US2945530A - Method of treating sheet and strip material - Google Patents

Method of treating sheet and strip material Download PDF

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US2945530A
US2945530A US643367A US64336757A US2945530A US 2945530 A US2945530 A US 2945530A US 643367 A US643367 A US 643367A US 64336757 A US64336757 A US 64336757A US 2945530 A US2945530 A US 2945530A
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rolls
roll
waves
group
sheet
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Frederick K Maust
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Frederick K Maust
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21DWORKING OR PROCESSING OF SHEET METAL OR METAL TUBES, RODS OR PROFILES WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21D1/00Straightening, restoring form or removing local distortions of sheet metal or specific articles made therefrom; Stretching sheet metal combined with rolling
    • B21D1/02Straightening, restoring form or removing local distortions of sheet metal or specific articles made therefrom; Stretching sheet metal combined with rolling by rollers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21DWORKING OR PROCESSING OF SHEET METAL OR METAL TUBES, RODS OR PROFILES WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21D3/00Straightening or restoring form of metal rods, metal tubes, metal profiles, or specific articles made therefrom, whether or not in combination with sheet metal parts
    • B21D3/02Straightening or restoring form of metal rods, metal tubes, metal profiles, or specific articles made therefrom, whether or not in combination with sheet metal parts by rollers
    • B21D3/05Straightening or restoring form of metal rods, metal tubes, metal profiles, or specific articles made therefrom, whether or not in combination with sheet metal parts by rollers arranged on axes rectangular to the path of the work

Description

July 19, 1960` F, K. MAUST METHOD OF TREATING SHEET AND STRIP MATERIAL Uriginal Filed Nov. 4, 1955 FIGA.
O5 |04 99 lOO 99u lOl 98 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 his ATTORNEY July 19, 1960 F. K. MAUsT 2,945,530.
METHOD OF' TREATING SHEET AND STRIP MATERIAL Original Filed Nov. 4, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR FREDERICK K. MAUST BYQAMM his ATTORNEY July 19, 1960 F. K. MAUs'r METHOD OF' TREATING SHEET AND STRIP MATERIAL Originakl Filed Nov. 4, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 July 19, 1960 F. K. MAUST 2,945,530
METHOD OF TREATING SHEET AND STRIP MATERIAL Original Filed Nov. 4, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 FIG. ls. n. m
INVENTOR FRE ERICK K. MAUST BY M Unite METHOD OF TREATING SHEET AND STRIP MATERIAL Frederick K. Mausi, ss-36 212th st., Queens Village, NX.
Original application Nov. 4, 1955, Ser. No. 545,045. and this application Mar. 1, 1957, Ser. No.
-may be due to the edges of the sheet being longer than the center, thus producing edge buckles, or the center portion of the sheet may be longer than its edge portions, thereby producing center buckles. In wide sheets, certain areas of the sheet between the edges and the center may be short or long as compared to the rest of the sheet. These are mill shapes mentioned above. Other defects may be described as internal stresses in the sheet. These stresses may be caused by the rolling or by passes through a roller leveler adjusted to correct faulty mill shapes as described, or both.
The roller levelers of the prior art are able7 to correct sheets or strips having all of these defects. A roller leveler operates by subjecting the sheet to a series of waves transverse to the direction of movement of the sheet through the leveler. When the leveler is set to correct the sheet for faulty mill shapes such as those described above, then it is adjusted so that the amplitude of the waves is greater in the short portion of the sheet than in the long portion, thereby stretching the short portion kso that all portions of the sheet are made of equal length. Severe correction passes in a roller leveler invariably must be followed by a separate, so-called light iiattening pass to knead the structure sutiiciently to lay it at by counteracting or equalizing the internal stresses. When the leveler is set to correct the sheet for internal stresses, each transverse Wave has usually a substantially.
constant amplitude across the sheet.
The roller levelers of the prior art have not been able to make both mill shape and internal stress corrections in one pass. In operating such a leveler, it is first .set for mill shape correction, and when that is accomplished, then the internal stress elimination is done in another pass, either through the same leveler with a diiierent set` ting, or through another leveler.
In a roller leveler, a sheet or strip of material is subjected to transverse waves of sufficient magnitude to exceed the elastic limit of the particular material by pass-V States Patent O ice ing or back-up rolls for each straightening roll may consist of several longitudinally separated sections, or alternatively, each supporting roll may consist of one single roll. When the roller leveler is to correct internal stresses, the supporting roll sections for each straightening roll are kept in substantial alignment with each other, and parallel to the'straightening roll.
When it is desired to stretch preferentially one portion of the material with respect to another, then the sections of the supporting roll are adjusted diiierentially so that the straightening roll is either deflected by the adjustment into a convex, concave or sinuous contour or is deflected into such a contour by the material when it passes between the work rolls, the particular contour always depending on the setting of the supporting roll sections. The material being treated is thereby subjected to waves whose amplitude Varies transversely-of the sheet. This setting of the straightening roll and supporting roll positions is termed the deflection adjustment. The degree of both height and deflection adjustments depend upon various factors, such as physical properties, thickness, hardness and mill shape of the material, etc.
When using the roller levelers of the prior art, the rst step in leveling is to correct or stretch the short areas in the material by means of one or more correction' passes in which the straightening rolls of one or both banks are deected to stretch the desired areas in the material by waves whose amplitude varies transversely ofthe sheet.
Even though the proper length corrections are made in the sheet by these passes, the typical sheet still does not lay iiat. essary in which the straightening rolls Vof both opposite banks are kept in substantial parallel alignment to equalize and thus flatten the variously treated areas of the sheet by means of waves having substantially the same.- amplitude across the width of the sheet.
In order to stretch a portion of the sheet material, that portion must be preferentially stressed in the leveler beyond its elastic limit, so that it will not return to its previous dimension when it leaves the machine.
One Well known Itype of roller leveler is called a single tilt type. One bank of its straightening rolls is tiltable as a unit about an axis extending transversely of the path of movement of the material through the leveler and located midway between the entry and exit 4ends of .the machine. The opposite bank of rolls are v.the leveler without a momentary stop.
Another known type of roller leveler Iis termed the double tilt leveler and is shown and claimed in my V U.S. Patents No. 2,132,426, issued October vl1, 1938,
and No. 2,638,143, ,issued May l2, 1953. In the double tilt leveler, one bank of rolls is divided transversely into three groups, which may be termed an entry group,V a middle group and an exit group. As in the single tilt leveler, the straightening rolls are either all deected into a suitable contour in a 4mill shape correction pass or they are all kept in substantially straight alignment for a flattening pass. l
gradually increasing in amplitude from ya very small To Hatten the sheet, a second light pass is nec-v Experience In the double tilt leveler, the entry group of rolls subjects the material to wavesV 3 waves having a preselected maximum amplitude through: out the group. The exit group subjects the material to waves gradually decreasing in amplitude from the maximum to Substantially zero.
One main object of the present invention isV to provide a method of, and apparatusfor, leveling a sheet or strip of material in one single pass through a roller leveler combining both mill shape correction and attening steps.
Another object `is to provide still more traction between entry work rolls and material prior to both correcting and flattening steps than previously possible with the double tilt machines, by subjecting the material to waves of even transverse but gradually increasing amplitudeV in the pass direction at the entry side.
Another object is, in a roller leveler, to subject the material first to waves of transversely constant amplitude, gradually increasing in the direction of travel of the material from zero `to a maximum amplitude in the entry group rolls, then to waves of transversely varying amplitude in .the middle group of rolls .to correct the mill shape of the material and finally in the exit group of rolls to waves of transversely substantially constant amplitude gradually decreasing from a maximum to zero in the direction of movement of the strip material, for the purpose of attening .the material during the same pass through the roller leveler.
A further object is to provide a method and apparatus of the type described above in a double tilt leveler.
A still further object is to provide a leveler which can level material in a single pass for correction and flatten-V ing, and which needs no readjustment for correction and flattening when the direction of operation is reversed."
Other objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following description and claims, taken .together with the accompanying drawings.
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is an elevational view of the front or control side of a roller leveler embodying the invention;
Fig. 2 is an elevational View of the roller leveler of Fig. 1, taken from the right-hand end as viewed in Fig. 1, with certain parts broken away;
Fig. 3 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken on the line III-III of Fig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows;
Fig. 4 is a horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line IV-IV of Fig. 2;
Fig. 5 'is a fragmentary cross-sectional view on` an enlarged scale taken on line V--V of Fig. 4;
Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic cross-sectional view through the center section of the upper and lower banks of rolls, taken as on the line Vl--VI of Fig. 8, showing a convex deflection of the lower middle roll group;
Fig. 7 is a similar diagrammatic sectional View taken as on the line VIL-V11 of Fig. 8, showing the deflection of one of the side sections of the middle roll group;
Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic perspective view showing a sheet or strip passing throughthe leveler and being subjected to a convex deflection in the center section of the middle group of rolls;
Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic perspective view similar to Fig. 8, showing a strip subjected to a concave deflection in the center section of the middle group of rolls;
Fig. l0 is a diagrammatic cross-sectional view taken on the line X-X of Fig. 9;
Fig. 1l is a diagrammatic cross-sectional view on the line XL-XI of Fig. 9;
Fig. l2 is a diagrammatic perspective view similar to Figs. 8 and 9, showing a strip subjectedto a convex deliliection in a side section of .the middle group of ro s; Y
Fig. 13 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view similar to Fig. 3, of a roller leveler embodying a modified form of .the invention; Y
Fig. 14 is a diagrammatic perspective view of a sheet passing through the apparatus of Figs. 13, 16 and 17, with the center section of the entry group and the center section of the middle group both having convex deflections;
Fig. 15 is a diagrammatic sectional view on the line XV--XV of Fig. 14;
Fig. 16 is an elevational view similar to Fig. 2, of the modified form of apparatus shown in Fig. 13; and
Fig. 17 is an end-elevational view of the apparatus of Figs. 13 and 16, taken from the left-hand end as viewed in Fig. 16.
Referring to Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4, the leveler comprises a base 20 on which are mounted a pair of front roll housings 21 and a pair of rear roll housings 22. Each of roll housings is connected at the top by a cross piece 23. Upper and lower banks of straightening rolls extend the full width of the leveler between the roll housings 21 and 22. The upper bank of straightening rolls are identied by the reference numerals 27, 32, 33, 34 and 39. The lower bank of straightening rolls are identified by the reference numerals 78 and 85. The upper bank of supporting or backing up rolls are identified by the reference numerals 29, 36 and 41. The lower bank of supporting or backing up rolls are identied by the reference numerals 30 and 89. The drive ends (Fig. 2) of the straightening rolls have secured thereto universal couplings 25 and are driven by means of drive spindles 26 and a gear box, speed reducer and motor (not shown) as is well known in the art.
Double tilt of upper straightening rolls The principle of the double tilt is described in my Patent No. 2,132,426, issued October 11, 1938. The upper bank of straightening and supporting rolls is divided into three groups. In the left-hand group, as viewed in Fig. 1, straightening rolls 27 are journaled at their ends in front and rear bearing blocks 28 (Fig. l) and supported by supporting rolls 29 carried in bearing blocks 30 (Fig. 3), the bearing blocks 28 and 30 being fastened to a wing 31.
The straightening or Work rolls 32, 33 and 34 of the middle group are journaled at their ends in bearing blocks 35 (Fig. 1) and supported by supporting rolls 36 (Fig. 3) carried in bearing blocks 37, the bearing blocks 3S and 37 being fastened to a center beam 38.
In the right-hand group, as viewed in Fig. 1, straightening rolls 39 are journaled at their ends in bearing blocks 40 and backed up by supporting rolls 41 (Fig. 3) carried in bearing blocks 42, the bearing blocks 40 and 42 being fastened to a Wing 43. Three backing up rolls 41 are shown for each straightening roll. This particular number of backing up rolls was selected by way of example only, other numbers of rolls being entirely practical.
The center beam 38 is provided at each end with a cross head 44, which is guided in the roll housings 21 and 22. The two outer wings 31 and 43 which are tiltable around the center of the straightening rolls 32 and 34, respectively, are provided at their ends with projections 45 resting on a bar 46 attached to the beam 38. The contacting surface of projections 45 and bar 46 are concentric with the respective centers of tilting motion.
The straightening roll bearing blocks 2S and 40 of the Wings 31 and 43 are positively guided around their respective tilt centers by inner and outer arcuate surfaces 47a, 47b which bear respectively against arcuate surfaces provided on the center straightening roll bearing block 35 and against the straight inner guide surfaces of the roll housings 21 and 22. To tilt the Wings 31 and 4.3 around the respective longitudinal axes of straightening rolls 32 and 34, shafts 4S, one for each v/ing, are rotatably mounted in the cross head 44 and in bearings 49 attached to the center beam 38. The shafts 48 have fixed thereon eccentrics 50, best seen in Fig. 3, which engage shoes 51 sliding in brackets 52 fastened to the top of each wing. A hand grip lever 53, fastened to each shaft 48, is provided with a swing handle 54 engaging notches in av segment 55 secured to the center beam 38. Movement of lever 53 towards or away from the center of the leveler causes the respective wing to tilt towards or away from the lower bankV of straightening rolls. In other words, the work rolls mounted in the wing are set at an angle to the work rolls of the middle group which remain parallel to the lower bank of straightening rolls,
H eight adjustment The center beam 38, carrying the three groups of the upper roll bank, is suspended from a top bridge 58 by means of rigid but adjustable suspension rods 58a, so that the beam 38 and bridge 5S move as a unit. At each side of the leveler, a pair of lead screws 59 are journaled at one end in the top of the cross head 44 of the center beam 38, and at their opposite end in the top bridge 58. The screws 59 extend through and threadedly engage traveler nuts 60, which are xed on the cross-piece 23. Thus, the weight of the top bridge and the weight of the upper roll bank are transferred through nuts 60 to crosspieces 23, and thence through housings 21 and 22 to base Z0. Also, any upward force on the upper roll bank caused by material passing between the upper and lower roll banks, is transferred through the nuts 60. The whole top structure may be raised or lowered by means of hand wheel 56 fastened to a shaft 57 rotatably mounted in the top bridge 58. Fixed on the upper end of each lead screw 59'is a worm gear 61 meshing with worms 62 and 63. Worm 62 is fixed on the rear portion of shaft 57 while worm 63 is mounted on a sleeve 64 encircling the front portion of shaft 57 and connected to a pin clutch 65 on hand wheel 56. By disengaging the pin clutch 65 and turning hand wheel 56, the drive for the front screws is cut out and the rear cross head 44 of the center beam 38 can be raised or lowered and thus the upper roll bank inclined towards the front or rear.
This height adjustment or screw-down may be effected manually as shown, or by power, such as an electric motor. Y
A pointer 66, freely mounted on a shaft 67 and actuated by a pin 68 secured to the front cross head 44, indicates the front height adjustment of the upper roll bank on a scale 69 provided on the stationary cross-piece 23.
- A pointer 70, secured to the shaft 67, indicates the rear height adjustment of the upper roll bank on scale 69. A pin 71, mounted on the rear cross head 44, is pivotally connected to an arm on shaft 67, and translatesits vertical movement to rotary movement of shaft 67.
Deflection adjustment The lower bank lof straightening and supporting rolls is divided into three groups 75, 76 and 77 (Fig. 7), the outer groups '75 and '77 being stationary and the middle group 76adjustable in height. Both the outer groups include straightening rolls 78 journaled at their ends in bearing blocks 79. The rolls 78 are backed by supporting rolls 80 journaled in fixed bearing blocks 81 which are mounted on beams 32 secured to base 20 by brackets 83. rThe straightening roll bearing blocks 79 are mounted on spacer brackets 34 (Figs. 1 yand 2) which are fastened between the uprights of housings 21 and 22 to the base 20. Ihemiddle group I6-includes straightening -rolls85 journaled at their ends in bearing blocks 86 (Figs. 1 and 2) andV adapted to rock around the center of pins 87 (Figs. 1, 2 and 4) which extend inwardly from the bearing blocks 79 of the two outer group-s 75 and 77. The bottom of each bearing block 86 is supported by a saddle 88 fixed on the upper part of a spacer bracket 84. The
straightening rolls 85 of the middle group are backed up by supporting rolls S9. Each roll 85 is backed up by a pluralityof supporting rolls 89. The particular number of rolls shown, by way of example, is three.A Thus the work rolls 85 may be termed to be supported by three supporting or back up roll sections. rThe supporting rolls section are journaled in a pair of bearing blocks 90 (Figs.
4 and 5) which can be raised or lowered independentlyY of the bearing blocks of the other sections in order to deflect the straightening rolls of the middle group 76 into convex, concave, sinuous or other desirable contour. Each pair of supporting roll bearing blocks is secured to a cradle 91, which seats in a saddle 92 and is positively guided therein for tilting by means of two side plates 93. Each plate 93 is provided with a tongue engaging a groove in the saddle 92. The radii of the seat of the saddle and cradle as well as the tongue and groove have one common center which may be located at the point of contact between the supporting rolls 89 and the straightening rolls S5, yas shown, or alternatively lat the center of the rotational axis of supporting'rolls 89.
Each individual saddle 92, carrying its associated cradle 91 with the bearing blocks 90 which support one section of the rolls 89 of the middle group 76, can be raised .or lowered by a wedge 94, slidably engaging T slots respectively on the bottom of the saddle 92 and on the'top of a block 95 fastened to the base 20. Each wedge has an internally threaded hole which receives a lead screw 96 (Fig. 3), journaled in a bearing block 97 and having attached to its opposite end a bevel gear 98 meshing with a bevel gear 99 xed on la sleeve journaled in a bracket 100 attached to bearing block 9'7. Rotation of screw 96 causes wedge 94 to slide on block 95 and raises or lowers the saddle 92 and cradle 91, which are guided for vertical movement by machined surfaces on the inner side of beams `82. Each sleeve of bevel gears 99 is provided with jaws 99a, engaging a jaw clutch 101, slidably mounted on and keyed for rotation with ashaft 162, which is freely supported in the sleeves of bevel gears 99 and in the rightahand (as viewed in v1Eig. l) upright of housing 21. The jaw clutches 1011 are provided with Ia groove and may be shifted in or out of engagement by levers 183 engaging the grooves. Levers 103 are y pivotally connected to shifter rods 104, which in tum are pivotally connected to hand levers freely mounted 108 `and a gear 109 meshing with a gear y110 secured tov shaft 102 for operating the deection mechanism.
, The exact height adjustment of each supporting roll section is indicated by pointers 111 on a scale 112 fastened to a housing 113, which is secured to the spacer bracket l84. The wedge 94 of each roll section has a rack 114 meshing with a pinion 115 fastened to a shaft 116 journaled in the block 95 and housing 113. Shafts 116 transmit their motion through individual chain drives 117 to the respective pointers. Each of the three pointers shown indicates the deflection position of the respective back-up roll section. 'I'he taper on the -wedges 94 and the lead of the thread on `screws 96 may be so chosen that, when all clutches 101 are engaged and hand whee1=108 is turned clockwise, the three supporting roll sections 89 ofV the middle group 76 are raised diierent amounts so that the straightening rolls S5 of that group are positively detiected into a predetermined upwardly convex contour.
When the hand wheel `1138 is turned counterclockwise, the
three supporting roll sections 89 of the middle group 76 are lowered different amounts, kand yas material is passed through the leveler, the `straightening rolls 85` are deected by the material into an upwardly concave contour,
predetermined by the adjustment height position of each support roll section.
Operation of leveler acarrear) taining roll passes, i.e., spacing between upper 'and lower straightening rolls, of the desired magnitude, corresponding to the thickness of the material being treated, either uniformly by rotating hand wheel 56 with pin clutch 65 in engagement, causing all four height adjusting screws S9 to rotate, or longitudinally inclined by disengaging pin clutch 65 and thus keeping the two front screws S9 stationary.
The entry and exit roll groups of the upper bank (double tilt) are tilted into any desired position by hand levers 54. This adjustment will depend on the effect to be produced on the work material. When the tilt setting ofthe entry and exit roll group is identical, the same effect will be obtained whether the work material is passed through the leveler from left to right or vice-versa.
If the work material requires correction, ie., longitudinal stretching of one or more portions of the sheet with respect to another portion, the straightening rolls SS of the lower middle roll group 76 are deected into the necessary contour by manipulating clutch levers 105 and turning hand wheel 103. Figures 6, 7 and 8 show diagrammatically a correction adjustment of the lower middle work roll group 76 for stretching the center portion of the sheet or strip, while Figures 9, 16 and ll sirnilarly show a correction adjustment for stretching both edge portions of the material. Fig. 12 shows the straightening rolls 85 of the lower middle roll group 76 detlected to stretch an area located intermediate between the center and one outer edge of the sheet or strip.
By adjusting the leveler for any correction and attening pass as shown in Figures 6 to 12, the sheet material is subjected first in between the lower and upper entry -work roll groups to waves which individually are of constant amplitude across the entire width of the sheet, but whose amplitude gradually increases from zero to a maximum depth as the sheet moves through the entry roll groups. These waves provide maximum traction between work rolls and material and eliminate entry marks on the material. Then in the middle work roll groups the sheets are subjected to waves of amplitude varying across the width of the sheet. The varying amplitudes of these waves remain constant as the sheet moves through the middle group. These waves in the middle group correct the mill shape of the material. Finally, in the exit work roll groups, the material is subjected to waves of constant amplitude across the width of the sheet, the constant amplitude of each succeeding wave gradually diminishing from a maximum amplitude to zero at the end of the exit groups. These last waves provide a nal Ilattening of the material.
The upper supporting or backing up rolls for each straightening roll may be divided into three sections, as best seen in Fig. 2. All three of the sections may always move vertically together, so that each upper straightening roll is always substantially straight throughout its length. The reason for dividing the backing up rolls into sections in this manner is to provide a large number of support roll bearings for absorbing the work load and to unyieldably support the straightening rolls along their entire length.
I have chosen, as an example, to show the upper straightening rolls straight and non-deiiectable. The lower half-waves to which material is subjected in the machine are therefore shown as Valways having a constant transverse amplitude throughout the width of the material. The upper half-waves, whose contours are determined by the lower straightening rolls, are the only ones which are shown as varying in amplitude across the width of the material. It would be possible to construct an arrangement in which the deilection of the material by the upper rolls also varied in amplitude across the material. However, for present needs, a completely satisfactory result is secured in the machine illustrated, where only the upper half-waves vary in amplitude across the width of the machine. it will be readily understood that it would be equally easy to construct a machine in which only the lower half-waves varied in amplitude, i.e., one in which the upper rolls take over the function of the lower rolls in the machine illustrated and the lower rolls correspondingly take over the function of the present upper rolls.
Fgs.13 to 17 Individual roll group deflection In the modification illustrated in Figs. 13, 14 and l5, the lower bank of straightening and supporting rolls is divided into three groups '75', 76 and 77', each group of supporting rolls being adjustable in height independent of each other.
This arrangement permits deflection of the lower entry work roll group so that it may cooperate with the upper tilted entry work roll group to subject the material to waves of amplitude varying across the width of the sheet and increasing gradually in the direction of travel of the sheet from zero to a maximum. The entry Work roll group thus cooperates with the deected lower middle work roll group 76 and aids the latter in correcting the mill shape of the material when the effect of additional rolls is required for especially severe correction passes. The center group of rolls alone may in some such cases prove insuicient to cope with the existing mill shape. The lower exit work roll group is kept in straight alignment and cooperates with the upper tilted exit work roll group to subject the material to Waves of constant transverse amplitude decreasing in the direction of travel of the sheet from a maximum to Zero for ilattening the material as previously described.
The straightening rolls 78' of the outer groups 75 and 77 are journaled at their ends in bearing blocks 79 and are backed up by sectionalized supporting rolls 80 rotatably mounted in hearing blocks 81' which are fastened to cradles 120. The cradles seat in saddles 121 and are positively guided therein for tilting by side plates 122, each side plate being provided with a tongue engaging a groove in saddle 121. The cradles and saddles are similar to the structure described above for supporting the rolls 89 of the middle group of the construction shown in Figs. l to 12. Each saddle 121 of the individual outer support roll sections may be raised or lowered by a lead screw 122 rotatably mounted therein and threaded in a nut 123 fastened to the base 20. Located along each outer roll group is a shaft 124, rotatably supported in bearings 125 secured to base 20. Rotatably mounted on each shaft 124 are a plurality of worms 127, one for each section of the rolls 86', connectable to shaft 124 by jaw clutches similar to the clutches 101 of Fig. 4. Each worm 127 cooperates with a helical gear 126, which is keyed to a lead screw 122 for rotation with it. A hand wheel 137 may be provided at the front of the machine to raise or lower each individual entry support roll section. These sections may be operated separately or concurrently, as determined by the operation of the clutches. The ratio of the worm gearing and the lead of the screws 122 is so chosen that rotation of shaft 124 in one direction and with all jaw clutches engaging worms 127, all supporting roll sections of the entry roll group are raised dilerent amounts to deect the associated straightening rolls into a convex contour. Rotation of shaft 124 in the opposite direction lowers the support roll sections in a similar manner and when material is passed between the upper and lower work roll, they are deflected into a concave contour. By engaging, for instance, only one clutch and controlling the deflection of the straightening rolls near one side of the sheet as shown for the middle roll group in Fig. l2, the lower entry straightening roll group 9.. may be similarly deflected. In cooperation with the upper tilted straightening rolls 39' they will then subject the Asheet to waves whose amplitude varies across the width of the sheet and increases from zero to a predetermined maximum in the direction of travel of the sheet.
Deection of the middle group of straightening rolls 86 may be accomplished by the wedge construction shown in Figs. 1 to 4 or by means of screws illustrated in Fig. 13.
The cradles 91 of the middle work group 76', carryingthe support roll bearing blocks 90', are seated in saddles 128 and positively guided therein for tilting by means of side plates 129, each plate being provided' with a tongue engaging a groove in saddle 123. The radii of the seat of the saddle 128 and cradle 91', as well as the tongue and groove, have one common center which may be located at the point of contact between the supporting rolls 89' Vand the straightening rolls 85'. Each saddle 128 is raised or lowered by two screws 130 rotatably .mounted therein and threaded in nuts 131 fastened to the base 20. Secured to each screw 130 is a worm or helical gear 132'meshing with a worm 133 Which is operatively connected to a centrally located shaft 134 by means of a jaw clutch 135. Shaft 134 may be rotated by a centrally located hand wheel 137 and the straightening rolls of the middle group deflected into various contours as described before.
The arrangement described permits also operation as illustrated in Figs. l to 12 by deecting the middle roll group 76 only. Inasmuch as separate defiection means are provided for the entry, outer and exit work roll groups, transverse waves of different magnitude may be selected for each group.
Three sets of indicating and control mechanisms, generally indicated by the reference numeral 136, are provided, for each defiection adjusting apparatus of the three groups of supporting rolls of the lower bank, i.e., the entry, middle, and exit groups. Since these indicating and control mechanisms are substantially identical, only one of them will be described in detail.
Each drive shaft, i.e., the shafts 124 of the entry and exit groups and the shaft 134 of the middle group, is operated by a hand wheel 137 through suitable gearing 138. The deection adjustment mechanism of each group includes three jaw clutches 135, shown in Fig. 16 for the right-hand group of Fig. 17. Each jaw clutch is operated by a push rod 139 which extends to the front of the machine and is provided on its end Iwith a knob 140. The operation of the hand wheel 137 andl the push rods 140 is generally the same as the operation of the hand Wheel 108 and the end levers 105 in the modification of Figs. 1 to 5.
The indicating mechanism for the deflection adjustment apparatus of each group of rolls comprises a shaft 141 for each section of the group, making a total of three shafts 141 for each of the three groups. Each shaft 141 is geared to a sleeve which carries one of the worms 127 or 133 and extends therefrom toward the front of the machine. The front end of each shaft 141 is connected by suitable mechanism such as a chain drive 142 schematically indicated in Figs. 16 and 17 to mechanism for driving one of three pointers 143 which cooperate with a scale 144.
The indicating and control mechanism 136 for each group of rolls is substantially the equivalent of the indicating and control mechanism provided for the middle group of rolls in Figs. 1 to 5.
` General In order to obtain eciency in leveling, 11 have described my new method of deflecting work rolls in connection with a double tilt leveler. It should be understood, that my invention is not limited to the use of a double tilt leveler, but may also be utilized to advantage in connection with a single tilt leveler.
To modify a single tilt leveler Yof the' priorxart; the' upper or lower work and support rolls may be dividedA roll diameter, roll length, gauge of material and operating speed desired.
Various other changes and modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art and I desire, therefore, that only such limitations shall -be placed upon my invention as specifically set forth in the following claims.
I claim:
l. The method of treating sheet and strip material in a roller leveler comprising, in a single pass of the material through the leveler, bending the material in `a succession of waves transverse to the direction of movement of the material, at least alternate half-waves of said succession having -amplitudes varying across the width of the material, and thereafter bending the material in a second succession of waves, each wave of said second succession having amplitude substantially constant across the width of the material. i
2. The method of claim 1, in which the waves of said second succession decrease in amplitude in the direction of travel of the material through the leveler.
3. The method of claim 2, in which the amplitude of the final wave of the second succession is substantially zero.
4. The method of treating sheet and strip material in la roller leveler, comprising, in a single pass of the material through the leveler, bending the material in a first succession of waves transverse to the direction of movement of the material, said waves increasing in amplitude in the direction of travel of the material, thereafter bending the material in a second succession of waves transverse to the direction of movement ofthe material, at least alternate half-waves of said second succession having amplitude varying across the width of the material, and thereafter bending the material in a third succession of waves, each wave of said third succession having an amplitude constant across the width of the material, the
amplitudes of said third succession of waves decreasing in the direction of travel of the material.
5. The method of claim 4, in which the waves of said first succession are of constant amplitude across the width of the material.
y6. The method of claim 4, in which the waves of said first succession have amplitudes varying across the width of the material.
7. The method of claim 46, in which the pattern of transverse variation of the amplitudes of the waves of said first and second successions are the same.
8. The method of treating sheet and strip material in a roller leveler, comprising, in a single pass of the material through the leveler, bending the material in a first suc cession of Waves transverse to the direction of movement of the material, said `waves of said first succession having amplitudes varying across the width of the material and said waves increasing in amplitude in the direction of travel of the material, thereafter bending the material in a second succession of waves transverse to the direction of movement of the material, at least alternate half-'waves of said second succession having amplitude varying across the width of the material, and thereafter bending the material in a third succession of waves, the waves of said third succession having amplitudes varying across the width of the material, the amplitudes of the waves of that third succession being different from those of said second 11 succession andr decreasingjn the direction of travel of the material.
9. Themethod of-claim 8, in which the amplitude of the waves of said third succession is less than that of said second succession.
l0. Themethod of treating sheet and strip material in a roller leveler which comprises, in a single pass of the material through the leveler, bending the material between a rst group of staggered work roll banks in a rst succession of waves transverse to the direction of movement of the material, at least alternate half-waves of said rst succession having amplitudes varying across the width of vthe material, said varying amplitudes being produced by deecting at least one work roll bank of said irst group, and thereafter bending the material between a second group of staggered work roll banks in a second succession of waves, each wave of said second succession having a substantially constant amplitude across the width of Ithe material produced by maintaining said second group of staggered work roll banks in substantially undeflected position.
1l. The method of treating sheet and strip material in a roller leveler which comprises, in a single pass of the material through the leveler, subjecting the material between a first group of staggered work roll banks to a first 25 succession of transverse waves, each of said waves having a substantially constant amplitude across the width of the material with the amplitude of each successive wave increasing in the direction of travel of the material to create maximum traction for feeding the materialinto the leveler, thereafter subjecting the material between a second group of staggered work roll banks to a second succession of transverse waves, at least alternate half-Waves' References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,009,508 Maussnest July 30, 1935 2,049,142 Ungerer July 28, 1936 2,132,426 Maussnest Oct. 11, 1938 FOREIGN PATENTS 642,790 Germany Mar. 18, 1937 490,908 Great Britain Aug. 23, 1938
US643367A 1955-11-04 1957-03-01 Method of treating sheet and strip material Expired - Lifetime US2945530A (en)

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US545045A US2963070A (en) 1955-11-04 1955-11-04 Roller leveler
US643367A US2945530A (en) 1955-11-04 1957-03-01 Method of treating sheet and strip material

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3656332A (en) * 1957-06-19 1972-04-18 Rotary Profile Anstalt Metal working
EP0274722A2 (en) * 1987-01-10 1988-07-20 Sms Schloemann-Siemag Aktiengesellschaft Straightening machine for plate and strips
US5189896A (en) * 1992-03-02 1993-03-02 Mesta International Single stand roller leveller for heavy plate
US5255548A (en) * 1992-03-02 1993-10-26 Mesta International Method for roller levelling of heavy plate
US6598445B2 (en) * 2001-04-16 2003-07-29 Automatic Feed Company Leveling machine and method

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2009508A (en) * 1934-03-27 1935-07-30 Hedwig Maussnest Method and apparatus for straightening sheet material
US2049142A (en) * 1933-09-14 1936-07-28 Ungerer Fritz Plate straightening machine
DE642790C (en) * 1935-05-11 1937-03-18 Maschb Akt Ges Vormals Ehrhard Sheet leveler for thick-walled sheets
GB490908A (en) * 1937-02-17 1938-08-23 Paul Bernhardt Method and machine for straightening and smoothing plates
US2132426A (en) * 1935-09-04 1938-10-11 Hedweg Maussnest Method and apparatus for straightening sheet material

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2049142A (en) * 1933-09-14 1936-07-28 Ungerer Fritz Plate straightening machine
US2009508A (en) * 1934-03-27 1935-07-30 Hedwig Maussnest Method and apparatus for straightening sheet material
DE642790C (en) * 1935-05-11 1937-03-18 Maschb Akt Ges Vormals Ehrhard Sheet leveler for thick-walled sheets
US2132426A (en) * 1935-09-04 1938-10-11 Hedweg Maussnest Method and apparatus for straightening sheet material
GB490908A (en) * 1937-02-17 1938-08-23 Paul Bernhardt Method and machine for straightening and smoothing plates

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3656332A (en) * 1957-06-19 1972-04-18 Rotary Profile Anstalt Metal working
EP0274722A2 (en) * 1987-01-10 1988-07-20 Sms Schloemann-Siemag Aktiengesellschaft Straightening machine for plate and strips
EP0274722A3 (en) * 1987-01-10 1989-12-20 Sms Schloemann-Siemag Aktiengesellschaft Straightening machine for plate and strips
US5189896A (en) * 1992-03-02 1993-03-02 Mesta International Single stand roller leveller for heavy plate
US5255548A (en) * 1992-03-02 1993-10-26 Mesta International Method for roller levelling of heavy plate
US6598445B2 (en) * 2001-04-16 2003-07-29 Automatic Feed Company Leveling machine and method

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