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US2965699A - Shear-action wire-connector - Google Patents

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US2965699A
US2965699A US64000157A US2965699A US 2965699 A US2965699 A US 2965699A US 64000157 A US64000157 A US 64000157A US 2965699 A US2965699 A US 2965699A
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Prior art keywords
connector
bars
wire
figure
shear
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Bollmeier Emil Wayne
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3M Co
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3M Co
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R4/00Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact
    • H01R4/10Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact effected solely by twisting, wrapping, bending, crimping, or other permanent deformation
    • H01R4/18Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact effected solely by twisting, wrapping, bending, crimping, or other permanent deformation by crimping
    • H01R4/188Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact effected solely by twisting, wrapping, bending, crimping, or other permanent deformation by crimping having an uneven wire-receiving surface to improve the contact
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R4/00Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact
    • H01R4/10Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact effected solely by twisting, wrapping, bending, crimping, or other permanent deformation
    • H01R4/18Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact effected solely by twisting, wrapping, bending, crimping, or other permanent deformation by crimping
    • H01R4/20Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact effected solely by twisting, wrapping, bending, crimping, or other permanent deformation by crimping using a crimping sleeve
    • H01R4/203Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact effected solely by twisting, wrapping, bending, crimping, or other permanent deformation by crimping using a crimping sleeve having an uneven wire-receiving surface to improve the contact
    • H01R4/206Electrically-conductive connections between two or more conductive members in direct contact and means for effecting or maintaining such contact effected solely by twisting, wrapping, bending, crimping, or other permanent deformation by crimping using a crimping sleeve having an uneven wire-receiving surface to improve the contact with transversal grooves or threads
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01RLINE CONNECTORS; CURRENT COLLECTORS
    • H01R43/00Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current connectors or for joining electric conductors
    • H01R43/04Apparatus or processes specially adapted for manufacturing, assembling, maintaining, or repairing of line connectors or current connectors or for joining electric conductors for forming connections by deformation, e.g. crimping tool
    • H01R43/058Crimping mandrels

Description

Dec. 20, 1960 E. W. BOLLMEIER 2,965,699

sHEAR-ACTION WIRE-CONNECTOR v Filed Feb. 13,1957

MVM

United States Patent() SHEAR-ACTION WIRE-*CONNECTOR Emil Wayne Bollmeier, Mendota Heights, Minn., as

signor to Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, St. Paul, Minn., a corporation of Delaware Filed Feb. 13, 1957, Ser. No. 640,001

10 Claims. (Cl. 174-84) This invention is concerned with wire-connectors, such as may be used for splicing or connecting together bare or insulated copper or aluminum wire conductors in telephone and other electrical circuits. One application for which the connectors of the invention are particularly well adapted is the splicing of plastic-covered copper wires in telephone cable junctions.

Wire-connectors made in accordance with the principles of this invention are capable of forming low-resistance connections between wire conductors. The connection is permanent and is not loosened or increased in electrical resistance by repeated mechanical stresses, `temperature or pressure changes, or exposure to moisture. Insulation-covered wire conductors need not be preliminarily stripped of insulation. Heating vand soldering are dispensed with. Connections are therefore completed in much less time than was formerly required; yet the connectors, and the tools or apparatus needed yfor their installation, are extremely simple .both to manufacture and to use.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a view in perspective of one form of shearaction connector element;

Figure 2 is a plan view of the elementof Figure 1 in kflat extended position;

,ure 5 .Figure 7 is a plan view, partly in section, of a con- .nector assembly including the connector element of `Figures 5 and 6, applied to a pair of insulated .wire conductors and in readiness for nal sealing by means of a reducing die, and Figure 7a is a ,partial plan 4view of one jaw member of .the reducing die;

Figure 8 is a plan view, partly in section, of an insulated connector assembly applied to and sealed vabout a connected pair of insulated wire conductors;

Figure 9 is an end elevation of another form of'connector element in position for compression;

Figure 10 is a plan view of the connector element of Figure 9, and Figure 10a is a view inperspective .of one` of the shear segments thereof;

Figure r11 is an end elevation of-theqconnector `of Figures 9 and l() in compressed formand Figure 12 is anr exploded view illustrating in perspective-a` still further modification of myy wire-connector.

Figure 3 will serve to illustrate the principles on which each of these wire connectors operate. ,Theinsulatedwire conductor 10 is herel shown pressed between the two sides of the connector elementr 11 v.offliiigureL ,v the upper side consisting of bars`12,y 1p3, .14.and 1,15." and 2,965,699 Pfenied Dec. 2o, 196g the lower side correspondingly consisting of bars 16, 17 and 18. Bars 12 and 16 are spaced apart a distance substantially greater than the diameter of the insulated conductor 10, whereas bars l5 and 18 come into sliding Contact. The spaces between the intervening pairs of bars gradually decrease in the direction from bar 12 to bar 15, providing for a series of shearing actions of gradually increasing severity. As the two sets of bars, i.e. the two sides of the connector 11, are forceably pressed together and against the conductor previously inserted therebetween, the latter deforms into an increasingly serpentine shape. Where the wire passes between a pair of bars spaced the full diameter of the insulated covering, the action is primarily that of bending. Where the bars are more and more closely spaced, the plastic covering is first deformed and forced from the metallic con ductor 19, the latter is next drawn out or reduced in cross-section and is eventually either completely severed or reduced to a thickness permitting easy removal of the extending segment 20 by hand pulling.

The required control of the spacings between the sev eral bars of this connector element is insured by the presence of the widened tips 21, 22 and 23 of the bars 16, 17 and 18 respectively. The tip 21, for example, tits snugly between the bars 12 and 13 when the connector is formed into the shape shown in Figure l.

The spacings between the several bars, and the distance between the two sets of bars, i.e. between the two sides of the connector element of Figure 1, are based on the particular size of wire which is to be connected. Thus, the largest space between bars of the shear-action connector in fully closed condition should be at least `as large as the maximum wire diameter, and the interior opening of the connector should be of a size suicient to accept the number and size of wires for which connection is desired.

The connector element 11 is shown in Figure 4 surrounding three insulated wire conductors 10a, 10b, and 10c, and is itself surrounded by a metal sheath 24 and an insulating covering 25. Typical sheath and cover structures are shown in greater detail in Figures 7, 8 and 12. Jaws 26 and 27 are shown in position for exerting -pressure against the two opposing sides of the connector assembly in forming the desired connection. Pressure is applied as indicated by arrows, by means not shown, but which may be either mechanical or hand-operated, 'as for example with suitable pliers or other lever arrangement. During such operation, the bars of the connector element 11 form the connection with the several conductors, the metal sheath 24 is flattened around the connector 11, fitting snugly against both ends of the connector and preventing it from expanding axially along the wires and thereby becoming loosened, and the insulating covering 25 conforms to the compressed assembly and provides electrical insulation and physical isolation.

The connector element 50 of Figures 5 and 6 is, like that of Figures 1 4, conveniently stamped and formed from a single flat strip of metal, The bar segments 51, 52 and 53 are displaced from the plane of the metal strip in one direction, and segments 54, 55 and 5K6 are displaced in the opposite direction, as shown in Figure 6, to provide an open channel through which the wire conductors may be threaded. Pressure applied against the opposing extended surfaces of the connector, as prep viously indicated in connection with the device of Figure conductor. Accurate spacing of the bars is maintained,

since both ends of each bar are permanently attached :to the side portionsv5'7, 58,which however necessarily increase the over-all width of the connector element over that of the structure of Figure l.

In Figure 7 the connector element 50 of Figures 5 and 6 is assembled within a metal shell 70 and a section of plastic insulating tubing 71 having constricted end portions 72, 73, surrounded by metal tube elements 74, 7S respectively. Since this form of connector element is self-restraining and does not require exterior longitudinal restraint as does the connector of Figure l, the metal shell 70 may be omitted if desired, but is here included for added mechanical protection. The insulated wires 76 and 77 pass entirely through the assembly, thus assuring that they are adequately encompassed by the connector element. After compression of the connector t) within its retaining shell 70 and insulating covering 71, as described in connection with Figure 4, the segments 78 and 79 of the conductors are easily removed at the shear plane location between the contacting bars 56 and 53 of the compressed connector, by slight hand bending and pulling if necessary; or they may alternatively be left in place. In either case, both of the constricted end portions are next tightly closed and sealed by means of intermeshing reducing die elements 80 partially indicated in cross-section, and $1 partially indicated in elevation, forming a moisture proof seal at both ends of the connector assembly. The working portion of die 81 is shown in plan view in Figure 7a, wherein is indicated at .section s-s the sectional view shown in Figure 7. The

dies are forced against the tube segment 74 (and 75) by pressure applied as indicated by the arrows.

A somewhat different sealing assembly is illustrated in Figure 8. ln this case, the conductors are first cut to the desired length for insertion in the connector assembly, which in this instance is open only at the upper end. The connector element 83, metal sheath 84, and insulating covering 85 are next compressed to form the connection, and the metal tube 82 is separately compressed, by means of reducing dies as in Figure 7, to form the moisture proof seal. The metal sheath 84 is here shown to be constricted at both ends, as required for preventing longitudinal displacement of the shear bars of connector 83 which, like the bars of connector element 11 of Figure 1, are disconnected along one side of the connector.

The insulating covering provided in these connector assemblies is relatively tough and rigid, and does not of itself adequately conform to the shape of the conductors so as to provide a fully moisture resistant seal. For this latter purpose, it has been found effective to coat the inner surface of at least the constricted portion or portions of the insulating covering with a soft plastic tacky hydrophobic substance such as a silicone grease, soft hydrocarbon polymer, or fluorocarbon wax. A suitable material adheres well to all surfaces contacted, will flow around all of the components of the seal, and will thereafter remain in place as an effective permanent moisture barrier. Surprisingly small amounts of such plastic sealing materials are required, particularly with plastic-insulated wires. The high pressures used in compressing the seals serve to distribute the hydrophobic sealant in extremely thin adherent and highly shear-resistant films over all insulation interfaces Within the sealed area, and also tend to deform the plastic insulation, to provide a fully moisture-resistant barrier which effectively resists displacement and penetration under repeated variations in external fluid pressure.

A further modification of my novel connector element is illustrated in Figures 9, 10, 10a and 11. The connector element 90 consists of a at multi-slotted segment 91 and a plurality of raised shear bars 92, 93 and 94 passing through the slots. The shear bars are maintained in accurate position by widened end portions frictionally tting against the slot edges, and are prevented from being pulled through the slots by extended corner segments, all as illustrated in Figure 10a. The same shearing action is obtained with this connector element as with those previously described, and permanent electrical connections may be obtained, particularly where effective transverse restraining means, such as an exterior conformable steel shell, are additionally provided.

The connector element is applied to the conductors by passing the conductor ends between the plate 91 and the shear bars 92, 93 and 94, and then compressing the assembly between flat pressure plate 95 and shaped die 96 as indicated by arrows in connection with Figure 9. The ends of the shear bars are thereby deformed into substantial parallelism with the edges of the plate 91, as indicated in Figure l1.

The several slots in the segment 91 of the connector element 90 are identical in width, whereas the slot openings formed in the connector element 11 of Figure 1 are each of a different width. Either system may be applied to either style of connector element.

The steel shell of Figure l2 is similar to the shell 24 of Figure 4 in being completely closed at one end. In the connector of Figure l2, however, the shell serves an additional function of holding the several independent deformable segments of shear bars of the connector in operative position both before and after compression about the wire or wires. The segments, of which two are shown as bars 111 and 112, are forced snugly into the shell 110 and the open end of the latter is then crimped over the outer edge of the outermost segment so that fully effective shearing action is obtained between opposing bars on compression of the connector. The assembly may be further protected with an insulating covering and a moisture resisting seal as heretofore described. In this connector, as in other connectors with a metal shell having only a single opening, moisture resistance may alternatively be effected by introducing into the bottom of the shell a small amount of a hydrophobic sealing compound or composition as hereinbefore identied. When the connector is applied to conductors and compressed to form the connection, the plastic composition is forced around the several parts to form a highly effective moisture barrier.

These connectors have been applied to aluminum as well as copper wires, both bare and insulated, and in a wide variety of wire diameters. The wire may be insulated with plastic, paper, or other insulating covering; in all cases, the shearing action has been found suflicient to displace the insulation and to provide good electrical contact between connector element and metal conductor. The effect is particularly good with wires coated with polyethylene or similar plastic material, since the shearing and stretching action appears to cause orientation of the polymer and reduction in its subsequent flow characteristics. The formation of completely moisture-proof seals with this type of wire is of particular importance, since the polyethylene wire covering itself is also substantially completely impervious to moisture. The requirement is much less important in the case of paper covered conductors, where other means must be provided for insuring the absence of moisture throughout the entire circuit.

It has been pointed out that the effectiveness of these connectors depends in great measure on the shearing action provided by the adjoining opposed shear blades or pressure bars. Surprisingly, it is found that the shearing edges themselves need not be harder than the material of the conductors, but may in fact be substantially softer. For example, the connector unit 11 of Figure l may be made of half-hard copper plate or of aluminum plate having a hardness of S2 or S-3. The wire deforms the shearing edges of the connector even as it is itself deformed and cold drawn, thereby apparently providing much better electrical contact than would otherwise be obtained.

Additional cutting action may be provided where desired, for example by hardening or burring the cutting edges at the juncture between bars 15 and 18 of the connoted in connection with the description of Figure 7. Plated steel may also be used. Where differences in cutting action at the several shearing zones are desired, the connectors of Figures l and 12 are particularly useful, since the separate shear bars of these connectors may be made of different materials having different degrees of hardness. The metal of the connector element should be as free of springiness as possible.

While the numbers and dimensions of the shearing bars of the connector elements are not critical, it has been found that to 7 bars, properly spaced, are adequate in a connector designed,'for example, to accept wires from number 19 gauge to number 26 gauge inclusive. Larger numbers of bars may be used; fewer bars may be found effective where wires of a single diameter are to be connected. The spaces between bars along the connector will preferably be uniformly progressively altered as shown.; but two or more such spaces may be made equal in width provided the bars are sufficiently rigid. l

It is desirable in most cases to hold the over-all dimensions of the connector assembly to a minimum. The present connector may be made extremely small and compact while remaining highly effective. The individual bar elements must of course be of sufficient width and thickness to withstand the pressures involved in bending and shearing the conductors without themselves being unduly deformed. It has further been noted that somewhat improved connections are obtained where the width of these bars is increased even beyond the minimum thus established. The additional length of conductor provided between areas of shear appears in these cases to permit additional cold drawing of the metallic conductor and to avoid any possibility of decreased cross-section and weakening of the conductor at such areas.

An exemplary connector assembly for use on telephone cable connections may include a connector element as illustrated in Figure l and made of aluminum plate of a thickness approximately twice the diameter of the largest copper conductor to be used. It may be protected by, and contained within, a cold-drawn open-ended steel shell such as that of Figure 1l, made of steel plate having an initial thickness of 0.012 inch. The assembly may be contained within an insulating jacket closed at one end and constricted at the other, as illustrated in Figure 8, the jacket being formed of a thin film of hard and tough copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate and having a thickness approximately the same as that of the metal connector element. The constricted neck portion may be interiorly coated with a thin layer of soft sticky isobutylene polymer, and externally surrounded with a close fitting thin copper or aluminum tube. Such a connector assembly has been applied to test pairs of polyethylene insulated copper wires, one wire being number 26 gauge and the other number 19 gauge, and subjected to prolonged testing including 50 cycles alternating from 10 lbs ./sq. in. pressure to a vacuum of 20 inches of mercury while suspended in an aqueous electrolyte at a temperature of 130 F., and repeated at a temperature of 0 F., without any failures whatever and with no significant decrease in conductivity across the connection.

Further mdifications and combinations of the connctors herein described and illustrated, such as doubleended connectors, connectors in which the final servering stage is omitted, connectors designed for mounting on binding-posts, heavy-duty connectors for use with large diameter wires or cables, connectors in which shear elements are mounted directly on or formed from a compression shell member, and various others in which the principles of this invention are incorporated, are contemplated as coming within the scope of this invention as defined in the appended claims. One such combination involves a double-ended connector having one or more narrow slot areas at the center portion and oneor more wide slot areas at each end portion, and hence being equally well adapted for application to wire-ends at either end portion.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. A wire-connector comprising, in combination, (a) a series of opposing pairs of scissortype shear blades, the blades of each pair being separated from each other to form with the remaining pairs a central open channel for insertion of wire-ends, and (b) spacing means associated therewith providing progressively decreased fixed spacing between opposed blades longitudinally of said channel for controlling the shearing action of each pair of blades to provide increasing severity of shear along inserted wire-ends and for restraining said blades from displacement along said wire-ends when said connector is closed thereagainst under uniform compression between parallel pressure-plates.

2. A shear-action wire-connector element having a first series of spaced shear bars along one side, and an opposing series of spaced shear bars along the opposite side, of a central open wire-receiving channel enveloped thereby, all of said bars being fastened at one end along a supporting spacer member, each of the bars of said opposing series being spaced to form a shear zone with at least one of the bars of said first series, and, where the bar forms shear zones with two bars of said first series, being provided with a free end spacer portion fitting closely between said two bars; the width of said shear zones progressively increasing along said spacer member.

3. A shear-action Wire-connector element having two sets of spaced, generally parallel shear bars permanently connected at the ends to restraining and spacing members common to all of said bars, alternate bars being displaced from the plane of said common members in opposite directions to provide an open channel therebetween for insertion of wire-ends, the opposing shear edges at one end of said element coming together in sliding contact on forcing the two sets of bars toward each other, the remaining bars being spaced apart at progressively greater distances along said channel from said one end.

4. A shear-action wire-connector element having two sets of spaced, generally parallel shear bars permanently connected at the ends to restraining and spacing members common to all of said bars, alternate bars being displaced from the Vplane of said common members in opposite directions to provide an open channel therebetween for insertion of wire-ends, said bars being spaced apart at progressively lesser distances along said common members from an open end of said channel.

5. A wire-connector assembly comprising a multiple shear action connector element having two sets of spaced, generally parallel shear bars permanently connected at the ends to restraining and spacing members common to all of said bars, alternate bars being displaced from the plane of said common members in opposite directions to provide an open channel therebetween for insertion of wire-ends, said bars being spaced apart at progressively lesser distances from one open end of said channel to provide increasing severity of shear action along a wiresegment inserted in said channel when said bars are compressed thereagainst; and a deformable weather-proof tubular plastic cover member surrounding Said element and having a constricted open tubular end portion providing for access to said open channel at said one open end by said wire-segment.

6. A wire-connector assembly as described in claim 5 in which the open tubular end portion of the plastic cover member is exteriorly provided with a close-fitting deformable tubular restraining member and interiorly supplied with plastic water-repellent adherent sealer composition.

7. A shear-action wire-connector capable of vproviding a. series of shearing actions of progressively increasing severity along a wire-segment when closed thereagainst by uniform compression between parallel at pressure.- applying surfaces and comprising, in combination, (a) multiple opposed-blade scissor-type shear-blade means, and (b) control means providing progressively decreased xed spacing between opposed blades longitudinally of said wire-segment for increasing the severity of said shearing actions under said uniform comprsssion.

8. A shear-action wire-connector comprising (a) a series of generally parallel bar-shaped scissor-type shearblade segments arranged alternately along opposite sides of a central open wire-receiving channel, (b) spacer elements at the ends of each of said segments providing progressively decreased spacing between opposed segments along said channel, and (c) restraining means for preventing displacement of said segments along said channel when said connector is closed against an inserted wire and under uniform compression between parallel pres sure-plates.

9. A wire-connector assembly including a connector element comprising multiple opposed-blade scissor-type shear-blade means and control means associated therewith providing progressively decreased fixed spacing between opposed blades longitudinally of said connector ele-v ment for increasing the severity of shearing action of said opposed blades when said connector is closed against an inserted wire and under uniform compression between parallel pressure plates, and a deformable weatherproof tubular plastic cover member surrounding said connector element and having a constricted open tubular end portion providing for access by a wire end to said connector element at the position of maximum fixed spacing between opposed blades.

10. A wire-connector assembly including a shearaction wire-connector as defined in claim 7, a deformable metallic shell member surrounding thev entire side areas of said wire-connector and open at least at the end at which maximum spacing between opposed blades of said connector is provided, and a deformable Weatherproof tubular plastic cover member surrounding said shell and having, in line with said open end area, a constricted open tubular end portion.

References (Cited in the file of this patent UNlTED STATES PATENTS 2,262,802 Hayden Nov. 18, 1941 2,327,650 Klein Aug. 24, 1943 2,375,480 Lee May 8, 1945 2,721,354 Anderberg Oct. 25, 179.55V 2,906,810 DAscoli f.,` Sept. 29, 1959 2,908,744 Bollmeier Oct. 13, 1959 FOREGN PATENTS 24,085 Great Britain Dec. 4, 1899 214,271 Germany Q Q- Feb, 19, 1909 683,860 Germany Nov. 17, 1939 688,703 Great Britain Mar. 11, 1953 213,239 Australia Nov. 22, 1956 765,082 Great Britain Jan. 2, 1957

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Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3125706A (en) * 1964-03-17 Certificate of correction
US3201744A (en) * 1961-02-15 1965-08-17 Itt Contact terminal for an electrical conductor member
US3205299A (en) * 1961-03-03 1965-09-07 Hi Shear Corp Conductive connector
US3259873A (en) * 1963-10-21 1966-07-05 Itt Terminals for flat electrical conductors
US3441659A (en) * 1967-02-13 1969-04-29 Amp Inc Shielded heater cable connection
US3474399A (en) * 1966-03-09 1969-10-21 Amp Inc Crimping ferrule with insert rings of hard material
US3594704A (en) * 1969-10-02 1971-07-20 Raychem Corp In-line connector for electrical conductors or the like
US3611262A (en) * 1969-02-06 1971-10-05 Amp Inc Electrical connector having integral wire severing means
US4019801A (en) * 1976-01-19 1977-04-26 Amp Incorporated Electrical splice
US4442316A (en) * 1980-11-15 1984-04-10 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Crimp connector for electrical wires
US4455057A (en) * 1981-12-21 1984-06-19 Thomas & Betts Corporation Insulation piercing terminal
US20070294873A1 (en) * 2006-06-22 2007-12-27 Robert Bogursky Apparatus and methods for filament crimping and manufacturing
US20090291601A1 (en) * 2008-05-24 2009-11-26 Michael Richter Contact
US8851443B2 (en) 2010-12-15 2014-10-07 Autosplice, Inc. Memory alloy-actuated apparatus and methods for making and using the same
US20150017845A1 (en) * 2013-07-09 2015-01-15 Hitachi Metals, Ltd. Wire connection member, wire connection structure and annular power distribution member
US9206789B2 (en) 2011-10-26 2015-12-08 Autosplice, Inc. Memory alloy-actuated apparatus and methods for making and using the same

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DE683860C (en) * 1935-01-03 1939-11-17 Bayernwerk Akt Ges A process for producing under high tensile forces overhead electrical line connections
US2262802A (en) * 1940-08-02 1941-11-18 Hayden Boyd Method of forming end fittings on wires
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US2721354A (en) * 1951-05-07 1955-10-25 Axel W Anderberg Cable attaching structure and method of making same
GB765082A (en) * 1953-10-19 1957-01-02 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Improvements in and relating to the insulation and protection of wire splices or connections
US2906810A (en) * 1956-02-15 1959-09-29 Anaconda Wire & Cable Co Insulated electric conductor splice
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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE214271C (en) *
GB189924085A (en) * 1899-12-04 1900-01-06 Robert Frederick Hall Improvements in Terminals and Connections for Electric Cables and like Conductors.
DE683860C (en) * 1935-01-03 1939-11-17 Bayernwerk Akt Ges A process for producing under high tensile forces overhead electrical line connections
US2327650A (en) * 1940-01-04 1943-08-24 Nat Telephone Supply Co Wire connecting sleeve
US2262802A (en) * 1940-08-02 1941-11-18 Hayden Boyd Method of forming end fittings on wires
US2375480A (en) * 1941-12-29 1945-05-08 Burndy Engineering Co Inc Coined wire splice
GB688708A (en) * 1950-06-21 1953-03-11 Glover & Co Ltd W T Improvements in couplings for stranded electric conductors
US2721354A (en) * 1951-05-07 1955-10-25 Axel W Anderberg Cable attaching structure and method of making same
GB765082A (en) * 1953-10-19 1957-01-02 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Improvements in and relating to the insulation and protection of wire splices or connections
US2906810A (en) * 1956-02-15 1959-09-29 Anaconda Wire & Cable Co Insulated electric conductor splice
US2908744A (en) * 1956-05-28 1959-10-13 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Cable splice cover

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3125706A (en) * 1964-03-17 Certificate of correction
US3201744A (en) * 1961-02-15 1965-08-17 Itt Contact terminal for an electrical conductor member
US3205299A (en) * 1961-03-03 1965-09-07 Hi Shear Corp Conductive connector
US3259873A (en) * 1963-10-21 1966-07-05 Itt Terminals for flat electrical conductors
US3474399A (en) * 1966-03-09 1969-10-21 Amp Inc Crimping ferrule with insert rings of hard material
US3441659A (en) * 1967-02-13 1969-04-29 Amp Inc Shielded heater cable connection
US3611262A (en) * 1969-02-06 1971-10-05 Amp Inc Electrical connector having integral wire severing means
US3594704A (en) * 1969-10-02 1971-07-20 Raychem Corp In-line connector for electrical conductors or the like
US4019801A (en) * 1976-01-19 1977-04-26 Amp Incorporated Electrical splice
US4442316A (en) * 1980-11-15 1984-04-10 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Crimp connector for electrical wires
US4455057A (en) * 1981-12-21 1984-06-19 Thomas & Betts Corporation Insulation piercing terminal
US8113243B2 (en) 2006-06-22 2012-02-14 Autosplice, Inc. Apparatus and methods for filament crimping and manufacturing
US20070294873A1 (en) * 2006-06-22 2007-12-27 Robert Bogursky Apparatus and methods for filament crimping and manufacturing
US8939180B2 (en) 2006-06-22 2015-01-27 Autosplice, Inc. Apparatus and methods for filament crimping and manufacturing
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