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Manufacture of resilient foam with contoured face

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US2902091A
US2902091A US59163556A US2902091A US 2902091 A US2902091 A US 2902091A US 59163556 A US59163556 A US 59163556A US 2902091 A US2902091 A US 2902091A
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Prior art keywords
sheet
rollers
foam
shaft
line
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Donald E Dahle
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Wood Conversion Co
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Wood Conversion Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D3/00Cutting work characterised by the nature of the cut made; Apparatus therefor
    • B26D3/003Cutting work characterised by the nature of the cut made; Apparatus therefor specially adapted for cutting rubber
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D3/00Cutting work characterised by the nature of the cut made; Apparatus therefor
    • B26D3/28Splitting layers from work; Mutually separating layers by cutting
    • B26D3/281Splitting layers from work; Mutually separating layers by cutting the work being simultaneously deformed by the application of pressure to obtain profiled workpieces
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C44/00Shaping by internal pressure generated in the material, e.g. swelling, foaming ; Producing porous or cellular expanded plastics articles
    • B29C44/34Auxiliary operations
    • B29C44/56After-treatment of articles, e.g. for altering the shape
    • B29C44/5627After-treatment of articles, e.g. for altering the shape by mechanical deformation, e.g. crushing, embossing, stretching
    • B29C44/5654Subdividing foamed articles to obtain particular surface properties, e.g. on multiple modules
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/04Processes
    • Y10T83/0405With preparatory or simultaneous ancillary treatment of work
    • Y10T83/0419By distorting within elastic limit
    • Y10T83/0424By stretching
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/04Processes
    • Y10T83/0491Cutting of interdigitating products
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/202With product handling means
    • Y10T83/2074Including means to divert one portion of product from another
    • Y10T83/2083Deflecting guide
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/343With means to deform work temporarily
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6584Cut made parallel to direction of and during work movement
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6584Cut made parallel to direction of and during work movement
    • Y10T83/6635By feed roller
    • Y10T83/6636Pinch rollers

Description

Sept. 1, 1959 D. E. DAHLE 2,902,091

' MANUFACTURE OF RESILIENT FOAM WITH CONTOURED FACE Y 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 15, 1956 15 25 1 15 2 1- l 26 T5 /Q=? r 426 -oi I2 jnb'enzor' u idflfiaile D. E. DAHLE Sept. 1, 1959 MANUFACTURE OF RESILIENT FOAM WITH CONTOURED FACE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June- 15, 1956 jhvenzor Janaidli flafile United States Patent MANUFACTURE OF RESILIENT FOAM WITH CONTOURED FACE Application June 15, 1956, Serial No. 591,635 13 Claims. (Cl. '16439) The present invention relates to the splitting of sheets of foamed elastomer to form two sheets each having one contoured cut face.

Apparatus for splitting sheet material into layers is well known. Material such as leather, fiber felts and thicker materials have been so cut by moving the sheet edgewise onto a cutting knife edge which cuts in a straight line. In this way, sheets of foam have been so split into thinner sheets. I

The present invention relates to cutting foam materials which are resilient so that a sheet being cut may be variously subjected to compression whereby to vary the line of the cut when the cut sheet is released from compressron.

It is the object of the present invention to split resilient foam sheets while both faces thereof are variously compressed at chosen locations over the cutting line to form contoured cut faces.

It is a particular object of the invention to provide the pattern of locations by use of two revolving means between which the sheet passes.

It is a particular object of the invention to provide at 7 both facesthe same pattern of compression locations and to select a pattern such that both contoured faces are the same. 1 i w 4 It is also a particular object to split a sheet of foamed elastomer into two layers with contoured faces such that the high spots of one are located in positions to be opposed by corresponding high spots in the other layer.

Various other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and explanation.

By practice of the present invention, a sheet of resilient foam may be so split that the cut face is corrugated in the direction of the movement of the sheet over the cutting blade, and so that such corrugations of each sheet are identical with hilltops of each sheet in a plane. As a result, two such sheets may be placed in apposition with the hilltops of one opposed to the hilltops of the other, and the hilltops may be connected by adhesive or by other interposed means, such as, sheet material. Thus, a cored foam structure is readily formed.

However, such acorrugated structure has parallel bands of relatively high resistance to compression alternating with parallel bands of relatively low resistance to compression. The present invention permits varying the pattern so that there are also crossing bands of relatively high and low resistance to compression.

Numerous patterns for the contour of the cut faces may be provided by varying the locations of compression of the foam over the cutting line. The accompanying drawings illustrate apparatus designed for making only a preferred pattern, and it is to be understood that it is merely illustrative of the method and of the apparatus and that it is. not to be considered as a limitation of the invention expressed in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 represents .in profile on line 11 of Fig. 2 the .g

2 general arrangement of the parts of the apparatus whereby foam is fed to a cutting knife edge on the cutting line of which the foam is compressed by rollers.

Fig. 2 represents in elevation a portion of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1 illustrating the arrangement of the compressing rollers shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 represents in cross-section two layers of foam as cut by the apparatus shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the two layers being separated along thethickness dimension.

Fig. 4 represents in cross-section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3 the same two layers of foam, to illustrate particularly the effect of the crossbars and recesses on the parallel corrugations formed by the rollers per se.

Fig. 5 is a view'of the two patterns of compression rectified from the rollers, the two identical patterns being shown with one a quarter phase behind the other.

In Fig. 1, the numeral 10 designates an uncut sheet of foamed elastomer havinga uniform thickness shown only in dotted lines, as it approaches a moving cutting blade 11, of which the line of cutting lies in the plane of the axes of shaft 12 and shaft 13. The shaft 12 has a series of rollers 15 and shaft 13 has a series of rollers 16, all better shown in Fig. 2. The defining cylinders in which lie the peripheries of the two series of rollers are positioned by vertically adjusting the positions of the shafts 12 and 13 so that the cylinders compress each face of the foam 10 over and toward the cutting line of blade 11.

The rollers 15 or 16 on any one shaft may have the same diameter, and preferably all the rollers 15 and 16 have the same diameter. When the shafts 12 and 13 are equally spaced from the knife 11 and when the rollers are as illustrated, both faces of the foam 10 are compressed by-forces applied in the same predetermined pattern, the pattern at one face being so offset from the pattern at the other face that a symmetrical corrugation is produced, particularly by those arcuate portions of the rollers designated C.

The foam 10 is fed forward on conveyer belt 20 moving at a fixed rate which is. the same rate as travel the peripheries of the rollers 15 and 16. The resulting upper layer 18 is carried away on conveyer 21 moving at said fixed rate,- and the resultinglower layer dropsto conveyer 22 moving at said rate-The cut layers 18 and 19 are shown in .dotted lines; merely toindicate the. thickness thereof rather. than. the structure.

In Fig. 2, the rollers 15 and 16. are shown in their relation to each other. Although the rollers may vary in peripheral contour and spacing on each shaft and in location with reference to the-rollers 'on the other shaft, they are shown as all having flat peripheries, all having the same thickness, all spaced apart on each shaft by an amount at least equal to the thickness,'and with each roller on one shaft unopposed by a roller on the other shaft. i t

. As a specific illustration, the rollers may be spaced on 3-inch centers, have diameters of about 4 inches and a fiat periphery of 1% inches width. The shafts 12 and 13 may be vertically adjustable by means not shown, to vary the desired result, and particularly to accommodate foam sheets 10 of varying thickness. In use on afoam of 2.75 inches thickness, the peripheries of the rollers may be separated 0.39 inch. For a foam of 4.75 inches thickness, the peripheries of the rollers may be separated 0.45 inch.

Consider the rollers as so far described, but -notas illustrated, that is, disregarding the crossbars 25 and therecesses 26 seen in Figs. 1 and 2, or in other words, consider the effect of the. arc portions C. Such apparatusoperates as follows:

' Each face of the foam 10 iscompressed toward but not to the knife 14 by forces applied at spaced locations ,over the cutting line' bythe rollers 15 and 16- and-the force at each location on each face is unopposed by a force at the other face. The straight line on which the compressed foam is cut will, upon expansion of the foam, result in across-section of corrugation. The layers 18vand'19 will eachhave identi'caland complementary corrugations of'hillsrand'valleys running parallel to the direction, of movement and the hilltops of. the corrugations; will .be ina plane in. each layer parallel to the retained face of foam 10.

Fig. 3 in its cross-section illustrates thetwo complementary layers asthey are merely separated, the crosshatched portion indicating the econ-tour formed when the foam is compressed by the arcuate portions C of the rollers .as seen inv Fig. 1. In Fig. 3, the lines 10 are the boundaries of the, cut faces, which are cut as a straight line parallel to the approaching uncompressed faces of foam 10. At the lines of arrows the foam 10 was compressed by rollers 15. .At'the lines of the arrows '16", the foam was, compressed-by the rollers 16. The width of the rollers may be varied, according to the conditions'of original foam thickness and extent of compression so that the tops of the hills may be flat or rounded as desired. A slight narrow band of flatness is shown at the tops of'the hills 18' and 19'.

The continuity of the corrugations illustrated in crosssection in Fig. 3 may be broken at spaced intervalsalong the direction of the moving web, at which inter vals the pattern of compression locations. is changed. One way to do this is 'to provide one or more of crossbars 25, each across a space between adjacent rollers 15 or 16. Another way is to provide recesses 26 in one or more peripheries of'the rollers. As shown, there is a'pattern of locating crossbars'25 and a pattern of locating recesses 26, and the pattern is preferably the same for each set of rollers, as illustrated.

Each intermediate roller 15 and 16 carries two crossbars inlaid into theperipheries, of which one crosses one adjacent space to the next roller and the other crosses the other adjacent space to'the next roller. These crossbars on each roller are diametrically located, so that in Fig. 1 the arrangement presents a zig-zag line for the rollers 15. The rollers 16 have thesarne arrangement but the location on the peripheries is advanced 90 in the peripheral direction. When one disregards the presence of the recesses 26, and considers the rollers with the crossbars, the operation above described is so changed that each portion of a crossbar located over a space between its carrying rollers compresses the form 10 against the periphery of a roller on theopposite shaft. Thus, at this location, a foam is compressed from both faces equally, and the line of cut is centered between the faces of foam 10.

The recesses 26 are located so that they lie opposite each crossbar in the rotation of the two shafts, and the depth and width of the recess 'controls the extent to which the compression bythe crossbar is opposed. When the recess is so large that there is no opposing force,

then the compression eifect is the same as takes place at a portion C of a roller, and the cut will be centered at the same level as the tops of hills 18' and 19" of the corrugations. These two 'condi'tions of no recess at all, and of a non-compressingrecess 26, establish limits, respectively, locating the cut centrally of the thickness of foam 10, or at a level with the tops of the hills 18 and 19 'of'the corrugations formed bythe arcuate portions C of the rollers.

The illustrated recesses 26 are niches in the peripheries and as" a mechanical convenience are of the same size as the 'cross-section ofthe crossbars 26, so that corrugations formed by 'the' roller portions C, i.e.,' the cross-hatched areas of Fig, 3.

-' Fig. 4 shows the complement'arylower section 19 and of the tops of hills 19'.

, .4 upper section 18 as viewed on line 44 of Fig. 3. The hills 18 and 19 shown in Fig. 3 are indicated respectively in cross-section and in elevation and numeral 30 designates the slopes of the hills 19'. The cross-hatched area in Fig. 4 shows the hills and valleys resulting from the cooperative action of the crossbars 25 and the re cesses 26. Hills 31 are formed with tops below the level Since the upper section 18 has hills and valleys the same as the lower section 19, the contour 'of the'hills 19 and their valleys'a-s seen in elevation in Fig. 4 matches the contour of the cross-sectioned area in Fig. 4. In consequence, the ridges. of hills 19', as corrugations, are not continuous but are broken by 'valleys 31' corresponding to hills 31 in the opposite section. The valley between hills 31 measured from hilltop to hilltop corresponds to one revolution of the rollers. Midway between the hilltops 31 (Fig. 4) there is a much lower hill 32 corresponding to a depression 32' centered in the top of the ridge of hill 19'. Between each hill 31 and the next lowerhill 32 there is a minor rise 33 whichhasa matching dip 33' in the said ridge of'hill. 19 between valley 31 and depression 32'. Said hill 32 is theinherent result of hills 31 being lower than hills 19. The rise 33 and dip 33 are incidental results of the distribution of compressive forces within the foam sheet 1L0v While being split.

The effect of the rollers as described above may be better understood from Fig. 5, which shows the two sets of rollers 15 and 16 rectified to identical plane patterns of the areas over which compression forces are applied. The identical patterns are applied out of phase, with one 90 behind the other.

The first pattern shows the areas 15- as the peripheries of the rollers 15 rectified to a series of parallel bands spaced apart by a distance at least equal tothe band width. The length of the band is theunit length of the pattern. Some crossbars 25 form letters H with each adjacent pair of adjacent bands -as legs of the H. The remaining crossbars 25 connect the adjacent'letters H at their tops. r

The second pattern is identical with the first, and as shown in Fig. 5 is positioned one-quarter of the unit length behind it. The bands 16. are the peripheries. of the lower rollers 16, and similar crossbars 25 complete the pattern.

The dotted areas 26 on all the bands are the locations for'the recesses 26, which'reg'ister opposite a crossbar 25. As stated above each region 26 may vary in depth upwardly from zero. 'When it is zero in depth, the foam sheet is equally compressed at both faces at the cutting 'line by a crossbar and by an opposite roller, and hence the cut lies in the median plane of the uncompressed sheet. Such regions 26 of zero depth are the only places in the pattern which effect equal compression at both faces. When the'regions 26 are as deep as shown the compression is greater on the face with the crossbar leading to the valleys 33 (Fig. '4) and the hills 33. When the recesses 26 are so' deep as'to provide no compression from their bottoms, the valleys 33' and bills 33 disappear. When the recesses 26 have zero depth, the valleys33 bottom at the median plane, and the'hills 33 top at the median plane. 'On every hand in the pattern there may be counted'the-difiering'areas of compression on the foam sheet. When the recess 26 has depth, these areas are eight in number, and in Fig. 4, in section 19, there are eight corresponding areas fromhill 31 at the left to hill 31 at the right.

The contoured layers which may be formed by the present invention have many uses. The preferred and illustrated forms are especially suitable for assembling the two layers so that the hills 19 of one layer oppose the corresponding hills of the other layer. These hilltops, being each in a plane, may be adhesively united or otherwise connected by interposedmaterial, such as,

ibeing unopposed the peripheries of :the moving sheet.

:arranged to cut on a straight cutting line, :a uniformly thick sheet of resilient foam having two parallel faces onto said blade with said blade midway between the two faces of the approaching sheet, two shafts parallel to the cutting line and in the plane thereof, which plane the sheet, said shafts :speed in opposite directions, said shafts being equidistant :from the nearest face of the moving sheet, and a plurality sheets of fabric of of foam, to, provide a cored cushion of suitable foamed material, such as polyurethane, as described and claimed in my copending application Serial No. 591,636, filed June 15, 1956, now Patent No; 2,836,- 238 issued May 27, 1958.

The present application is directed to the method and apparatus for forming contoured faces on resilient foam.

. I claim:

' 1. Apparatus comprising a length of cutting blade arranged to cut on a straight line, means to feed a sheet of resilient foam having two parallel faces onto said blade with said faces at equal distances from said cutting line whereby to split the foam into two layers, two shafts parallel to the cutting line and in the plane thereof which plane is perpendicular to the direction of movement of the sheet, each shaft being spaced away from a face of the sheet, and spaced rollers on each shaft of diameter to compress the face of the sheet toward said cutting line, each roller on one shaft being unopposed by a roller on the other shaft.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein the rollers on each shaft are of the same diameter, of the same peripheral contour, and equally spaced on the shaft by spaces not less than the thickness of the roller.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2 in which the rollers on both shafts are ofthe same diameter, ofthe same peripheral contour, and equally spaced on the shaft by spaces not less than the thickness of the roller.

4. Apparatus according to claim 3 in which pairs of adjacent rollers are connected by at least one crossbar inlaid in the peripheries thereof, each crossbar at one shaft by a crossbar at the other shaft when the rollers move at the same speed as 5. Apparatus according to claim 4 in which pairs of :adjacent rollers are connected by at least one crossbar inlaid in the peripheries thereof, each crossbar at one -shaft being opposed by a recess in the opposing roller on the other shaft when the peripheries of the rollers move at the same speed as the moving sheet.

cutting blade 6. Apparatus comprising a length of means to feed is perpendicular to the direction of movement of being arranged to rotate at the same of like rollers on each shaft equally spaced apart by a distance at least as great as the width of the rollers, each roller on each shaft being unopposed by a roller on the opposite shaft, the faces of each roller being spaced from the cutting line a distance less than half the thickness of the sheet.

7. Apparatus comprising a length of cutting blade arranged to cut on a straight cutting line, means to feed a uniformly thick sheet of resilient foam having two parallel faces onto said blade with said blade midway between the two faces of the approaching sheet, two shafts parallel to the cutting line and in the plane thereof, which plane is perpendicular to the direction of movement of the sheet, said shafts being arranged to rotate the same speed in opposite directions, said shafts being equidistant from the nearest face of the moving sheet, a plurality of like rollers on each shaft equally spaced apart by a distance at least as great as the width of the rollers, each roller on each shaft being unopposed by a roller on the opposite shaft, the faces of each roller being spaced from the cutting line a distance less than half the thickness of the sheet, and each shaft having adjacent rollers connected by one bridge with an outer surface substantially coextensive with the peripheries of the rollers, the bridges on each intermediate roller being apart.

8. Apparatus comprising a length of cutting blade arranged to cut on a straight cutting line, means to feed a uniformly thick sheet of resilient foam having two parallel faces onto said blade with said blade midway between the, two faces of the approaching sheet, two shafts parallel, to. the cuttting line and in the plane thereof, which plane is perpendicular to the direction of movement of the sheet, said shafts being arranged to rotate at the same speeed in opposite directions, said shafts being equidistant from the nearest face of the moving sheet, a plurality of like rollers on each shaft equally spaced apart by a distance at least as great as the width of the rollers, each' roller on each shaft being unopposed by a' roller on the opposite shaft, the faces of each roller being spaced from the cutting line a distance less than half the thickness of the sheet, and each shaft having adjacent rollers connected by one bridge with an outer surface substantially coextensive with the peripheries of the rollers,'the bridges on each intermediate roller being 180 apart, and each roller having a recess in its perpihery, positioned to register in opposition to a bridge in rotationof the two shafts.

9. Apparatus comprising a length of cutting blade arranged to cut on a straight cutting line, means to feed a uniformly thick sheet=of resilient foam having two parallel'faces onto;.-saidjblade'-with said blade midway between the two faces ofthe approaching sheet, two shafts parallel to the, cutting line and in the planethereof, which plane is perpendicular to the direction of move ment of the sheet, said shafts being arranged to rotate at the same speed'in opposite directions, said shafts being equidistant from the nearest face of the moving sheet, a plurality of like rollers on each shaft equally spaced apart by a distance at least as great as the width of the rollers, each roller on each shaft being unopposed by a roller on the opposite shaft, the faces of each roller being spaced from the cutting line a distance less than half the thickness of the sheet, and each shaft having adjacent rollers connected by bridging means with outer surface substantially coextensive with the peripheries of the rollers, each roller having its bridging means equally spaced about its periphery.

10. Apparatus comprising a length of cutting blade arranged to cut on a straight cutting line, means to feed a uniformly thick sheet of resilient foam having two parallel faces onto said blade with said blade midway between the two faces of the approaching sheet, two shafts parallel to the cutting line and in the plane thereof, which plane is perpendicular to the direction of movement of the sheet, said shafts being arranged to rotate at the same speed in opposite directions, said shafts being equidistant from the nearest face of the moving sheet, a plurality of like rollers on each shaft equally spaced apart by a distance at least as great as the width of the rollers, each roller on each shaft being unopposed by a roller on the opposite shaft, the faces of each roller being spaced from the cutting line a distance less than half the thickness of the sheet, and each shaft having adjacent rollers connected by bridging means with outer surface substantially coextensive with the peripheries of the rollers, each roller having its bridging means equally spaced about its periphery and each roller having a recess in its periphery positioned to register in opposition to bridging means in rotation of the two shafts.

11. The method which comprises continuously moving in one direction 'a sheet of resilient foam material normally characterized by two parallel faces defining the thickness, locating a moving slitting blade substantially midway between the normal location of said faces of said sheet at a fixed straight cutting line parallel to said faces and at right angles to said direction of movement, displacing alternate portions of each face of the sheet toward said cutting line first at one side and then at the other 7 side of said cutting line by applying forces at various locations arranged in a predetermined pattern which is repetitive in the direction along the cutting line and at right angles thereto in the direction of movement of said material, the pattern being the same at both faces but offset in the two faces and such that the resulting contours of the cut faces of the resulting two sheets of foam are the same whereby the resulting interfitting cut sheets may be separated, then ofiset so that high spots on one sheet are opposed by corresponding high spots on the other sheet.

12. The method of claim 11 in which forces are appliedat a first face of the sheet as viewed on said face tafteri leaving the blade, which forces are applied in a first tftern which is a repetition of units in the direction sheet movement, each unit consisting of a pluralit'yof laterally'alined uniformly wide parallel bands I of uniform length in the direction of sheet movement spaced' apart by a distance at least as great as the width Uf the bands', adjacent pairs of said bands each having their constituent bands connected by a crossbar thereby forminga line of spaced letters H, and adjacent letters H having th e iii adjacent constituent bands connected together at their tops by -a similar crossbar; and in which fofc'es "are-applied at the second face of said sheet as viewed'aft'er leaving the blade, said last-mentioned forces being applied in'a like pattern one-quarter unit length behind the first pattern and with its bands opposite spaces between the bandsof thefirst pattern.

13. The method of claim 11 in which forces are applied at a first face of the sheet as viewed on said face after leaving the blade, which forces are applied in a first pattern which is a repetition of units in the direction of sheet movement, each unit consisting of a plurality of laterally alined uniformly wide parallel bands of uniform length in the direction of sheet movement spaced apart by a distance at least as greatas the width of the bands, adjacent pairs of said bands each having their constituent bandsconnected by a crossbar thereby forming a line of spaced letters H, and adjacent letters H having their adjacent constituent bands connected together at their tops by a similar crossbar; and in which forces are applied at the second face of said sheet as viewed after leaving the blade, said last-mentioned forces being applied in alike pattern one-quarter unit length behind the first pattern and with its bands opposite spaces between the bands of the first pattern, each band in each of said two patterns having areas for less compression at the time of cutting than in the remainder of the band which areas are located opposite the crossbar's of the other pattern.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 681,347 Scott Aug. 27, 1901 1,204,922 Wilms Nov. '14, 1916 1,670,514 Lane May'22, 1928 1,786,542 McDonald Dec, 30, 1930 2,214,461 Hendry Sept. 10, 1940 2,404,731 Johnson July 23, .1946

FOREIGN PATENTS 268,978 Germany Jan.- 9, 1914 1,113,156 France Nov. 28, 1953 83,135 Norway .t Feb. 15, 1954 UNITED STATES PATE CERTIFICATE Patent No. 2,902,091

NT OFFICE OF CORRECTION September 1, 1959 Donald E, Dahle (SEAL) Attest:

KARL H AXLINE Commissioner of Patents

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Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3125919A (en) * 1964-03-24 Material fabricating machine
US3154607A (en) * 1957-10-04 1964-10-27 Fiber Bond Corp Method of making a cushion
US3186271A (en) * 1961-07-08 1965-06-01 Kaiser Fritz Process and apparatus for the production of one-piece shaped articles of elastically deformable material
US3287196A (en) * 1962-11-23 1966-11-22 Du Pont Method of styling textiles by contour sculpturing
US3431802A (en) * 1955-11-21 1969-03-11 Karel H N Schulpen Device for the manufacture of objects of yieldably deformable material
US3665793A (en) * 1970-01-23 1972-05-30 Lyn Flex Ind Inc Innersole forming strip
US3690203A (en) * 1969-11-14 1972-09-12 Helmut Huttemann Cutting apparatus for foam material and the like
US3730031A (en) * 1970-10-16 1973-05-01 W Huttemann Apparatus for continually cutting blanks with tridimensional surfaces from foam or the like material
US4626184A (en) * 1985-03-14 1986-12-02 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Scarfing apparatus
US4675144A (en) * 1985-03-14 1987-06-23 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Scarfing method
US4879776A (en) * 1988-04-04 1989-11-14 Farley David L Anatomically conformable foam support pad
US5022111A (en) * 1990-06-29 1991-06-11 E. R. Carpenter Company, Inc. Pressure reduction mattress
US5031261A (en) * 1990-03-15 1991-07-16 E. R. Carpenter Company, Inc. Mattress overlay for avoidance of decubitus ulcers
US5430901A (en) * 1993-06-10 1995-07-11 Farley; David L. Anatomically conformable therapeutic mattress overlay
US5477573A (en) * 1994-09-30 1995-12-26 Foamex L.P. Method of manufacturing a zero base convolute pad
USD381543S (en) 1994-10-27 1997-07-29 Foam pad
WO1998005480A1 (en) * 1996-08-02 1998-02-12 Foamex L.P. Synthetic foam surface contouring machine
US5749993A (en) * 1996-02-01 1998-05-12 Foamex L.P. Method of making an automotive carpeting with precut conforming foam underlayment
EP0939690A1 (en) * 1997-07-23 1999-09-08 Foamex L.P. Continuous platform cutting method
US5974609A (en) * 1998-06-29 1999-11-02 The Spring Air Company Quilt top mattress with convoluted foam cushion
US5974935A (en) * 1998-06-26 1999-11-02 Belt Equipment, Inc. Belt splitting machine
US6003179A (en) * 1997-11-18 1999-12-21 Farley; David L. Inclined anatomic support surface
US6041459A (en) * 1997-10-03 2000-03-28 The Spring Air Company Convoluted foam cushion
US6176164B1 (en) * 1999-08-16 2001-01-23 Robert B. Nylander Compression cutting process for flexible form and template for use therewith
US6372076B1 (en) 1999-09-28 2002-04-16 L&P Property Management Company Convoluted multi-layer pad and process
US6500292B1 (en) * 1999-07-29 2002-12-31 L&P Property Management Company Convoluted surface fiber pad
GB2383294A (en) * 2001-12-21 2003-06-25 Vita Cortex Technologies Ltd A sawing machine for contouring foamed plastics
US20060105692A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2006-05-18 Prime Equipment Group, Inc. Poultry breast portion sizing apparatus
US20060107806A1 (en) * 2004-11-23 2006-05-25 Foamex L.P. Surface shaping of compressible cellular polymers with continuous rotary method
US20100251864A1 (en) * 2009-03-09 2010-10-07 Rose Robert J Compressible Material Profile Forming Tooling, Profile Assembly With, and Method of Using Same

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US1204922A (en) * 1916-02-17 1916-11-14 Scholl Mfg Company Felt-skiving machine.
US1670514A (en) * 1921-02-24 1928-05-22 Harry H Beckwith Skiving machine
US1786542A (en) * 1928-09-17 1930-12-30 Hood Rubber Co Inc Machine for cutting articles from sheet material
US2214461A (en) * 1939-08-10 1940-09-10 Adolph R Hendry Patch cutting machine
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Cited By (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3125919A (en) * 1964-03-24 Material fabricating machine
US3431802A (en) * 1955-11-21 1969-03-11 Karel H N Schulpen Device for the manufacture of objects of yieldably deformable material
US3154607A (en) * 1957-10-04 1964-10-27 Fiber Bond Corp Method of making a cushion
US3186271A (en) * 1961-07-08 1965-06-01 Kaiser Fritz Process and apparatus for the production of one-piece shaped articles of elastically deformable material
US3287196A (en) * 1962-11-23 1966-11-22 Du Pont Method of styling textiles by contour sculpturing
US3690203A (en) * 1969-11-14 1972-09-12 Helmut Huttemann Cutting apparatus for foam material and the like
US3665793A (en) * 1970-01-23 1972-05-30 Lyn Flex Ind Inc Innersole forming strip
US3730031A (en) * 1970-10-16 1973-05-01 W Huttemann Apparatus for continually cutting blanks with tridimensional surfaces from foam or the like material
US4626184A (en) * 1985-03-14 1986-12-02 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Scarfing apparatus
US4675144A (en) * 1985-03-14 1987-06-23 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Scarfing method
US5038433A (en) * 1988-04-04 1991-08-13 Farley David L Anatomically conformable foam support pad
US4879776A (en) * 1988-04-04 1989-11-14 Farley David L Anatomically conformable foam support pad
US5031261A (en) * 1990-03-15 1991-07-16 E. R. Carpenter Company, Inc. Mattress overlay for avoidance of decubitus ulcers
US5022111A (en) * 1990-06-29 1991-06-11 E. R. Carpenter Company, Inc. Pressure reduction mattress
US5430901A (en) * 1993-06-10 1995-07-11 Farley; David L. Anatomically conformable therapeutic mattress overlay
US5477573A (en) * 1994-09-30 1995-12-26 Foamex L.P. Method of manufacturing a zero base convolute pad
US5666682A (en) * 1994-09-30 1997-09-16 Bonaddio; Vincenzo A. Mattress pad of adjustable size
USD381543S (en) 1994-10-27 1997-07-29 Foam pad
US5749993A (en) * 1996-02-01 1998-05-12 Foamex L.P. Method of making an automotive carpeting with precut conforming foam underlayment
WO1998005480A1 (en) * 1996-08-02 1998-02-12 Foamex L.P. Synthetic foam surface contouring machine
US5819631A (en) * 1996-08-02 1998-10-13 Foamex L.P. Synthetic foam surface contouring machine
EP0939690A4 (en) * 1997-07-23 2004-05-26 Foamex Lp Continuous platform cutting method
EP0939690A1 (en) * 1997-07-23 1999-09-08 Foamex L.P. Continuous platform cutting method
US6041459A (en) * 1997-10-03 2000-03-28 The Spring Air Company Convoluted foam cushion
US6003179A (en) * 1997-11-18 1999-12-21 Farley; David L. Inclined anatomic support surface
US5974935A (en) * 1998-06-26 1999-11-02 Belt Equipment, Inc. Belt splitting machine
US5974609A (en) * 1998-06-29 1999-11-02 The Spring Air Company Quilt top mattress with convoluted foam cushion
US6500292B1 (en) * 1999-07-29 2002-12-31 L&P Property Management Company Convoluted surface fiber pad
US6740610B2 (en) 1999-07-29 2004-05-25 L&P Property Management Company Convoluted surface fiber pad
US6176164B1 (en) * 1999-08-16 2001-01-23 Robert B. Nylander Compression cutting process for flexible form and template for use therewith
US7452589B2 (en) 1999-09-28 2008-11-18 L&P Property Management Company Convoluted fiber pad
US6596387B2 (en) 1999-09-28 2003-07-22 L&P Property Management Company Convoluted multi-layer pad and process
US20030235684A1 (en) * 1999-09-28 2003-12-25 Ogle Steven Eugene Convoluted multi-layer pad and process
US7008691B2 (en) 1999-09-28 2006-03-07 L&P Property Management Company Convoluted multi-layer pad and process
US20060099869A1 (en) * 1999-09-28 2006-05-11 Mossbeck Niels S Convoluted fiber pad
US6372076B1 (en) 1999-09-28 2002-04-16 L&P Property Management Company Convoluted multi-layer pad and process
GB2383294B (en) * 2001-12-21 2005-02-23 Vita Cortex Technologies Ltd A foamed plastics material contouring machine assembly
GB2383294A (en) * 2001-12-21 2003-06-25 Vita Cortex Technologies Ltd A sawing machine for contouring foamed plastics
US20060105692A1 (en) * 2004-10-29 2006-05-18 Prime Equipment Group, Inc. Poultry breast portion sizing apparatus
US7204748B2 (en) * 2004-10-29 2007-04-17 Remington Holdings Llc Poultry breast portion sizing apparatus
US20110212206A1 (en) * 2004-11-23 2011-09-01 Foamex Innovations Operating Company Surface shaping of compressible cellular polymers with continuous rotary apparatus
US7955544B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2011-06-07 Foamex Innovations Operating Company Surface shaping of compressible cellular polymers with continuous rotary method
US20060107806A1 (en) * 2004-11-23 2006-05-25 Foamex L.P. Surface shaping of compressible cellular polymers with continuous rotary method
US20100251864A1 (en) * 2009-03-09 2010-10-07 Rose Robert J Compressible Material Profile Forming Tooling, Profile Assembly With, and Method of Using Same

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