US2966684A - Heat protective outfit - Google Patents

Heat protective outfit Download PDF

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Publication number
US2966684A
US2966684A US694691A US69469157A US2966684A US 2966684 A US2966684 A US 2966684A US 694691 A US694691 A US 694691A US 69469157 A US69469157 A US 69469157A US 2966684 A US2966684 A US 2966684A
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air
cooling
wearer
conditioning
outfit
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US694691A
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John H Bonin
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John H Bonin
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D13/00Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches
    • A41D13/002Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches with controlled internal environment
    • A41D13/005Professional, industrial or sporting protective garments, e.g. surgeons' gowns or garments protecting against blows or punches with controlled internal environment with controlled temperature
    • A41D13/0053Cooled garments

Description

Jan. 3, 1961 J. H. BONIN 2,966,684
HEAT PROTECTIVE OUTFIT 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 5, 1957 INVENTOR.
JDH/v H BUM/v Jan. 3, 1961 J. H. BONIN 2,966,684
HEAT PROTECTIVE OUTFIT Filed Nov. 5, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 I III INVEN TOR.
L EH/v /Z FUN/N Jan. 3, 1961 BQNIN 2,966,684
HEAT PROTECTIVE OUTFIT Filed NOV. 5, .1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 IN VEN TOR. I
United States Patent HEAT PROTECTIVE OUTFIT John H. Bonin, Chicago, Ill., assignor to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army Filed Nov. 5, 1957, Ser. No. 694,691
14 Claims. (Cl. 2-81) This invention relates to a protective outfit for use in areas of high temperatures and in particular to an air cooling and conditioning outfit.
It is an object of this invention to provide a protective outfit to be worn by a person exposed to high temperatures.
Another object of this invention is to provide a protective outfit which not only insulates the wearer from high temperatures but also cools and conditions the body of the wearer.
It is also an object of this invention to provide an air cooling and conditioning system to be worn under an insulating unit.
Other objects and advantages will be readily apparent from the following description:
In general, the protective outfit is comprised of a tubular air cooling and conditioning system which is worn under an insulating unit. Air under pressure is fed into the tubular system, thereby continuously removing the heat which is not eliminated by the insulating unit. Holes in the air distributing system bleed a portion of the air onto the body of the wearer so that a conditioning as well as cooling system is provided. This air picks up the perspiration from the body and is vented to the atmosphere along with the cooling air through openings in the insulated unit. Boots and mittens form a part of the outfit and have provisions for connecting to the air cooling and conditioning system. A helmet having a similar cooling and conditioning system protects the face of the wearer from the high temperatures.
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a cut away front view of the outfit showing the entire outfit with a cut away portion showing the tubular cooling and conditioning unit.
Fig. 2 is a back View of the tubular unit showing the main distribution line and connecting cooling passages.
Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken along line III-III of Fig. 1.
Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken along line IV-IV of Fig. 1.
Fig. 5 is an exploded view of the mitten assembly.
Fig. 6 is a sectional View taken along line VI-VI of Fig. 1.
Fig. 7 is a sectional view of the helmet taken along line VII-VII of Fig. 8.
Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken along line VIIIV-IH of Fig. 7.
Fig. 9 is a view of the boot assembly.
Figure 10 is an enlarged fragmentary view showing in detail the connection of the mitten assembly and the cool ing and conditioning unit.
Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 the heat protective outfit It comprises an insulating suit or coverall 12 with a helmet 14, boot assembly 16, and mitten assembly 18. A tubular cooling and conditioning unit 20 is worn under the insulating suit 12.
The insulating coverall 12 is composed of a glass clothlined quilt 13 insulation, such as a felted fiber glass insulating material, covered by aluminized herringbone asbestos cloth. It is in a conventional coverall form having a zipper fastener 22. As seen in Fig. 4 a plurality of vent holes 24 in the quilt to provide an exit for the air are covered by respective flaps 26 constituting a plurality of valves to prevent entrance of the heat into the quiltbut;
operatively permitting exit therefrom of air under pressure through the vent holes.
The cooling and conditioning unit 20 is made of tubufeeder line to prevent collapsing of the plastic line. This hose is connected to an air source (not shown). The ends. of the main feeder line at the hands and feet have T connections 36 and 38 respectively, to which the boot assembly 16 and mitten assembly 18 are connected, as will be explained below.
The tubular passages 28 branch off from opposite sides of the feeder line 30 and encircle the portion of the body to be cooled as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, thus providing a doughnubshaped channel arrangement. Exist h0les 37 are provided near the ends of each individual tube 28 so that the air can be vented through holes 24 in coverall 12. In this way the doughnut-shaped channels obtain air from the feeder. and discharge it after travel half-way around the cooled portion. The opposite ends of tubes 28 are joined together by plastic strips 40 to keep the tubes in position. The channels 28 are graded in size so as to conform to the contour of the body. A sliding fastener 42 is used to join the trunk encircling portion.
Air is bled off from holes 44 in hose 34 and feeder line 30 to provide a cooling and conditioning air system which removes perspiration from the body of the wearer. From these holes the cool air can circulate over the body, picking up moisture and then can exit through vent holes 24 along with the heated air after cooling. In this way a continuous circulating layer of air passes over the body thereby controlling the humidity between the wearer and the unit proper.
Referring to Fig. 5, the detachable mitten assembly 18, is built along the same principle as the aforementioned portion of the outfit. A plastic cooling and conditioning air component is connected to one end of the T connection 36. This component 50 lies alongside the hand of the wearer and has openings which allow the air to circulate over the hand. Over component 50 is a plastic glove 52 which separates the cooling and conditioning component 50 and the air cooling and conditioning system defined'by main conduit 58 and tubular projections 60. Over the glove 52 is a tubular plastic member 54 having a conduit 56 for connection to the other end of T connection 36. Air component 50 and tube 56 may be secured to T connection 36 in any con ventional manner. For example, as shown in Figure 10, one end of tube 56 may be press fitted into the opening at one end of a flexible hose section 45 in fluid communication therewith and taped thereto as at 46 to prevent air leakage and to secure hose 46 and tube 56 in position. The other end of hose 45 is securely fitted to T connection 36 in fluid communication therewith. Similarly, one end of a flexible hose section 45 may be inserted into the opening 51 (Figure 5) of air component 50 and taped thereto as at 46 to prevent air leakage during use of the outfit. The other end of tube section 45 is securely fitted in fluid communication with the other end of T connection 45. Similarly, connections between conduits and 94 of boot assembly 16 and conduits 38 can be made utilizing flexible hose sections. Helmet as- Patented Jan. 3, 1961 sembly 14 may also be connected to a T connection in main line 30.
A circular main conduit 58 communicates with conduit 56 and acts as a feeder line for tubular projections 60 through which cooling air passes. The projections 64) have air exit holes 62. The air then exits through vent openings (not shown) at the ends of the exterior mitten 64. These vent openings are the same as vents 24. Attached to glove 52 is strip 53 which serves to hold projections 60 in position as shown in. Fig. 6 which shows adjacent 50 cross sections of the wearers fingers 57. The entire mitten assembly 18 can be removably attached to the suit 12 or merely pulledv over the end of the sleeve of suit 12.
Referring to Figs. 7 and 8, helmet 14 has three coaxial cylinders 67, 69 and 71 of sheet aluminum forming an insulation chamber 68, a cooling chamber 70 and a central opening 72 into which the head of the wearer is inserted. The insulating chamber 68 and cooling chamber 70 are filled with an insulating material such as Fiberglas. A tubular air conduit '74 leads air to the cool-' ing chamber through holes 76. The air then flows through chamber 70 and exits through vent 78 in the top of the helmet. A tubular air conduit 80 leads air into the central chamber through holes 82. The air then circulates over the head of the wearer and also exits through vent 78. Inlet connections 84 and 86 on air conduits '74 and 8i) respectively can be joined to an independent air source or if desired can be connected to a T connection (not shown) at the neck of main feeder line 30. At eye level a window 88 is provided. Preferably, this window is composed of three layers: the exterior member of Pyrex glass, the intermediate of metallized plastic and the innermost of Vycor glass.
The boot assembly 16 is shown in Fig. 9. A cooling and conditioning air conduit 90 lies inside a plastic boot 92 which acts as a separating element between conduit 90 and a cooling and conditioning air conduit 94 which lies over the boot 92 and is connected to metallic inlet 95 which leads to the sole of the boot. The air conduits are connected to main line 30 through a T connection 38. The sole of the boot assembly 16 has an asbestos belting layer 96 lying on an aluminum member 98 which forms passages 99 through which cooling air from inlet 94 passes. The lower part of the sole has three layers of asbestos belting 100. An overall asbestos boot 101 covers the unit and overlaps the coverall 12.
In wearing the outfit, a light cotton overall (not shown) is preferably worn over the body to prevent direct contact of the plastic with the body of the wearer The cotton coverall does not appreciably affect the cooling and conditioning system and provides added comfort to the wearer. The air requirements are approximately 200-300 cubic feet per minute of air at 90 F. and 80% relative humidity. This maintains an ambient temperature of 85 F. with a 70% humidity around the wearer when exposed to temperatures up to 400 F.
Many modifications and variations of the present invention are apparent in view of the teachings herein, without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A heat protective outfit for conditioning the body of a wearer comprising: an outer insulating garment having vent holes therein; an inner air cooling and conditioning unit adapted to substantially encircle the entire body of a wearer including a first direct cooling and conditioning air flow system adapted for connection to an air source and having a plurality of vent holes therein positioned for directing air against the body of a wearer, and a second indirect cooling and conditioning air flow system comprising a plurality of closed tubular channels adapted to encircle the body of a wearer and in fluid communication with said first direct system, said channels having a plurality ofvent holes adjacent the closed ends thereof positioned therein for directing air away from the body of a wearer; a helmet for covering the head of a wearer; a boot assembly for covering the feet of a wearer; a mitten assembly for covering the hands of a wearer; and means connecting said helmet, boot and mitten assemblies to said inner cooling and conditioning unit so as to cool and condition the head, hands and feet of a wearer.
2. A heat protective outfit for conditioning the entire body of a wearer comprising: an outer insulating garr ment having a plurality of valves associated therewith normally closing a plurality of vent openings in said garment and being movably responsive to pressure within said garment for opening; an inner air cooling and con ditioning unit adapted to substantially encircle the body of a wearer, said unit including a first direct cooling and conditioning air flow system extending longitudinally of the trunk, arms and legs of a wearer and adapted to be connected to an air source, said first direct air flow system having a plurality of vent holes positioned therein for directing air flow against the body of a wearer, and a second indirect cooling and conditioning air flow system comprising a plurality of channels, each closed at one end thereof and in fluid communication with said first direct air flow system, pairs of said channels extending from each side of said first direct air flow system adapted to encircle the body of a wearer, vent holes positioned in said channels adjacent the closed ends thereof for directing air flow away from the body of a wearer, whereby a portion of air from said air source flowing through said cooling and conditioning unit to said garment openings is bled through said first system vent holes directly against the body of a wearer for cooling thereof and the remainder of said air flow from said first direct air flow system through said second indirect air flow system to said second indirect air flow system vent holes for indirect cooling of the body of a wearer, said direct cooling air and said indirect cooling air reuniting in the space defined by the outer insulating garment and the body of a wearer for venting through said garment vent openings; a helmet assembly for covering the head of a wearer; a boot assembly for covering the feet of a wearer; a mitten assembly for covering the hands of a wearer; and means connecting said helmet, boot and mitten assemblies to said inner cooling and conditioning unit so as to cool and condition the head, hands and feet of a wearer.
3. A body enclosing heat protective unit comprising: a cooling and conditioning unit including a first direct cooling and conditioning air flow system extending longitudinally of the trunk, arms and legs of a wearer and adapted to be connected to an air source, said first system having a plurality of vent holes positioned therein for directing air flow against the body of a wearer, and a second indirect cooling and conditioning air flow system comprising a plurality of channels, each closed at one end thereof and in fluid communication with said first system, pairs of said channels extending from each side of said first system adapted to encircle the body of a wearer, vent holes positioned in said channels adjacent the closed ends thereof for directing air flow away from the body of a wearer, whereby a portion of air from said air source in flowing through said cooling and conditioning unit is bled through said first system vent holes directly against the body of a wearer for cooling and conditioning thereof and the remainder of said air in flowing from said first direct system through said second indirect system to said second indirect system vent holes indirectly cools and conditions the body of a wearer.
4. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 2 in which said helmet assembly comprises a first cylindrical member providing a central chamber for inclosing the head of a wearer; a second cylindrical member coaxial with said first member and defining a first annular space therebetween; a third cylindrical member coaxial with said second member and defining a second annular space therebetween; insulating material in said first and second annular spaces, a cooling and conditioning unit adapted to be connected to an air source including a direct first cooling and conditioning air flow system extending through said cylindrical members into said central chamber for encircling the head of a wearer, said system having vent holes therein opening into said central chamber positioned to direct air flow against the head of a wearer, and an indirect second cooling and conditioning system extending through said third and second cylindrical members into said first annular space and encircling said first cylindrical member, said second system having a plurality of vent holes therein opening into said first annular space and means for venting said first and second systems through said third cylindrical member.
5. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 4 in which said first cooling and conditioning air fiow system includes a conduit leading to within said first cylindrical member, and said second cooling and conditioning air flow system includes a second conduit leading to within said first annular space, said conduits being adapted for connection to said air source.
6. A heat protective assembly as defined in claim 2 in which said boot assembly comprises a sole portion for providing support for the foot of a wearer, a cooling and conditioning unit adapted for connection to an air source including a first direct cooling and conditioning air flow system lying adjacent the foot of a wearer and having vent holes therein for directing air flow against the foot of a wearer, a separating member between said first fluid flow system and a second indirect cooling and conditioning air flow system having vent holes therein for indirectly cooling and conditioning the foot of a wearer.
7. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 2 in whichsaid insulating garment comprises a coverall covering the torso, arms, and legs of said wearer; said coverall being formed of a glass cloth-lined quilt of insulating material.
8. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 7 in which said coverall has an outer lining of aluminized cloth.
9. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 4 and further comprising a top member covering said cylindrical members, said top member having an opening through which said air can be vented to the atmosphere.
10. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 6 in which said sole portion comprises an asbestos layer lying adjacent the sole of said foot of said wearer, a second asbestos layer, a metallic member between said asbestos layers, said metallic member having passages for circulating said cooling air and providing a firm support for said foot of said wearer.
11. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 6 in which said separating member comprises a plastic boot.
12. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 2 in which said mitten assembly comprises an air ventilating conduit lying adjacent the hand of said wearer, an air cooling member, a glove separating said air cooling member from said ventilating conduit, means connecting said conduit and said member to an air source, and an asbestos mitten covering said conduit, said member and said glove.
13. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 12 in which said cooling member comprises a circular tubular conduit connected to said air source, a plurality of tubular projections on said circular conduit, said projections communicating with said circular conduit and having openings though which said cooling air can exit.
14. A heat protective outfit as defined in claim 13 and further comprising a strip on said glove, said strip having openings through which said projections pass so as to hold said projections in position.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,418,069 Delano Mar. 25, 1947 2,512,990 Akerman June 27, 1950 2,540,547 I Rodert Feb. 6, 1951 2,560,591 Oltrogge July 17, 1951 2,561,891 Tbcker July 24, 1951 2,573,414 Dunn Oct. 30, 1951 2,627,072 Frommelt et al. Feb. 3, 1953 2,701,923 Toman Feb. 15, 1955 2,702,386 Johnston Feb. 22, 1955 2,709,667 Grubb et al. May 31, 1955 2,773,262 Brouha et al Dec. 11, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 808,342 Germany Mar. 27, 1952
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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3083373A (en) * 1960-11-17 1963-04-02 Mary P Rizzotto Snow protector
US3121877A (en) * 1960-06-14 1964-02-25 North American Aviation Inc Glove ventilating system
US3385286A (en) * 1967-01-25 1968-05-28 Westinghouse Electric Corp Hydrogen-oxygen catalytic heater
US3411156A (en) * 1965-03-17 1968-11-19 Whittaker Corp Space garment
US3449761A (en) * 1967-04-17 1969-06-17 Richard W Long Heated underwater diving suit
US3874000A (en) * 1974-01-21 1975-04-01 Max S Altman Hot water mitt
FR2437973A1 (en) * 1978-10-05 1980-04-30 Bidou Gabriel Heated clothing for motorcyclists - uses hot air drawn from engine fins and blown through channels in protective clothing
US4302851A (en) * 1980-05-27 1981-12-01 Adair Robin W High temperature protective mitt
EP0051714B1 (en) * 1980-10-11 1984-08-22 Oskar W.K. Roehr Clothing articles such as jackets, parkas, overalls, coats, blousons or the like for heating drivers of motor vehicles
US5421326A (en) * 1993-04-19 1995-06-06 H.R.I. Incorporated Heat resistant suit with active cooling system
US6055670A (en) * 1999-04-13 2000-05-02 Parker; Kirk A. Breath-heated insulated glove and associated method
US20060277785A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-14 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for footwear and foot coverings
US20060277786A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-14 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for apparel
US20060277787A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-14 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for footwear
ITMI20091862A1 (en) * 2009-10-27 2011-04-28 Tech & Power Ltd Heat exchanger and accessory for cryotherapy and / or thermotherapy treatments
EP2387894A2 (en) 2010-05-19 2011-11-23 Werner Maier Flexible air conditioning device for heating or cooling a part of the body
US20120053661A1 (en) * 2010-08-25 2012-03-01 Gary Neil Hooper Wearable, motion activated body part warming device
USD784665S1 (en) 2015-06-08 2017-04-25 Tbl Licensing Llc Toe cap for footwear
US10743622B2 (en) 2015-06-08 2020-08-18 Tbl Licensing Llc Footwear ventilation structures and methods

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2418069A (en) * 1943-03-24 1947-03-25 Richard Delano Inc Head gear
US2512990A (en) * 1947-07-09 1950-06-27 John D Akerman Ventilator suit
US2540547A (en) * 1947-03-24 1951-02-06 Stewart Warner Corp Air-conditioned garment
US2560591A (en) * 1949-07-11 1951-07-17 Bernard W Oltrogge Foot ventilating shoe
US2561891A (en) * 1949-07-28 1951-07-24 Johns Manville Insulating fabric
US2573414A (en) * 1947-03-05 1951-10-30 Karl L Dunn Hot work garment
DE808342C (en) * 1949-04-27 1952-03-27 Friedrich Limm Clothing and other equipment for fire protection
US2627072A (en) * 1951-05-29 1953-02-03 Horace A Frommelt Heat-resistant garment
US2701923A (en) * 1953-05-22 1955-02-15 Frank J Toman Ventilated boot
US2702386A (en) * 1949-03-22 1955-02-22 Temple Safety On Sea Mfg Co In Fire and water safety suit
US2709667A (en) * 1951-04-18 1955-05-31 Grubb Robert Fire fighter suit
US2773262A (en) * 1954-10-14 1956-12-11 Du Pont Air ventilation harness

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2418069A (en) * 1943-03-24 1947-03-25 Richard Delano Inc Head gear
US2573414A (en) * 1947-03-05 1951-10-30 Karl L Dunn Hot work garment
US2540547A (en) * 1947-03-24 1951-02-06 Stewart Warner Corp Air-conditioned garment
US2512990A (en) * 1947-07-09 1950-06-27 John D Akerman Ventilator suit
US2702386A (en) * 1949-03-22 1955-02-22 Temple Safety On Sea Mfg Co In Fire and water safety suit
DE808342C (en) * 1949-04-27 1952-03-27 Friedrich Limm Clothing and other equipment for fire protection
US2560591A (en) * 1949-07-11 1951-07-17 Bernard W Oltrogge Foot ventilating shoe
US2561891A (en) * 1949-07-28 1951-07-24 Johns Manville Insulating fabric
US2709667A (en) * 1951-04-18 1955-05-31 Grubb Robert Fire fighter suit
US2627072A (en) * 1951-05-29 1953-02-03 Horace A Frommelt Heat-resistant garment
US2701923A (en) * 1953-05-22 1955-02-15 Frank J Toman Ventilated boot
US2773262A (en) * 1954-10-14 1956-12-11 Du Pont Air ventilation harness

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3121877A (en) * 1960-06-14 1964-02-25 North American Aviation Inc Glove ventilating system
US3083373A (en) * 1960-11-17 1963-04-02 Mary P Rizzotto Snow protector
US3411156A (en) * 1965-03-17 1968-11-19 Whittaker Corp Space garment
US3385286A (en) * 1967-01-25 1968-05-28 Westinghouse Electric Corp Hydrogen-oxygen catalytic heater
US3449761A (en) * 1967-04-17 1969-06-17 Richard W Long Heated underwater diving suit
US3874000A (en) * 1974-01-21 1975-04-01 Max S Altman Hot water mitt
FR2437973A1 (en) * 1978-10-05 1980-04-30 Bidou Gabriel Heated clothing for motorcyclists - uses hot air drawn from engine fins and blown through channels in protective clothing
US4302851A (en) * 1980-05-27 1981-12-01 Adair Robin W High temperature protective mitt
EP0051714B1 (en) * 1980-10-11 1984-08-22 Oskar W.K. Roehr Clothing articles such as jackets, parkas, overalls, coats, blousons or the like for heating drivers of motor vehicles
US5421326A (en) * 1993-04-19 1995-06-06 H.R.I. Incorporated Heat resistant suit with active cooling system
US6055670A (en) * 1999-04-13 2000-05-02 Parker; Kirk A. Breath-heated insulated glove and associated method
US8146266B2 (en) 2005-06-02 2012-04-03 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for footwear and foot coverings
US20060277785A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-14 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for footwear and foot coverings
US20060277787A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-14 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for footwear
US7392601B2 (en) 2005-06-02 2008-07-01 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for apparel
US8359769B2 (en) * 2005-06-02 2013-01-29 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for footwear
US20060277786A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-14 The Timberland Company Chimney structures for apparel
ITMI20091862A1 (en) * 2009-10-27 2011-04-28 Tech & Power Ltd Heat exchanger and accessory for cryotherapy and / or thermotherapy treatments
EP2387894A2 (en) 2010-05-19 2011-11-23 Werner Maier Flexible air conditioning device for heating or cooling a part of the body
US20120053661A1 (en) * 2010-08-25 2012-03-01 Gary Neil Hooper Wearable, motion activated body part warming device
USD784665S1 (en) 2015-06-08 2017-04-25 Tbl Licensing Llc Toe cap for footwear
USD831314S1 (en) 2015-06-08 2018-10-23 Tbl Licensing Llc Toe cap for footwear
USD886423S1 (en) 2015-06-08 2020-06-09 Tbl Licensing Llc Toe cap for footwear
US10743622B2 (en) 2015-06-08 2020-08-18 Tbl Licensing Llc Footwear ventilation structures and methods

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