US2866425A - Lockstitch sewing machines - Google Patents

Lockstitch sewing machines Download PDF

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Publication number
US2866425A
US2866425A US51551455A US2866425A US 2866425 A US2866425 A US 2866425A US 51551455 A US51551455 A US 51551455A US 2866425 A US2866425 A US 2866425A
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Prior art keywords
hook
needle
thread
loop
beak
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Expired - Lifetime
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Richard G Palmbach
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Union Special Machine Co
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Union Special Machine Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B57/00Loop takers, e.g. loopers
    • D05B57/08Loop takers, e.g. loopers for lock-stitch sewing machines
    • D05B57/10Shuttles
    • D05B57/14Shuttles with rotary hooks
    • D05B57/143Vertical axis type
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B73/00Casings
    • D05B73/04Lower casings
    • D05B73/12Slides; Needle plates

Description

Dec. 30, 1958 R. G. PALMBACH 2,866,425

LOCKSTITCH SEWING MACHINES Filed June 14, 1955 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 I3 I I2 I v :23: I 34 i II I: JUIIDVE i all I i [LL-fi I !s I I15 5 Dec. 30," 1958 R. G. PALMBACH LOCKSTITCH SEWING MACHINES Filed June 14, 1955 5 SheetS-Shget 2 III" Dec. 30, 1958 PALMBACH 2,865,425

LOCKSTITCH SEWING MACHINES Filed June 14, 1955 F IGQG 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 0, 1958 R. G. PALMBACH 2,866,425

LOCKSTITCH SEWING MA CHI NES Filed June 14, 1955 FIGJO e ocLocK POSITION 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 DIRECTION OF ROTATION FIG."

United States Patent Cfiice 2,866,425 Patented Dec. 30, 1958 LOCKSTITCH SEWENG MACHINES Richard G. Palmbach, Lombard, Ill., assignor to Union Special Machine Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application June 14, 1955, Serial No. 515,514 6 Claims. (Cl. 112-182) This invention relates to a lockstitch sewing machine having a rotary hook of the type adapted to be revolved about a vertical axis or an axis perpendicular to the work supporting surface of the machine, at an angular speed which is twice that of the shaft which drives the cooperating needle.

In machines of the character indicated, difficulties have been encountered in insuring the proper passage of loops of needle thread of different weights around the bobbin case and through the spaces momentarily provided between various shoulders and detents. These difficulties have been particularly pronounced when the machines have been supplied with a relatively heavy needle thread, since the heavier threads are not so readily carried across the upper face of the bobbin case. The tendency of the upper leg of the needle thread loop to lag behind makes it diflicult to bring it at the proper time to the gap temporarily provided between the shoulders on the bobbin case and its detaining means and also to the point at which the looper opener acts upon the bobbin case. As a result, frequent breakage of the thread occurs because it is held at one point or another at the time it is being rapidly pulled up by the takeup mechanism.

In an effort to provide the required timing for the passage of a heavy thread between the shoulders and detaining means mentioned above, the action of the hook opening mechanism has been delayed for about in certain machines, but this has left inadequate time for the withdrawal of the usual opening finger before the thread must be pulled between this finger and the cooperating surface on the bobbin case. Other expedients which have heretofore been adopted involve a change in the timing of the needle thread takeup means and an a increase in the takeup action. These changes have also proved objectionable. Moreover, in adjusting a machine by these expedients to provide the proper timing for a relatively heavy thread the timing is wrong for a lighter thread.

Also to insure proper cooperation between the needle and the looper, it is desirable for proper stitch formation to provide for adjustment of a needle guard element carried by the looper to accommodate needles of different guages, as when the machine is required to deal with light and heavy needle threads at different times.

An important object of the present invention has been to provide a lockstitch sewing machine with a rotary book of the character indicated having special means for so retaining and directing the needle thread loop that its upper leg will be carried properly across the top of the bobbin case, regardless of the weight of the thread being employed at any particular time. The preferred arrangement is such that a minimum of resistance is offered to the movement of the thread across the various surfaces which it must engage in its passage round the bobbin case. It is also preferably such that the top legof the loop is passed across the top of the bobbin case substantially simultaneously and in parallelism with the pasage of the lower leg across the bottom of the bobbin case or even slightly in advance of the latter. With hooks as heretofore constructed, the top leg of the loop has lagged considerably behind the lower leg in its movement across the bobbin case, particularly when a relatively heavy thread has been used.

The improved hook of the present invention has a loop seizing beak the upper and lower portions of the outer surface of which incline inwardly toward the axis of the hook from a substantially median line extending lengthwise of the beak. In this way the upper and lower edges of the beak are positioned as closely as possible to the top and bottom peripheral edges of the bobbin case retained within the hook. Now in conjunction with this beak formation the hook is provided with a needle thread loop retaining element which projects outwardly and upwardly from the inclined upper portion of the outer surface of the beak at a point adjacent the base of the beak where it merges with the main vertical wall of the hook body. The point of connection of the element or spur with the hook is substantially midway between the usual raceway in the hook and the top edge of the hook beak. It is also so located that the raceway is substantially midway between this point of connection of the spur and the bottom of the bobbin case. The arrangement of the spur is such that it tends to hold the portion of the thread loop which extends across the outer face of the beak in a substantially vertical position until the beak of the hook has moved through an arc of somewhat more than after entering the needle thread loop.

Another object has been to provide a needle guard on a rotary hook of the character indicated which may be readily adjusted for cooperation with needles of different gauge without the necessity of bending the metal of which the guard is formed. The arrangement is such that all portions of the guard maintain their proper relation to the needles of different gauge when appropriately adjusted. Thus the guard performs its needle deflecting and positioning function in the desired manner and enables the formation of the desired needle loop for seizing by the beak of the hook, regardless of the gauge of the needle and the weight of the thread being employed.

Other objects, features, and advantages of the invention will appear from the detailed description of an illustrative embodiment of the same which will now be given in conjunction with the acompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view through a portion of the work support of a sewing machine and through one of a pair of vertical axis rotary hook units incorporating the invention, embodied in the machine, the cooperating needles also being shown;

Fig. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the parts forming one of the vertical axis hooks;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of one of the rotary books with the parts thereof assembled;

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view through the main body portion of one of the rotary hooks;

Fig. 5 is a bottom view of one of the rotary hooks showing the adjustable mounting of a needle guard;

Figs. 6, 7, 8,' and 9 are plan views of the pair of verticall axis rotary hooks embodied in the illustrative machine, together with a cooperating throat plate partly broken away and shown in section; these views show the books at different positions in their cycle of operation;

Fig. 10 is a perspective view of the hook assembly and illustrates the position of the needle thread loop at a point in the cycle of operation of the hook;

Fig. 11 is a bottom View of a preferred form of throat plate embodied in the machine; and

Fig. 12 is a vertical, transverse sectional view through the throat plate, taken along the line 12-12 of Fig. 11.

The sewing machine embodying the invention may be of the general construction illustrated in the patent to Quist No. 2,329,484, granted September 14, 1943. It includes a pair of vertical axis hook units in the work supporting base of the frame and a needle bar in the head of the overhanging arm of the frame provided with a pair of needles arranged for reciprocation toward and through the work support for cooperation with the hook units. Also, as disclosed in the Quist patent, the needle bar actuating mechanism may include means for imparting a needle feed movement to the needles as they are engaged with the work on the work support.

Referring now particularly to Fig. l of the drawings, there is illustrated a pair of thread carrying needles arranged to be carried downwardly through a work supporting surface 11 provided on the machine frame. Each needle is arranged to cooperate with a vertical axis hook unit, only one of which is illustrated in Fig. l and designated 12. A four-motion feed dog 13, which may be operated through connections of the character illustrated in said Quist patent, serves to advance the work in the course of switch formation. Each hook unit has a housing 14 adapted to support the operating parts of the unit and also to provide a lubricant reservoir for the automatic lubrication of the wear receiving parts. As disclosed in the above mentioned Quist patent, each unit is preferably arranged for adjustment on the frame of the sewing machine to vary the spacing of the lines of stitching formed by the pairs of needles and cooperating rotary hooks. Within suitable extensions of each housing 14 there is journaled a vertically disposed hook shaft 15 arranged to be driven through a spiral gear 16 secured to the shaft which cooperates with a spiral gear 16a (Fig. 6) on the main drive shaft 16b in the base of the machine. The relationship between the gear 16 and the driving gear 16a on the main shaft is such that the hook shaft 15 is rotated at twice the angular speed of the drive shaft. Secured to the upper end of the shaft 15 is a hook assembly 17 which includes a rotary component 18 that is revolved with the shaft and is provided with a needle-thread loop-seizing beak 19. Hub 18a of the rotary component is secured to the shaft by set screws 18b. The rotary component 18 also carries a needle guard 20 arranged to cooperate with the needle 10 just prior to the seizing of the needle thread loop by the beak 19.

Rotary component 18 of the hook unit is cup-shaped and arranged to receive a stationary bobbin case 21 having a circumferentially extending rib formation which cooperates with a raceway in the rotary component. Bobbin case 21 is held against rotation with the rotary component by means of a projection 22 at the top of the bobbin case which cooperates with a downwardly extending rib 23a of a throat plate 23 mounted in an opening in the work supporting surface 11 of the machine frame. Rib 23a is cut away in a region 23b to receive the projection 22 of the bobbin case and is arranged to provide a pair of spaced shoulders for cooperation with the projection 22. The arrangement is such that the bobbin case may be turned through a small angle to provide a gap at one side or the other of the projection 22. It will be understood that as the rotary component 18 is revolved, it will normally tend to drag the bobbin case in the same direction so that one edge of projection 22 is urged against one of the shoulders provided on the rib 23a. However, when it is desired to draw the upper leg of the needle thread loop upwardly between the projection 22 and the cooperating shoulder on rib 23a, the bobbin case is shifted slightly in a direction counter to the direction of revolution of the hook. For this purpose a finger 24 is arranged to cooperate with a projection 25 on the bobbin case. Finger 24 is adjustably mounted on an arm 26 secured by means of a screw 27a to the upper end of a rock shaft 27 mounted in the hook frame 14. At the lower end of shaft 27 there is secured thereto an arm 28 which is pivotally connected with one end of a pitman 29 having a strap portion cooperating with an eccentric 30 adjacent the lower end of shaft 15. The arrangement is such that the hook opening finger 24 is moved into engagement with the projection 25 of the bobbin case to turn the latter slighly at the time in the cycle of rotation of the hook that the upper leg of the needle thread loop is in vertical alignment with the notch or cutout portion of the rib 23a, so that this leg of the thread may be pulled upwardly through the gap and subsequently passed over the projection 22 of the bobbin case.

Considering the construction of the hook in greater detail, by reference to Figs. 2 to 5 inclusive, the main body portion 18 of the rotary component has a generally cylindrical contour. However, in the region of the beak 19 it is provided with an upward extension, the outer face 31 of which is inclined inwardly toward its top in the direction of the axis of the hook. This inwardly inclined surface 31 continues throughout the length of the beak and serves to position the top edge 32 of the beak as close as possible to the bobbin case and relatively near the top of the latter. The longitudinal center line 33 of the beak forms a continuation of the top edge of the cylindrical portion of the body member 18 but is inclined upwardly as shown. Beneath this center line the beak is provided with an inwardly inclined surface 34 which serves to position the lower edge of the beak as close as possible to the bobbin case. A radially extending shoulder 35 provided around the inner surface of the hook body 18, over a circumference of about forms the lower edge of a hook raceway the top edge of which is provided by the underside of a removable semi-annular plate 36 adapted to be attached to the body 18 by means of screws. Interrupted rib formation-'37 extending around the bobbin case is adapted to ride in the raceway so formed.

Adjacent the base of the beak 19, where it joins the main body of the hook, the surface 31, which is otherwise curved circumferentially, is flattened in an area 38 and at this point there is provided an outwardly and upwardly extending thread retaining element or spur 39. The latter has a shank 40 inserted in a hole formed perpendicular to the flattened surface 38. A flange 41 on the spur rests upon such flattened surface. The spur may be held in the opening by any suitable means, such as the friction created by a tight press fit. Outwardly of the flange 41 the spur is provided with a groove 42 which extends around the circumference of the pin like spur. The arrangement is such as to provide a number of conditions adapted to bring about the desired movement of the needle thread loop across the top and bottom faces of the bobbin case. The spur is positioned about inwardly fro-m the point of the hook beak. Its forwardmost point is substantially vertically above a shoulder 43 provided by the merging of the lower edge of the beak with the cylindrical portion of the body 18 of the hook. The outer end of the opening in which the stem 40 of the spur is inserted is positioned about midway between the top of the beak of the hook and the raceway described. This raceway, moreover, is positioned about midway between the outer end of the opening which receives the stem 40 and the bottom of the bobbin case. The axis of the spur 39 extends outwardly in a radial direction from the axis of the hook and is inclined upwardly at an angle of about 30. This serves to position the uppermost part of the groove 42 near the top of the portion 31 of the hook body so that, as will appear more clearly hereinafter, the upper leg of the needle thread loop extends in a substantially straight line from the top of the spur to the bottom of the throat plate at the stitching point.

As best shown in Fig. 5 the needle guard 20, which extends upwardly from the base of the main body of the hook in a region below and forwardly of the hook beak, is carried by and preferably formed integrally with a plate 44 having an opening surrounding the hub 18a of the body of the hook. This plate is attached at one point by means of a screw 45 to the underface of the hook body and it is attached at another point by a screw 46. When the screws are loosened the plate may be pivoted about the axis of screw 45 to the extent permitted by an elongated slot 47 in plate 44 which receives the shank of screw 46. If desired such pivotal adjustment could be provided by an enlarged circular opening cooperating with screw 46 in lieu of the elon gated opening. It will be seen from Fig. 5 that through the pivotal adjustment of the plate 44 about the axis of screw 45 the needle guard may be shifted inwardly or outwardly to a limited extent in relation to the axis of the hook. Plate 44 is provided with an enlarged central opening 48 surrounding the hub 18a to allow for such adjustment. It should be noted in connection with the foregoing that in the adjustment of the needle guard the radial movement of end 20a thereof is greater than that of the end 20b thereof. This is desirable since,

in the rotation of the hook, the portion 20b comes opposite the needle first and the beak of the hook is not encountered until about the mid-portion of the needle guard is engaged with or is positioned opposite the needle. The curvature of the needle guard is such that its mid-portion extends radially outward slightly more than either end portion. This insures the desired outward deflection of the needle to prevent interference with the passage of the hook beak. This function of the needle guard must be achieved without interfering with the casting of a small loop by the needle as it is moved upwardly a slight distance from its lowermost position so that the loop may be seized by the beak of the hook.

The bobbin case is adapted to receive a spool or bobbin 49 suitably supplied with the locking thread for the stitching produced by the operation of the machine. This spool has a central opening arranged to fit over a tubular center post 50 extending upwardly within the bobbin case and the spool is retained in position by means of a spring urged arm 5th: pivotally mounted at the top of the post 50.

Turning now to Figs. 6 to 9 inclusive, the operation of the hook in the course of a loop-seizing revolution is illustrated. In these figures two hooks are shown, one adapted to cooperate with each of the needles 10. Since these hooks are of identical construction, but positioned in reverse relation to each other, it will suffice to consider the action of one. For convenience the description will be directed to the action of the lefthand hook. In Fig. 6 the hook is shown in the position it assumes just as the point of the loop-seizing beak is ready to enter the needle thread loop. The needle thread is not shown in Fig. 6 but the bobbin thread 52 is indicated as extending from the end of a tensioning spring element 51 (Fig. 2) on the outer face of the bobbin case to its point of connection with the work being advanced over the throat plate 23. The path of thread 52 is such that is is above the beak of the hook as the latter approaches the loop-seizing position.

In Fig. 7 the beak 19 of the hook is shown approaching the six oclock position, i. e. 180 from the point at which it has entered the needle thread loop. The needle thread is indicated at 53 and it wil be noted that at this time it extends from the needle 10 along a substantially straight line to the spur 39. At the point where the thread crosses the bobbin case detaining rib 23a of the throat plate the thread is approaching alignment with a gap between the projection 22 of the bobbin case and the forward shoulder of the passage through the rib 23a. Also, it will be noted that the projection 22 has been shifted at least partially counter to the movement of the rotary hook, by the action of the opening finger 24. Thus the upper leg of the needle thread loop is at this 6 time about ready to pass upwardly through the gap, so that it may, from this point on, be carried freely across the top of the bobbin case.

In Fig. 8 the point of the beak of the hook has progressed to a position about 210 from the point at which the needle thread loop was seized. The gap between projection 22 and the forward shoulder on rib 23a is still open so that the upward movement of the needle thread loop through the gap may be continued up to this point. The looper opening finger 24, however, is being restored toward the right so that the gap is beginning to close and it becomes fully closed before the point of the beak of the loop er reaches the position shown in Fig. 9, which is about 240 from the needle. At this position the finger 24 is a slight distance from the projection 25 and the needle thread loop, which is being drawn upwardly by the takeup mechanism of the machine, is free to pass between the arm 24 and projection 25 of the bobbin case. As has been explained above, if the timing of the hook opening finger were such as to hold the gap between projection 22 and the shoulder on rib 23a appreciably longer than is indicated in Fig. 8, there is danger that the opening finger will not be retracted fast enough to permit the thread loop to pass between it and projection 25. If the thread is nipped at this point it is likely to be severed by the rapid pulling action of the takeup mechanism.

Fig. 10 illustrates the course of the needle thread loop both above and beneath the bobbin case. The hook in this view is substantially in the position indicated in Fig. 7. It will be noted that the needle thread loop 53 has its upper leg 53U extending across a portion of the top of the bobbin case and has its lower leg 53L correspondingly positioned across a portion of the bottom of the bobbin case. The intermediate portion 53a of the thread extends substantially vertically along the outer face of the hook adjacent the base of the beak.

In Figs. 11 and 12 there is illustrated a preferred form of throat plate employed in connection with the invention. The throat plate 23 is provided with feed dog receiving openings 54 separated by a central rib 55. The latter has its longitudinal edges bevelled as indicated at 55a in Fig. 12. Similarly the outer longitudinal edges of the openings 54 have their lower portions bevelled as indicated at 56. This bevelling of the edges of the openings which cooperate with portions of the feed dog serves to eliminate, or at least minimize, the accumulation and packing of lint in the groove at the top of the feed dog. Itv should also be noted in connection with Fig. 11 that the cut-away portions or openings of the two ribs 23a, which are indicated at 23b, are not in direct transverse alignment. This is to provide the offset relationship, indicated in Figs. 6 to 9 inclusive, for correct action with the projections 22 of the bobbin cases.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been disclosed in considerable detail, it will be understood that various modifications may be made within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a lockstitch sewing machine having a horizontally disposed work supporting surface, a thread carrying needle reciprocable through said surface, a cup-like rotary hook cooperating with said needle in stitch formation mounted for rotation below said surface about a vertical axis, and driving means for reciprocating said needle and rotating said hook and arranged to impart two revolutions to said hook for each reciprocation of said needle, a loop seizing beak on said hook the top portion of the outer surface of which is inclined inwardly toward the axis of the hook, said beak merging on its lower side with a loop retaining shoulder at the base of the beak and adjacent the bottom of the hook, said needle during its reciprocation passing outside of the circular path of the tip of the loop seizing beak, a bobbin case mounted within said rotary hook and extending upwardly therefrom and a'spur extending outwardly from the inwardly inclined surface of said hook "beak adjacent the base thereof, the outermost point on said spur being substantially within the confines of the circular path of the tip of the loop seizing beak, the forward side of said spur being arranged to engage the needle thread loop and carry the upper leg thereof across the top of said bobbin case.

2. In a lockstitch sewing machine adapted for use with both light and heavy threads carried by needles of different diameter, said machine having a work support with a horizontally disposed work supporting surface, a reciprocable needle bar adapted to receive a thread carrying needle of any desired diameter and to reciprocate the same through said work supporting surface, a cup-like rotary hook cooperating with said needle in stitch formation mounted for rotation below said surface about a vertical axis, and driving means for reciprocating said needle and rotating said hook and arranged to impart two revolutions to said hook for each reciprocation of said needle, a loop seizing beak on said hook the top portion of the outer surface of which is inclined inwardly toward the axis of the hook, said needle during its reciprocation passing outside of the circular path of the tip of the loop seizing beak, a bobbin case mounted within said rotary hook and extending upwardly there from, a spur extending outwardly from the inwardly inclined surface of said hook beak adjacent the base thereof, the outermost point on said spur being substantially within the confines of the circular path of the tip of the loop seizing beak, the forward side of said spur being arranged to engage the needle thread loop at a point near the plane of the top of the bobbin case and carry the upper leg of the loop across the top of said bobbin case, a needle guard carried by said hook for deflecting the needle in advance of the loop seizing action of said beak, and means for adjustably mounting said.

needle guard on the bottom of said hook to accommodate needles of different diameter.

3. In a lockstitch sewing machine adapted for use with both light and heavy threads carried by needles of different diameter, said machine having a work support with a horizontally disposed work supporting surface, a reciprocable needle bar adapted to receive a thread carrying needle of any desired diameter and to reciprocate the same through said work supporting surface, a cup-like rotary hook cooperating withsaid needle in stitch formation mounted for rotation below said surface about a vertical axis, and driving means for reciprocating said needle and rotating said hook and arranged to impart two revolutions to said hook for each reciprocation of said needle, a loop seizing beak on said hook the top portion of the outer surface of which is inclined inwardly toward the axis of the hook, said beak merging on its lower side with a loop retaining shoulder at the base of the beak and adjacent the bottom of the hook, said needle during its reciprocation passing outside of the circular path of the tip of the loop seizing beak, a bobbin case mounted within said rotary hook and extending upwardly therefrom, a spur extending outwardly from the inwardly inclined surface of said hook beak adjacent the base thereof, the outermost point on said spur being substantially within the confines of the circular path of the tip of the loop seizing beak, the forward side of said spur being arranged to engage the needle thread loop and carry the upper leg thereof across the top of said bobbin case, a needle guard carried by said hook for deflecting the needle in advance of the loop seizing action of said beak, and means for adjustably securing said needle guard to the bottom of said hook to accommodate needles of different diameter, said needle guard having a plate-like base applied to the bottom of the rotary hook, and said securing means comprising screws at least one of which cooperates with an enlarged opening in said plate-like base to provide for adjustable securernent of the latter.

4. In a lockstitch sewing vmachine of the character set forth in claim 1, said spur being of cylindrical, pin-like form.

5. In a lockstitch sewing machine of the character set forth in claim 4, said cylindrical, pin-like spur having an annular groove around the same intermediate its ends to retain said thread loop, and said spur extending outwardly and upwardly from the inwardly inclined surface of said hook beak to substantially the level of the top of the bobbin case.

6. In a lockstitch sewing machine of the character set forth in claim 1, a fixed shoulder on said machine adjacent said work supporting surface in the region of the reciprocation of said needle, a cooperating shoulder on said bobbin case for detaining the bobbin case against rotation with said hook, and means operable intermittently for turning said bobbin case counter to the direction of rotation of said hook to provide a gap between said shoulders when the tip of said loop seizing beak is not more than from the position in which it enters the needle thread loop, said spur being so located as to insure presentation of the upper leg of said loop at said gap when the bobbin case is turned by said intermittently operated means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

US2866425A 1955-06-14 1955-06-14 Lockstitch sewing machines Expired - Lifetime US2866425A (en)

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US3624735A (en) * 1969-08-16 1971-11-30 Pfaff Ag G M Thread-cutting device for lock stitch sewing machines
US3658021A (en) * 1969-08-16 1972-04-25 Pfaff Ag G M Arrangement for cutting threads on double stitch sewing machines
US4213410A (en) * 1979-03-09 1980-07-22 The Singer Company Adjustable hook for a sewing machine
DE3212543A1 (en) * 1981-06-06 1982-12-23 Kochs Adler Ag Needle guard of a sewing machine
US4421046A (en) * 1980-02-21 1983-12-20 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Thread cutter assembly in sewing machine
US4488499A (en) * 1981-12-02 1984-12-18 The Singer Company Replaceable hook point and needle guard for sewing machine loop taker
US4669401A (en) * 1984-12-20 1987-06-02 Pfaff Industriemaschinen Gmbh Lockstitch sewing machine with a rotary hook
US4691650A (en) * 1984-12-20 1987-09-08 Pfaff Industriemaschinen Gmbh Lockswitch sewing machine having a rotary hook
US4858543A (en) * 1988-03-07 1989-08-22 Bakron Corp. Plastic bobbin basket with needle guard plate
US20080216722A1 (en) * 2007-03-05 2008-09-11 Brother Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Sewing machine
CN1796634B (en) 2004-12-28 2011-06-22 重机公司 Opening apparatus for sewing machine
DE10309316B4 (en) * 2002-03-06 2013-10-10 Daniele Cerliani Vertical-axis rotary hook for a lockstitch sewing machine with adjustable by screw peripheral needle guard plate, needle guard plate, adjusting and positioning screw functionally adapted

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DE3026092C2 (en) * 1980-07-10 1985-04-25 Hirose Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Osaka, Jp

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US959948A (en) * 1907-04-17 1910-05-31 William F Lautenschlager Sewing-machine.
US1020041A (en) * 1911-07-24 1912-03-12 John Kiewicz Sewing-machine.
US2019284A (en) * 1934-03-13 1935-10-29 Singer Mfg Co Rotary hook for sewing machines
US2712802A (en) * 1952-01-18 1955-07-12 Union Special Machine Co Sewing machine
FR1098359A (en) * 1953-06-15 1955-07-25 Union Special Machine Co Sewing machine lockstitch
US2763226A (en) * 1954-03-04 1956-09-18 Singer Mfg Co Bobbin case opener driving mechanisms

Patent Citations (7)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US578137A (en) * 1897-03-02 h dimond
US959948A (en) * 1907-04-17 1910-05-31 William F Lautenschlager Sewing-machine.
US1020041A (en) * 1911-07-24 1912-03-12 John Kiewicz Sewing-machine.
US2019284A (en) * 1934-03-13 1935-10-29 Singer Mfg Co Rotary hook for sewing machines
US2712802A (en) * 1952-01-18 1955-07-12 Union Special Machine Co Sewing machine
FR1098359A (en) * 1953-06-15 1955-07-25 Union Special Machine Co Sewing machine lockstitch
US2763226A (en) * 1954-03-04 1956-09-18 Singer Mfg Co Bobbin case opener driving mechanisms

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3624735A (en) * 1969-08-16 1971-11-30 Pfaff Ag G M Thread-cutting device for lock stitch sewing machines
US3658021A (en) * 1969-08-16 1972-04-25 Pfaff Ag G M Arrangement for cutting threads on double stitch sewing machines
US4213410A (en) * 1979-03-09 1980-07-22 The Singer Company Adjustable hook for a sewing machine
US4421046A (en) * 1980-02-21 1983-12-20 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Thread cutter assembly in sewing machine
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