US2898108A - Battleship game - Google Patents

Battleship game Download PDF

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US2898108A
US2898108A US76069158A US2898108A US 2898108 A US2898108 A US 2898108A US 76069158 A US76069158 A US 76069158A US 2898108 A US2898108 A US 2898108A
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relay
wire
circuit
armature
coil
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Richard C Meyer
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Richard C Meyer
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00643Electric board games; Electric features of board games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00075War games

Description

Aug. 4, 1959 Filed Sept 12. 1958 NUfLL Z'ON 2 'ON SET PLAY TARGETS GAME NO. HQ!

SET WINNER R. C. MEYER BATTLESHIP GAME 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

Richard C Meyer Affar/my Aug. 4, 1959 Filed Sept. 12, 1958 R. C. MEYER BATTLESHIP GAME 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. fife/2am C Man" *WaM R. C. MEYER BATTLESHIP GAME Aug. 4, 1959 5 Sheets-Sheet (5 Filed Sept. 12, 1958 INVENTOR. Pic/21m 6. Meyer BY p A/farnay,

Aug. 4, 1959 R. c. MEYER BATTLESHIP GAME 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Sept. 12, 1958 Afro/my m Em g MM d Patented Aug. 4, 1959 BATTLESHIP GAME Richard C. Meyer, Topeka, Kans. Application September 12, 1958, Serial No. 760,691

Claims. (Cl. 273130) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in game apparatus, and has particular reference to an electrical apparatus adapted for playing the game commonly known as Battleship.

In the game of Battleship, played by two contestants or players, each player has a playing board marked in checkerboard-like squares, and the players, in turn, select any square or squares on their playing board by marking, covering, or otherwise designating the selected squares, each selection being called a shot. The object of the game is to locate and sink the opposing players ships. The opposing players ships constitute lines of squares on a selecting panel which he has previously marked in some manner, but which is not visible to the other player. The selecting panel squares corresponding to the squares of the other players playing board, and the ships usually consist of straight lines of squares arranged either horizontally, vertically, or diagonally of the panel. Also, the number of squares in the line designating each ship may be varied; for example, one square might represent a submarine, two squares a destroyer, three squares a cruiser, and four squares a battleship. A ship is sunk when all of the squares corresponding thereto on the opposing contestants playing board have been selected, and the first player to sink all of the opponents ships wins the game.

The principal object of the present invention is the provision of an apparatus operable to play the game as outlined above electrically. Each playing board consists of a panel in which are arranged a series of electrically operated indicators each corresponding to a square of the playing board above described. Each selector panel consists of a board in which are arranged a series of manually operable switches each corresponding to an indicator on the opponents playing board. To play, each contestant in turn manually moves a selector member over the indicator on his playing board at which he desires to shoot, then presses a Fire but ton. The selected indicator is moved physically to indicate that it has been selected. Further, if that indicator corresponds to one of the opponents selector switches which has been previously closed, the indicator will also be lighted to indicate a Hit. The contestant who first scores Hits on the indicators corresponding to all of the closed selector switches of his opponent wins the game. The number of selector switches to be closed by each contestant is a prearranged rule of the game.

Other features and objects of the invention are the provision of means whereby the stations selected by each contestant are counted and a signal given when the required number of selections have been made, means whereby each contestant, once play has begun, is prevented from altering the number or pattern of his selections without notifying his opponent, means preventing commencement of actual play until both contestants have completed their selections, means operable during play to indicatewhich contestant has the next turn,

and to prevent their playing out of turn, means operable to count the hits made by each player, and to give a signal indicating that one contestant has won the game whenever he has scored hits on all stations selected by his opponent, and means operable to prevent further play after either contestant has Won the game.

Other objects are simplicity and economy of construction, eificiency and dependability of operation, and adaptability for use as a coin-operated device.

With these objects in view, as well as other objects which will appear in the course of the specification, reference will be had to the drawing, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of a game device embodying the present invention,

Fig. 2 is an elevational end view of the device as shown in Fig. l,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged top plan view of the device as shown in Fig. 1, with the housing and other portions thereof broken away and shown in section to illustrate the construction thereof,

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken on line IV-IV of Fig. 3, with portions left in elevation,

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on line VV of Fig. 3, with portions left in elevation,

Fig. 6 is a slightly irregular sectional view taken on line VIVI of Fig. 4,

Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken through one of the indicator pegs and related parts, with portions left in elevation,

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on line VIII-VIII of Fig. 7, showing the indicator peg in its normal position before it is tripped,

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 but showing the indicator peg after it has been tripped, and

Fig. 10 is a schematic wiring diagram ofthe device.

Like reference numerals apply to similar parts throughout the several views, and the numeral 2 applies to a planar base of rectangular form. A housing 4 has the form of a rectilinear box having a top wall 6, side walls 8 and 10, and end walls 12 and 14, said side and end walls being secured at their lower edges to the corresponding edges of base 2 by .any suitable fasteners such as screws 16. The top wall 6 of the housing is provided with a pair of transparent windows 18 and 2t) spaced apart longitudinally of the housing, through which the playing areas of contestants No. 1 and No. 2 may be viewed respectively.

As best shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5, the playing board consists of a pair of rectangular, vertically spaced apart and horizontally coextensive sheets 22 and 24 of an insulating material, said sheets extending longitudinally of the housing below top wall 6 thereof. Said sheets are joined rigidly together along their longitudinal edges only by means of channel members 26, each of said channels being provided with an inner facing 28 of insulating material. The lower sheet 24 is rigidly connected to and supported above base 2 along its end edges only by means of a pair of channel members 30 and 32, the vertical webs of said channels being disposed respectively adjacent and parallel to end walls 12 and 14 of the housing.

Playing board 22-24 carries a series of indicator pegs 34 in the portion thereof disposed beneath and viewable through window 18, and a series of like indicator pegs 34 in the portion thereof disposed beneath and viewable through window 20. As best shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 9, each of said indicator pegs comprises a hollow tube, closed at its upper end, made of a transparent or trans lucent plastic or other suitable material, said tube being guided for vertical sliding movement in a hole 36 provided therefor in sheet 22, and a hole 38 provided therefor in sheet 24. A rod 40 is afiixed diametrically in the tube intermediate sheets 22 and 24, and is provided at each end with a hook formation 42. A pair of tension springs 44 have their upper ends engaged respectively in hooks 42, and their lower ends engaged in sheet 24, whereby t6 urge the tube downwardly at all times. canteen the lower end of the tube is a U-s'haped spring 46 bent to fon'n a laterally projecting tooth 48 which extends radially through a slot 50 formed in the nibe 'wa lt. Said tooth may be deflected resiliently inwardly,biit normally extends to engage the upper surface of sheet 24 as shown in Fig. 8, whereby to support the tube against the pres'sure of springs 44. A small electric light bulb 52 is disposed in the upper end of the tube, the lead wires 54 and 56 thereof being connected respectively to red 40 and spring 46.

Associated with indicator pegs 34 is' a horizontally disposed giill 58 disposed between sheets 22 and 24, and comprising a series of interconnected, horizontally extending angle-irons 60 dispdsed in spaced relation above sheet 24, each angle-iron extending closely adjacent one row (if pegs 34. When any peg 34 is elevated, by means yet to be described, the spring tooth 48 thereof is depressed inwardly by the associated angle-iron 60, and said tooth then snaps outwardly above said angle-iron to hold the peg in an elevated position, as shown in Fig. 9. All of angle-irons 60 are electrically interconne'cted. Indicator pegs 34' are similarly provided with a grill 58' having angle-irons 60. The grills 58 and 58' are interconnected at their contiguous ends by rneans of an electrical insulating strip 62. At the end of grill 58 adjacent housing end wall 12, an insulating spacer 64 is affixed thereto, and the upper edge of a switch-reset plate 66 is afiixed to said spacer. Plate 66. is disposed vertically, and rests in sliding contact with the outer face of the vertical web of channel 30, for a purpose to be described. Similarly the end of grill 58 adjacent housing end 'wall 14 is provided with an insulating spacer 64 and a depending switch reset plate 66"which slidably engages the outer surface of the vertical web of channel 32.

It will be seen that the unitary assembly comprising grills 58 and "58', insulating members 62, 64 and 64', and reset plates '66 and 66, is carried slid'abl'y on sheet 24 for movement transversely of the housing, this movemerit being limited by channel members 26. The assembly is normally urged to the left as viewed in Figs. 3 and or to the right as viewed in Fig. 6, by a tension spring 68 (see Figs. 3 and 4), connected at one end to insulating strip 62 and secured at its opposite end in the left channel 26 (as viewed in Fig. 3). In this position, the angles 60 and 60 of the grills are disposed immediately adjacent the pegs 34 and 34 whereby to engage the spring teeth 48 of said pegs to support said pegs in elevated posit'io'n as previously described. However, when the grill assembly is moved to the right as viewed in Figs. 3 and 5, or to the left as viewed in Fig. 6, angles 6t) and 69 are moved to greater distance from their corresponding pegs 34 or 34, and thus out of engagement with the teeth 48 of any pegs which have previously been elevated, thereby allowing said pegs to fall to their normal positions with teeth 48 engaging sheet 24.

h The grill assembly is moved to release the pegs by means of a pair of links 70 (see Figs. 3 and '6) attached respectively to insulating spacers '64 and '64, and extendmg horizontally to the right as viewed in Fig. 3. The outer ends of said links are pivoted respectively to the lower free ends of a pair of cranks 72. Said cranks are disposed respectively adjacent opposite ends of the hous- 1ng, 'and are fixed on a shaft 74 which extends longitudinally of the housing adjacent one of channels 26, said shaft being rotatably supported by hearing brackets 76'wh1ch are'afiixed to said channel. 'One of said cranks ls extended downwardly, and the lower end thereof is attached links 78 to the armature 80 of a solenoid 0011 82 mounted'on base 2. Each time coil 82 is energized,

it functions through cranks 72, shaft 74 and links 70 to move the grill assembly to release the indicator pegs as previously described.

Indicator pegs 34 are selectively moved to their elevated positions as described by a mechanism best shown in Figs. 3-6. A carriage 34 is disposed for horizontal movement beneath the portion of the playing board carrying indicator pegs 34. Said carriage includes a pair of parallel rods 86 extending transversely the full width of the playing board. At the right side of the playing board, as viewed in Fig. 3, said rods are secured in a bracket 88 provided with a leg 90 on the lower end of which is mounted a wheel 92 which engages base 2 and supports the carriage for movement longitudinally of the playing board. At the left side of the playing board, as viewed in Fig. 3, rods 86 are secured in a head 94 having bearing lugs 96 slidably mounted on a horizontal rod extending longitudinally of the housing. The ends of said rod are secured respectively in a plate 100 secured to and arising from base 2 adjacent housing end wall 12, and a plate 102 affixed to and arising from base 2 ad jacent the longitudinal midpoint of the housing. Afiixed in plate 106 is a bearing sleeve 104 which is parallel to rod 93 and which extends outwardly through a slot 106 in housing wall 12. Rotably mounted in said sleeve in a tubular hub 168. To the inner end of said hub is affixed a pulley 11% (see Fig. 6) disposed adjacent the inner surface of plate 160, and to the outer end of said hub is attached a knob 112. A taut cord or cable 114 is attached at one end to carriage head 94 and is thence trained around a pulley 116 carried by plate 192, a pulley 118 carried by plate 100, pulley 110, a second pulley 120-, and has its opposite end also afhxed to carriage head 94. Thus it will be seen that by turning knob 112, carriage 84 may be moved longitudinally of the housing.

Mounted for sliding movement on rods 86 of carriage 84 is a traversing carriage 122 in which is mounted a solenoid 124 the armature 126 of which is normally held in its lowered position as shown by gravity, but which is elevated whenever the solenoid is energized. A taut cord 128 is attached at one end to carriage 122, and is thence trained, as best shown in Fig. 5, around a pulley 130 carried by bracket 88, a larger pulley 132 carried ro'tatably by carriage head 94, pulley 134 .also carried by carriage head 94, and has its opposite and also secured to carriage 122. Pulley 132 is disposed coaxially with pulley 116. A non-circular shaft 136 has one end thereof journalled in plate 162, extends slidab-ly but non-rotatably through the hub of pulley 1.32, and has its opposite end secured to an axle 133 which is disposed rotatably in the hub 108 of pulley 11h. Axlc 133 extends outwardly through said hub, and has a knob 140 secured to the outer end thereof. It will be seen that by turning knob 140, pulley 132 will be turned and will drive carriage 122 transversely of the playing board. By manipulating both knobs 11-2 and 144 the solenoid 124 may be positioned selectively beneath the lower end of any one of indicator pegs 34. When the solenoid is then energized, the armature 126 contacts and raises the selected peg 34, asdescribed above. The portion of the playing board carrying indicator pegs 34" is also provided with a playing solenoid and positioning means therefor as just described in connection with pegs 34, corresponding portions of the mechanism being indicated by corresponding primed numerals.

In order that the player may know the position of the solenoid beneath his section of the playing board, an indicating mechanism is provided which includes a U-shaped rigid tube 142 fixed in the head Q-t'of carriage 34. As best shown in Fig. 5 the upper leg 144- o'f'said tube opens horizontally and is directed generally across the upper surface of the playing board in a =transverse vertical plane which includes solenoid armature 126, and the lower leg 146 of said tube opens horizontally and is directed in a line .parallel to and adjacent the lower reach of cord 128 which drives carriage 122. A similar U-shaped tube 148 is aifixed in bracket 88 of carriage 122 and is disposed at the opposite side of the playing board from tube 142. The upper and lower legs 150 and 152 of tube 148 are disposed in directly opposed relation respectively to the upper and lower legs of tube 142. An endless fine wire 154 is trained successively through tubes 142 and 148, the upper reach of said wire extending horizontally and transversely across the upper surface of the playing board, and the lower reach of said wire extending adjacent the lower reach of cord 128, and being secured thereto by clip 156. An indicator button 158 is affixed in the upper wire reach, and is visible through housing window 18. The button is provided with radiating spring wire spokes 160 which slide against the inner surface of window 18 to hold the button in a horizontal plane. It will be seen that but ton 158 will always be disposed vertically above the armature of solenoid 124. Thus, in selecting the peg 34 at which he desires to fire, the player turns knobs 112 and 140 until button 158 is disposed directly above the desired peg, then presses the Fire switch 162 which energizes solenoid 124 as will be described. The playing area of indicator pegs 34' is of course also provided with an indicator button 158' corresponding to button 158 just described, and operating means therefor, corresponding parts being indicated by corresponding primed numerals. Switches 162 and 162' are mounted respectively in plates 100 and 100 and the operating push buttons thereof extend outwardly through slots 106 and 186 of housing walls 12 and 14 respectively. A mounting plate 164 extends horizontally beneath the top wall 6 of the housing, being affixed to the upper ends of plates 100 and 100'. Said mounting plate serves as a base for various indicator lights to be described, the fixtures of said lights extending through holes provided in wall 6 so as to be visible thereabove, as indicated in Fig. 5.

The vertical webs of channel members 30 and 32 which support the playing board serve also as switch mounting plates. Channel 30 has a plurality of switches 166 al'fixed to the inner surface thereof, each correspond ing to an indicator peg 34, and channel 32 carries a like series of switches 166 each corresponding to an indicator peg 34, as will be described. Operating levers 168 of switches 166, and levers 168 of switches 166, extend outwardly through said channels. Said switches are of the slide type, being operable to be closed by mov ing levers 168 and 168 to the left as viewed in Fig. 3, and to be closed by a reverse movement. Switch levers 168 and 168 extend also through slots 170 provided respectively in switch reset plates 66 and 66', re-v set plates being afiixed to the assembly of grills 58 and 58 as previously described. As long as said grill assembly is disposed in its normal position to the left, slots 170 of plates 66 and 66 are disposed to permit manual closure of switches 166 and 166. However, when reset solenoid 82 is energized to move the grill assembly to release any indicator pegs which have previously been elevated, as described above, the Walls of slots 170 of the reset plates also engage switch levers, 168 and 168' to open all of switches 166 and 166'.

Switches 166 and 166' are accessible for manual operation through door openings 172 and 172' formed respectively in housing end walls 12 and 14, said openings being normally closed by a pair of doors 174 and 174' each supported along its upper edge from the housing by a hinge 176. Each of said doors is provided with an inwardly projecting notched finger 178 and 178 which cooperate respectively with spring catches 180 and 180.

to hold said doors closed. Said catches are affixed respectively to switch reset plates 66 and 66', so that whenever reset solenoid 82 is energized to pull grills 58 and 58 and reset plates 66 and 66 to the right, said catches will release fingers 178 and 178 to permit opening of '6 the doors. When the doors are closed, fingers 178 and 178 also engage respectively the operating levers 182 and 182 of micro-switches 184 and 184' to close said switches, which are mounted on base 2. When doors 174 and 174' are open, switches 184 and 184 are also open.

Fig. 10 shows a schematic wiring diagram of the device. An ordinary supply circuit of perhaps volts A.C. is represented by line wires 186 and 188, which are connected through a master switch 190 and fuse 192 with a rectifier 194 operable to produce a like positive direct current voltage of volts in wire 196, which will be utilized as set forth below. Said rectifier is grounded at 198. Connected also across line wires 186 and 188 is a transformer 200 operable to produce a reduced alternating current of perhaps 8 volts in wires 202 and 204, which are connected to a rectifier 206. Said rectifier is operable to produce a negative direct current of about 8 volts in wire 208, and is grounded Reset solenoid 82 is provided with an operating circuit from line wire 186 through wires 212, 214 and 216, solenoid coil 82, wire 218, and control switch 220 to ground at 222, and the solenoid is actuated whenever switch 220 is closed. Said switch may be of the coinoperated type if desired and is not shown structurally in Figs. l-9 since such switches are well known in theart. Actuation of solenoid 82 returns all of indicator pegs 34 and 34 to their normal lowered positions, opens all of selector switches 166 and 166 which may have been closed in previous games, releases spring catches 181) and to permit opening of doors 174 and 174', and opens door switches 184 and 184, all as previously described. This readies the device for the play of a new game.

At the right end of Fig. 10 is shown a select-play relay 224 having a single coil 226 operable to move five armatures 228, 230, 232, 234 and 236. When the coil is not energized, said armatures respectively engage upper contacts 238, 240, 242, 244 and 246. When the coil is energized, said armatures respectively engage lower contacts 248, 250, 252, 254 and 256. Shown also are a first counter relay 258 the armature of which engages contact 260 when coil 202 thereof is not energized, and engages contact 264 when the coil is energized, and a second counter relay 266 having corresponding contacts 268' and 270 and coil 272. The armatures of said counter relays are grounded at 274 and 276. Shown at 278 is a vacuum tube of the t-win-triode type, having two plates 280 and 282, two grids 284 and 286, and two cathodes 288 and 290, said cathodes having a common ground at 292. The heater filament 294 for said tube is shown connected across the secondary wires 202204 of transformer 200.

The negative direct current voltage of rectifier 206 travels through wire 288, rheostat 296 and wire 298 to contact 248 of relay armature 230, and through rheostat 300 and wire 382 to contact 250 of armature 230, said armature being connected by wire 304 to tube grid 234. Similarly, the negative voltage of rectifier 206 is applied through wires 208 and 386, rheostat 308 and wire 310 to contact 244 of relay armature 234, and through wires 288 and 386, rheostat 312 and wire 314 to contact 254 of armature 234. Armature 234 is connected by wire 316 to tube grid 286.

One terminal of each selector switch 166 is connected through a resistor 318 to a common wire 320 which is connected to wire 298 and hence to relay contact 240. The same terminals of switches 166 are also each connected through a resistor 322 and a Wire 324 to one of the springs 44 of the indicator peg 34 corresponding to that switch. Similarly, one terminal of each selector switch 166is connected through a resistor 326 to a common wire 328, which in turn is connected to Wire 3210 and hence to relay contact 244, and is also connected through a resistor 330 and a wire 332 to a spring 44 of the corresponding indicator peg 34. The opposite terminals of all of switches 166 and 166' are connected by common wires 334 and 336 respectively to the direct current output wire 196 .of rectifier 194. All of the angles 60 of grill 58 are connected through a common wire 338 and *wire 302 to relay contact 250, and all of angles 60' of grill 58' are connected through wires 340 and 314 to relay contact 254. It will be understood that while only three of the selector switches 166 and indicator pegs 34 for each player are shown in the diagram, all those not shown are connected similarly to those shown.

Relay armature 228 is connected by wire 342 to contact 264 of relay 258, and the contacts 238 and 248 of armature 228 are connected respectively through signal lamps 344 and 346 and a common resistor 348 and wires 214 and 212 .to line wire 186. Similarly, relay armature 236 is connected by wire 350 with contact 270 of relay 266, and the contacts 246 and 256 of armature 236 are connected respectively through indicator lamps 352 and 354 and a common resistor 356 to wire 214. It will be understood that all of the indicator lamps shown are of a low voltage gas type, and hence are each connected in series with a resistor.

Relay armature 232 is connected by wire 3.58 to line voltage wire 214. The contacts 242 and 252 of said relay are connected respectively through signal lamps 360 and 362 and a common resistor 364 to aground at 366. One terminal of each of coils 262 and 272 of relays 258 and 266 are connected to wire 196 to receive the direct current voltage of rectifier 194. The other terminal of coil 262 is connected by wire 368 to tube plate 280, and the other terminal of coil 272 is connected by wire 370 with tube plate 282. The operating coil 226 of gang relay 224 is provided with a line voltage operating circuit from wire 214 through wire 372, door switch 184, coil 226, and door switch 184' to ground at 374.

At the stage of operation as presently described, just after actuation of reset relay 82 and the opening .of doors 174 and 174, door switches 184 and 184' are of course open, and relay coil 226 is hence not energized, and all of the armatures thereof engage their upper contacts. Armature 232 engages contact 242 to complete the circuit of lamp 360, thereby indicating to the contestants that they should set their targets by closing switches 166 and 166. Armatures 230 and 234 engage contacts 240 and 244 respectively to impress the low negative voltage of rectifier 206 on tube grids 284 and 286 through rheostats 296 :and 308 respectively. Armatures 228 and 236 engage contacts 238 and 246 respectively, but do not cause lighting of any of lamps 344, 346, 352 or 354, since the ground wires 342 and 350 of said armatures are connected respectively to contacts 264 and 270 of relays 258 and 266, said contacts being open at this time, and remain open so long as relay coils 262 and 27.2 are not energized. Said coils are not energized at this time, since .one leg of the circuit for coil 262 extends from the coil through wire 368, tube plate 280 and cathode 288 to ground at 292, and the positive voltage impressed on plate 280 is not sufiicient to overcome the negative bias of grid 284. Similary, the circuit of relay coil 272 includes wire 370, tube plate 282, cathode 290 and ground 292, and is blocked by the negative zbias'of grid 286.

However, when player No. 1 closes one of the selector switches 166, the positive direct current voltage of rectifier 194 is impressed through Wires 196 and 334, the selected switch 166 and its associated resistor .318, wires 320 and 29,8, relay contact 240 and armature 230, and wire 304 onto grid 284. This reduces the negative bias of the grid. As player No. l closes additional switches 166, additional resistors 318 .are inserted in parallel in the circuit, thereby reducing the overall resistance of 8 the circuit and increasing the positive voltage impressed on grid 284. When the required number of switches 166 have been closed, for example six, the negative bias of grid 284 will havebeen "reduced to such an extent that current will flow front plate 280 to cathode 288, and relay coil 262 will be energized. Adjustment of rheostat 296 will cause coil 262 to be energized only after any desired number of switches 166 have been closed.

Energizing of relay coil 262 causes the relay to close on contact 264, and this completes a circuit from line wire 186 through wires 212 and 214, resistor 348, lamp 344, contact 238 and armature 228, wire 342, contact 264 and relay 258 to ground 274, thereby lighting lamp 344 to indicate that player No. 1 has selected the required number of targets" by closing switches 166. He cannot thereafter cheat by opening some of switches 166, since lamp 344 would then go out and thereby indicate his action to his opponent. Player No. 1 then closes the door 174 over his selector switches 166, this action also closing door switch 184.

Player No. 2, in the same manner, makes his target selections by closing the required number of switches 166, thereby impressing the positive direct voltage of rectifier 194 through wires 196 and 336, switches 166, resistors 326, wire 328, contact 244 and armature 234, and wire 316 to tube grid 286, whereby to neutralize the negative bias impressed on said grid from rectifier 206, through wires 208 and 306, rheostat 308, wire 310, contact 244, armature 234 and wire 316. When the required number of switches 166' have been closed, the tube plate current from plate 282 to cathode 290 will flow energizing relay coil 272, causing relay 266 to close on contact 270 to complete the circuit for lamp 352, indicating that Player No. 2 has set the required number of targets. Player No. 2 then closes door 174' over his selector switches, which action also closes door switch 184. This completes the circuit to coil 226 of relay 224 from line wire 186 through wires 212, 214 and 372, switch 184, coil 226, and switch 184 to ground at 374. All of the armatures of said relay are thus closed on their lower contacts.

When this occurs, armatures 230 and 234 break the circuits from resistors 318 and 326, thereby restoring full negative bias to grids 284 and 286 and thereby causing relay coils 262 and 272 to be de-energized and the armatures 258 and 266 thereof to close on contacts 260 and 268, interrupting the circuits to lamps 344 and 352. Armatures 228 and 236 close on contacts 248 and 256 which are connected to lamps 346 and 354, but cannot cause said lamps to be lit since contacts 264 and 270 of relays 258 and 266 are then open. The negative voltage of rectifier 206 is then impressed on grid 284 through wires 208, rheostat 300, wire 302, contact 250, armature 230 and wire 304, and on grid 286 through wires 208 and 305, rheostat 312, wire 314, contact 254, armature 234 and Wire 316. Armature 232 closes on contact 252, thereby completing a line voltage circuit from wire 214 through wire 358, armature 232, lamp 362 and resistor 364 to ground at 366, lamp 362 indicating that the device is fully ready for playing the game. Closure of armature 232 on contact 252 also supplies full line voltage to wire 376, which energizes the playing circuits as will be described below. It will be apparent that from this point on neither player can alter the number or the pattern of the selector switches he has closed, since to do so he would have to open door 174 or 174- to obtain access to said switches. Opening of either of said doors will open switch 184 or 184, interrupting the circuit to relay coil 226 and causing relay 224 to return to its Set Targets position, which of course is immediately made apparent to his opponent by the lighting of lamp 360.

The playing circuit includes switches 162 and 162', previously described, which are of the push button type. Switch 162 interconnects contacts 378 and 380 when nr 44n k4 released, and connects contacts 382 and 384 when pressed. Switch 162 is supplied with corresponding contacts indicated by corresponding primed numerals. Contacts 382 and 378' are connected by wire 386, and contacts 378 and 382 are connected by wire 388. The playing circuits include also a turn relay 390 and a pair of play relays 392 and 392'. Turn relay 390 comprises armatures 394, 396 and 398, all operable by a single coil 400. When said coil is de-energized, said armatures engage contacts 402, 404 and 406 respectively, and when the coil is energized, said armatures engage contacts 408, 410 and 412 respectively. Play relay 392 comprises three armatures 414, 416 and 418 operable by a single coil 420. When said coil is not energized, said armatures engage contacts 422, 424 and 426 respectively. When the coil is energized, said armatures engage contacts 428, 430 and 432 respectively. Play relay 392' is of the same construction as relay 392, and corresponding parts thereof are indicated by corresponding primed numerals. Contacts 406 and 412 of relay 390 are connected respectively to a pair of single lamps 434 and 436, and thence through a common resistor 438 to ground at 440. Contact 402 of relay 390 is connected through a resistor 442 to ground at 444, said resistor having the same resistance as operating coil 400 of relay 390, for a purpose which will appear.

When line voltage is supplied to wire 376 by the closure of relay armature 232 on contact 252, said voltage is supplied to armatures 396 and 398 of turn relay 390. All of the armatures of this relay are engaging their upper contacts, indicating that it is the No. 1 contestants turn to play. The engagement of armature 398 on contact 406 lights lamp 434, furnishing visual indication of this fact. Engagement of armature 394 with contact 402 completes a high voltage direct current circuit from rectifier 194 through wires 196, 446 and 448, armature 394, contact 402 and resistor 442. This resistor loads the circuit while relay coil 400 is inoperative, as will appear.

Contestant No. 1 then makes his play by first turning knobs 112 and 140 until indicator button 158 is disposed above an indicator peg 34 which he believes player No. 2 may have selected, as previously described, then presses Fire button 162 momentarily. This completes a line voltage circuit from relay armature 396 through wire 450, contacts 378 and 380' of No. 2 Fire switch 162 (which must be released at this time), wire 386, contacts 382 and 384 of switch 162, wire 452, coil 420 of relay 392, wire 454, contact 268 and armature 266 to ground at 276. Relay coil 420 thus energized, causes contact 414 to close on contact 428, completing a holding circuit from wire 450 through wire 456, armature 414, contact 42%, wires 458 and 452, coil 420, and thence through wire 454 to ground at 276, whereby coil 420 is kept energized as long as armature 396 is closed on contact 404. Closure of armature 418 on contact 432 completes a line voltage circuit from line wire 186 through wires 212, 460 and 462, armature 418, contact 432 and play solenoid 124 to ground at 464, whereby to elevate the selected indicator peg 34 as previously described. Closure of armature 416 on contact 430 completes a high voltage direct current circuit from rectifier 194 through Wires 196 and 446, armature 416, wire 466, coil 400 of relay 390, wire 468 and armature 416 to ground at 470, thereby energizing relay coil 400 and causing the armatures operated thereby to engage their lower contacts.

Closure of armature 394 on contact 408 of course removes resistor 442 from the circuit, thereby compensating for the resistance of coil 400 which now loads the circuit, and completes a holding circuit from wire 446 through wire 448, armature 394, wires 472 and 466, coil 400, wire 468 and armature 416' to ground 470, whereby coil 400 will remain energized as long as armature 416 engages contact 424'. The movement of armature 396 away from contact 404 breaks the holding circuit of relay 392, and this action of course follows rapidly the actuation of relay 392. However, the actuation of relay 390 is delayed slightly by a condenser 474 connected across the terminals of relay coil 400. In this manner, the de-energizing of play relay coil 420 is delayed long enough to give play solenoid 124 time to operate fully. Closure of armature 398 on contact 412 completes the circuit of lamp 436, giving visual indication that it is now No. 2 contestants turn to play.

After positioning his solenoid 124' by mam'pulation of knobs 112' and No. 2 contestant registers his play by pressing Fire button 162. This completes a line voltage circuit from armature 396 through wire 476, con tacts 378 and 380 of switch 162 (which must be released at this time), wire 388, contacts 382 and 384' of switch 162', wire 478, relay coil 420', wire 480 and relay 258 to ground 274. Coil 420, thus energized, closes armature 418 on contact 432', thereby completing a power circuit to play solenoid 124' and ground 482, and the closure of armature 414', which completes a holding circuit from armature 396 through wires 476 and 484, armature 414 and wires 486 and 478 to coil 420'. The movement of armature 416' away from contact 424 opens the holding circuit of relay 390 and permits said relay to return to its No. 1 Play position. This in turn opens the holding circuit of relay 392', but the action is delayed by condenser 474 to give solenoid 124' ample time to operate. The mechanism is then again in position for play by contestant No. l, and the cycle is repeated. The interlocking of switches 162 and 162' as shown prevents a rapid alternate actuation of solenoids 124 and 124', in the event both switches should be pressed simultaneously.

Each time player No. 1 presses switch button 162, the indicator peg 34 below which solenoid 124 is positioned at that time will be elevated, as previously described, thereby giving a visual indication that that particular peg has been fired at. If, in addition, the selected peg 34 corresponds to one of selector switches 166' which player No. 2 has previously closed, No. 1 has scored a hit. A registering circuit is thereby completed from rectifier 194 through wires 196 and 336, one of switches 166', its corresponding resistor 330 and wire 332, spring 44 of the corresponding peg 34, then (referring to Fig. 9) through rod 40, wire 54, lamp 52, wire 56, spring 58, and angle 60 of grill 58, then (referring back to Fig. 10) through wire 338, to rheostat 300 which, being charged negatively permits a current to flow to light lamp 52. The positive voltage of wire 338 is also impressed through wire 302, armature 230 and wire 394 to tube grid 284-, The lighting of lamp 52 in the selected peg 34 gives a visual indication of the hit and the positive voltage impressed on grid 284 partially oifsets the negative bias of said grid which is impressed thereon from rectifier 286 through wire 208, rheostat 300, wire 302, armature 230 and wire 304. When either player, say No. 1, has scored hits on pegs 34 corresponding to all of the switches 166' closed by player No. 2, the positive voltage impressed on grid 284 will have sufficiently reduced the negative bias of said grid that the tube plate circuit corresponding thereto will beestablished. This circuit flows from rectifier 194 through wire 196, coil 262 of relay 258, wire 368, plate 280, and cathode 288 to ground at 292. Coil 262, thus energized, closes relay 258 on contact 264. This breaks the ground connection of coil 420' of the No. 2 play relay 392', so that No. 2 is thereafter prevented from playing, and completes a line voltage circuit from wire 214 through resistor 348, lamp 346, armature 228, wire 342, and armature 258 to ground at 274, thereby giving a visual signal that player No. 1 has won the game. Player No. 1 also cannot make additional plays, since his play relay 392 cannot be actuated until the coil 420 thereof is furnished current from armature 396 of turn relay 390, since armature 396 cannot engage contact 404 to energize coil 420 until the holding circuit of coil 4% of the turn relay is broken, said holding circuit including armature 416 of play relay 392', and since coil 420 of relay 392, cannot be energized to break said holding circuit due to the opening of relay 258 from contact 260. Thus neither player can register any further plays after either player has won the game, until reset solenoid 80 is again actuated as previously described to return all parts to their starting positions.

The play circuits of player No. 2 are of course similar to those just described for player No. 1. When player No. 2 makes a hit, a circuit is established from rectifier 194 through wires 196 and 334, one of switches 166, resistor 322 and wire 324 corresponding thereto, through the notching peg 34 and the lamp 52 contained thereby, grill 60, wires 340 and 314, armature 234 and wire 316 to tube grid 286, the positive voltage on said grid being gradually increasedas more resistors 322 are connected in parallel in the line, whereby eventually to neutralize the egative bias of said grid which is impressed thereon from rectifier 206 through wire 2%, rheostat 312, wire 314, armature 234 and Wire 316, whereby to permit flow of current from plate 282 to cathode 290 to energize coil 272 of relay 266 to cause said relay to break the ground connection of No. 1 play relay 392, and to light lamp 354 to indicate that player No. 2 has won.

All of the indicator lamps 344, 346, 352, 354, 363, 362, 33-; and 436 are mounted in structural plate 164 as previously described so as to be visible above the housing. The pattern of said lamps is as shown in Fig. 1, though this of course is optional. The rectifiers 194 and 206, transformer 22%, vacuum tube 278, the various resistors and relays, and other common electrical devices used, are not shown in the structural drawings since they are well known in the art. It will be understood, however, that they may be mounted at any practical location within housing 4, particularly on that portion of base 2 to the right of the playing board, as viewed in Figs. 3 and 5.

While I have shown and described a specific embodiment of my invention, it 'will be readily apparent that many minor changes of structure and operation could be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim as new and desire to protectby Letters Patent is:

1. A game apparatus comprising a housing, two series of indicator members carried in said housing, a first electrically operable play device carried movably in said housing whereby to be selectively positionable adjacent any one of the first of said series of indicator members, a second electrically operable play device carried movably in said housing whereby to be selectively positionable adjacent any one of the second of said series of indicator members, said play devices being operable when energized to actuate the indicator member adjacent thereto, an operating means for each of said play devices including a manually operable switch, said operating means being effective when said switch is closed to energize the associated play device, a pair of selector panels carried by said housing and each having a series of selector switches carried thereby, the selector switches of ,each panel corresponding with the indicator members of one of said series of indicator members, an electrically operable signal means associated with each of said indicator members, and a plurality of registering circuits each including a source of electric power, one of said selector switches, the signal means associated with the corresponding indicator member, and an electric switch associated with said last named indicator member, said last named switch being operable to be closed responsively to the actuation of said indicator member by the associated play device.

2. A game apparatus as recited in claim 1 wherein a playing board is carried in said housing, wherein each of said indicator members is carried movably by said board, and wherein each of said-play devices comprises an electrically operable actuator movable relative to said board to be disposed selectively adjacent any one of said indicator members, whereby when said actuator is energized, it will engage said indicator member to move the latter from a first position to a second position relative to said playing board.

3. A game apparatus as recited in claim 1 wherein a playing board is carried in said housing, wherein each of said indicator members is carried movably by said board, and wherein each of said play devices comprises an electrically operable actuator movable relative to said board to be disposed selectively adjacent any one of said indicator members, whereby when said actuator is energized, it will engage said indicator member to move the latter from a first position to a second position relative to said playing board, and with the addition of cooperating latch members carried respectively by each of said indicator members and by said playing board, said latch members being operable to engage and retain said indicator member 'in said second position, said latch members also comprising members of said electric switch associated with said indicator member, whereby said registering circuit associated with each indicator member isclosed whenever said indicator member is disposed in said second position.

4. A game apparatus as recited in claim 3 wherein all of said latch members carried by said playing board are movable with respect to said indicator members whereby to be disengaged from the latch members carried by said indicator members, thereby permitting said indicator members to return to their first positions, and electrically operable reset means operable when energized to move said latch members carried by said board to their disengaging positions.

5. A game apparatus as recited in claim 1 with the addition of a pair of movable doors carried by said housing and each providing access when open to one of said selector panels, an electric door switch associated with each of said doors and operable by the movement of said door, and electric means including said door switches and operable whenever either of said doors is open to render said play devices inoperable.

6. A game apparatus as recited in claim 1 with the addition of a plurality of selector circuits each including one of said selector switches, a first counting means operable whenever .a predetermined number of selector switches on one of said selector panels have been closed to close a first signal circuit, a first electrically operable signal device in said signal circuit, a second counting means operable whenever a predetermined number of selector switches on the other of said selector panels have been closed to close a second signal circuit, and a second electrically operable signal device in said second signal circuit.

7. A game apparatus .as recited in claim .1 with the addition of a first counting device interconnected with the registering circuits associated with one of said series of indicator members and operable when a predetermined number of said registering circuits have been closed to render one of said play devices inoperative, and a second counting device interconnected with the registering circuits associated with the other of said series of indicator members and operable when a predetermined number of said circuits .have been closed to render the other of said play devices inoperative.

8. A game apparatus as recited in claim 7 with the addition of a plurality of selector circuits each including one of said selector switches, all of said selector circuits associated with one of said selector panels being adapted to be interconnected with said first counting device, and all of said selector circuits associated with the other of said selector panels being adapted to be interconnected with said second counting device, whereby whenever a predetermined number of selector circuits associated with either of said counting devices is closed, said counting device will be actuated, a pair of signal devices energized by the actuation of said two counting devices respectively, and switching means operable to connect, with each counting device, either the selecting circuits or the registering circuits associated therewith.

9. A game apparatus as recited in claim 8 wherein said switching means includes a pair of doors carried movably by said housing and providing access when open to said selector panels respectively, a pair of switches operable by said doors, and means operable by said switches when either of said doors is open to interconnect said selector circuits to said counting devices, and operable when both of said doors are closed to interconnect said registering circuits to said counting devices.

10. A game apparatus as recited in claim 7 wherein each of said counting devices comprises a relay operable when actuated to render one of said play devices inoperative, an actuating coil for said relay, an amplifier type vacuum tube, the operating circuit for said coil including the plate circuit of said tube, means impressing a negative bias on the control grid of said tube, whereby to block the plate circuit of said tube and retain said coil de-energized, the registering circuits associated therewith comprising a plurality of parallelconnected circuit legs each having one of said selector switches, a resistor, one of said signal means, and one of said indicator member switches connected in series therein, each of said circuit legs being connected at one end to a source of positive voltage, and the other ends of said circuit legs all being connected with the grid of said tube, whereby successive completion of said circuit legs will insert said resistors successively intothe circuit in parallel, whereby to increase in steps the positive voltage impressed on said grid, whereby the negative bias of said grid will eventually be overcome to permit flow of the tube plate circuit after a predetermined number of said circuit legs have been completed.

11. A game apparatus as recited in claim 9 wherein each of said counting devices comprises a relay operable when actuated to render one of said play devices inoperative, and to actuate said signal device associated therewith, an operating coil for said relay, an amplifier type vacuum tube, the operating circuit for said coil including the plate circuit of said tube, means impressing a negative bias on the control grid of said tube to prevent the plate circuit thereof from flowing, the registering circuits associated therewith comprising a plurality of parallel-connected circuit legs each having one of said selector switches, a resistor, one of said signal means, and one of said indicator member switches connected in series therein, and the selector circuits associated therewith comprising a plurality of parallel-connected circuit legs each including one of said selector switches and a resistor connected in series therein, one end of each of the parallel-connected legs of all of said associated registering circuits and selector circuits being connected to a source of positive voltage, theground ends of said registering circuit legs, or the ground ends of said selector circuit legs, being selectively connectable to said tube grid by said switching means, whereby successive completion of either the selector circuit legs or the registering circuit legs, as the case may be, will insert the associated resistors successively into the circuits in parallel, whereby to increase gradually the positive voltage impressed on said grid, whereby the negative bias of said grid will be overcome to permit flow of the tube V plate current after a predetermined number of said selec-' 14 tor circuit legs, or said registering circuit legs, 'have been completed.

12. A game apparatus as recited in claim 1 with the addition of a pair of doors carried movably by said housing and providing access when open to said selector panels respectively, a pair of latches operable respectively to retain said doors closed, and electrically operable reset means operable when energized to deactuate all of said indicator members which have previously been actuated 'by said play devices, to open all of said selector switches which may previously have been closed, and to release said door latches.

13. A game apparatus as recited in claim 1 wherein said operating means for said play devices comprises a first play relay operable when actuated to complete an operating circuit to said first play device, a second play relay operable when actuated to complete an operating circuit to said second play device, a turn relay operable when not energized to complete an actuating circuit to said first play relay through said manually operable switch associated therewith, and when energized to complete an actuating circuit to said second play relay through said manually operable switch associated therewith, means operable by the actuation of said first play relay to complete a holding circuit therefor which includes said turn relay and is closed only when said turn relay is not actuated, means operable by actuation of said first play relay to actuate said turn relay, means operable by actuation of said turn relay to break the holding circuit of said first play relay, and to complete a holding circuit for said turn relay, said last named holding circuit including said second play relay and being closed only when said second play relay is not actuated, and means operable by actuation of said second play relay to com plete a holding circuit for said second play relay, and to break the holding circuit of said turn relay, the holding circuit of said second play relay including said tlurn relay and being closed only when said turn relay is actuated, all of which requires that said two manually operable switches must be closed alternately to provide operation of said two play devices.

14. A game apparatus as recited in claim 13 wherein the actuating means for said turn relay constitutes an actuating coil, and with the addition of a condenser connected across the terminals of said coil, whereby upon the making or the breaking of the operating circuit of said coil, the actuation of or de-actuation of said coil will be delayed, thereby delaying the dc-actuation of either the first or the second play relay, as the case may be, sufficiently to permit full operation of said play devices.

' 15. A game apparatus as recited in claim 13 wherein said two manually operable switches are both of the push button type, each being operable to connect a first pair of contacts when pressed and a second pair of contacts when released, the play relay actuating circuit including the first contacts of each switch including also the second contacts of the other switch, whereby the relay actuating circuits controlled by said switches cannot be closed simultaneously.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,932,524 Jackson Oct. 31, 1933 2,575,269 Hall Nov. 13, 1951 1 FOREIGN PATENTS 41,216 Netherlands July 15, 1937 471,041 Italy May 2, 1952

US2898108A 1958-09-12 1958-09-12 Battleship game Expired - Lifetime US2898108A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3012780A (en) * 1959-04-29 1961-12-12 Friedman Sol Jet dogfight game
US3046017A (en) * 1959-11-23 1962-07-24 Alger A Kazakevich Game
US3104878A (en) * 1963-09-24 Parlor game
US3127174A (en) * 1964-03-31 Battle contest game board with electrically
US5520393A (en) * 1994-06-06 1996-05-28 Rickey, Jr.; Alfred J. Spatial perception/physical reaction game

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
NL41216C (en) *
US1932524A (en) * 1932-11-23 1933-10-31 Jr William E Jackson Game
US2575269A (en) * 1949-02-28 1951-11-13 Corliss W Hall War game apparatus

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
NL41216C (en) *
US1932524A (en) * 1932-11-23 1933-10-31 Jr William E Jackson Game
US2575269A (en) * 1949-02-28 1951-11-13 Corliss W Hall War game apparatus

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3104878A (en) * 1963-09-24 Parlor game
US3127174A (en) * 1964-03-31 Battle contest game board with electrically
US3012780A (en) * 1959-04-29 1961-12-12 Friedman Sol Jet dogfight game
US3046017A (en) * 1959-11-23 1962-07-24 Alger A Kazakevich Game
US5520393A (en) * 1994-06-06 1996-05-28 Rickey, Jr.; Alfred J. Spatial perception/physical reaction game

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