US2970459A - Method and means for preventing formation of eyelets in circular knitting - Google Patents

Method and means for preventing formation of eyelets in circular knitting Download PDF

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US2970459A
US2970459A US632106A US63210657A US2970459A US 2970459 A US2970459 A US 2970459A US 632106 A US632106 A US 632106A US 63210657 A US63210657 A US 63210657A US 2970459 A US2970459 A US 2970459A
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yarn
needles
knitting
auxiliary
stitches
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Gene E Hart
Howard F Metcalf
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Carolina Knitting Machine Corp
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Carolina Knitting Machine Corp
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/42Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration
    • D04B9/46Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof
    • D04B9/56Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration stockings, or portions thereof heel or toe portions

Description

1951 G. E. HART ETAL 2,970,459
' METHOD AND MEANS FOR PREVENTING FORMATION OF EYELETS IN CIRCULAR KNITTING Filed Jan. 2, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENI'OR G ENE E. HART and HQWAPJ) F. METCALF' BY tmem, J Ji-W Feb. 7, v 1961 G. E. HART ET AL METHOD AND MEANS FOR PREVENTING FORMATION OF EYELETS IN CIRCULAR KNITTING Filed Jan. 2, 195'.
7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR:
GENE- E. HART 2nd HOWARD F. METCALF'.
ATTORNEY5 HART ET AL Feb 7, 1961 G. E. 2,970,459
METHOD AND MEANS FOR PREVENTING FORMATION 0F EYELETS IN CIRCULAR KNITTING 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan. 2, 1957 /m..o A mm. v Ni n m m l HJ I 5.. mm-\$ w ww wm INVENTOR:
G E NE E. HART and HOWARD F. METCALF. BY at, 629. AMA--4- ATTORNEYS Feb. 7, 1961 I G. E. HART ETAL 2,970,459
METHOD AND MEANS FOR PREVENTING FORMATION OF EYELETS IN CIRCULAR KNITTING Filed Jan. 2, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 R I w A ml] L lib L 2 GENE- E. HART and HOWARD F. METcALF,
INVENT OR BY 5,115,. (wmw 42.11
ATTORNEYS Feb. 7, 1961 G. E. HART ETAL METHOD AND MEANS FOR PREVENTING FORMATION OF EYELETS IN CIRCULAR KNITTING 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan. 2, 195'.
I: 0 ka Mg .T TA RE A V H W. LL.F. ED 1 w G W ,5 H I Z mu 7 mm m Wm 0 w PL .WIM! T:
ATTORNEYS Feb. 7, 1961 G. E.-HART ETAL METHOD AND MEANS FOR PREVENTING FORMATION 0F EYELETS IN CIRCULAR KNITTING Filed Jan. 2, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 20?. 2 5 2 I47 16 206 6 5o ZZ\ 2 3 220 fig-1% I1 g"-]5 2\o was INVENTOR! GENE E. HART and HOWARD F. METCALF- ATTORNEYS 1961 G. E. HART ET AL 2,970,459
METHOD AND MEANS FOR PREVENTING FORMATION 0F EYELETS IN CIRCULAR KNITTING .Filed Jan. 2, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 m Y mi m N 4A R E TC 0 Nm i R M? m HM .EE E0 in m m a O H @T? ml; m1; N -3 9 2 is Q2 #2 Q2 mi i @2 N; a?
Unite Sttes Patent METHOD AND MEANS FOR PREVENTING FOR- MATION 0F EYELETS IN CIRCULAR KNITTING Gene E. Hart and Howard F. Metcalf, Charlotte, N.C., assignors to Carolina Knitting Machine Corporation, Charlotte, N.C., a corporation of North Carolina Filed Jan. 2, 1957, Ser. No. 632,106
23 Claims. (Cl. 66-42) This invention relates to multiple-feed, independentneedle circular knitting machines and is particularly concerned with a novel method and means for manipulating the needles relative to the sinkers to prevent the formation of openings, commonly referred to as eyelets or cateyes in the knitting of seamless stockings when an additional or auxiliary knitting station is rendered active following the knitting of any portionsoffabric in which only the main knitting station is used.
As is well known, the welts, after-welts heels and toes of ladies sheer stockings are formed from a relatively heavy weight yarn, such as a forty denier nylon yarn, fed to needles at a main knitting station and, upon the completion of .each portion of the fabric formed from the relatively heavy yarn, a yarn change occurs at the main station wherein a few stitches are formed from boththe heavy yarn and a first relatively, light weight or fine yarn (usually fifteen denier nylon yarn) whereupon the heavy yarn is withdrawn and one or more auxiliary knitting stations are successively activated to feed a second relatively fine yarn to the needles so as to knit two or more courses with each revolution of the needle cylinder during the rotary knitting of the leg and foot of each stocking. Many attempts have been made to prevent the formation of relatively large loops which form openings or eyelets in the fabric when the auxiliary body yarns are'introduced at auxiliary knitting stations. However, to our knowledge, none of such attempts have been entirely successful and, in some instances, extremely complicated changes have been required in knitting machines or it has required that an entirely new machine be manufactured. These eyelets are objectable in that they detract from the appearance of the stocking and render them unsalable.
It is, therefore, an obg'ect of this invention to provide a novel means and method of knitting on a multi-feed circular knitting machine which requires only a few inexpensive and easily made changes in the mechanism and wherein the portions of the resultant fabric at which the second or auxiliary yarns are successively introduced may be extensively stretched and distorted without causing such eyelets to occur. As a matterof fact, it has been found that such eyelets areno more likely to occur at the points at which the auxiliary yarns are introduced in the fabric than they are at any regularly knit portions of the fabric. i 3
These objectives are realized in practice, as hereinafter more fully disclosed, by the provision of improved means and method for controlling needles upon thejin'troduction of auxiliary yarn so the first few needles to which the auxiliary yarn is fed are not lowered sufiiciently to draw 2,970,459 Fatented Feb. 7, 196].
the length of normal stitches ultimately. Thereafter, multiple course knitting continues in which stitches of normal length are formed throughout the fabric. The result is two-fold, in that the laying of the yarn end across the sinker ledges removes excessive tension from the yarn by the time initial stitches are formed therefrom and the extremely short initial stitches formed from the auxiliary or second body yarn are, because of their size, extremely tight stitches as compared to the tautness of normal stitches, thus avoiding disortion of the initial stitches as they are formed and also securely tying the auxiliary or second ,body yarn into the fabric as it is initially knit at the auxiliary station.
Although the present invention is embodied in a single knitting station auxiliary to a main knitting station, it is to be noted that more than one auxiliary knitting station may be used and operated in succession to the other auxiliary station or stations in the same manner in which said single auxiliary station operates with respect to the main station.
This application is a continuation-in-part of our copending application Serial Number 511,936, filed May 31, 1955 and entitled Circular Multi-Feed Hosiery Knitting Machine and Method of Knitting, now Patent No. 2,785,553 issued March 19, 1957.
Some of the objects of the invention having been stated other objects will appear as the description proceeds when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure l is a somewhat schematic side elevation of the upper portion of a circular knitting machine embodying the present invention;
Figure 2 is a fragmentary rear elevation of one side portionof the machine taken substantially along line 22 in Figure 1;
Figure 3 is a plan view, partially in section, taken substantially along line 33 in Figure 1;
Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 3, but takenon a lower level substantially along line 4-4 in Figure 1 Figure 5 is a plan view of the sinker cap removed from the knitting machine;
Figure 6 is a somewhat schematic developed view 0 the cams surrounding the needle cylinder as though looking outwardly from'the cylinder and showing the path Figure 8 is an isometric view showing the relative position of a few sinkers and needles at the auxiliary knitting station as the needles travel the path shown in Figure 6; p v Figure 9 is a fragmentary View similar to the left-hand portion of Figure 6, showing the path traveled by the needles at the auxiliary knitting station while drawing stitches therewith;
Figure 10 is an isometric view showing therelative position of a few needles and sinkers as the needles travel the path shown in Figure 9 Figure 11 is an enlarged elevation of the outside of'the cam block and-corresponding needle cams at the auxiliary stitches therewith, but are merely lowered to where a I "are lowered progressively increasing distances tdform -"'stitches ofprogressively increasing length, not; exceeding knitting station taken substantially along line 11-11 in Figure 4; I Figure 12 is a plan view of the'structure shown in Fig are 11; e
Figure 13. is a'view looking at the opposite side of the "cam blockand corresponding cams from that shown. in npigure 11;, e! i Figure. 14 is a fragmentary vertical. sectional yietv main yarn ML directed thereto.
. 3 taken substantially along line 14-44 in Figure 12, showing the auxiliary stitch cam;
Figure 15 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially along line 1.5-15 in Figure 14;
Figure 16 is a fragmentary sectional plan view taken substantially along line 16-16 in Figure 14;
Figure 17 is a fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view taken substantially along line 17-17 in Figure 15;
Figure 18 is a fragmentary substantially vertical sectional view through the needle shedding cam, being taken along a line also substantially parallel to the axis of the pivot pin projecting upwardly from the shank of said cam, substantially along line 18-18 in Figure 12;
Figure 19 is a fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view taken substantially along line 1919 in Figure 12;
Figure 20 is a schematic plan view of the cylinder and needle circle illustrating the needle butts, in particular;
Figure 21 is a view of a ladies stocking as it is worn; Figure 22 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the outside of the portion of the stocking indicated by the dotted rectangle 22 in Figure 21 and illustrating the novel method of tying in auxiliary yarns for multi-course knitting;
Figure 23 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view through the auxiliary yarn feed station.
Referring more specifically to the drawings, the knitting machine in general is provided with the usual needle cylinder 50 (Figures 1 and 7) which is driven, at times, to rotate and, at other times, to reciprocate in the usual manner by conventional means, not shown. The lower portion of the cylinderfid is surrounded by a main bed plate 51 having the usual auxiliary or cam bed plate 52 (Figure 4) fixed thereto on which conventional needle cams and needle cams peculiar to the present invention are secured, as will be later described. The machine is also provided with the usual sinker cap 53 having sinkers generally designated at S therein (Figures 16 and 11). A latch ring 54 is provided above the sinker cap 53 and the machine is also preferably provided with a dial mechanism 55 (Figure 3) and gearing 56 (Figure l) for drivlog the dial 55 in making the usual turned or double welt of ladies seamless hose. The rear portion of latch ring 54 is supported on a post 57 and its forward portion rests upon and is suitably latched to a hunter post as. The posts 57, 6% are fixed upon the main bed plate 51.
The main bed plate 51 has a thrust rod support plate .61 fixed thereto and extending rearwardly therefrom,
from which a bracket 62 depends. The lower end of bracket 62 supports one end of the shaft 63 of a conventional main pattern drum ed on which the lower ends of a plurality of thrust rods or bars 67 rest. The upper ends of the thrust bars s7 are adapted to engage a plurality of conventional yarn feed fingers (generally designated at 65) at a main yarn feed station broadly designated at 66 (Figures land 6). The yarn feed fingers 65 are pivotally mounted on an upstanding portion of the latch ring 54.
It will be observed in Figures 6 and 9 that only two of the main yarn feed fingers are necessarily used in carrying out the present method (these two fingers being indicated at 6511 and 6512), although it is Well known that additional yarn feed fingers may be used. In this instance, the yarn feed finger 65a preferably has a relatively heavy main yarn MH directed thereto and the yarn feed finger 65b has a relatively lightweight yarn MH may be forty denier nylon and is preferably used in the knitting of the welt, heel and toe of a stocking. The light weight main yarn ML may be fifteen denier nylon and is used in knitting the legand foot of the stocking (see Figure 21-). The latch ring 54 is pro The relatively heavy vided with a main throat or opening'ltl having a threat 4 feed fingers 65 rest when in operative position (Figure 6). A suitable yarn clamping and cutting mechanism 73 is mounted upon the dial 55 and functions in the usual manner, as disclosed in US. Patent No. 1,641,161 to Scott, for example.
The principles of the present invention may be applied to various types of machines and, in this instance, it will. be observed in Figure 6 that the needle cylinder is equipped with conventional latch needles N having specially arranged butts thereon as will be hereinafter described (Figure 20), and under alternate needles N a jack 1 is provided. The needles N and iacks l are controlled by cams mounted upon the auxiliary or cam bed plate 52 (Figure 4) and include a main cam ring broadly desig' nated at 75 whose lower edge is generally spaced slightly above the level of the auxiliary or cam bed plate 52 and which is built upfrom a plurality of segments through 83 (Figure 6).
The segments 86, 81 are cut away at their juncture to accommodate a conventional jack raising cam 34. Spaced above the cam segment 3% at the front of the machine is a conventional widening pick 85 which is pivotally mounted on the hunter post 69 (Figure 1) and which is adapted to, at times, nest in a fixed guide cam 86 secured on the hunter post 60. The needle cams also include a main knitting station of conventional construction comprising top and bottom center earns 90, 91 and right-hand and left-hand stitch cams 92, 93 which are positioned, as usual, in a substantially V-shaped opening at the juncture of the cam segments 31, 32 of the cam ring 75. A pair of conventional narrowing picks 94 9.5 are connected by a link 96 (Figure 4) and cooperate with the respective right-hand and left-hand stitch cams 92, 93 in the knitting of the heel and toe of a stocking.
The machine is also provided with conventional mov able cams indicated at 7 through and lilila, reading from right to left in Figure 6. Cams 97 and 101 are (Figures 5 and 7) fixed to the upper end of the needle cylinder 59 and providediwith radial grooves therein for reception of conventional sinkers S, the tail portions or butts of which ride in a concentric groove 166 in the 'l' he sinker cap 53 is provided with lugs sinker cap 53. 107 having hunters 111i adjustably mounted thereon which are adapted to alternately'engage opposite sides of the hunter post 6% during reciprocatory knitting, as is well.
known in the art. The outer wall of the rear portion of the concentric groove 1% is recessed at 111 in alinement with the top center cam 99 and a main sinker cam 112 engages the butts of and moves the sinkers outwardly radially of the needle cylinder 5% when yarn is being fed at the main feed station 66 and so the yarn will then be fed beneath the nibs of-the sinkers 2 in a conventional manner.
All the parts'heretofore described are generally conventional and'are of types usually associated with a Scott 8;
-Williams Model H Circular Knitting lviachine, for ample, and it is with such or similar parts that he embodiment of the present invention is adapted to be as sociated.
As bestshown in Figure 6 the present invention includes an auxiliary yarn feed station, broadly designated at 115,'whieh station is similar to the auxiliary yarn feed station disclosed iniour said appending application Serial Number 511,936, although a gap closer is not requiredi-in" the present invention. The auxiliary yarn feed station 115 is spaced forwardly of the main yarn feed station 66 with respect to counterclockwise movement of the needles N and needle cylinder 50 and comprises a throat 116 cut in the latch ring 54 and whose bottom is closed by an auxiliary throat plate 117 adapted to support the inner lower ends of a pair of auxiliary yarn feed fingers'120, 121 (Figures 1, 3, 6, 8, 9, and 23). Although only two yarn feed fingers 120, 121 are shown at the auxiliary yarn feed station 115, it is to be understood that any desired number of yarn feed fingers may be mounted in the auxiliary throat 116 of the latch ring 54.
It will be observed in Figures 1 and 3 that medial portions of the auxiliary yarn feed fingers 12% 121 are oscillatably mounted on a pivotshaft 123 carried by upstanding portions 124 on the latch ring 54. The yarn feed fingers 120, 121 may be resiliently urged into engagement with the throat plate 117 by springs 122 (Figure 23) usually used for this purpose. The auxiliary yarn feed fingers 120, 121 are moved into and out of operative position (in engagement with the throat plate 117) by respective levers 125, 126 (Figures 1, 2 and 3)v whose forward portions are engaged by the outer or tail portions of the respective auxiliary yarn feed fingers 120, 121.
The levers 125, 126 are oscillatably mounted, intermediate their ends, on a shaft 127 projecting outwardly from the rear post 57 and the rear ends of the levers 125, 126 are engaged by the upper ends of thrust rods or bars 130, 131 which are provided in addition to the main yarn feed finger controlling thrust bars 67 and whose lower ends rest upon the main pattern drum 64 or suitable cams provided on the main pattern drum, as the case may be.
The auxiliary yarn feed station 115 may be constructed 'in identically the same manner as the auxiliary yarn feed station disclosed in said copending application and the present drawings also disclose a sinker retracting cam 135 (Figure which may also be constructed and operated in substantially the same manner as the sinker retracting cam 200 of said copending application. It will be noted that the sinker retracting cam 135 is disposed subsequent 'to the auxiliary yarn feed station 115 and is positioned at the inner wall of the concentric groove 106 in the sinker cap 53 so that, when it is actuated, it will move the nibs of sinkers S outwardly of the vertical plane of the hooks of the needles so the yarn being fed at the auxiliary yarn feed station 115 will rest upon the ledges'of the sinkers inwardly of the nibs thereof. The sinker cap 53 also has a sinker returning cam 136 secured thereto and projecting into the concentric groove 106 to return the sinkers S to their innermost position after having been moved outwardly by the sinker retracting cam 135 in the manner described. 4 n
As best shown in Figure 7, the sinker retracting earn 135 is fixed to and depends from the inner end of a bar or stem 140 (see also Figures 1, 3 and 5) and the stem 140 is guided for substantially radial movement on the sinker cap 53 as by means'of a pair of, screws 141 (Figure 7) which penetrate a longitudinally extending slot 142 in the inner portion of the stern 140. The outer end portion of the stem 141 has a pin 143 depending therefrom which is engaged by a substantially horizontal arm 144 on a sleeve 145 (Figures 3 and 11) oscillatably mounted for movement about a substantially vertical axis on a post 146. The lower end of post 146 is fixed toa central plate or cap 147 suitably secured .to.the upper central portion of an auxiliary knitting station cam block 159. Thecam block 150 is suitably secured to from which rides in a notch 164 (Figure 1) formed in a.
medial portion of a corresponding thrust rod 165.
The lower ends of the thrust rods 165 ride upon the main pattern drum 64 or corresponding cams, as the case may be. Typical cams are shown mounted on the pattern drum 54 and indicated generally at 166, it being deemed unnecessary to illustrate the specific configuration of the cams for controlling each of the thrust rods 165, since the arrangement of cams on the pattern drum to perform a particular function and to obtain the desired sequence of operations of the various elements of a knitting machine is well known in practice.
As heretofore stated, the nucleus of the present inven tion lies in the method of controlling the needles at the auxiliary yarn feeding station, the method being carried out by a novel arrangement of cams at an auxiliary knitting station, which will now be described in detail. Generally, the auxiliary knitting station comprises a radially movable auxiliary needle raising or shedding cam 170 disposed immediately in advance of the auxiliary yarn feed station 115 with respect to counterclockwise movement of the needle cylinder 50, and adjacent which a vertically and radially movable auxiliary stitch cam 171 is disposed. The upper end of the auxiliary stitch cam is disposed on a level sufliciently above the level of the shedding cam 170 to engage the butts of any needles raised by the shedding cam 170. An intermediate needle-raising cam 173, formed integral with segment 82, is peculiar to the present invention in that it raises needles to take yarn from the auxiliary yarn feed station 115, but not high enough to where the latches of the needles will pass above the stitches thereon (above the ledges of the sinkers S). The lower surface of the auxiliary stitch cam 171 slopes downwardly and forwardly, with respect to counterclockwise movement of the needle cylinder 50, so as to lower any needles after they have taken yarn from the auxiliary yarn feed station 115 to, at times, cause needles to lay the corresponding yarn upon the ledges of the sinkers and under the nibsthereof without drawing stitches and to, at other times, cause these needles to be lowered sufficiently to where the hooks thereof will draw stitches through previously formed stitches. Accordingly, the lower surface of auxiliary stitch cam171 is then spaced below the ledges of the sinkers a distance substantially equal to the distance from the upper surfaces of the butts of the needles to the lower surfaces of the books of the needles (see'Figure 8). Since the butts of the needles are deflected upwardly relatively suddenly upon moving past the lowermost sur- 7 face of the auxiliary stitch earn 171, a hardened needle the auxiliary bed or cam plate 52 (Figures 4 and 14).
The lower portion of sleeve has-a crank arm 152,, projecting inwardly therefrom toward the. needle cylinion a shaft "carried by; the plate .61; Similar bell deflecting cam 172 may be provided which is spaced beneath the auxiliary stitch cam 171 sufliciently 'to' permit the butts of the needles to pass therebetween and which may move in unison with the auxiliary stitch cam 171. It is apparent by referring to Figure 6 that the segment 82 of the cam ring 75 is recessed in order to accommodate the cams 170, 171 and 172. i
The needle lowering earn 101 is not necessarily a part of the present invention and it is merely coincidental that the stem of the cam 101 is mounted forradial movement relative to the needle cylinder in a cam .block 175'fixed to one sideof the station cam block 150; In order to accommodate the novel cams 170, 171 and the mechamsm for operating the same, the needle lowering cam 1011s also operatedby novel meanswhich will now be nected to'the upper end of thebell crank154'and; as
"best shownin Figures 2 and '14,- the upper ends of the bell cranks 156, 157-31161 158-also have the rear endsof respective: links 116, 177*. and. 17 8 pivotallyuconxiected the. same.
thereto. The forward ends of the links 176, 177 and 178 are pivotally connected to respective bell cranks 181, 182 and a lever 183 which are instrumental in operating the respective cams 101, 171 and 170. The bell crank 181 is oscillatably mounted on a post 185 (Figures 11, 12, 13 and 19) carried by the cam block 175 and its arm opposite from the arm to which the link we is connected, is pivotally connected to a stem 1% integral with or suitably secured to the cam 101, by means of a pin 137. The pin 187 extends downwardly through a slotted plate 19% and is connected to the stem 186.
' The slotted plate 190 is fixed to the upper surface of block 175 for retaining the stem 186 of cam 101 in the groove provided therefor in the block 175. It will be observed in Figure 19 that the cam 161 is normally urged inwardly toward the needle cylinder by a compression spring 192 positioned in a sleeve 193 which is closed at its inner end (adjacent the needle cylinder) and whose closed inner end engages the downwardly projecting inner end of the stem 186. The spring 192 bears against the closed outer end of a cavity 194 (Figure 19) formed in the block 175 and the cam 1131 is limited as to inward movement by an adjustment screw 196 threaded through the downwardly projecting outer end of the stem 36 and engaging the outer surface of the block 175.
Auxiliary stitch cam Referring to Figures 13 and 14, it will be observed that the auxiliary stitch cam 171 and the deflecting cam 172 therebeneath are fixed to the inner face of a carrier block 201) guided or keyed for vertical sliding movement in a cavity or groove 201 formed in a radially movable housing 202. The housing 2112 is guided for radial movement in a slot 203 (Figures 15 and 16) formed in the cam block 150 and whose upper end is partially closed by the removable cap or plate 147.. Plate 147 has a longitudinally extending groove 205 therein. The outer end of the slot 203 is closed by a plate 266. The plate 2% has a transverse slot 207 therein through which a stem 210 projects. The stem 21% is suitably secured to or formed integral with the housing 202.
The outer end of the stem 21% is bent upwardly and is penetrated by an adjustment screw 211 which normally bears against the outer surface of the plate 2%. The abutment or adjustment screw 211 limits the extent to which the auxiliary stitch cam 171 may be moved inwardly to operative position under the pressure of com- .pression springs 212 which, as shown'in Figure 14, are positioned between the plate 2% and the housing 2it2.
The bottom of the cavity Zil l in the housing 2G2 is partially closed, as at 213, and the portion 213 has the lower end of a post or column 214 fixed thereto which loosely penetrates the rear overlying portion of the car- .rier block 200 and has an abutment or limiting collar 215 adjustably secured thereto, as by being threaded onto The slot 255 is provided in the cam 147 to accommodate thecollar 215. A compression spring 215 surrounds the post 214 and its opposite ends bear against the proximal overlapping portions of the carrier block and the housing 2&2 to thereby normally urge the carrier block 260 upwardly against the abutment or collar 215.
In order to lower the auxiliary stitch cam 171 and the needle deflecting cam 172 at certain times, the carrier block 200 has an outwardly projecting pin 22% thereon on its lower inner portion which is rounded at its upper innermost end. The shifting carn 221 is guided for longitudinal movement in the block 15% immediately adjacent thehousin'g 202 andis normally urged outwardly by a 8 compression spring 225 whose inner end bears against the bottom of a hole or cavity 226 formed in the main cam block 150 and whose outer portion is positioned in 'a tubular member 227 which is closed at its outer end. The closed outer end of the tubular member 227 bears against the laterally bent outer portion of the stem 222.
Now in order to withdraw the auxiliary stitch cam 171 from operative position at the proper times, it will be noted that the lever 183 is pivotally connected to the lower surface of the stem 210 immediately outwardly of the plate 2%, and the end of the lever 133, opposite from the end to which the link 1178 is connected, bears against the outer surface of the plate 206. Thus, upon the thrust rod or bar corresponding to hell crank 158 being engaged by any one of the corresponding cams 166 on the main pattern drum 64-, the bell crank 153 is moved in a counterclockwise direction in Figure 1 to impart rearward movement to the link 178 and the outer end of the lever 183. Since the inner end of the lever 183 bears against the outer surface of the plate 2% (Figure 14) it is apparent that the stem 210 is moved outwardly to move the housing 202, the carrier block 2% and the cams 171, 172 outwardly therewith.
The shifting cam 221 is so arranged that, when it moves inwardly, the lower inclined cam surface 223 thereon rides against the upper surface of the pin 220 and moves the carrier block 291) and its stitch cam 171 downwardly from a partially operative to a fully operative position. The extent to which the carrier block 2661 may move downwardly is limited by a stop member shown in the form of a screw 2311 fixed to the upper surface of the carrier block 2119 and whose head projects outwardly to one side of the carrier block 2% and is adapted to engage the upper surface of the corresponding wall of the cavity 2111 formed in the housing 292 Now, in order to move the shifting cam 221 into operative position at the proper times, the reading end of a bell crank 235 bears against the outer end of the stern 222 of the shifting cam 221 and is oscillatably mounted on a post 236 (Figure 11) projecting upwardly from the bed plate 51. The other arm of the bell crank 235 extends outwardly and has the forward end or a link 237 pivotally connected thereto. The rear portion of link 237 loosely penetrates a pin 240 projecting outwardly from and oscillatably connected to the upper end of the bell crank 159 (Figures 1, 2 and 4). The rearmost end of the link 237 has a collar 241 adjustably secured thereon and a compression spring 242. engages the proximal surfaces of the collar and the pin 24%).
It is thus seen that, when the thrust bar 165 corresponding to the bell crank 159 is engaged by any one of the corresponding cams 166 on the patterndrum 64 (Figure '1), the bell crank 159 is moved in a counterclockwise direction to impart clockwise movement to bell crank 235 (Figure 4) through the medium of the link237. With clockwise movement, of the bell crank 235 in Figures 4 and 12, it is apparent that the shifting cam 221 is moved inwardly to lower the auxiliary stitch cam 171 and deflecting cam 172 from idling or partially operative position to fully operative position. The auxiliary stitch cam 171 may be lowered in a step-by-step manner, if desired; To this end, one or more of the cams on the drum 64, which are alined with that thrust bar 165 to which link 23'? is connected, may be stepped at its leading end, as at 165a, forv example Figure 1).
The auxiliary stitch cam 171' is so positioned relative to the sinkers S that, when the switch cam 171 occupies inward and partially operative or idling position, the hooks of the needles whose butts pass therebeneath are positioned on substantially the same, level as the ledges of the corresponding sinkers S, in substantially theimannet in which. the first four needles in the lower portion of Figure 8 are shown,.so the yarn taken by these needles is .rnerelylaid' upon the ledges of the sinkers; and, since these sinkers occupy inward position; it will 9 be noted that the corresponding floating portion of the yarn from the corresponding auxiliary yarn feed finger is merely held under the m'bs of corresponding sinkers.
On the other hand, when the auxiliary stitch cam 171 occupies fully operative position, corresponding needles passing therebeneath are lowered to where the hooks thereof pass below the levels of the ledges of the corresponding sinkers as shown in Figure 10 so as to draw stitches through previously formed loops as the previously formed loops thereon are cast off the needles. This will be more fully described hereinafter.
Shedding cam The shedding cam 170 is supported and operated in substantially the same manner as that of the needle lowering cam 101. To this end, it will be noted that the earn 170 is fixed to or formed integral with a stern 245 which is mounted for radial sliding movement in the cam block 150 (Figures 11, 12, 13 and 18) and is retained in the block 150 by a cap or plate 246 suitably secured to the inclined left-hand portion of the block 150. The stem 245 has a pair of pins 247, 248 suit ably secured thereto and projecting upwardly and downwardly, respectively, therefrom. The upper pin .247 loosely penetrates a slot 251 formed in the plate 246.
The lower pin 248 loosely pentrates a slot 252 formed in the block 150 and the lower end of the pin 248 engages the inner end of a compression spring 253 (Figure 18) positioned in a cavity 254 formed in the block 150. The outer end of spring 253 bears against a screw 255 threaded into the cavity 254. It will be noted that the outer end of the stem 245 of the cam 170 is bent downwardly and is penetrated by a stop member shown in the form of an adjustment screw 256. The inner end of the adjustment screw 256 is normally urged into engagement with the outer surface of the block 150 by the compression spring 253 and, thus, limits the extent to which the cam 170 may be moved inwardly toward the needle cylinder 50 by the compression spring 253.
In order to withdraw the shedding cam 170 from operative position at the proper times, the end of the bell crank 182, opposite from that end to which the link 177 is connected, is connected to the pin 247. The bellcrank 182 is oscillatably mounted on a stud or post 260 (Figure 13) suitablysecured to the auxiliary bed plate or cam plate 52 (Figure 4).
It is thus 'seen that, when the thrust rod or bar 165 corresponding tothe bell crank 157 is engaged by. a corresponding cam 166 on the main pattern drum 64 (Figure l) the bell crank 157 is moved rearwardly at its upper end to impart corresponding movement to the link 177 and the outer end of the bell crank 182. It is apparent that this will impart corresponding outward movement to the stem 245 and thelshedding cam 170. f I The needle butts' I Now, in orderto facilitate introduction of the auxiliary stitch cam 171 and the shedding cam 170 at the proper times, and to also facilitate raisingapproximately one-half of the needles to inoperative position uponicommencing knitting the heel and the toe of a stocking,
the needles N are provided withbutts of varying lengths which are shown somewhat diagrammatically in Fig.- ure20. v
As shown in Figure 20, theneedles may be divided into eight sections generally designated at A through H The needles in section A, which section includes ap proximately one-half of the needles, are long butt needles indicated at LN and the remaining substantially one half of the needles include'mediurn-long butt needles."
MLN, medium-short butt needles MSN; and short butt needlesgindicated at SN. The .number of needles in each of the sections B through H may vary and may bein the approximate proportions illustrated in Figure 20. Theneedles'in sections B; H are relativelylong which the heel and toe pockets of the hose or stockings are knit.
The fabric The stocking shown in Figure 21 includes a plurality of fabric sections comprising a double-thickness or turned welt 270' Which is knit with dial hooks and cylinder needles in the usual manner, and following which a single thickness shadow welt 271 is knit. The welt 270 and the shadow welt 271 are usually knit froma relatively heavy yarn, such as forty denier nylon. The stocking also includes a leg 272, a heel pocket 273, a foot 274 and a toe pocket 275. The heel and toe 273, 275 are also usually knit from a relatively heavy yarn and relatively fine yarn, such as fifteen denier nylon, is used when knitting the leg 272 and the foot 274.
Now, as heretofore stated, prior attempts to prevent the formation of eyelets in the fabric at the point at which each successive additional yarn is introduced to the fabric in multi-feed knitting have not been entirely successful. However, this defect is overcome by knitting the fabric in the manner in which the portion of fabric shown in Figure 22 is knit. This portion of fabric may represent any part of the stocking at which multi-feed knitting commences or at which an additional knitting station is brought into action.
In order to expedite production, the introduction of additional yarn in the initiation of multi-feed knitting occurs at the termination of knitting the shadow welt 271 and at the termination of knitting the heel pocket 273, since only the main knitting and yarn feed stations are used in the circular knitting of the turned welt 270 and the shadow welt 271, and in reciprocatory knitting of the heel pocket 2'73 and the toe pocket 275. Although'the enlarged fragmentary view of the portion of fabric shown in Figure 22 illustrates the juncture of the circularly knit courses in the shadow welt 271 with the circularly knit courses in the leg 272, it is apparent that the courses formed from the heavy yarn in the upper portion of Figure 22 may be reciprocatorily knit courses, such as at the juncture of the bottom of the heel pocket 273 with the foot 274. v I
For purposes of illustration, the portion of fabric shown in Figure 22 includes courses C1, C2 and C3 which may be either circularly or reciprocatorily knit at the main yarn feed and knitting stations and, subsequent. v to the course C 3, courses C-3a, C-4, C-4a, C-5 and f C,54z are knit, the courses C-4 and C5 being knitat the main knitting station and the courses C-3a, C-4a and C-5a being knit atthe auxiilary knitting station. The portions of needle wales shown in Figure 2 are indicated at W1,'W'2 through W-9 and W-10 through W416i It will-be noted that the fabric is shown as being broken away between wales W6' and W-7, between, wales W-8 and W 9, and between wales W-14' and W15 to indi-' cate that there may be a substantial number of additional wales interposed between the particular needle wales at which the fabric is shown as broken away. A more detailed description of the fabric section showntin Figure 22 will be. given in .the following description of the method-of operation.
' Method of operation stitches are transferred from the dial hooks to the'cylinderfineedlesto form the: turned welt 2701 (Figure 121),;
I circular. knitting all in a conventional manner. II l this Q Thereafter, the afterlwelt or shadow wel t,2l7 1'-is knit by '11 welt 271, the auxiliary stitch cam 171, the deflecting cam 172 and the auxiliary shedding cam 170 remain inactive, as do the auxiliary yarn feed fingers 126, 121. stitches are drawn only at the main knitting station as a relatively heavy yarn, such as yarn MH (Figure 6) is fed to corresponding needles and as the butts of corresponding needles pass beneath the left-hand stitch cam 93.
The courses -1, (3-2 and C3 in Figure 22 may represent final reciprocatory courses in the heel 2'73 or they may represent final courses in the shadow welt 2".1 in Figure 21. It will be noted that a yarn change occurs during the knitting of course (3-3 from right to left in Figure 22, in which the yarn feed finger 6522 having the relatively light weight yarn ML is lowered to operative position while the yarn feed finger 65a remains in lowered position, so that both the relatively heavy and the relatively light yarns MH and ML are fed to a few of the needles, such as at the wales W-3 through W in Figure 22, to form overlapping stitches thereat, whereupon the yarn feed finger 65a is raised to inoperative position so that subsequent needles take, from finger 65b, only the relatively fine or light weight yarn ML in the hooks thereof and draw stitches therewith as they pass through the main knitting station. Although the latter overlapping vstitches may be formed by a few of any of the needles, it is preferred that the latter overlapping stitches are formed by the needles in section F (Figure 20). The manner in which the needles form the latter over-lapping stitches is conventional in single feed knitting.
As the yarn feed finger 65a raises to inoperative position, one of the auxiliary yarn feed fingers is lowered to operative position as will be later described, and it will be assumed that the yarn feed finger 12%) moves into operative position in this instance. Now, since the main knitting station is spaced in advance of the auxiliary knitting station, the overlapping stitches are formed in course C-3 and wales W-S through W-i, on needles SN in section F, at substantially the time that the short butt needles in section D move adjacent the auxiliary stitch cam 171. At this time, the auxiliary stitch earn 171 is permitted to be moved inwardly by the compression springs Z12 (Figures 14 and 15) to engage the outer edges or the butts of short butt needles SN in section D. Of course, the needle deflecting cam 172 also moves in unison with the auxiliary stitch cam 171.
Also, at this time, the shifting cam 221 (Figures 16 and 17) remains withdrawn sothe auxiliary stitch earn 171 is actually moved inwardly on a higher than normal level or, in other words, to a partially operative position. .in other words, auxiliary stitch cam 1'71 moves inwardly, on a high level against the butts of needles. SN in section D so as to subsequently engage and lower the butts of medium short butt needles MSN of. section E. As the butts of the needles in. section E are being lowcred, the spring 212 will move the cam l7ll"inwardly to a position closely adjacent the needle cylinder so that the short butt needles SN in section F and the succeeding needles will be lowered. Also, as the auxiliary stitch cam iil moves against the butts of needles SN in section D the auxiliary yarn feed finger i259 moves into opera tive position (Figure 6) and the auxiliary sinker cam 35 (Figures and :7) is moved outwardly to operative position, by the. means heretofore described, to withdraw corresponding sinlcers at the auxiliary yarn feed station 3115. it should be noted thatauxiliar yarn feed finger 120 moves downward to operative position so as to start feeding yarn AL to needles in section E.
v The auxiliary stitch cam 171 remains in raised partially operative position as the medium short butt needles MSNin section B and the short butt needlesSN in section Thus,
1'2 the yarn to the needles is held by the clamping means 73 (Figure 3) in the usual manner so the leading needles in the section B adsorb the initial excessive tension in the relatively fine or light weight yarn AL as it extends from the clamping means '73 and through the yarn feed finger 120.
However, since the auxiliary stitch cam 171 occupies raised, partially operative position as the needles in section E pass below the same, the hooks of the needles MSN are merely lowered to where the yarn AL as laid upon or deposited upon the ledges of the sinkers immediately subsequent to the movement of these needles past the yarn feed finger 120 as shown in Figure 8. It will be noted that the sinker cam 136 (Figure 5) moves the sinkers inwardly immediately after they pass the auxiliary yarn feed station 115 so the end of the yarn ALis held in the nibs of the corresponding sinkers as the latter sinkers and needles continue movement with the needle cylinder from right to left in Figure 6 and until the needles are raised by the right-hand stitch cam 92 and lowered by the stitch cam 93 in forming the remainder of course 0-3 (Figure 22).
It is extremely important to note that the shedding cam 1'70 remains withdrawn while the auxiliary stitch cam 171 occupies said raised or partially operative position as shown in Figure 6, so the leading needles to which the auxiliary yarn AL is fed retain thereon the stitches F moved passed and are lowered by the auxiliary stitch yarn extending therefrdm preceding the introduction of previously formed at the main yard feed station. The auxiliary stitch earn 171 remains in its raised or partially operative position until all the needles in both sections E and F in Figure 20 and a few of the medium short butt needles, say, four needles, in section G have moved past the same.
However, as the short butt'needles SN in section F move into alinernent with the needle raising o'rshedding cam 170, the cam is permitted to move inwardly under the influence of the compression spring 253 (Figure 18) so as to raise all the needles in section G, and all subsequent needles throughout multi-course knitting, to where the'latchcs-of these needles pass above the ledge of the sinkers and, consequently, through the loops previously formed on these needles.
As the leading medium-short-butt needles MSN in section G moves into engagement with the auxiliary switch cam 171, the bell crank 235 is moved in a clock wise direction in Figures 4 and 12 to move the shifting cam 22l'inwardly so the stitch cam 171 is lowered to fully operative position. 1 It is apparent that several needles in section G move past the auxiliary "stitch cam 171 in the course of its downward movement so the first of 'the needles in section G (Figure 20) draws the first stitch formed from the auxiliary yarn Al. which, in this instance, is the stitch a formed in the needle wale W41 and course C -Sa.
Since the auxiliary stitch cam 171 is in the course or downward movement from said partially operative position to 'fully operative position-as several of the needles in section G (Figure 20) move past the same, it is thus seen that an extremely small or short stitch is initially formed from the yarn AL in the Wale W-ll and course C-3a, and subsequent stitches, such as b, c and d formed from the yarn AL progressively increase in length until the auxiliary stitch cam 1'71 is in fully operative or lowered position, at which timethe needles commence forming stitches of normal-or regular length, say, at the wale W-15 in course C 3, It is well known thatithe shorter or smaller thestitches formed, the more taut are the stitches so the tautness of the stitches gradually diminishes from the stitch formed in Wake W-llito the stitch formed in Wale W-IS in course C-3a. Stitch a is made assmall as possible; that is,'.it is only large enough to permitthe hook and the latch of the correspondingneedleto pass through the stitch asithe stitchis cast off the needle iu forming. the subsequent course, 4.15); the: main yarn-feeding station 66 audits trates how the courses the stitches formed from the yarn AL in wales W-11 through W-14 and course C-3a, for example. are so very small and so very tight that the yarn AL is tightly clinched or locked in engagement with previously and subsequent ly formed stitches in these wales so the tail T (Figure 22) of the fine auxiliary yarn AL cannot be dislodged from the fabric at the initial stitch a with any less ditficulty than would be encountered in dislodging any others of-the stitches from the body of the fabric being knit.
7 Also, because of the extremely small size of the stitches a and immediate subsequent stitches b, c, d, it is not apparent to the viewer that the course C-3a actually commences at the wale W11. Instead, it appears in viewing the actual fabric as though the course C-3a commences at some point midway or substantially close to the first full length or full size stitch, such as that formed in wale W-lS of course C-Sa. Since the stitches a, b, c' and others of the extremely short stitches which may be formed as a result of practicing the present method are so very small-relatively to adjacent stitches, any stretching or pulling forces placed upon the fabric at these points are entirely absorbed by the adjacent stitches rather than saidrelatively small stitches, thereby practi- I cally eliminating the probability of eyelets or enlarged stitches being formed at the point or points at which auxiliary yarns are introduced into the fabric at an auxiliary knitting station or stations in multi-course knitting.
It may be desirable to step down the stitch cam 171 from partially operative to fully operative position (see 165a in Figure 1), so as to successively form two or more stitches the same size as stitch a (Figure 22), and to then gradually and progressively increase the size of the stitches up to regular size.This can be more readily performed at the termination of the shadow welt 271 than at the termination of the heel 273, because the heavy yarn MH is only knit on approximately one-half of the needles in the final course of the heel section 273, and the small tight stitches formed at the introduction of the auxiliary yarn might then form an objectionable line in the i'nstepof the stocking. It is apparent, however, that the introduction of the auxiliary yarn AL at the first course C'3 formed from the yarn ML causes the small tight stitches to be practically hidden by those stitches in thesame wales found from the heavy yarn MH. Also, the small tight stitches actually appear beneath the heels of the wear'er and may be hidden by the shoes of the wearer. Theportions of courses C- 4, C-4a, C5 and C5a are included in Figure 22 merely to bear out'the fact that alternate courses 0-4, C-5 and subsequent alternate courses are formed from the first relatively fine or light weight yarn ML and intervening courscr C-4a, C- S a andsubsequent interveningcourses are formed from the relatively fine or light weight auxiliary yarn AL, and that one'of said'alternate courses and one of said intervening' courses are'knit with each revolution of the needle cylinder.
straighten out at the juncture of the needle waleeW-ll), W-ll as knitting progresses. 7 In"thepresent' embodiment of the invention, the leg 27 2 of the stocking shown in Figure 2 1 i. knit following the introduction of auxiliary yarn so that twocourses are formed with each revolution of the needle cylinder and legvi/as'knit. I t
' Immediately prior to commencing knitting of the heel 273*and the toe 275 of the stocking shownin Figure 21, theshedding ca'm' 170 moves outwardly to inoperative .positionbefor'e the-auxiliary stitch cam 171 is withdrawn. The auxiliary stitch. cam i171, 'then,occupies operative :positionzlong enough for those remaining needles which were raised by the shedding cam 1 70 to. movedownwardly 7 ,through, previously f rmed stitches and. thus lraviq stitches The showing in Figure 22 also illus v therewith. Thereupon, the auxiliary stitch cam 171 and the yarn feedfinger are withdrawn .to inoperative position. 1
Immediately prior to withdrawal of the shedding cam and the auxiliary stich earn 171 to inoperative position, the yarn feed finger 65a is lowered into operative position to feed the relatively heavy yarn MH to the same needles which are subsequently the last to move past the cams 170 and 171, so as to form overlapping stitches from both of the yarns. Of course, since the heel and toe pockets 273, 275 are knit with the needles in the sections B through'H, it is apparent that the last needles which pass through the auxiliary knitting station, that is, beneath the auxiliary stitch cam 171 while it is in operative position; should be needles included in one of the sections B through H or at the juncture of any adjacent sections B through H.
It is thus seen that we have provided a novel means and method for introducing auxiliary yarns during the knitting of fabric to effect multi-course or multi-feed knitting wherein the'initial stitches formed from each additional yarn are extremely small and are formed following the depositing of the yarn upon the ledges of the sinkers without forming stitches therefrom.
It is within the scope of the present invention to eliminate the necessity of initially depositing the auxiliary yarn upon the ledges of sinkers. However, this is preferred in'order that initial stitches, such as the stitch a in Figure 22, may be as small and as tight as possible and it is preferred that this be done by first moving the auxiliary stitch cam 171 inwardly at a sufiiciently high level so that it will not cause the corresponding needles passing therebeneath to draw stitches, and then lowering the stitch cam 171 in the manner described.
In; the drawings-and specification'there has been set forth a preferred embodiment-of the invention and, although specific terms 'are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes.
of limitation, the scope'ofthe invention being defined in the claims.-
We claim: A e
1. In a method of knitting seamless hosiery having a first portion knit from at least one first yarn and a secend portion knit frorn at'least one second yarn and at least one third yarn; the steps of knitting a plurality of courses of regular stitches solely from the first yarn to form saidfirst portion, knitting a few regular stitches from the first andsecond ya'rns, continuing knitting solely from the second yarn; then knitting a few stitches from .the'third yarn independently of the second yarn, commencing with at least one extremely small stitch and gradually increasing the size ofthe, stitches until the stitches formed are of said regular size,and then knitting successive circular courses of regular stitches solely from the third yarn and solely from the second yarn in alternation. r
2. In a method of knitting seamless hosiery having a first portion knitfrom, at least onerelatively heavy weight .65 the foot 274 is also knit in the same manner in which the l first yarn and a second portion knit from at least one relatively light weight second yarn and at least one rela-' tively light weight third yarn, the steps of knitting a plurality of courses solely frorn'the first yarn to form said first portion, knitting a few stitches of regular size from the first and second yarns in a medial portion of.
the final course of the first portion, then continuing knitting stitches of regular size solely from the secondyarn to complete said final course, then knitting a few stitches from the third yarn independently of the second yarn, commencing with at least one extremely small stitch and gradually increasing the size of the stitches until the stitches formed are of regular size, and then knitting successive circular courses .of regular size stitches solely from the'third yarn and solely from the second yarn in alternation. x
. A mete 9 hi q i t ni a ofa typehaving first and second seriallyarrangedknitting stations which includes the steps of feeding a first yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith at the first knitting station, feeding a second yarn to a first few selected needles at the second knitting station without drawing stitches thereat, then feeding the second yarn to a second few selected needles immediately subsequent .to the said first few and drawing stitches of progressively increasing lengths therewith at the second knitting station, then continuing feeding the first yarn to all the needles and draw ing stitches therewith at the first knitting station and continuing feeding the second yarn to all the needles and drawing stitches therewith at the second knitting station with a plurality of successive revolutions of the needle cylinder to form two courses with each revolution of the needle cylinder.
4. The method of introducing an auxiliary yarn, during the knitting of tubular fabric with a main yarn, ina circular knitting machine having a rotary cylinder with needles, a main feeding and knitting station, and at least one auxiliary feeding and knitting station spaced from the main feeding and knitting station, which method cornprises introducing an auxiliary yarn to a few inactive needles, continuing feeding said yarn to a few additional needles immediately subsequent to the first-named few needles while gradually and progressively rendering the second-mentioned few needles active to cause said sec ond-mentioned needles to draw stitches of progressively increasing length up to, but not exceeding, the length of regular fabric stitches, and then knitting regular fabric stitches on all subsequent needles at the auxiliaryfeeding and knitting station in addition to knitting regular stitches at the main feeding and knitting station to form at least two courses with each revolution of the needle cylinder.
5. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine of a type having first and second serially arranged knitting stations which includes the steps of feeding a first yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith at the first knitting station to form a first fabric section,.then feeding the first yarn and a second yarn to a few needles and drawing a few stitches therewith at the first knitting station during the knitting of the final course in the firstfabric section, then feeding only the second yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith at the first knittingstation, then feeding a third yarn only to a few needles and drawing stitches therewith of progressively increasing length at thesecond knitting station, then feeding the third yarn to allsubsequent needles and forming stitches therewithofnormal length at the second knitting stationand feeding the second yarn to all needles and forming stitches therewith at the first knitting station with a plurality ,of successive revolutions of the needle cylinder during rotary knitting to form a second fabric section.
6. A method of knitting on a circular independent needle knitting rnachine which includes the steps of feeding a first yarn to needles during reciprocatory knitting ofa plurality of courses to form a first fabric section, feeding a second yarn while also feeding the first yarn to a few needles while knitting a final. coursein the first fabric sec- I tion, then feeding a third'ya'rn to the needles independently of the first and second yarns'while forming stitches of sub stantially lesser lengththan the stitches previously formed frorn the first and second yarns, then gradually increasing the length of stitches formed from the third yarn to ultininet foirn stitches from the third yarn of substantially the same length as the stitches previously formed from the first and second yarns, and then alternately feeding said second and third yarns to the needlesduring rotary knitting of a second fabric section While forming stitches of regular length so that alternate and intervening courses are formed by the second and third yarns, respectively.
7. 'A method of knitting on a circular independent needle knitting machine which includes the steps of feeding a first yarn to needles during rotary knitting of a plurality of courses to form a first fabricsection, then feeding a second yarn while also feeding the-first yarn to'a few pendently of the first and second yarns while forming stitches of substantially lesser length than the stitches previously formed from the first and second yarns, then gradually increasingthe length of the stitches formed from the third yarn to ultimately form stitches from the third yarn of substantially the same length as the stitches previously formed from the first and second yarns, and then alternately feeding said second and third .yarns to the needles during rotary knitting of a second fabric section while forming stitches of regular length so that alternate and intervening courses are formed from the second and third yarns, respectively. a 1. The method of introducing an auxiliary yarn, during the knitting of tubular fabric with a main yarn, in a circular knitting machine having a rotary cylinder with needles, sinkers cooperating with the needles, amain feeding and knitting station, and an auxiliary' feeding and knitting station spaced circumferentially of the cylinder from the main feeding and knitting station, which method comprises introducing an auxiliary yarn to a first few selected needles, then lowering said first few needles to deposit the yarn in the hooks thereof upon the ledges of the sinkers without drawing stitches with said first few needles, then gradually increasing the extent to which a second few of the needles are progressively lowered while feeding such auxiliary yarn to the needles to where the first needle of the second few immediately subsequent to said first few needles is lowered below the ledges of adjacent sinkers sufficient only to cast off the stitch then on said first needle and to thereby draw an extremely small stitch therewith and to where subsequent needles in said second f ew draw stitches ofprogressively increasing length as compared to the stitch formed on the first needle, and then continuing knitting with the needles at the main and auxiliary stations in alternation.
9. Arnethod of knitting on a circular knitting'machine having first and second serially arranged knitting stations including first and second respective stitch cams which includes the steps of feeding at least one yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith at the first knitting station while the second stitch cam is withdrawn to form a fabric section, then moving the second stitch cam on a higher level than that of the first stitch cam into the path of the needles while feeding a second yarn to needles in advance of the second stitch cam such as to cause, needles to take the second yarn in the hooks thereof without drawing stitches therewith, then lowering the second stitch cam to substantially the same level as the first stitch-cam to cause a subsequent few needles taking yarn at the second knitting station to be lowered progressively increasing distances to first form at least one relatively small stitch therewith and to then form stitches of progressively increasing length, andfeeding the first yarn to all the needles and the second vyarn to all the needles and forming stitches therewith at therespectivefirstand second knitting stations with a plurality of successive revolutions of the needle cylinder during rotary knitting to form" a succeeding fabric section. e V i '10. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine having first and second seriallyrarranged knitting stations including first and second respective stitch cams which includes the steps of feeding at least one relatively heavy yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith at the first knitting station during reciprocatory knitting while the second stitch cam is withdrawn to form afirst fabric section, feeding the heavy yarn and a' first'relatively light yarn to needles and drawing stitchesztlierewith at the first station, then moving the second stitch. cam on a higher level thanthat of the first'stitch card into the path Ofthe needles while feeding a second relatively light weight yarn to needles in advance of the s'eco'rid'stitch cam such as to'cause' needles to take said second yarn'in 17 the hooks thereof without drawing stitches therewith, then lowering the second stitch cam to substantially the same level as the first stitch cam to cause a subsequent few needles taking said second yarn to be lowered progressively increasing distances to first form a relatively small stitch therewith and to then form stitches of progressively increasing length, and feeding said first yarnto all the needles and said second yarn to all the needles and forming sistches therewith at the respective first and second knitting stations with a plurality of successive revolutions of the needle cylinderduringrotary knitting to form a second fabric section. i
11. A method of knitting on, a circular knitting machine having first and second serially arranged kniting stations including first and second respective stitch cams which includes the steps of feeding at least one relatively heavy yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith'at the first knitting station during rotary knitting while the second stitch cam is withdrawn to form a first fabric section, feeding the heavy yarn and a first relatively light yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith at the first station, then moving the second stitch cam on a higher level than that of the first stitch cam into the path of the needles while feeding a second relatively light weight yarn to needles in advance of the second stitch cam such as to cause needles to take said second yarn in the hooks thereof without drawing stitches therewith, then lowering the second stitch cam to substantially the same level as the first stitch cam to cause a subsequent few needles taking said second yarn to be lowered progressively increasing distances to first form a relatively small stitch therewith and to then form stitches of progressively in creasing length, and feeding said first yarn to all the needles and said second yarn to all the needles and forming stitches therewith at the respective first and second knitting stations with a plurality pfsuccessivejrevolw tions of the needle cylinder during rotary knittingto form a second fabric section. V o, 7 o
12. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine which includes the steps of feeding a relatively heavy yarn to needles for a plurality of courses during knitting of a first fabric section, feeding a first relatively fine yarn and also feeding the heavy yarn to a few needles while knitting a final course in the first fabric section,
knitting a few stitches from the first fine yarn .independ ently of the heavy yarn, introducingia second relatively fine yarn to the needles independently of the other mentioned yarns in which, the initial stitch is extremely small as compared to regular stitches knit from the other yarns and a few succeeding stitches are progressively in-' creased in length until the stitches subsequently formed from the secondfine yarn are of regular size, and then feeding said first and'second yarns separately to the needles during rotary knitting of a second fabric section so that said first and second fine yarns appear only in alternate and intervening courses,'respectively'.
13. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine which -includes the steps of feeding a relatively heavy yarn to needles for a 'pluralitypf, courses, during reciprocatory knitting of a first fabric sectionQjIfeding a first relatively fine yarn and also feeding the heavy yarn to a few needles while knitting a final'course in' the'fir'st fabric section, knitting a few stitches from the first fine yarn independently of the heavy yarn, introducing a second relatively fine yarn to the needles independently of the other mentioned yarns in which the initial stitch is extremely small as compared to regular stitches knit from the other yarns and a few succeeding stitches are progressively increased in length until the stitches subsequently formed from the second fine yarn are of regular size, and then feeding said first and second yarns separately to the needles during rotary knitting of a second fabric section so that said first and second fine yarns appear only in alternate and intervening courses, respectively.
14. A method of knitting on a circular knitting machine which includes the steps of feeding a plurality of first yarns separately to the needles during rotary knitting of a first fabric section so that any one yarn appears only in recurring courses, feeding a second yarn to needles independently of said first yarns for a plurality of courses during knitting of a second fabric section, feeding any one of said first yarns and also feeding the second yarn to a few needles While knitting a final course in the second fabric section, then knitting a few stitches from the last-mentioned one of the first yarns independently of the second yarn, then introducing at least one other of .said first;yarns to the needles independently of the remaining yarns in which the initial stitch is extremely small as compared to regular stitches knit from the other yarns and a few succeeding stitches are progressively increased in length until the stitches subsequently formed from the other of said first yarns are of regular size, and then feeding said first yarns separately to the needles during rotary knitting of a third fabric section so that any one of said first yarns appears only in recurring courses.
15. A method of knitting on a circular independent needle knitting machine having sinkers and first and second serially arranged knitting stations including first and second respective stitch cams, which method includes the steps of feeding at least one yarn to needles and drawing stitches therewith at 'the first knitting station while the second stitch cam is withdrawn to form a first fabric section, then moving the'second stitch cam on a higher level than that of the first stitch cam into the path of the needles while feeding a second yarn to needles inadvance of the second stitch cam such as to cause needles to lay the second yarn upon the ledges of sinkers without drawing stitches therewith, then lowering the .seobnd stitch cam to substantially the same level as the 'fir-st stitch cam to cause a subsequent few needles taking yarn at the second knitting station to be lowered progressively increasing distances below the ledges of the sinkers to first form a relatively small stitch therewith and to then form stitches of progressively increasing length, and feeding the first yarn to all the needles and the second yarn to all the needles and forming stitches therewith at the respective first and second knitting stations with a plurality of successive revolutions of the needle cylinder during rotary knitting to form a succeeding fabric section.
16. A circular knitting machine having a circular series of independent needles, sinkers, a main set of stitch cams,
-a main yarn feed, an auxiliary yarn feed spaced from the main feed, an auxiliary stitch cam subsequent to the auxiliary feed, first means to raise needles to take the auxiliary yarn while retaining previously formed stitches between the hooks and latches thereof, means to move'the auxiliary stitch cam into position on a high level such that at least portions of the hooks of a few of the needles raised by said first means remain above the sinkers, second needle raising means, means to move the second needle raising means into position for raising needles following said few needles to. take the auxiliary yarn while passing the latches of said following needles above previously formed stitches thereon, and means, operable in timed relation to the means to move the second needle raising means, for lowering the auxiliary stitch to the auxiliary feed, first means to raise needles to take the auxiliary yarn while retaining previously formed stitches between the hooks and latches thereof, pattern controlled means to move the auxiliary stitch cam into position on a high level such that at lemt portions of the hooks of a few of the needles raised by said first means remain above the sinkers, second needle raising means, pattern controlled means to move the second needle raising means into position for raising needles following said few needles to take the auxiliary yarn while passing the latches of said following needles above previously formed stitches thereon, and pattern controlled means, operable in timed relation to the means to move the second needle raising means, for lowering the auxiliary stitch cam to stitch-forming level whereby a few of said following needles draw stitches of progressively increasing length as the auxiliary stitch cam is lowered and subsequent needles draw stitches of constant length.
18. In a circular knitting machine having a cylinder with latch needles, and a main knitting station with a main yarn feed and a main stitch cam for actuating the needles to knit regular size stitches from the main yarn; the combination of an auxiliary station spaced circumferentially of the cylinder from the main station, said auxiilary station including an auxiliary yarn feed and an auxiliary stitch cam, means to move the auxiliary stitch cam into partially operative position with its lower surf-ace on a relatively high level, means to raise substantially all the needles for taking yarn from the'auxiliary feed, said high level of the partially operative auxiliary stitch cam being such that a few of the needles so raised retain the yarn in the hooks thereof without drawing stitches therewith, means for lowering the auxiliary stitch cam to fully operative position whereby succeeding needles take yarn from the auxiliary feed and a first few of said succeeding needles are progressively lowered increasing distances to form stitches of progressively increasing sizes and whereby all needles subsequently draw stitches of regular size at the auxiliary stitch cam and at the main station in succession.
19. In a circular knitting machine having a cylinder with latch needles, a main knitting station with a main yarn feed and a main stitch cam for actuating the needles to knit the main yarn and a plurality of sinkers between the needles; the combination of an auxiliary station spaced circumferentially of the cylinder from the main station, said auxiliary station including an auxiliary yarn feed, means to move the auxiliary yarn feed into operative position, means to raise all the needles for taking yarn from the auxiliary feed, means subsequent to the auxiliary feed to lower a leading few of the needles so raised to a higher level than that to which they are normally lowered during ordinary knitting such that said few needles retain the auxiliary yarn .in the hooks thereof and deposit the auxiliary yarn upon the sinkers without drawing stitches therewith, and means for progressively lowering a first few needles, immediately succeeding said leading few needles, progressively increasing distances below the ledges of the sinkers to form stitches of progressively increasing sizes whereby all needles thereafter are lowered to said normal level and thereby draw stitches of regular size at the auxiliary station and at the main station in alternation.
2Q. In a circular knitting machine having a cylinder with latch needles, a main yarn feed station and a main knitting station, said main knitting station including a main stitch cam and sinkers cooperating with said needles to knit regular size stitches from the main yarn at the main stitch cam; the combination of an auxiliary yarn feed and an auxiliary stitch earn spaced circumferentially of the cylinder from the main station, means to move the auxiliary yarn feed into operative position, means to move said auxiliary stitch cam into partially operative position to where the lower surface thereof is spaced below the ledges of the sinkers a distance substantially equal to the distance from the upper surfaces of the butts of the needles to the lower surfaces of the books of the needles, means to raise some of the needles for taking yarn from the auxiuiary feed' while said auxiliary stitch cam occupies said partially operative position whereby the latter needles deposit the auxiliary yarn upon the ledges of the sinkers, means to gradually lower the auxiliary stitching cam as the butts of a few succeeding needles pass therebeneath whereby the first of said few needles draws a relatively small stitch and the remainder of said few needles draw stitches of progressively increasing size and whereby, thereafter, all needles draw regular size stitches at the main and auxiliary stitch cams in alternation 21. A structure according to claim 20 having a normally inoperative needle raising cam disposed in advance of the auxiliary feed, means to move the needle raising cam into operative position in timed relation to the lowering of the auxiliary stitch cam such that the leading needle raised by the needle raising cam is the first needle lowered sufiiciently by the auxiliary stitch cam to draw a stitch therewith, and the level of the upper surface of the needle raising cam being such as to move the latches of corresponding needles above stitches previously formed on said correspondingineedles.
22. A structure according to claim 20 wherein said means to raise some of the needles for taking yarn from the auxiliary feed is so positioned relative to the sinkers that loops previously formed on the needles are retained between the hook-s and the latches of the needles.
23. A structure according to claim 22 having an additional needle raising means comprising a normally in? operative needle raising cam disposed in advance of the auxiliary feed, means to move the needle raising cam into operative position in timed relation to the lowering of the auxiliary stitch cam such that the leading needle raised by the needle raising cam is the first needle lowered sufiiciently by the auxiliary stitch cam to draw a stitch therewith, and the level of the upper surface of the needle raising cam being such as to move the latches of corresponding needles above the ledges of the sinkers whereby the previously formed stitches are cast oflf the needles as they are subsequently lowered to stitch-forming level by the auxiliary stitch carn.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,525,704 Miller Oct. 10, 1950 2,664,723 McDonough Jan. 5, 1954 2,785,553 Hart et al. Mar. 19, 1957
US632106A 1957-01-02 1957-01-02 Method and means for preventing formation of eyelets in circular knitting Expired - Lifetime US2970459A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3260072A (en) * 1962-01-10 1966-07-12 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine
US3430463A (en) * 1961-02-18 1969-03-04 Hanes Corp Method and apparatus for making run-resistant knitted fabric
US3457735A (en) * 1963-07-10 1969-07-29 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting methods and machines

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2525704A (en) * 1946-01-16 1950-10-10 Hanes Hosiery Mills Co Knitting machine and method
US2664723A (en) * 1951-09-08 1954-01-05 Scott & Williams Inc Circular multifeed hosiery knitting machine
US2785553A (en) * 1955-05-31 1957-03-19 Carolina Knitting Machine Corp Circular multi-feed hosiery knitting machine and method of knitting

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2525704A (en) * 1946-01-16 1950-10-10 Hanes Hosiery Mills Co Knitting machine and method
US2664723A (en) * 1951-09-08 1954-01-05 Scott & Williams Inc Circular multifeed hosiery knitting machine
US2785553A (en) * 1955-05-31 1957-03-19 Carolina Knitting Machine Corp Circular multi-feed hosiery knitting machine and method of knitting

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3430463A (en) * 1961-02-18 1969-03-04 Hanes Corp Method and apparatus for making run-resistant knitted fabric
US3260072A (en) * 1962-01-10 1966-07-12 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting machine
US3457735A (en) * 1963-07-10 1969-07-29 Scott & Williams Inc Knitting methods and machines

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