B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2018-02-27 Soundmed, Llc Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US9826324B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2017-11-21 Soundmed, Llc Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US9781526B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2017-10-03 Soundmed, Llc Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20110026740A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2011-02-03 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20090097685A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2009-04-16 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US20090097684A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2009-04-16 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US9736602B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2017-08-15 Soundmed, Llc Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US9615182B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2017-04-04 Soundmed Llc Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US9185485B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2015-11-10 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US9113262B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2015-08-18 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US20100322449A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2010-12-23 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US8712077B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2014-04-29 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20090268932A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2009-10-29 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Microphone placement for oral applications
US7664277B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2010-02-16 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Bone conduction hearing aid devices and methods
US8649535B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2014-02-11 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US20100312568A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2010-12-09 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US7724911B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2010-05-25 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US8588447B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2013-11-19 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US20100220883A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2010-09-02 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US7796769B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2010-09-14 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US7801319B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2010-09-21 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US8358792B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2013-01-22 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US7844070B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2010-11-30 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US7844064B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2010-11-30 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US20070280492A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2007-12-06 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US7876906B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2011-01-25 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US10194255B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2019-01-29 Soundmed, Llc Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US20110002492A1 (en) * 2006-05-30 2011-01-06 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Bone conduction hearing aid devices and methods
US8233654B2 (en) 2006-05-30 2012-07-31 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20080070181A1 (en) * 2006-08-22 2008-03-20 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems for manufacturing oral-based hearing aid appliances
US8291912B2 (en) 2006-08-22 2012-10-23 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems for manufacturing oral-based hearing aid appliances
US20090099408A1 (en) * 2006-09-08 2009-04-16 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for treating tinnitus
US20080064993A1 (en) * 2006-09-08 2008-03-13 Sonitus Medical Inc. Methods and apparatus for treating tinnitus
US8270638B2 (en) 2007-05-29 2012-09-18 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide communication, positioning and monitoring of user status
US20100098270A1 (en) * 2007-05-29 2010-04-22 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide communication, positioning and monitoring of user status
US20080304677A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2008-12-11 Sonitus Medical Inc. System and method for noise cancellation with motion tracking capability
US20090028352A1 (en) * 2007-07-24 2009-01-29 Petroff Michael L Signal process for the derivation of improved dtm dynamic tinnitus mitigation sound
US20100194333A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2010-08-05 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Intra-oral charging systems and methods
US8433080B2 (en) 2007-08-22 2013-04-30 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Bone conduction hearing device with open-ear microphone
US20090052698A1 (en) * 2007-08-22 2009-02-26 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Bone conduction hearing device with open-ear microphone
US8224013B2 (en) 2007-08-27 2012-07-17 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Headset systems and methods
US20100290647A1 (en) * 2007-08-27 2010-11-18 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Headset systems and methods
US8660278B2 (en) 2007-08-27 2014-02-25 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Headset systems and methods
US7854698B2 (en) 2007-10-02 2010-12-21 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US7682303B2 (en) 2007-10-02 2010-03-23 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US9143873B2 (en) 2007-10-02 2015-09-22 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US8177705B2 (en) 2007-10-02 2012-05-15 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US8585575B2 (en) 2007-10-02 2013-11-19 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US20090105523A1 (en) * 2007-10-18 2009-04-23 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods for compliance monitoring
US8795172B2 (en) 2007-12-07 2014-08-05 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide two-way communications
US20090149722A1 (en) * 2007-12-07 2009-06-11 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide two-way communications
US8712078B2 (en) 2008-02-15 2014-04-29 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Headset systems and methods
US8270637B2 (en) 2008-02-15 2012-09-18 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Headset systems and methods
US7974845B2 (en) 2008-02-15 2011-07-05 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Stuttering treatment methods and apparatus
US20090208031A1 (en) * 2008-02-15 2009-08-20 Amir Abolfathi Headset systems and methods
US20090220921A1 (en) * 2008-03-03 2009-09-03 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide communication and monitoring of user status
US8023676B2 (en) 2008-03-03 2011-09-20 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide communication and monitoring of user status
US8649543B2 (en) 2008-03-03 2014-02-11 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Systems and methods to provide communication and monitoring of user status
US20090226020A1 (en) * 2008-03-04 2009-09-10 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Dental bone conduction hearing appliance
US8433083B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2013-04-30 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Dental bone conduction hearing appliance
US7945068B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2011-05-17 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Dental bone conduction hearing appliance
US8150075B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2012-04-03 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Dental bone conduction hearing appliance
US20090270673A1 (en) * 2008-04-25 2009-10-29 Sonitus Medical, Inc. Methods and systems for tinnitus treatment

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2971065A (en) Ear insert hearing aid
US4712245A (en) In-the-ear hearing aid with the outer wall formed by rupturing a two-component chamber
US3470328A (en) Hearing aid vent tube
KR100198003B1 (en) Acoustic transducer and acoustic transducing system
US3247324A (en) Acoustic and electronic stethoscope
EP0360517A2 (en) Sound reproducing apparatus
CN1838834B (en) Improved eletroacoustic transducer mounting in shells of personal communication devices
US4438772A (en) Differential stethoscope
US4879750A (en) Hearing aid with cerumen trapping gap
KR101017736B1 (en) Musical toothbrush
EP0977536B1 (en) Acoustic respiratory therapy apparatus
US4596899A (en) Telephone hearing aid
US4088849A (en) Headphone unit incorporating microphones for binaural recording
US4965836A (en) Stereo headphone
JP4966201B2 (en) Earphones for sound reproduction
US20010007050A1 (en) Hearing apparatus
AU703548B2 (en) An electronic stethoscope
US5491756A (en) System for delivering sound to and monitoring effects on a fetus
AU714114B2 (en) Underwater communication apparatus and underwater microphone, and closed-type sound converter
CN1642357B (en) Noise-reducing earpiece
US5327506A (en) Voice transmission system and method for high ambient noise conditions
US3882285A (en) Implantable hearing aid and method of improving hearing
US5395168A (en) In the ear hearing aid having extraction tube which reduces acoustic feedback
US3488457A (en) Earphone housing with offset opening for sound quality variation
US7925038B2 (en) Earset assembly