US2941527A - Foot corrective cushion - Google Patents

Foot corrective cushion Download PDF

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Publication number
US2941527A
US2941527A US709539A US70953958A US2941527A US 2941527 A US2941527 A US 2941527A US 709539 A US709539 A US 709539A US 70953958 A US70953958 A US 70953958A US 2941527 A US2941527 A US 2941527A
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pad
layer
cushioning
foot
cushioning material
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Expired - Lifetime
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US709539A
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William M Scholl
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William M Scholl
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/06Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads specially adapted for feet or legs; Corn-pads; Corn-rings
    • A61F13/063Corn-pads; Corn-rings

Description

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IM( I I I .n .Il mi June 21, 1960 w. M. scHoLl.

FooT CoRREcTIvE CUSHION Filed Jan. 17. 1958 June 21, 1960 w. M. scHoLl. 2,941,527

FooT coRREcTIvE CUSHION Filed Jan. 1'?,` 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 6 Claims. (Cl. 12S-80) This invention relates to improvements in a foot corrective cushion, and more particularly to a cushion designed for the alleviation of pain and discomfort resulting from bunions, tender joints, corns, calluses, and other aiictions or injuries to the foot, as well as other parts of the body, as will be apparent to one skilled in the art.

In the past, many and various types of foot corrective or cushioning pads and appliances have been developed, but diiculty has been experienced in making such devices suiiiciently smooth, durable, and of such construction that they might be attached to the body with either side of the device against the skin.y Further, difficulty was experienced heretofore in constructving cushion and corrective devices which would retain their shape and resiliency or cushioning effect through` 'out a long life and regardless of severe wear.

'and which is not only comfortable to wear but which maybe disposedrwith either side next the skin of the user in order to enable the device to alleviate an afiction to the optimum extent.`

Another object of the invention is the provision of a i corrective cushion or pad in which the cushioning ma- Ufed States Patent o terial is fully enclosed in a smooth cover, which cover is preferably skin-like and which may resemble the human skin in color and texture.

Also an object ofthe instant invention is the provision of a corrective pad of the character set forth herein in which the cushioning material is provided with a curvate margin by virtue of the joining together of the top and bottom cover members and the cushioning material is maintained in that shape by virtue of the cover members and the junction therebetween.

Another feature of the instant invention resides in the provision of a corrective pad embodying cushioning means having an opening therethrough in an intermediate location, and a pair of thin skin-like cover members secured together inside the opening and around the bounding edge of thepad itself.

Still another object of the instant invention is the pro- ,.vision of a corrective pad containing cushioning material varying'in thickness, andenclosed within joined It is also an object of this invention toprovide-a corrective pad embodying cushioning material disposed between a pair of thermoplasticcover sheets, withthe cover sheets heat sealed together to fully enclose the cushioning material.

While some of the more salient features,` characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from accompanying drawings, in which er* y Patented June 21 19.60

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary plan view of an assembly of materials from which the instant invention is made;

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the assembly of Fig. 1, taken substantially as indicated by the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 3 is a view similar in character to Fig. 2, but showing the pad partially formed; l

Fig. 4 is a top plan view illustrating the completion of the forming of the pad;

Fig. 5 is a transverse vertical sectional view through the resultant pad, taken substantially as indicated by the line 5 5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a top plan view illustrating another shape which may be imparted to the ins-tant invention;

Fig. 7 is a plan view of the foot, illustrating somewhat diagrammatically the application of the instant invention in diierent locations; and

Fig. 8 is a view similar in character to Fig. 7 illustrating the use of the instant invention in connection with a hammer toe or similar affliction.

As shown on the drawings:

The initially separate parts going to make up the instant invention are preferably joined together by heat sealing, electronic heat sealing being highly satisfactory. With electronic heat sealing, the workpiece is placed between ya pair of dies or electrodes usually mounted in a suitable press capable of providing the necessary pressure, and the electrodes send a high frequency current through the material to heat it above its melting point, and the pressure between the dies' fuses the material in the heated regions to establish a seam.

In general, the resultant corrective cushion or pad comprises a cushioning material enclosed within a covering material. At least a part of thecushioning material is preferably a thermoplastic foam, which can be electronically heat sealed, and while a number of thermoplastic foam materials may be suitable for the purpose, there are others which do not respond satisfactorily to heat sealing attempts. By way of specic example therefore, and not by Way of limitation, l may mention that a very satisfactory substance is vinyl foam made from a liquid composition generically known as a plastisol. The plastisol is expanded, by the use of an inert gas or otherwise, and then cured in the expanded condition to provide a lightweight structural material which is highly flexible, resilient, and long lived. This plastisol may satisfactorily be a dispersion or suspension of polyvinyl chloride resin, or a copolymer in one or more plasticizers selected from a large number of high boiling esters, for example, such as dioctyl phthalate, dioctyl adipate, dicapryl phthalate, etc.

The covering material is preferably skin-like or in the form of an unsupported thermoplastic ilm. This covering material may have the same chemical constituency as the foam cushioning material, but is made under a different process to provide fa relatively thin sheet or film. vThe resins and plasticizers going to make up the cover material may be charged directly into a Banbury mill, and from there pass to a calender which rolls `out the finished product, there being no expansion of the material involved, and the resultant material will have Vfirst in accordance with the method of making a corrective. cushion embodying principles of this invention.

Looking rst at Figs-1 and 2, the initially separate pieces may be assembled bywplacing a cover lm or sheet- 1 in position, feeding a relatively thick layer of cushioning material 2, preferably thermoplastic foam as above described, on the cover sheet. This layer 2 is provided with an opening or aperture 3 therein. Another layer of cushioning material 4 may be disposed on top of the layer 2, and the layer 4 is of less area than the layer 2, but is preferably disposed s o as to be in alignment with the bounding edge of the layer 2. The layer 4 may be notched as indicated at 5 so as not to block the aperture 3 in the layer 2. The smaller layer of cushioning material 4 may be the same substance as the layer 2, or it may be any other suitable substance.

Another cover sheet or film 6 is placed over the assembly, as seen clearly in Figs. 1 and 2, so that all of the cushioning material is disposed between the cover sheets 1 and 6, and these cover sheets are preferably identical in character.

After the parts have been assembled as seen in Fig. 2, i i

the cover sheets 1 and 6 are preferably heat sealed together inside the opening 3 of the cushioning sheet 2, so as to provide, in effect, a skin-like web 7 that closes the aperture. Preferably, the resultant web 7 is made from both sides toward the center so that the web is located substantially intermediate of the thickness of the cushion layer 2.

Following the formation of the web 7, the cover sheets 1 and 6 are then heat sealed together around the entire bounding edge of the device to form a heat seal seam 8, whereupon the cushioning material is completely enclosed in a substantially integral envelope made from the cover sheets 1 and 6. The die utilized for the second heat sealing operation may be so shaped that uponthe formation of the seam 8 the resultant pad is virtually severed from the stock sheets 1 and 6i.`

Now it will be particularly noted that in forming the device and heat sealing the cover members 1 and 6 together, the heat seal is made in such a manner that the marginal portions of the cushioning layersl at the outer boundary of the device and also around the aperture 3 are curved inwardly toward each other, and the cushioning material is held in that shape by virtue of the tight fit of the cover sheets 1 and 6, and the heat seal. seams joining those sheets. This arrangement provides a pad without any abrupt edges, whereby the pad will not snag articles of wearing apparel, and whereby there will be no ne pressure points to irritate the user, but pressure from an article of apparel such as a shoe or. the like will be gradually and evenly distributed to the healthy tissue around an aiiliction.

It will also be noted that the pad varies in thickness by virtue of the use of the smaller cushioning layer 4. It should further be noted that where either or both cushioning layers are of thermoplastic foam, the very outer edges of these layers may be caught in the heat seal seams and actually form -a part of those seams to more firmly unite the structure. seams, not any of the sheets or layers are otherwise secured to each other. Leaving the layers free from each other except at the heat seal seams tends to eliminate any buckling or wrinkling of; the pad during use.

Obviously, the pad may be made in numerous sizes, as well as numerous shapes. It is not essential that the pad have the substantially true oval shape seen in Figs. 4 and 5, but it may be in the form of a long oval such as the pad 9 illustrated in Fig. 6, which is a' better formation for use with a bunion or the like.

The cushioningl device may be attached to the foot or other part of the body by means of an elastic band, or by adhesive strips, ory in any other suitable manner. Either face of the pad may contact the skin of the user, since the pad is identical on both sides, and with that arrangement the thick portion of the pad may be disposed in any desired location.

For example, in Fig. 7 I haveV illustrated an elongated Exceptl for the heat seal pad 9 attached to a foot 10 by adhesive strips 11. The pad 9 is disposed in position to alleviate discomfort from a bunion, and the thicker e'nd of the pad is preferably placed forwardly so as to better remove shoe pressure. Referring again to Fig. 5, it will be seen that one side of the pad changes in thickness more abruptly than the other side, and either side may be placed next to the skin depending upon which is deemed more desirable for a particular aiiction.

A pad of the character seen in Figs. 4 and 5 might be disposed on the underside of the foot to alleviate a callus or the like beneath the metatarsai arch, and if so desired with the variation in thickness, Athat pad might also be disposed in position to aid` in supporting the metatarsal arch, substantially as seen in Fig. 7.

In Fig. 8 I have illustrated a smaller sized pad 12 disposed in position to alleviate a hammer toe 13 or similar aftiiction. In this instance, the thicker end of the pad would preferably-be disposed rearwardly and the-side of the pad having the more abrupt change in thickness would `exudation from the aiiliction from soiling the apparel.

From the foregoing, it is apparent that I have provided an'V extremely durable and effective corrective cushion which will retain its resiliency and cushioning eEect throughout a long life, as well as retain its initial shape. It is also to be noted that the pad may be made in various sizes and shapes and may he applied to the body of the user in any one of several different positions asmay be indicated byy the particular afliiction. The device may also be laundered, if desired, at any time. Further, the device always presents a smooth surface without abrupt elevations so that wearing apparel will readily slide thereover. In addition, it may be mentioned that the device may be economically manufactured, and when its long life is considered, very economical to use.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

l. A foot corrective pad comprising a plurality of layers of cushioning material of different areas in superposed relationship with the edges of said layers adjacent the boundary of the pad in alignment, and a thin thermoplastic film overlying each face of the superposed layers, said films beingy heat sealed together around the outer bounding edge of the resultant pad, at least one of said layers being of thermoplastic foam with its outer edge forming a part of the heat seal seam.

2. A foot corrective pad comprising a plurality of normally fiat layers of cushioning material of different areas in superposed relationship with the edg of said layers adjacent the boundary of the pad in alignment, and a thin thermoplastic film overlying each face of the superposed layers, said films being heat sealed together around the outer bounding edge of the resultant pad, the outer margins of said layers being held inwardly curvate by the heat seal seam uniting said films, and at least one of said Ylayers beingof thermoplastic foam with the edge thereof fused in said seam.

3. A foot corrective pad comprising a plurality of normally flat layers of cushioning material of different areas in` superposed relationship with the edges of said layers adjacent the boundary of the pad in alignment, and a thin thermoplastic film overlying each face of the superposed layers, said films being heat sealed together in the form of a finel line heat seal seam around the bounding edge ofy the pad with the outer margins of said layers curving toward said fine line seam and retained so by the seam itself.

4; A footcorrective pad, comprising upper and lower sheets of thin thermoplastic lm, a layer of cushioning material having an aperture therein between said films, another layer of cushioning material of lesser area than the rst said layer in superposed relation therewith between said lms and to one side of said aperture, and said films being heat sealed together through said aperture and around the bounding edge of the larger layer.

5. A foot corrective pad, comprising upper and lower sheets of thin thermoplastic lm, a layer of cushioning material having an aperture therein between said films, another layer of cushioning material of lesser area than the rst said layer in superposed relation therewith between said lrns and to one side of 4said aperture, and said films being heat sealed together through said aperture and around the bounding edge of the larger layer, said smaller layer being aligned with the outer edge portion of the rst said layer and notched on its inner edge to leave said aperture free.

6. A foot corrective pad, comprising upper and lower sheets of thin thermoplastic lm, a layer of cushioning 20 material having an aperture therein between said lms,

films being heat sealed together through said aperturel and around the bounding edge of the larger layer, and the edges of said layers being rounded and retained in such shape by said films and the heat seal seams.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 663,224 Georges Dec. 4, 1900 2,081,715 Scholl May 25, 1937 2,332,473 Salander Oct. 19, 1943 2,575,133 Scholl Nov. 13, 1951 2,633,127 Scholl Mar. 31, 1953 2,712,311 Scholl July 5, 1955 2,771,612 Samuels Nov. 27, 1956 2,842,119 Walton July 8, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 811,761 France Jan. 23, 1937

US709539A 1958-01-17 1958-01-17 Foot corrective cushion Expired - Lifetime US2941527A (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3196869A (en) * 1962-06-13 1965-07-27 William M Scholl Buttress pad and method of making the same
US20040134103A1 (en) * 2001-05-16 2004-07-15 Peter Kohler Dressing holder and a combination of a foot bed and such a dressing holder
US20060276737A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-07 Christopher Rose Functional toe brace
US20070234595A1 (en) * 2006-04-05 2007-10-11 Kdd Enterprises, Inc. Memory foam shoe insert
US20100222728A1 (en) * 2007-10-05 2010-09-02 Dr. Brooks Innovations, Llc Body Pad
US20100299961A1 (en) * 2009-05-28 2010-12-02 Nike, Inc. Article of Footwear With A Shape Correcting Member
US8529267B2 (en) 2010-11-01 2013-09-10 Nike, Inc. Integrated training system for articles of footwear
US8573981B2 (en) 2009-05-29 2013-11-05 Nike, Inc. Training system for an article of footwear with a ball control portion
US8616892B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2013-12-31 Nike, Inc. Training system for an article of footwear with a traction system
US8632342B2 (en) 2009-05-28 2014-01-21 Nike, Inc. Training system for an article of footwear
US20150157510A1 (en) * 2013-11-05 2015-06-11 Leslie Wald Smith Offloading device and methods of using same

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US663224A (en) * 1900-09-08 1900-12-04 William W Georges Bunion or corn shield.
FR811761A (en) * 1935-11-11 1937-04-22 Scholl Mfg Company Improvements in medical cushions for the treatment of feet and similar applications
US2081715A (en) * 1933-12-11 1937-05-25 William M Scholl Corn pad and the like
US2332473A (en) * 1940-12-27 1943-10-19 Abraham B Salander Foot corrective device
US2575133A (en) * 1948-06-19 1951-11-13 William M Scholl Corn pad
US2633127A (en) * 1949-07-28 1953-03-31 William M Scholl Corn pad
US2712311A (en) * 1950-09-09 1955-07-05 William M Scholl Molded foam latex surgical pad and method of making same
US2771612A (en) * 1955-08-12 1956-11-27 Samuel Samuels Cushioned toilet seat
US2842119A (en) * 1957-03-15 1958-07-08 Walton Mildred Cheek uplift

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US663224A (en) * 1900-09-08 1900-12-04 William W Georges Bunion or corn shield.
US2081715A (en) * 1933-12-11 1937-05-25 William M Scholl Corn pad and the like
FR811761A (en) * 1935-11-11 1937-04-22 Scholl Mfg Company Improvements in medical cushions for the treatment of feet and similar applications
US2332473A (en) * 1940-12-27 1943-10-19 Abraham B Salander Foot corrective device
US2575133A (en) * 1948-06-19 1951-11-13 William M Scholl Corn pad
US2633127A (en) * 1949-07-28 1953-03-31 William M Scholl Corn pad
US2712311A (en) * 1950-09-09 1955-07-05 William M Scholl Molded foam latex surgical pad and method of making same
US2771612A (en) * 1955-08-12 1956-11-27 Samuel Samuels Cushioned toilet seat
US2842119A (en) * 1957-03-15 1958-07-08 Walton Mildred Cheek uplift

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3196869A (en) * 1962-06-13 1965-07-27 William M Scholl Buttress pad and method of making the same
US20040134103A1 (en) * 2001-05-16 2004-07-15 Peter Kohler Dressing holder and a combination of a foot bed and such a dressing holder
US20060276737A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-07 Christopher Rose Functional toe brace
US20070234595A1 (en) * 2006-04-05 2007-10-11 Kdd Enterprises, Inc. Memory foam shoe insert
US7827707B2 (en) * 2006-04-05 2010-11-09 Kdd Enterprises, Inc. Memory foam shoe insert
US20100222728A1 (en) * 2007-10-05 2010-09-02 Dr. Brooks Innovations, Llc Body Pad
US8616892B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2013-12-31 Nike, Inc. Training system for an article of footwear with a traction system
US8196321B2 (en) * 2009-05-28 2012-06-12 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with a shape correcting member
EP2434919B1 (en) * 2009-05-28 2016-05-18 NIKE Innovate C.V. Article of footwear with a shape correcting member
US8632342B2 (en) 2009-05-28 2014-01-21 Nike, Inc. Training system for an article of footwear
US20100299961A1 (en) * 2009-05-28 2010-12-02 Nike, Inc. Article of Footwear With A Shape Correcting Member
US8573981B2 (en) 2009-05-29 2013-11-05 Nike, Inc. Training system for an article of footwear with a ball control portion
US8529267B2 (en) 2010-11-01 2013-09-10 Nike, Inc. Integrated training system for articles of footwear
US9623309B2 (en) 2010-11-01 2017-04-18 Nike, Inc. Integrated training system for articles of footwear
US20150157510A1 (en) * 2013-11-05 2015-06-11 Leslie Wald Smith Offloading device and methods of using same

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